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AMY OLBERDING

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AMY OLBERDING Powered By Docstoc
					                                    AMY OLBERDING

                                  Department of Philosophy
                                   University of Oklahoma
                                455 W. Lindsey St., Room 605
                                     Norman, OK 73019
                                       (405)325-6834
                                     aolberding@ou.edu

EDUCATION
     Ph.D.             Philosophy, University of Hawai'i at Manoa              2001
     M.A.              Philosophy, University of Hawai'i at Manoa              1995
     B.A.              Philosophy and Religion, Hendrix College                1991

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Chinese Philosophy, Ethics, Philosophical Approaches to Mortality

AREAS OF COMPETENCE
Roman Philosophy, Philosophy and Literature, Indian Philosophy, Japanese Philosophy

EMPLOYMENT
Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Oklahoma, 2007 – present
Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy and School of International and Area Studies,
        University of Oklahoma, 2004 – 2007
Assistant Professor, Philosophy and Religious Studies, College of DuPage, 2001 – 2004
Instructor, Philosophy and Religious Studies, College of DuPage, 2000 – 2001
Adjunct Instructor, Philosophy and Religious Studies, College of DuPage, 1999-2000
Adjunct Instructor, Philosophy, University of Hawai'i, January – May 1997
Teaching Assistant, Philosophy, University of Hawai'i, January 1996 – December 1997

COURSES TAUGHT (at University of Oklahoma)
Phil 1203 – Human Destiny
Phil 1223 – Introduction to Asian Philosophy
Phil 3033 – Philosophy and Literature
Phil 3303 – East Asian Philosophy
Phil 3343 – Chinese Philosophy
Phil 3743 – Feminist Philosophy
Phil 3811 – Writing Workshop for Philosophy Majors
Phil 4900/5900 – Early Chinese Philosophy
Phil 6393 – Seminar in Chinese Philosophy

INDEPENDENT STUDIES
Phil 3980 – Honors Research: Chinese Philosophical Views of the Body and Medicine
Phil 3980 – Honors Research: Epicurus and Epicureanism
Phil 5990 – Graduate Directed Reading: Mencius and Xunzi
Phil 5990 – Graduate Directed Reading: Philosophical Daoism

DISSERTATION COMMITTEES
Andrea Taylor (co-chair), Angela Thurmond, Charity Smith, Landon Schurtz
PUBLICATIONS
Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought, co-edited with Philip J. Ivanhoe. Forthcoming with
State University of New York Press. Contributors: Michael Puett, Roger Ames, Mark
Czikszentmihalyi, POO Mu-chou, Eugene Wang, Tao Jiang, Mark Berkson, GUO Jue, PENG
Guoxiang, Philip J. Ivanhoe, and Amy Olberding.

“’I Know Not “Seems”’: Grief for Parents in the Analects.” Forthcoming in Mortality in
Traditional Chinese Thought, Amy Olberding and Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), State University of
New York Press.

“’Ascending the Hall’: Demeanor and Moral Improvement in the Analects.” Forthcoming in
Philosophy East and West (October 2009).

“Dreaming of the Duke of Zhou: Exemplarism and the Analects.” Journal of Chinese
Philosophy 35:4(2008):625-639.

“’A little throat cutting in the meantime’: Seneca’s Violent Imagery,” Philosophy and Literature
32(2008):130-144.

“Slowing Death Down: Mourning in the Analects,” in Confucius Now: Contemporary
Encounters with the Analects, ed. David Jones (LaSalle, IL: Open Court Press, 2008), 137-149.

“Sorrow and the Sage: Grief in the Zhuangzi,” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy
6:4(2007):339-359.

“The Educative Function of Personal Style in the Analects,” Philosophy East and West 57:3
(2007):357-374.

“The Stout Heart: Seneca’s Strategy for Dispelling Grief,” Ancient Philosophy 25 (2005):1-14.

