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Temporary Food Events Pack June 2009

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Temporary Food Events Pack June 2009 Powered By Docstoc
					TEMPORARY
   FOOD
  EVENTS
   PACK
                               Business Centre:               Address all correspondence to:
                               111 Brown Street               Chief Executive Officer
                               Hamilton 3300                  Locked Bag 685
                               Telephone:    (03) 5573 0444   Hamilton 3300
                               Facsimile:    (03) 5572 2910   council@sthgrampians.vic.gov.au
                               TTY:          (03) 5573 0458   www.sthgrampians.vic.gov.au




Dear Event Holder,

Thank you for your recent inquiry regarding your upcoming event.

For your information, the following steps need to be completed before you hold your
event:

•   Complete and return an Application to Register a Temporary Food Premises
    form which can be obtained from Southern Grampians Shire Council’s
    Environmental Health Unit, 2 Roberts Street Hamilton or it can be downloaded
    from our website www.sthgrampians.vic.gov.au/environmentalhealth
•   If you are a non-profit organisation, an incorporation number must be supplied.
•   Produce a Food Supervisors Certificate to the Council’s Environmental Health
    Unit.
•   Complete and return pages 2, 3, 25 & 26 of the DHS Food Safety Program
    Template – Food Events which is available from our website or from the
    Environmental Health Unit

At your event, the following information needs to be easily accessible on site:

•   A Food Safety Event Program Template.
•   A Temporary Food Events Registration Certificate.
•   An Events Registration Certificate.
•   Pages 2, 3, 25 & 26 of the DHS Food Safety Program Template – Food Events,
    which is available from our website or the Environmental Health Unit.

For further information, please contact the Environmental Health Unit on 5551 8482.


Yours faithfully




Environmental Health Officer
  RECOMMENDED SAFE FOOD
  STORAGE TEMPERATURES
• Chilled products should be displayed or
  stored at 5ºC or below.
• Hot food should be displayed or stored at
  60º or above.
• Frozen foods should be stored below -18ºC.
• Hot food can be safely cooled from above
  70ºC to 21ºC or below in 2 hours, then from
  21ºC to 5ºC or below in a further 4 hours.


 Keeping within these storage temperatures and
  cooling practices will minimise the growth of
    bacteria in potentially hazardous foods.


Remember HANDS are the most common form of
        cross contamination of food.
               WASH THEM!
    GUIDELINES FOR THE EXCLUSION OF
     FOOD HANDLERS FROM HANDLING
           UNPACKAGED FOOD
Disease/Organism Period of Exclusion for Case Gastroenteritis
(Acute vomiting and/or diarrhea)

1. When the organism is               •   Any person with gastroenteritis must be excluded from
   unknown                                food handling. Exclude until 48 hours after symptoms have
                                          ceased.
2. When the organism is known
   to be:
• Norwalk or Norwalk like virus       •   Any person with gastroenteritis must be excluded from
   and other vital gastroenteritis        food handling.
                                      •   Exclude until symptoms have ceased and counsel on
                                          returning to work regarding good personal hygiene.
                                      •   Known carriers of Salmonella should not work in food
                                          preparation areas without assessment of the premises and
                                          individual work practices.
•   Typhoid and Paratyphoid           •   Exclude from food handling until three consecutive
                                          negative specimens of faeces are obtained. Specimens
                                          should be taken each week for three weeks. If the urine
                                          was positive on initial diagnosis or the person has a
                                          history of urinary tract disease, urine samples should be
                                          collected in addition to faeces.
                                      •   A person who is a typhoid carrier (i.e. any person who
                                          continues to excrete Salmonella type organisms for 90
                                          days or longer), must not engage in the preparation,
                                          manufacturing or handling of food for consumption by
                                          others (Health (Infectious Diseases) Regulations 1990
                                          S24).
•   Cholera, Shigella and VTEC        •   Exclude until two consecutive faecal specimens taken at
                                          least 24 hours apart are found to be negative.
                                      •   Any person with gastroenteritis must be excluded from
                                          food handling.
•   Other bacterial gastroenteritis   •   Exclude until symptoms have ceased and counsel on
    (Campylobacter, Yersinia and          returning to work regarding good personal hygiene.
    others.)
•   Toxin producing bacteria          •   Exclude until symptoms have ceased and counsel on
    (Staphylococcus aureus,               returning to work regarding good personal hygiene.
    Clostridium perfringens,
    Bacillus cereus
•   Parasites (Cryptosporidium,       •   Exclude until symptoms have ceased and counsel on
    Entamoeba histolytic                  returning to work regarding good personal hygiene.
    (Amoebiasis), Giardia lamblia)
•   Hepatitis A and Hepatitis E       •   Exclude from food handling until one week after the onset
                                          of jaundice.
                                      •   (Any person with acute hepatitis must be excluded from
                                          work until the laboratory tests have revealed the condition
                                          not to be Hepatitis A or E.)
•   Boils, abscesses and other        •   Exclude until lesion is covered with a waterproof dressing.
    purulent lesions of hands, face
    and nose.
                       FOOD SAFETY TIPS
Enjoy your food. Don’t let it turn nasty

