Comparing Religions Through Law by P-TaylorFrancis

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Comparing Religions Through Law offers a ground- breaking study which compares these two religions through shared dominant structures. In the case of Judaism and Islam the dominant structure is law.Comparing Religions Through Law presents an innovative and sometimes controversial study of the comparisons and contrasts between the two religions and offers an example of how comparative religious studies can provide grounds for mutual understanding.

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									Comparing Religions Through Law
Author: Jacob Neusner
Author: Tamara Sonn



Edition: 1
Table of Contents

Preface I. Comparing Islam and Judaism in Particular. A. Why Compare Religions and Why Compare
their Laws? B. The Nonotheist Religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam C. Which Judaism, Which Islam,
and Why? D. Category Formations: Comparing Incomparables 1. Shared Structure 2. Shared
Disproportionate Categories a. Where They Say Much the Same Thing about the Same Topic b. Where
They Say Different Things about the Same Topic 3. Unique Categories: Areas Where They Do Not
Intersect
II. The Authoritative Documents of Judaism and Islam A. Where Do We Look for the Law? B. The Written
Torah and the Oral Torah: Scripture, the Mishnah and the Talmuds 1. Scripture: The Written Torah 2.
Mishnah: The Oral Torah 3. The Talmuds C. Islamic Counterparts 1. Scripture: The Qur'an 2. Tradition:
The Sunna 3. Fiqh D. Conclusions
III. The Intellectual Sources of the Law A. How Do the Authorities of the Law Reason? B. Islam:
Consensus, Reasoning, Exceptions 1. Consensus (Ijma') 2. Reasoning (ijtihad) 3. Exceptions C. Judaic
Counterparts: Exegesis, Logic, Argument, Dialectics 1. Exegesis: Midrash Halakhah 2. The Mishnah's
Applied Logic of Hierarchical Classification 3. The Argument of Analogy and Contrast 4. The Talmud's
Dialectics D. Conclusions
IV. The Working of the Law: Institutions A. Institutional Authority B. The Israelite Court in the Legal
Narrative of Islam 1. Legitimacy 2. Courts' Jurisdiction 3. Evidence 4. Punishments D. Conclusions
V. The Working of the Law: Personnel A. Bases of Authority B. Islam 1. Legal Scholars (Fuqaha') 2.
Judges 3. Muftis C.Judaism: The sage D. Conclusions
VI. Disproportions A. Temple Law and Sacrifice 1. Temple Law and Sacrifice in Judaism 2. Sacrifice in
Islam B. Slave Laws in Islam and Judaism 1. Slave Laws in Islam 2. Slave Laws in Judaism C. Sacred
Time/Sabbath in Judaism and Sacred Time/Pilgrimage Islam 1. Judaism: Sacred Time/Sabbath 2. Islam:
Sacred Time/Pilgrimage D. Conclusions
VII. Unique Categories A. The Unique Category B. Enlandisement (Judaism) C. Jihad (Islam) D. The Sage
and Torah Study in Judaism E. Khilafah and the Legal Scholars in Islam F. History, Time, and Paradigm
in Judaism G. History in Islam
VIII. Epilogue A. Comparisons Up Close B. Judaism and Islam: Comparisons in the Context of World
Religions
Index
Description

Comparing Religions Through Law offers a ground- breaking study which compares these two religions
through shared dominant structures. In the case of Judaism and Islam the dominant structure is law.
Comparing Religions Through Law presents an innovative and sometimes controversial study of the
comparisons and contrasts between the two religions and offers an example of how comparative religious
studies can provide grounds for mutual understanding.

								
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