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					MFA Report 2001                                                                            MFA project no.: AAA-xxx
NPA project no.: xxx.xxx (Z-xx)
NPA archive no:                                                                                      Appendix no: X.
Country/ Code:




       RETRAINING LAWYERS IN TRANSITION COUNTRIES OF SOUTHEAST
                            EUROPE: 2002 Report
               HR-Undervisning for jurister I Det tidligere Jugoslavia


PROJECT PRESENTATION:

1.        BACKGROUND AND PROGRESS SUMMARY

1.1:      Socio-political situation.

     It can be safely assumed that all lawyers who have graduated at the universities in the former Yugoslavia
     after 1945 have considerable gaps in their education, the most important being the absence of awareness of
     the rule of law, separation of powers and human rights. If it is further assumed that all lawyers who graduated
     between 1960 and 1990 are still in active service and that universities in the former Yugoslavia produced an
     average of 1.200 graduates per year, the total number of "defective" lawyers thus amounts to nearly 50.000.
     If it is allowed that some of them emigrated and that some are active in areas remote from the interpretation
     and application of law, and that still others have improved their knowledge on their own initiative and
     through the efforts of non-governmental organisations and state services, the figure is still worrying. This
     project operates with the rather conservative number of 15.000.
     In countries now in transition from communist rule the educational programs, including curricula at the
     schools of law, were for many years governed by the reigning ideology. The "Marxist – Leninist” concept of
     law as the manifestation of the will of the ruling class rendered any meaningful training in the law of human
     rights virtually impossible. Human rights were considered as a subversive import from the capitalist West
     and their interpretation was dominated by the needs of the building a "socialist society". The general absence
     of democracy contributed to the lack of official awareness of human rights. Generations of lawyers were
     trained without the abilities necessary to interpret and apply human rights standards contained in international
     human rights treaties, in spite of the fact that some communist countries had ratified the latter for reasons of
     propaganda and international prestige.
     Due to almost permanent conflicts in the area and the upsurge of ethno-nationalism and xenophobia the
     situation has basically not improved since the dissolution of Yugoslavia.
     In addition, most lawyers in the area are not aware of the fact that there is a very rich practice and standard
     building through the decisions of international and European bodies in the field of human rights protection.
     There is also a need for familiarity with cases, domestic and international. Judgements of the European Court
     of Human Rights, and especially decisions and recommendations of the international treaty bodies (Human
     Rights Committee, Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, and Committee Against
     Torture), are something that professionals (judges, prosecutors, attorneys, etc.) generally do not know, partly
     because the lack of translated texts.
     After the democratic changes in Croatia and Yugoslavia it can be assumed that all countries involved have
     entered the times of democratic transition and that the general political situation in the involved countries will
     gradually improve. However, in some of them authoritarian tendencies will remain, as well as the official
     misunderstanding of democracy and human rights. It is believed that the results of the training will be
     relevant both under more favourable and less favourable political hypotheses, i.e. in countries where this
     process will be slower. In the latter case, the alumni of the courses will exert strong influence towards
     democratisation and modernisation.
     For reasons of economy, shared experiences and similar legal tradition and vocabulary, South East European
     entities where the very similar Bosnian, Croat and Serb languages are spoken, i.e. Bosnia and Herzegovina
     (both entities), Croatia, Montenegro and Serbia, will be covered.



1.2:      Target group and direct beneficiaries.
MFA REPORT 2001        NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ         MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.




  This project potentially addresses the whole population of active lawyers in Bosnian, Croat, and Serbian-
  speaking parts of the South –Eastern Europe. Having in mind that it is impossible to find, approach and
  retrain all persons concerned, even in a project of very long duration, the feasible method appears to limit the
  project to the members of the legal profession in a narrower sense (judges, prosecutors, advocates, etc.) and
  to target those among them who can serve as the best multipliers, i.e. future lecturers, course organisers,
  trainers at universities or alternative schools organised by non-governmental organisations.
  Considering some of the further project goals (increasing general awareness of the importance of human
  rights, making the general public realise that human rights are not set of moral principles but enforceable
  legal norms, etc.) it is believed that, in a wider sense, the whole population of the countries covered by the
  project can be recognised as a target group.
   In the first phase of three years project the participating organisations have reached an audience of 150 well-
  chosen individuals and offered them training courses of ten days' duration. Additiionally, 28 participants
  from the same branch, chosen on the very same criteria, attended additional five-day seminar on the
  economic, social and cultural rights held in Belgrade during November 2003.
  Those individuals, judges, prosecutors, advocates, and other members of the legal profession from Bosnia
  and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro were selected on a basis of a criterion already mentioned
  above. An important consideration was their capacity to be best multipliers, as well as their future ability to
  maintain contacts among the states in the area both at the governmental and non-governmental level. With
  regard to the presence of the co-ordinator’s connection to the great number of the individuals dealing with
  law profession and to the method planned for the selection of direct beneficiaries, there were no expected
  difficulties in reaching out to the target group.
  Five seminars with around 30 participants each were held in Opatija (Croatia), Belgrade, Petrovac
  (Montenegro), Sarajevo and Dubrovnik (Croatia). An additional seminar on the economic, social and cultural
  rights including 28 participants took place in Belgrade in November 2003.
  Refering to the evaluation results on the seminars organised in 2002, the participants were represented
  according to the following alocation:

       -    40 from Serbia
       -    37 from Bosnia and Herzegovina (both entites)
       -    39 from Montenegro
       -    32 from Croatia

  The majority of participants were judges (65%), but also judicial associates (12%), court advisors (10%),
  prosecutors and deputy prosecutors (10%), and 3% of others (attorneys, assistant professors, investigators,
  etc.).
  Concerning that the co-ordinators from the partner organisations have a connection to the great number of the
  individuals dealing with law profession in the respective countries, as well as the planned selection method,
  there were no difficulties during the first phase in reaching out to the target group. Furthermore, during the
  selection procedure organisers were dealing with the increased number of candidates since the final number
  of participants for each seminar has been limited. For example, around 30 candidates from Bosnia and
  Herzegovina were interested to participate in the seminar held in Dubrovnik, but only 8 were selected
  following the selection criteria.
  During the first phase of the project an adequate mix of gender, nationality, religion and cultural background
  of the participants were made. After this phase is finished it can be safely assumed that it served as a method
  to identify the main problems and to develop friendships and contacts leading to better regional
  understanding and co-operation among the participants.


  In regard to the evaluation results for the seminar on the economic, social and cultural rights organised
  in Belgrade, the participants were represented as follows:

       -    16 from Serbia
       -    4 from Bosnia and Herzegovina (both entites)
       -    3 from Montenegro
       -    5 from Croatia




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MFA REPORT 2001           NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ          MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.



1.3:      Project initiation and project planning.

     The idea for the project originated in the Belgrade Centre 2000 and was then discussed with other centres and
     possible partners. It was noted that it fitting clearly into the general idea of the Stability Pact for SE Europe.
     It is a truly regional endeavour involving organisations from 3 countries in the region which until recently
     were de jure or de facto in the state of war. The general reconciliation efforts and efforts to promote co-
     operation in the region indicate that topics should be chosen where the whole legal profession has a common
     interest for improvement and shared historical experience. The fact that they share a working language,
     which used to be called Serbo-Croatian and which is now under a different name, mainly for political
     reasons, reduces the costs of the project considerably. The fact that the legal terminology has remained
     almost identical is very important in this context.
     The Norwegian Peoples Aid has been a partner with all organisations involved and the Norwegian
     government is highly respected in the whole region for its generous and inventive support in the field of
     humanitarian assistance, education, refugee matters, etc. Specifically the Belgrade Centre for Human rights
     has co-operated with NPA providing direct assistance in food, clothes, etc. to IDP`s in 11 collective centres
     in Serbia.

1.4:      Role of local government.

     The project fits well in the general efforts of the relevant states in the region where both, the legislative and
     executive branches, have been seriously involved in efforts to reform the judiciary. This process is still going
     on in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro and has gained momentum in Serbia since the
     beginning of 2001.

1.5:      Objectives, results, indicators and main activities.

     The main goal of the project is to enable lawyers active in various branches of government, the judiciary, and
     in the law profession, to better understand human rights issues, to become aware of the importance of human
     rights and to acquire the necessary skills to safeguard the rule of law. It was intended to reach a wider
     audience of law professionals and include them in the process of re-education on the rule of law, human
     rights and humanitarian law. Besides providing the trainees with necessary knowledge and skills in these
     fields, it was of great importance to familiarise the participants with the jurisprudence and actual practice in
     their countries and abroad, as well as with the decisions of the European Court of Human Rights and
     supervisory bodies of the international human rights treaties. Law professionals from the region covered by
     this phase of the project were subject to a system of education that did not provide them with an opportunity
     to be properly introduced to international promotion and protection of human rights; this also resulted in
     insufficient knowledge about the international mechanisms for the promotion and protection of human rights.
     Having in mind that it was impossible to find and retrain all persons concerned, even in a project of very long
     duration, the applied method was to limit the project to the members of the legal profession in a narrower
     sense (judges, prosecutors, advocates, court advisors, attorneys, etc.). The idea was also to target those among
     them who can serve as the best multipliers, i.e. future lecturers, course organisers, trainers at universities or
     alternative schools organised by non-governmental organisations.