The following explains simple ways to make sure the food that you buy and take
home to prepare for yourself, your family or friends remains safe. Victorian and
Australian food safety laws are designed to ensure that the food you buy is safe. All
Victorian food businesses such as supermarkets, delis, butchers, fishmongers, take-
away shops and restaurants, have to comply with these laws and standards by
selling food that is safe to eat and free of any contamination. Food businesses have
a responsibility for selling food that is safe to eat. Enjoy your food. But remember, it’s
up to you to make sure it does not turn nasty.

Food poisoning

Food poisoning is frequently caused by bacteria from food that has been poorly
handled, stored or cooked. The food may look, taste and smell normal.
Some people are more at risk from food poisoning including young children,
pregnant women, the elderly and people with other illnesses.
The symptoms of food poisoning may vary depending on the type of bacteria or
contaminants causing the illness. You may experience one or more of the following
symptoms:
   • Nausea
   • Stomach cramps
   • Diarrhoea
   • Fever
   • Headaches
Symptoms can occur within 30 minutes after eating, or a number of hours later. They
can be mild or severe. Some bacteria can also cause other symptoms. Listeria
bacteria may cause miscarriage or other serious illness in susceptible people.

Where to get help

   •   See your doctor
   •   Report your illness to your local council health department or the Department
       of Human Services, particularly if you think the illness is related to food that
       you have purchased or eaten so that the cause can be investigated.

High-risk food

Food poisoning bacteria are often naturally present in food, and in the right
conditions a single bacterium can grow into more than two million bacteria in just
seven hours.
Bacteria grow and multiply on some types of food more easily than on others. The
types of foods which bacteria prefer include:
   • Meat
   • Poultry
   • Dairy Products
   • Eggs
   •   Small goods, like salami and ham
   •   Seafood
   •   Cooked rice
   •   Cooked pasta
   •   Prepared salads, like coleslaws, pasta salads and rice salads
   •   Prepared fruit salads

Ready-to-eat foods

Ready-to-eat foods are foods that can be eaten without further preparation or
cooking such as pre-prepared salads, takeaways and prepared sandwiches.

Ten easy steps to safe food

   1. Buy from reputable suppliers with clean premises.
   2. Avoid spoiled foods, foods past their use-by dates or foods in damaged
       containers or packaging.
   3. Take chilled, frozen, or hot foods straight home in insulated containers.
   4. Keep raw foods and ready-to-eat foods separate.
   5. Avoid high-risk foods left in the Temperature Danger Zone for more than 4
       hours.
   6. Keep high-risk foods out of the Temperature Danger Zone. Keep chilled foods
                C                                  C
       cold at 5° or colder and hot food hot at 60° or h otter.
   7. Thoroughly wash and dry hands when preparing food.
   8. Use separate and clean utensils for raw foods and ready-to-eat foods.
   9. Cook minced meats, poultry, fish and sausages thoroughly.
   10. When in doubt, throw it out.