“’The Feel of Not to Feel it’: Lucretius’ Remedy for Death Anxiety,” Philosophy and Literature
29 (2005):114-129.

“The Consummation of Sorrow: An Analysis of Confucius’ Grief for Yan Hui,” Philosophy East
and West 54 (2004):279-301.

“Mourning, Memory, and Identity: A Comparative Study of the Constitution of the Self in
Grief,” International Philosophical Quarterly 37 (1997):29-44.

RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS
“The Art of Living Virtuously: Reading the Models of Socrates and Confucius.” National
Endowment for the Humanities Seminar, “Philosophical Ideas and Artistic Pursuits in the
Traditions of Asia and the West.” College of DuPage, November 2007.

“Making Sorrow a Virtue: Confucius’ Account of the Problem of Death.” The Brueggeman
Symposium, Confronting Death, Xavier University, October 2007.

“Keeping House: The Banality of Virtue in the Analects.” Presented as part of the Mike Ryan
Lecture Series at Kennesaw State University, Atlanta, GA, April 2006.




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“Of Gladiators and Gore: Roman Uses of Violence in Philosophical Exhortation.” Eta Sigma Phi
(University of Oklahoma Classics Society), Norman, OK, February 2006.

“The Educative Function of Personal Style in the Analects.” East West Philosophers’
Conference, East West Center, Honolulu, HI, June 2005.

“Personal Style and Moral Sensibility in the Analects.” American Philosophical Association,
Committee on the Status of Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies Panel,
Pacific Division meeting, San Francisco, CA, March 2005.

“Taming Death: Confucian Mourning and American Death Gone Wild,” Asian Studies
Development Program National Conference, Glen Ellyn, IL, March 2001.

“Youth and Death: Confucius and Seneca on Untimely Death and the Nature of a Full Life,”
Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy session, American Philosophical Association,
Central Division meeting, New Orleans, LA, May 1999.

OTHER PRESENTATIONS
Comment on Li-Hsiang (Lisa) Rosenlee, “Feminism, Care Ethics, and Confucianism.” American
Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, Chicago, IL, February 2009.

Comment on Aaron Stalnaker, “Virtue as Mastery in Early Chinese Thought.” American
Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, Chicago, IL, April 2007.

Comment on Justin Tiwald, “Virtue Ethics, Neo-Confucianism, and the Problem of Moralizing
the Human Good.” American Philosophical Association Central Division Meeting, Chicago, IL,
April 2007.

“Confucianism and Daoism.” Oklahoma Institute for Teaching East Asia, Universiy of
Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK, January 2006.

WORKS IN PROGRESS
Exemplarism in the Analects.
       Abstract: The Analects, I aver, operates according to a moral theory akin to that recently
       proposed by Linda Zagzebski, a theory in which commonplace experiences of admiration
       for exemplars are foundational and the work of moral theory resides in scrutinizing those
       we admire in order to discover just what features of the exemplary provide the conditions
       for virtue. Rather than sourcing its ethical conceptual schemata in an abstract account of
       human nature or tian, I argue, the Analects utilizes the dramatic personae of the text, from
       historically notable figures in early Chinese history to Confucius and his companions, to
       source the account of virtue it offers. In addition to making both a textual and practical
       case for such a reading, I proffer three examples of what an exemplarist approach to the
       text can yield regarding virtues abundantly on display among the text’s personae but only
       cursorily described in its more theoretical passages.

“Making Sorrow a Virtue: Confucius’ Account of the Problem of Death.” To be published in
Confronting Mortality: Psychology and Religion in Dialogue, ed. James Buchanan.