2.        PARTNERSHIP CO-OPERATION

     Participants in the consortium have extensive experience in organising seminars and schools for multipliers,
     future lecturers and activists in the field of human rights. They are members of the Balkan Human Rights
     Network, which has jointly organised educational events in Copenhagen, Budapest, Ohrid, Belgrade,
     Sarajevo, Zagreb and Dubrovnik.
     The local partners provided most of the lecturers and locally recruited the most suitable participants. Their
     staff was involved in the preparation of the events and the administration of the project. The contribution of
     the partners consisted of providing printing materials, logistics assistance and support of volunteers.
      The Norwegian Institute for Human Rights in Oslo was the co-operating partner from outside the region.
     During the fist phase of the project, the Norwegian Institute for Human Rights outstandingly supported the
     implementation of the project and, upon request, provided assistance in the selection of lecturers from outside
     the region and in selection of course materials. Furthermore, the experts from the Institute gave lectures at



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MFA REPORT 2001            NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ        MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.


     most of the training courses during the first phase (Ms. Gro Hillestad Thune, Prof. Andreas Follesdal). It is
     foreseen that such co-operation will take place in the upcoming parts of the project as well.


3.         CO-ORDINATION

       The relationship of the co-organisers with international organisations, governmental and non-governmental,
       has been permanent and strong. The local representatives of the United Nations High Commissioner of
       Human Rights, Council of Europe and OSCE will support the project in the form of lecturers, discussion
       leaders, resource persons, etc. The Belgrade Centre for Human Rights has been actively involved in the
       efforts to harmonise Yugoslav law with the standards of the Council of Europe. The Centre co-organised a
       conference on compatibility of legislation and practice with the requirements of the European Convention
       on Human Rights and other European norms in February 2001, hosted the visit of the Council of Europe
       eminent lawyers group and a visit of the representatives of the Venice Commission for Democracy through
       Law. The Director of the Belgrade Centre is the associate member of the Venice Commission and ad hoc
       judge to the International Court of Justice.


4.         NPA´s VALUE ADDED

       The presence of NPA in this project is important not only because of its experience in the region but also of
       the presence of its staff and experts who can offer useful advice. NGOs in the region have not the
       knowledge and skills of an old organisation. With its authority NPA would also help settle misunderstanding
       that might occur among the organisers.



5.         PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION 2001-2002:

5.1:       Planned activities in 2002

       In the first phase of the project, the partner organisations reached an audience of 148 well-chosen
       individuals and offered them training courses of ten days' duration. Five seminars with around 30
       participants each were held in Opatija (Croatia), Belgrade, Petrovac (Montenegro), Sarajevo and Dubrovnik
       (Croatia).
       The following schedule has been applied:

       First seminar in Opatija (Croatia), 12 – 21 April 2002

       Second seminar in Belgrade, 24 May – 4 June 2002

       Third seminar in Petrovac (Montenegro), 21 –30 June 2002

       Fourth seminar in Sarajevo, 6 – 15 September 2002

       Fifth seminar in Dubrovnik, 25 October – 3 November 2002

        Additionally, the seminar on economic, social and cultural rights was held in Belgrade, 19 – 23 November
       2003.




       The most important topics that were discussed within the programme of the seminars in 2002 are listed
       below:

               What are Human Rights - Development of the Idea of Human Rights?
               Sources of Human Rights Law – Domestic and International




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MFA REPORT 2001        NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ       MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.



          Prevention of Multiethnic Conflicts - Work of the OSCE High Commissioner for National
           Minorities
          Prohibition of Discrimination as a Precondition for the Implementation of Human Rights
           Implementation of Human Rights
          Panel Discussion - New Prospectives of the Protection of Human Dignity: Defamation and Insult
          Social Preconditions for the Implementation of Human Rights
          Church and State
          International Procedures for the Protection of Human Rights
          Terrorism and Human Rights
          Globalisation and Human Rights
          Organisation of the Courts, Independence of the Judiciary and it’s Role in Protecting Human
           Rights in Croatia
          Organisation of the Courts, Independence of the Judiciary and it’s Role in Protecting Human
           Rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina
          European Convention on Human Rights – Fundamental Standards
          Procedure before the European Court for Human Rights - Selected Judgements
          Organisation of the Courts, Independence of the Judiciary and it’s Role in Protecting Human
           Rights in Serbia
          Organisation of the Courts, Independence of the Judiciary and it’s Role in Protecting Human
           Rights in Montenegro
          The Interaction between ICTY and Domestic Courts in Prosecuting War Crimes in Former
           Yugoslavia
          Right to Fair Trial – Case Study
          Right to Peaceful Enjoyment of Property – Cases before the Courts in Bosnia and Herzegovina
          The Cases Related to the Labour Law in the Republic of Croatia/General Overview of the
           Alternative Methods in Resolving Disputes
          Rights of Minorities and Vulnerable Groups
          Workshop: Prevention of Ethnic Conflicts
          Right to Peaceful Enjoyment of Property
          Right to Peaceful Enjoyment of Property – Cases before the Courts in Serbia and Montenegro
          Right to Peaceful Enjoyment of Property – Cases before the Croatian Courts
          Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
          Freedom of Expression – international standards
          Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion
          Freedom of Expression - Cases before the European Court of Human Rights
          International Judge: Experience of Foreigners in the Work of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia
           and Herzegovina
          Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity
          The International Criminal Court and the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former
           Yugoslavia
          Panel Discussion: Responsibility for the violations of the International Humanitarian Law in the
           Ex-Yugoslavia
          Presentation of the ECHR Case Banković and Others vs. Belgium and others
          Right to the liberty and the security of person
          Cases against the Republic of Croatia before the European Court of Human Rights
          Violence against Women and Trafficking in Human Beings
          Human Rights Protection in the State of Emergency
          The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
          Procedure before the UN Human Rights Committee
          The Role of the Ombudsperson Institution in Protecting and Promoting Human Rights