Keep your food in the 'right' zone!

A basic rule-of-thumb is to keep ‘high-risk’ foods in the right temperature zone for as
long as possible.




Avoid leaving high-risk foods in the Temperature Danger Zone.
When shopping:
  • Buy your chilled and frozen foods towards the end of your shopping trip.
  • Hot chickens and other hot foods should also be purchased later in your trip
     and kept separate from cold food.
When storing and transporting food:
  • Keep chilled food at 5° or colder.
                            C
  • Use a fridge thermometer to check the temperature in your fridge. The
     temperature should be below 5°   C.
  • Keep frozen food frozen solid.
  • Keep the freezer temperature around -15° to -18°
                                              C       C.
  • Keep hot foods at 60° or hotter.
                           C
  • Throw out high-risk food left in the Temperature Danger Zone for more than 4
     hours.
  • Consume high-risk food left in the Temperature Danger Zone for more than 2
     hours––do not keep it for later.

Choose carefully when buying food

Even if food producers and sellers have followed the food safety laws, the quality
and safety of the food can sometimes be affected by how it is handled by you, the
consumer.
Once you purchase food, the safety of that food also becomes your responsibility.
    • Only buy from reputable suppliers with clean and tidy premises.
    • Check use-by dates and labels, avoid food past its use-by dates.
    • Check food labels for allergen and nutritional information.
    • Avoid products in damaged, dented, swollen or leaking cans, containers or
       other packaging.
    • Avoid food that seems spoiled, such as mouldy or discoloured products.
    • Check that serving staff use separate tongs when handling separate food
       types.
    • Only buy eggs in cartons that identify the supplier––avoid cracked or soiled
       eggs.
    • Avoid high-risk chilled and frozen foods that have been left out of the fridge
       and freezer.
    • Avoid hot foods that are not steaming hot.
    • Avoid ready-to-eat foods left uncovered on counters.
    • Prevent meat, chicken or fish juices leaking onto other products.
If you have serious concerns with the way food is handled, stored or prepared by a
business, contact your local council health department.
Get food home quickly

   •   If you have purchased hot, chilled or frozen foods, you should get them home
       as quickly as possible.
   •   For trips longer than about 30 minutes, or on very hot days, it is a good idea
       to take an insulated cooler or bag with an ice pack, to keep chilled or frozen
       foods cold.
   •   Consider placing hot foods in an insulated container for trips longer than
       about 30 minutes.
   •   Consider wrapping hot foods in foil.
   •   Once you arrive home, immediately transfer chilled and frozen food into your
       fridge and freezer.

Take extra care when taking food outside the home

Enjoy picnics, eating outdoors, and taking food to work or school. Take extra care
when preparing, storing and handling food.
   • Cut meats into serving-size pieces before leaving home, and have all salads
      ready to eat.
   • Put raw meats and high-risk foods into separate leak-proof containers and
      into insulated coolers.
   • Place containers with raw meats at the bottom of an insulated cooler and
      keep separate from ready-to-eat foods.
   • Avoid packing food that has just been cooked or is still warm, unless you can
      keep it out of the Temperature Danger Zone. Refrigerate overnight before
      packing.
   • Pack plenty of ice packs around chilled foods. Frozen drinks can serve as ice
      packs, especially in school lunches.
   • Don’t place ready-to-eat food into containers used for storing raw food without
      thoroughly washing and drying the containers first.
   • Consider using disposable wipes if there is no safe water for hand washing.