LANGUAGE
Classical Chinese; Mandarin Chinese (general reading proficiency)


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HONORS AND AWARDS
Howard Foundation Fellowship, 2009-2010

University of Oklahoma Small Funds Grant for Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought, Spring
2009

University of Oklahoma Faculty Enrichment Grant, Spring 2007; Spring 2009

University of Oklahoma Research Council Junior Faculty Research Grant, Summer 2005;
Summer 2008

University of Oklahoma College of Arts and Sciences Junior Faculty Summer Research Grant,
Summer 2006; Summer 2007

Author and Director of National Endowment for the Humanities Focus Grant faculty seminar
entitled, “Death, Grief, and Mourning as Windows on East Asian Traditions,” College of DuPage,
Fall 2002-Fall 2003

Recipient of Tellabs grant funds for development of a philosophy course entitled, “Science,
Values, and the Popular Imagination,” College of DuPage, Spring 2002

Teaching Assistantship, University of Hawai'i, 1996-1997

DEPARTMENTAL & INSTITUTIONAL SERVICE
University of Oklahoma
Philosophy Department Newsletter Editor, 2008 – present

Library Liaison, Department of Philosophy, 2004 – present

Jack Roe Denton Scholarship Committee, 2007 – present

Graduate Studies Committee, School of International and Area Studies, 2004 – 2007

Hiring Committee Member, Religious Studies Department, 2006 – 2007

East Asia Symposium Committee, School of International and Area Studies, 2005 – 2006

Affiliate Faculty Member, Department of Religious Studies, 2004 – present

Affiliate Faculty Member, School of International and Area Studies, 2007 – present

College of DuPage
Co-director, Regional Center for the Asian Studies Development Program, 2002 – 2004

Member, College of DuPage Asia Committee, 2000 – 2004 (Co-chair, 2002-2003)

Honors Faculty, College of DuPage, 2001 – 2004

Honors Program Scholarship Committee, 2001 – 2004



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College Student Awards Committee, 2001 – 2003

Library Literacy Committee, 2001 – 2003

Program Coordinator, Asian Studies Development Program National Conference, College of
       DuPage, 2001

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE AND AFFILIATIONS
China Book Review Editor, Philosophy East and West (2009-present)

Committee Member, American Philosophical Association Committee on the Status of Asian and
Asian-American Philosophies and Philosophers (2006-2009)

       Committee Panel Organizer:
       “Virtue in Traditional Chinese Thought,” APA Central Division Meeting, April 2006.
       “Feminism and Asian Philosophy,” APA Central Division Meeting, February 2009

       Guest Editor:
       Newsletter of the APA Committee on the Status of Asian and Asian-American
       Philosophies and Philosophers, Vol. 8, No. 1 (Fall 2008). A special state of the
       field issue on Chinese philosophy. Authored the editor’s introduction and compiled data
       on U.S. Ph.D. granting departments and five year data on job offerings. Contributors to
       this issue: Stephen Angle, Roger Ames, Manyul Im, Bryan Van Norden, Justin Tiwald,
       Donald Munro, David Wong, Hugh Benson, and Leslie Francis. Issue to be translated
       and reprinted in 中華國學研究 (Zhonghua guoxue yanjiu Research on Chinese Culture)
       published by 國學院 (Guoxueyuan Chinese Cultural Institute) at 人民大學 (Renmin
       Daxue People’s University of China) under the editorship of 梁濤 Liang Tao.

       Newsletter of the APA Committee on the Status of Asian and Asian-American
       Philosophies and Philosophers, Vol. 9, No. 1 (Fall 2009). A special section devoted to
       addressing the intersections of Asian and feminist philosophy. Contributors to include:
       Li-Hsiang (Lisa) Rosenlee, Ashby Butnor, Lisa Raphals, Sandra A. Wawrytko, Ann
       Pang-White, and Linyu Gu.

Manuscript and Proposal Reviewer for Oxford University Press, Columbia University Press, State
University of New York Press.

Referee for Journal of Chinese Philosophy, Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy,
Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Philosophy East and West, and Ancient Philosophy.

Grant Review Panelist for National Endowment for the Humanities

Member, American Philosophical Association, Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy,
International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophies




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