        The additional seminar was dealing with the wide range of topics related to the economic, social and
   cultural rights. The topic for this training problem was chosen as an area where the whole legal profession
   has a common interest for improvement and shared historical experience. It indicates the efforts to promote
   co-operation in the region.
       The main point of the seminar was to identify and discuss the main problems related to the economic
   and social rights. Due to the fact that human rights issues are closely connected, the topic has provided an



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MFA REPORT 2001            NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ          MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.


       opportunity for other human rights to be mentioned and elaborated as well. It has covered the most
       important issues related to the second generation of human rights, such as:

                    Development of the idea of economic, social and cultural rights
                    Gender issues in the light of economic, social and cultural rights
                    Rights of the child in light of economic, social and cultural rights
                    Right to education – international standards and practice
                    International financial organisations and human rights
                    Right to health
                    Right to housing
                    Relevant cases on the economic and social rights before the international bodies
                    The state of economic, social and cultural rights in the countries from the region


       After the consultations with the NPA and partner organisations and following the suggestions given by the
       participants during the first phase seminars, the Belgrade Centre for Human Rights has decided that all
       participants should be granted with certificate of attendance. The certificates has been sent to the partner
       organisations and forwarded to the participants in the countries of their origin.

       The certificates will serve as an additional attraction owing to the prestige of the lecturers and the reputation
       of the participating institutions.


5.2:       Implementation/ Achievements/Changes 2002

       The activities for 2002 were implemented as planned and in accordance with the time schedule proposed by
       the project. Thus, major changes in the implementation of the first phase activities did not occur.



6.         ADJUSTMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVE (S) OR PROJECT RESULTS:
               N/A

7.        FOOD AID ONLY
             N/A

8.        NORWEGIAN PRODUCTS
             N/A



9.        CONSEQUENCES/EFFECT

       During the first phase seminars questionnaires and evaluation papers were distributed to all participants. The
       most significant evaluation results will be presented below owing to the impact of this phase of the project
       and positive effect on the target group:

               General expectations
                Around 94% of the participants stated that the training courses helped them to improve their
                knowledge in the field of human rights; the seminars were also evaluated as excellent comparative
                analyses of the legislation in the region;


               Duration of the seminars
                Around 57% of the participants were satisfied with the duration of the seminars; it was frequently
                repeated that the duration was proportional to the number of the lecturers and presentations;
                Around 43% of the participants stated that duration of the seminars should be shortened; the most
                often suggestion was that it should last five or seven days, firstly because it is rather complicated to
                get the permission from the court officials when the training course lasts for more than a week;




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MFA REPORT 2001       NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ         MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.



          Professional needs
           Around 90% of the participants stated that the seminars were in accordance with their professional
           needs and requisits;

          Implementation of acquired knowledge
           Participants were asked whether it would be possible for them to implement the knowledge
           acquired at the courses. About 60% answered that it would be possible, 35% answered that it might
           depend on the circumstances, and 5% were silent on this point; Furthermore, participants were
           asked to state what kind of problems thay could have regarding implementation of acquired
           knowledge, if any. Some of the answers were: working with the conservative coleagues, non-
           membership in the COE, the national legislation which is not fully incompatible with the
           international standards, luck of legal remedies for protecting human rights within the respective
           countries, etc;

          Future education in the field of human rights
           Around 85% of participants underlined that the first phase seminars were inspiration for them to
           continue with the education in the filed of human rights;

          Organisation of the seminars
           The vast majority of participants expressed it satisfaction for being brought together with the
           coleagues from other ex-Yugoslav countries; the organisation of the seminars is evaluated as highly
           professional and competent; it was frequently repeated that the organisers were very hospitable and
           co-operative.

   In regard to the evaluation results for the seminar on economic, social and cultural rights, some of the most
   significant comments are as follows:

          General expectations
       -   91% of the participants stated that the training course on economic, social and cultural rights
           helped them to improve their knowledge in the field of the respective issues; the seminar was
           evaluated as an excellent comparative analyses of the legislation in the region with regard to
           economic and social rights;

          Duration of the seminar
       -   67% of the participants were satisfied with the duration of the training programme; it was
           frequently repeated that the duration was proportional to the number of the lecturers and
           presentations;

          Professional needs
       -   Around 90% of the participants stated that the seminar was in accordance with their professional
           needs in a particular field;

          Implementation of knowledge acquired
       -   About 70% stated that it would be possible for them to implement the knowledge acquired at this
           course, 25% answered that it might depend on the circumstances, and 5% was silent on this point;
       -   Furthermore, participants stated some problems thay could possibly have regarding implementation
           of acquired knowledge: the national legislation and its provisions not fully incompatible with the
           international standards in the field of economic and social rights, luck of legal remedies for
           protecting economic and social rights within the respective countries, etc;



          Future education in the field of human rights
      -    Around 80% of participants underlined that this kind of seminar would be an inspiration for them
           to continue with the education in the filed of human rights, particularly in the field of economic and
           social rights;

          Organisation of the seminar




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MFA REPORT 2001              NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ        MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.