Store food well

Keep food out of harm’s way by:
  • Keeping high-risk chilled food in the fridge.
  • Keeping frozen foods frozen hard.
  • Storing foods in clean, non-toxic, food storage containers.
  • Covering food in leak-proof containers with tight fitting lids or wrap in foil or
      plastic film.
  • Storing cooked foods separately from raw foods.
  • Storing raw meats, seafood and chicken at the bottom of the fridge, in sealed
      or covered containers.
  • Storing leftover’s in the fridge. Packaged food and food from cans and jars
      can become high-risk once opened.
  • Not storing food in opened cans.
  • Avoiding egg, dairy and meat products past their use-by dates.

Wash hands when preparing food

   •   Wash hands in warm, soapy water before preparing food for at least 30
       seconds.
   •   Wash your hands thoroughly before preparing food and after handling raw
       meats, chicken, seafood, eggs and unwashed vegetables.
   •   Dry your hands with clean towels or disposable towels.
   •   If you have any cuts or wounds on your hands, cover them with waterproof
       wound-strips or bandages.
   •   Wear clean, protective clothes like an apron when preparing food.
   •   If you feel unwell, let someone else prepare the food.
Keep things clean and separate

Prevent quality food from turning nasty by keeping things clean and separate.
   • Keep raw foods separate from ready-to eat foods.
   • Use separate and clean utensils and equipment for ready-to-eat food.
   • Do not use the same equipment and utensils for raw foods and for ready-to-
      eat foods, without thoroughly cleaning them first.
   • Thoroughly clean and dry cutting-boards, knives, pans, plates, containers and
      other utensils after using them.
   • Use hot soapy water to wash things and ensure they are thoroughly dry
      before using them again.
   • Use fresh clean tea-towels or disposable towels to dry utensils and
      equipment, otherwise allow them to air-dry.
   • Use a dishwasher with appropriate detergents to wash and dry utensils and
      equipment.
   • Rinse raw fruits and vegetables with clean water before using them.
   • Avoid pets around areas where food is prepared or stored.
   • Remove pests and vermin from where food is prepared or stored.

Use the fridge to thaw frozen food

Bacteria can grow in frozen food while it is thawing, so keep frozen food out of the
Temperature Danger Zone.
   • Unless instructions direct otherwise, thaw frozen food in the fridge or use a
      microwave oven.
   • If instructed on packaged frozen food, prepare and cook the food as directed,
      straight from the freezer.
   • Defrost frozen meats, fish and poultry thoroughly before cooking.
   • Keep defrosted food in the fridge until it is ready to be cooked.
   • If defrosting using a microwave oven, cook the food immediately after
      defrosting.
   • If you are using a microwave oven, speed-up the thawing by separating
      defrosted portions from still-frozen portions.
   • Avoid re-freezing thawed food.

Cook it right

One of the most important things you can do to stop food turning nasty is to cook it
thoroughly, especially high-risk foods.
   • Cook poultry until the meat is white–– there should be no pink flesh.
   • Cook hamburgers, mince, sausages, and rolled or stuffed roasts right through
      until any juices run clear.
   • Cook white fish until it flakes easily with a fork.
   • Most foods should be cooked to at least 75°     C.
   • Use a meat thermometer to help you get the temperature right. Meat
      thermometers are available from many retail stores that sell kitchen utensils
      and barbecue equipment.
   • Thoroughly cook foods made from eggs such as omelettes and baked egg
      custards.
   •   Take extra care when preparing foods where the eggs remain uncooked such
       as eggnog and homemade mayonnaise, as bacteria on the eggshells can
       contaminate the food.

Cooling & reheating food
  • Reheat foods thoroughly so they are steaming (above 75° or boiling.
                                                               C)
  • Keep cooked food out of the Temperature Danger Zone.
  • If you need to store food for later use, once the steam stops rising cover it and
      put it in the fridge.
  • When you cook ahead of time, divide large portions of food into small shallow
      containers for refrigeration.
  • If you do not want to cool the food straight away, keep hot food at a
                            C
      temperature of 60° or hotter.
 EMERGENCY POWER FAILURE
  FOOD STORAGE CHECKLIST
What food do I need to keep safe?

• Try to keep cold and frozen food cold. If food is still
  cold to touch, less than 5ºC, it is still safe to use.
• Only open fridge and freezer doors when absolutely
  necessary, this will keep the food and air temperature
  colder for longer.
• If available, put bagged ice under food packages and
  trays stored in freezers and fridges if the power failure
  lasts more than one hour.
• Place an insulating blanket over cold or frozen food
  where possible.
• Once cold or frozen food is no longer cold to touch,
  and is 5ºC or above, it can be kept and eaten for up
  to four hours, otherwise it must be thrown away.
• If you have hot foods, eat them within four hours of
  being hot or throw it away.
• If power is restored when frozen food is still cold to
  touch, less than 5ºC, the food is safe to refreeze.

Use this checklist to ensure that the food you make
              is as safe as possible.
     FOOD SAFETY AND
 EMERGENCY POWER FAILURE
What do I need to do to keep food safe?
• The most important thing is to try to keep cold and frozen
  food cold.
• If food is still cold to touch, and is less than 5ºC, it is safe to
  use.
Before and after a power failure
• Try to keep cold and frozen food cold. If food is still cold to
  touch, and is less than 5ºC, it is safe to use.
• Once cold or frozen food is no longer cold to touch, and is
  5ºC or above, it can be kept and eaten for up to four hours,
  otherwise it must be thrown away.
• If you have hot foods, eat them within four hours of being hot
  or throw it away.
• If power is restored when frozen food is still cold to touch,
  less than 5ºC, the food is safe to refreeze.
Things I can do during the power failure
• Move food from the fridge to the freezer.
• Only open fridge and freezer doors when absolutely
  necessary, this will keep the food and air temperature colder
  for longer.
• If available, put bagged ice under food packages and trays
  stored in freezers and fridges if the power failure lasts more
  than one hour.
• Place an insulating blanket over cold or frozen food where
  possible.
       TRAINING IN YOUR AREA
• You can search for training in your area by entering ‘food
  safety’ in the ‘Find a Course’ section at
  www.shortcourses.vic.gov.au

• You can also find other training courses on the following
  websites www.education.vic.gov.au/tafecourses or
  www.training.com.au

• You can also search for a registered training organisation
  by:
    o Looking in the Yellow Pages under ‘Education and
      Training’ or at www.yellowpages.com.au
    o Contacting your industry association for information.

• There are a number of links to training courses on the Food
  Safety website www.health.vic.gov.au/foodsafety

• Other useful links for training include:
    o www.otte.vic.gov.au
    o www.education.vic.gov.au

• For further information contact:
    o Southern Grampians Shire Council’s Environmental
       Health Unit on 5551 8482
    o Food Safety Hotline 1300 364 352

Get help from Business Victoria

A wide range of online tools and information is available to help
you start up and run your food business. Begin with the Step-
By-Step Guide to Starting a Food Business and register for a
free Business Victoria account on the Business Victoria website
at www.business.vic.gov.au. For further information visit
www.business.vic.gov.au/foodbusiness
    FOOD SAFETY RECORDS CLEANING SCHEDULE

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Job Number
1                                             9
2                                             10
3                                             11
4                                             12
5                                             13
6                                             14
7                                             15
8                                             16
  AUSTRALIAN FOOD STANDARDS CODE
   DIVISION 4 – HEALTH AND HYGIENE
            REQUIREMENTS
Subdivision 1 - Requirements for Food Handlers

13   General requirement

A food handler must take all reasonable measures not to handle food or
surfaces likely to come into contact with food in a way that is likely to
compromise the safety and sustainability of food.