                  - The vast majority of participants expressed it satisfaction for being brought together with the
                  coleagues from other countries in the region; the organisation of the seminar is evaluated as
                  competent and professional;



      For the final list of the participants that have participated in the first phase training courses, as well as in the
      additional seminar on economic and social rights, see Appendix 1 of this report.



10.         SUSTAINABILITY ASPECTS/CONTINUATION OF SUPPORT

10.1:       Institutional.

      The persons which took part in the first phase training programme are already active in relevant institutions,
      such as courts of law, public prosecutors and Ombudspersons offices, law offices, NGOs, parliaments, local
      government, etc. The nature of the project is to improve the functioning of the state. Thus, there was no
      sustainability problems in the classical sense it implementation of this phase.

10.2:       Gender/socio-cultural.

      During the first phase of the project an adequate mix of gender, nationality, religion and cultural background
      of the participants were made. After this phase is finished it can be safely assumed that it served as a method
      to identify the main problems and to develop friendships and contacts leading to better regional
      understanding and co-operation among the participants.
      The nature of this project and the main points from its background are not so obviously related to the
      problem of position of women. Still, human rights issues are closely connected to the idea of solving the
      problem of prejudices in any area. In any case, dealing with human rights, includes elaborating the topic of
      discrimination against women.
      From that point of view the project intends to address strategic gender needs.




10.3:       Ecological/technological.

            N/A

10.4:       Financial.

      During the first year no funding has been granted except the contribution of the local organisations. Efforts
      were made to obtain funding from sources other than MFA regarding next cycles of the project. There will
      be no costs after the cycles provided envisaged in the programme are over.

      Due to the positive balance of the approved and spent amount, the project partners has organised additional
      seminar on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in Belgrade during November 2003. For further
      information on the topics discussed at this seminar as well as the list of lecturers, see the Appendix 3 to this
      report.




      11.         GENERAL COMMENTS/CONCLUSIONS AND SPECIAL CONCERNS:

      The resource persons in the first phase were the most renowned and experienced local legal experts and
      practitioners, especially in the field of human rights, as well as the lecturers outside the area with a direct
      experience in the operation of the international courts and other bodies dealing with human rights, national
      courts or NGO's offering legal assistance to victims of human rights violations.



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MFA REPORT 2001        NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ          MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.




   During the first phase of the project 21 experts from abroad took part in the training courses. Most of them
   gave an outstanding support with their presentations in the respective field. For the final list of the foreign
   experts that have participated in the first phase training courses see Appendix 2 to this report.

   The expected benefits of this project highly outweigh its costs. If all the goals are achieved at the end of the,
   an influential section of legal profession will be affected and will be motivated to influence others and
   thereby effect the heightening of the standards in the whole region. This will not only influence the situation
   in all respective countries and entities but will also facilitate inter-state relations in a region where
   international co-operation is in the interest of the local population, as well as in the interest of the
   international community in general which expects the situation in SE Europe to be stabilised and remain free
   of conflicts.
   It is believed that no risks are involved in the implementation of this project. Owing to democratic changes
   no armed conflicts comparable to those that have contributed to deterioration of the situation are expected.
   The flow across the borders in the area has been facilitated during 2000 and 2001 so that visa problems,
   affecting such projects in the past, did not occur in first phase of the project. It is expected that such
   problems will not recur in the future as well.



   12.      SOURCES OF INFORMATION:

                            Belgrade Centre for Human Rights,
                            Mlatišumina 26, Belgrade, www. bgcentar.org.yu

                            The Human Rights Centre of the University in Sarajevo,
                            Zmaja od Bosne 8, www. balkan-rights.net

                            The Croatian Helsinki Committee for Human Rights in Zagreb,
                            Ilica 5, www. hho.hr

                            The Centre for Democracy and Human Rights in Podgorica,
                            Moše Pijade 40, e-mail: cedem@cg.yu




Appendix 1


                      The final list of participants for the first phase training courses




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MFA REPORT 2001         NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ      MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.