14   Health of Food Handlers

1. A food handler who has a symptom that indicates the handler may be
   suffering from a food-borne disease, or knows he or she is suffering
   from a food-borne disease, must, if at work:
   a) report that he or she is or may be suffering from the disease, or
      knows that he or she is carrying the disease, to his or her
      supervisor, as the case may be;
   b) not engage in any handling of food where there is reasonable
      likelihood of food contamination as a result of the disease; and
   c) if continuing to engage in other work on the food premises – take
      all practicable measure to prevent food being contaminated as a
      result of the condition.

2. A food handler who suffers from a condition must, if at work:
   a) if there is reasonable likelihood of food contamination as a result
      of the suffering condition – report that he or she is suffering from
      the condition to his or her supervisor; and
   b) if continuing to engage in the handling of food or other work – take
      all practicable measure to prevent food being contaminated as a
      result of the condition.

3. A food handler must notify his or her supervisor of the food handler
   knows or suspects that her or she may have contaminated food
   whilst handling food.

15   Hygiene of Food Handlers

1. A food handler must, when engaging in any food handling operation:
  a) take all practicable measures to ensure his or her body, anything
     from his or her body and anything he or she is wearing does not
     contaminate food or surfaces likely to come into contact with food;
  b) take all practicable measures to prevent unnecessary contact with
     ready to eat food;
  c) ensure that clothing is of a level of cleanliness that is appropriate
     for the handling of food that is being conducted;
  d) only use on exposed parts of his or her body, bandages and
     dressings that are completely covered with a waterproof covering;
  e) not eat over unprotected food or surfaces likely to come into
     contact with food;
  f) not sneeze, blow nose or cough over unprotected food or surfaces
     likely to come into contact with food;
  g) not spit, smoke or use tobacco or similar in preparations in areas
     in which food is handled; and
  h) not urinate or defecate except in a toilet.

2. A food handler must wash his or her hands in accordance with
   subclause 4:

  a) whenever his or her hands are likely to be a source of
     contamination for food;
  b) immediately before working with ready to eat food after handling
     raw food; and
  c) immediately after using the toilet.

3. A food handler must, when engaging in a food handling operation
   that involves unprotected food or surfaces likely to come into contact
   with food, wash his or her hands in accordance with subclause (4):

  a) before commencing or recommencing handling of food;
  b) Immediately after smoking, coughing, sneezing, using a
     handkerchief or disposable tissues, eating, drinking or using
     tobacco or similar substances; and
  c) after touching his or her hair, scalp or body opening.

4. A food handler must, whenever washing his or her hands:

  a) use the hand washing facilities provided;
  b) thoroughly clean his or her hands using soap or other effective
     means with warm running water; and
  c) thoroughly clean his or her hands on a single use towel or in
     another way that is not likely to transfer pathogenic micro-
     organisms to the hands.

5. A food handler who handles food at a temporary food premises does
   not have to clean his or her hands with warm running water or
   comply with paragraph 4 c), if the appropriate enforcement agency
   has provided the food business operating from the temporary food
   premises with approval in writing for this purpose.

Subdivision 2 - Requirements for Food Businesses

16 Health of persons who handle food – duties of food
businesses

1. A food business must ensure that the following persons do not
   engage in the handling of food for the food business where there is
   reasonable likelihood of food contamination:

  a) a person is known to be suffering from a food-borne disease, or
     who is a carrier of a food-borne disease; and
  b) a person known or reasonably suspected to have a symptom that
     may indicate he or she is suffering from a food-borne disease.

2. A food business must ensure that a person who is known or
   reasonably suspected to be suffering from a condition and who
   continues to engage in the handling of food for the food business
   takes all practical measures to prevent food contamination.

3. A food business may permit a person excluded from handling food in
   accordance with paragraph 1 a) to resume handling food only after
   receiving medical advice from medical practitioner that the person is
   no longer suffering from, or is the carrier of, a food-borne disease.

17 Health of persons who handle food – duties of food
businesses

1. Subject to subclause (2), a food business must, for each food
   premises:

  a) maintain easily accessible hand washing facilities;
  b) maintain, at or near each hand washing facility, a supply of;
              i. warm running water; and
             ii. soap
            iii. other items that can be used to thoroughly clean hands.
     c) Ensure hand washing facilities are only used for the washing of
        hands, arms and face; and
     d) Provide at or near each hand washing facility:
              i. single use towels or other means of effectively drying
                 hands that are not likely to transfer pathogenic micro-
                 organisms to the hands; and
             ii. a container for used towels if needed.

2. Paragraph 1 c) does not apply in relation to hand washing facilities at
   food premises that are used principally as a private dwelling if the
   proprietor of the food business has the approval of the appropriate
   enforcement agency.

3. With the approval in writing of the appropriate enforcement agency, a
   food business that operates from a temporary food premise does not
   have to comply with any of the requirements of paragraph 1 b)i or 1d)
   that are specified in the written approval.

18      General duties of food businesses

1. A food business must inform all food handlers working for the
   business of their health and hygiene obligations under Subdivision 1
   of this division.

2. A food business must ensure that any information provided by a food
   handler in accordance with Subdivision 1 of this division is not
   disclosed without consent of the food handler, except the proprietor
   or an authorised officer and that the information is not used for any
   other purpose other than addressing the risk of food contamination.

3. A food business must take all practicable measures to ensure all
   people on the food premises:
  a) do not contaminate the food;
  b) do not have unnecessary contact with ready to eat food; and
  c) do not spit, smoke, or use tobacco or similar in preparations in
     areas where there is unprotected food surfaces likely to come into
     contact with food.
 OVERVIEW OF FOOD LABELING
The general requirements for food labelling are as follows:

The name of food:
Prescribed name or description of the food to indicate the true
nature of the food.

Lot identification:
A date marked and the suppliers address details can help
satisfy the requirements of a lot maker.

Name and Address:
Name and address in Australia or New Zealand of the supplier.

Ingredients listing:
Ingredients and compounds must be declared in a statement of
ingredients in descending order of ingoing weight.

Date marking:
Best before date for food that does not pose a danger.
Use by when foods could not be consumed for health and
safety reasons.

Health and Safety Advice:
Directions for storage or additional directions for use of food.

Nutritional Information Panel:
For information go to www.foodsmart.vic.gov.au for ‘Quick
Links’ to the Nutritional Information Panel.

Percentage labelling:
Example: Wheat Flour, Meat (Minimum 25%)

Country of Origin:
Example: Product of or Made in.
  FOOD SECTORS AND MINIMUM
   COMPETENCY STANDARDS
Food Sector                                  Minimum Competency Standard
Food Processing                              FDFCORFSY2A ‘Implement the food
Businesses such as food product              safety program and procedures’
manufacturers including flour mills,
packers, canneries, bakers, breweries
and wineries.
Retail                                       WRRLP6C ‘Apply retail food safety
Businesses such as supermarkets,             practices’
grocers convenience stores, and              OR
delicatessens                                Use both units from the Hospitality
Take away and fast food businesses can       Sector below
be considered either retail or hospitality
food businesses.
Hospitality                                  THHGHS01B ‘Follow workplace hygiene
Businesses such as restaurants, cafes        procedures’
and hotels.                                  THHBCC11B ‘Implement food safety
Take away and fast food businesses can       procedures’
be considered either retail or hospitality   OR
food businesses.                             Use unit from the Retail Sector above
Health                                       HLTFS207B ‘Follow basic food safety
Businesses such as hospitals.                practices’
There is a transition of training from the   HLTFS310B ‘Apply and monitor food
old Health units to the new units.           safety
                                             requirements’
                                             HLTFS309B ‘Oversee the day-to-day
                                             implementation of food safety in the
                                             workplace’
Community Services                           Use all three units from the Health sector
Businesses such as childcare centres,        above.
nursing homes, hostels, and Meals on
Wheels services.
Transport and Distribution                   Use relevant units from other sectors.
Businesses such as warehouses.

				
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Description: Temporary Food Events Pack June 2009