SERBIA

1. Sneţana Jovanović, judge, III Municipal court in Belgrade
2. Ana Milošević, judicial associate, I Municipal court in Belgrade
3. Sonja Prostran, court advisor, District court in Beograde
4. Lidija Komlen, public prosecutor deputy, IV Public prosecutor office in Belgrade
5. Aleksandar Panĉevski, judge, IV Municipal court in Belgrade
6. Nebojša Popović, judge, Municipal court in Valjevo
7. Nela Vujkov, court advisor, Municipal court in Novi Sad
8. Tomislav Milojković, president of the Municipal court in Kladovo
9. Dušan Caranović, judge, Municipal court in Kladovo
10. Maja Šovran, judicial associate, II Municipal court in Belgrade
11. Slavka Mihajlović, judge, V Municipal court in Belgrade
12. Olivera Stojanović, judicial associate, Municipal court in Mladenovac
13. Momĉilo Mihajlović, judge, IV Municipal court in Belgrade
14. Dejan Petrović, judicial associate, Municipal court in Kraljevo
15. Vladimir Ostojić, associate, Office of the municipal prosecutor in Kraljevo
16. Branislav Radojĉić, judicial associate, II Municipal court in Belgrade
17. Dobrica Milovanović, judge, Municipal court in Veliko Gradište
18. Jela Mijailović, president of the Municipal court in Šabac
19. Dragan Plazinić, investigating judge, II Municipal court in Belgrade
20. Sneţana Nikolić Garotić, judge, District court in Belgrade
21. Dragana Ristić, investigator, Office of the ombudsperson institution in Kosovo
22. Vladimir Milić, judicial associate, Municipal court in Paraćin
23. Jelica Miljković, judge, District court in Kruševac
24. Aleksandar Trešnjev, judge, II Municipal court in Belgrade
25. Petar Grozdanović, court advisor, I Municipal court in Belgrade
26. Ivana Mijaĉić, court advisor, I Municipal court in Belgrade
27. Branislav Pavlović, advisor, Office of the municipal prosecutor in Kruševac
28. Zoran Zvonar, investigating judge, District court in Belgrade
29. Verica Davidović, judge, Municipal court in Kraljevo
30. Zorana Mitrović, judicial associate, District court in Niš
31. Nevena Vojinović, court advisor, district court in Kruševac
32. Vesna Kostić, judicial associate, V Municipal court in Belgrade
33. Aleksandra Ašler, senior court advisor, District court in Zrenjanin
34. Dušica Jelić, prosecutor, Office of the municipal prosecutor in Kruševac
35. Sanja Lekić, judge, District court in Belgrade
36. Milenko Mandić, prosecutor, Office of the district prosecutor in Uţice
37. Marko Milović, court advisor, District court in Belgrade
38. Nataša Pljakić, deputy prosecutor, Office of the public prosecutor in Kruševac
39. Ljubiša Radulović, president of the District court in Uţice
40. Mojca Šivert, attorney at law, Belgrade
41. Slavica Pavlović, judicial associate, Municipal court in Kraljevo
42. Bojana Radojĉić, judicial associate, Office of the public prosecutor in Valjevo
43. Eldina Saiti, judicial associate, IV Municipal court in Belgrade
44. Sanja Gojković, judicial associate, District court in Novi Sad
45. Milica Stanić, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade
46. Ksenija Marić, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade
47. Nataša Milutinović-Panĉevski, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade
48. Milanka Radovanović, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade
49. Ivana Arsić-Jelić, judicial associate, District court in Beograde
50. Tatjana Milenković, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade
51. Aleksandar Ćetković, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade
52. Rosanda Dţeverdanović-Savković, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade
53. Nataša Petriĉević, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade
54. Vanja Leĉić, judicial associate, District court in Belgrade

BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

1.   Snjeţana Ronĉević, judge, Municipal court in Banja Luka



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MFA REPORT 2001         NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ        MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.


2. Milica Cvijanović, judge, Municipal court in Banja Luka
3. Šemsa Droce, judge, Municipal court in Mostar I
4. Tatjana Kazazić, judge, Municipal court in Mostar II
5. Enes Halilović, judge, Municipal court in Tuzla
6. Adnan Gulamović, judge, Municipal court in Tuzla
7. Amina Begović, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo
8. Amira Rizvić, judge, Court of appeal in Sarajevo
9. Zorica Gogalo, judge, Court of appeal in Sarajevo
10. Cvetko Ostojić, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo
11. Mirjana Dević, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo I
12. Emina Tahirović, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo I
13. Ţeljka Krmek, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo II
14. Azra Filipović, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo II
15. Zorana Bošković, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo II
16. Ljiljana Širić-Ljubojević, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo II
17. Amela Selimović-Fazlagić, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo II
18. Mirsad Strika, public prosecutor, District prosecutor office in Sarajevo
19. Šaban Mujĉinović, judge, Court of appeal in Tuzla
20. Hikmeta Kuĉi, judge, Court of appeal in Tuzla
21. Ekrem Insanić, judge, Municipal court in Mostar I
22. Dragan Pekez, judge, Municipal court in Mrkonjić Grad
23. Rajko Dakić, judge, District court in Banja Luka
24. Aida Ţilić, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo I
45. Aleksandar Vuković, Constitutional court of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sarajevo
46. Ahmet Halebić, district prosecutor deputy, District prosecutor office in Sarajevo
47. Nedţad Ćorović, district prosecutor deputy, District prosecutor office in Sarajevo
29. Nenad Balaban, president of the District court in Banja Luka
30. Smail Fejzić, district prosecutor deputy, District prosecutor office in Sarajevo
31. Dušanka Amidţić, judge, Municipal court in Prijedor
32. Melika Fadilpašić, judge, Municipal court in Sarajevo I
33. Jovanka Hrkić-Sovilj, judge, Municipal court in Bihać
34. Nada MrĊa, judge, Municipal court in Prijedor
35. Fata Nadarević, president of the Municipal court in Bihać
36. Milica Reljić, judge, Municipal court in Bihać
37. Gara Sehinović, judge, Municipal court in Bihać
38. Carolina Sawicki, Swiss Development Agency, Office in Sarajevo
39. Sunita Šukanoi, court advisor, Municipal court in Banja Luka
40. Biljana Sabljić, court advisor, Municipal court in Banja Luka

MONTENEGRO

1. Suzana Ĉelanović Todorović, judge, Municipal court in Kotor
2. Milovan Spasović, judge, Municipal court in Berane
3. Milan Radović, president of the District court in Podgorica
4. Miljana Radović, state prosecutor deputy, Podgorica
5. Nataša Bošković, judge, Municipal court in Nikšić
6. Ţeljko Šupljeglav, judge, Municipal court in Bar
7. Ramo Striković, judge, Municipal court in Bjelo Polje
8. Miroslav Bošković, judge, Municipal court in Podgorica
9. Zahit Camić, president of the Municipal court in Roţaje
10. Rafet Suljević, judge, Municipal court in Roţaje
11. Sonja Cvijetiĉanin Ognjanović, judge, Municipal court in Herceg Novi
12. Zoran Paţin, judge, Municipal court in Podgorica
13. Zorica Dabetić, judge, Municipal court in Herceg Novi
14. Darka Kisjelica, judge, Municipal court in Herceg Novi
15. Vojislav Stojanović, judge, Municipal court in Berane
16. Milenko Magdalenić, public prosecutor, Roţaje
17. Zoran Đukić, judge, Municipal court in Berane
18. Anka Vojvodić, president of the Municipal court in Bar
19. Vukašin Šimrak, president of the Municipal court in Herceg Novi



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MFA REPORT 2001         NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ        MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.


20. Rade Perišić, president of the Municipal court in Nikšić
21. Ognjena Boljević, court advisor, Municipal court in Podgorica
22. Vesna Dragović, judicial associate, Municipal court in Podgorica
23. Nebojša Golubović, judicial associate, Municipal court in Bjelo Polje
24. Bojan Mandić, judicial associate, Municipal court in Bjelo Polje
25. Jelena Perović, judicial associate, Municipal court in Podgorica
26. Milica Đorojević, judicial associate, Municipal court in Podgorica
27. Radule Piper, judge, Commercial court in Bijelo Polje
28. Rifat Erović, judge, Municial court in Roţaje
48. Boris Savić, judge, Municipal court in Kotor
49. Amra Sujković, judge, Municipal court in Berane
50. Senada Hasanagić, judge, Commercial court in Bijelo Polje
51. Mevlida Muratović, judge, Commercial court in Podgorica
34. Nebojša Marković, judge, Municipal court in Cetinje
35. Vesna Moštrokol, judge, Municipal court in Podgorica
36. Slavica Stanić, judicial associate, Municipal court in Pljevlja
37. Ranko Šćekić, judge, Municipal court in Kotor
38. Milonja Veljić, judicial associate, Municipal court in Berane
39. Ana Vuković, judge, Municipal court in Podgorica
40. Nela Vuĉinić, attorney at law, Podgorica

CROATIA

1. Zdenka Baranić Ĉemeljić, president of the Municipal court in Pag
2. Berislav Devĉić, judge, District court in Poţega
3. Siniša Gudelj, judge, Municipal court in Našice
4. Ljiljana Jembrešić, judge, Municipal court in Vrbovac
5. Mihael Kovaĉić, president of the Municipal court in Sisak
6. Eva Nekić, court advisor, Municipal court in Našice
7. Jadranka Potoĉnjak, president of the Municipal court in Prelog
8. Valentina Varga, court advisor, Municipal court in Ĉakovec
9. Margareta Vivoda, court advisor, Municipal court in Buzet
10. Melani Vukmirica, senior court advisor, Administrative court of the Republic of Croatia
11. Goranka Lalić, project co-ordinator, Department for education of judges, the Croatian Helsinki Committee
     for Human Rights
12. Jadranka Kos, judge, Municipal court in Zagreb
13. Ksenija Dimec, judge, Municipal court in Rijeka
14. Branka Cerovski Jasenković, judge, Municipal court in Zagreb
15. Katarina Petrović, president of the Municipal court in Virovitica
16. Ţelimir Hrvatić, president of the Municipal court in ĐurĊevac
17. Ivica Pezo, judge, Municipal court in Zagreb
18. Gordana Grubeša, attorney at law, Zagreb
19. Nataša Đurović, legal advisor, the Croatian Judicial Centre
20. Perka Zelić, legal advisor, Zagreb
21. Damir Krahulec, judge, District court in Osijek
22. Vesna Katarinĉić Škrlj, president of the Municipal court in Buzet
23. Miroslav Dasović, municipal public attorney, Osijek
24. Ante Ujević, president of the Municipal court in Karlovac
25. Brankica Bobšić, court advisor, District court in Sisak
26. Mirela Krešić, assistant professor, Law faculty, University in Zagreb
27. Ika Peranović, court advisor, Municipal court, Sv. Ivan Zelina
28. Sandra Wagner, judge, Municipal court in Ploĉe
29. Ljudevit Zoriĉić, judge, Municipal court in Drniš
30. Jasna Zubĉić, judge, District court in Poţega
31. Damir Ujdur, judge, Municipal court in Metković
52. Sanda Navara, court advisor, Municipal court in Glina
53. Nataša Orešković, judicial associate, Municipal court in Jastrebarski
54. Mitar Kneţić, attorney at law, Dugo Selo
35. Tijana Vukojiĉić, project co-ordinator, the Croatian Helsinki Committee for Human Rights




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MFA REPORT 2001   NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ   MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.




Appendix 2




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MFA REPORT 2001        NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ      MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.




                The list of experts from abroad for the training courses organised in 2002



Mr. Richard Towle, Head of UN OHCHR, Belgrade
Ms. Gro Hillestad Thune, Senior advisor to the Norwegian Institute of Human Rights, Oslo
Prof. Roberto Toniatti, Faculty of Law, University of Trento, Italy
Dr Cordula Droege, Berlin
Mr. Aernout van Lynden, Sky news reporter
Mr. John Packer, Office of the OSCE/HCNM, Vienna
Ms. Nuala Mole, Queens cancelor, The Advice on Individual Rights (AIRE) Centre, London
Prof. Joseph Marko, Univesity of Graz, Austria
Prof. Christian Dominicé, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Laurie Wisenberg, Head of the UN OHCHR office in Podgorica
Stephane Jeannet, LL.M., Swiss Agency for Development and Co-operation
Mr. Christopher Harland, International member to serve on the High Judicial Councils of the Federation of
BiH and Republika Srpska
Ms. Madeleine Rees, Chief of mission, UN HCHR Office in Sarajevo
Ms. Monica Macovei, Council of Europe, Strasbourg
Mr. Panayotis Voyatzis, Attorney at law, Athens
Mr. Frank Orton, Human Rights Ombudsman of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Prof. Andreas Føllesdal, Norwegian Institute for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Oslo, Norway
Mr. Benjamin Narain, Criminal barrister, London
Dr. Roland Bank, Berlin
Prof. Brian Simpson, University of Michigan Law School
Dr Markus Schmidt, Secretary, the UN Human Rights Committee




Appendix 3

        The list of lecturers - seminar on the Economic, Social and Cultural rights held in Belgrade



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MFA REPORT 2001         NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ         MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.




Ružica Žarevac, LL.M, Belgrade Centre for Human Rights
Vladimir Todorić, LL.M, legal adviser, European integrations department, Ministry of International Economic
relations of the Republic of Serbia
Mr. Ljubomir Pejaković, executive director, Child Rights Centre, Belgrade
Dr Ivana Spasić, Faculty of Philosophy, University in Belgrade
Mr. sci. Ian Igor Zagrecki, Sarajevo
Dr Milica Delević Đilas, director of the Serbia and Montenegro European Integration Office
Heather Northcott, LL.M, University of Essex, England
Prof. Ksenija Petovar, Faculty of Architecture, University in Belgrade
Melani Vukmirica, senior court advisor, Administrative court of the Republic of Croatia
Dr Mirosinka Dinkić, senior researcher, director of the Department for social politics, G17 Institute, Belgrade
Dr Branimir Stojković, Faculty of political sciences, University in Belgrade
Ms. Marija Rudić, Belgrade Centre for Human Rights


          The list of topics - seminar on the Economic, Social and Cultural rights held in Belgrade


Economic, social and cultural rights – general overview
Responsibility of multinational corporations for human rights violations in international law
Rights of the child in the light of the economic and social rights
Gender issues in the light of the economic and social rights
Relevant cases on the protection of the economic, social and cultural rights
Economic and social rights in Bosnia
International financial institutions and human rights
Right to education – international standards
Justiciability of economic, social and cultural rights
Panel discussion: Economic and social rights in transition countries
Right to health
Economic and social rights in the Republic of Croatia
Economic and social rights in Sebia and Montenegro
Identity as a basis for cultural rights
Right to housing




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MFA REPORT 2001      NPA project no.: XXX.ZZZ   MFA proj. no.: AAA-XXX.



                                                               Place:     Date:
       Signed:
                                                                          December
       Borko Nikolic                                           Belgrade   15, 2003
       Project Co-ordinator
       Belgrade Centre for Human Rights


       Fred Rasmussen                                          Belgrade   December
       Resident Representative                                            15, 2003
       NPA Office in Belgrade

       Marianne Oen
       NPA Head Office, Oslo                                   Oslo




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