This Side of Paradise by P-Outrigger

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 6

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise describes life at Princeton among the glittering, bored, and disillusioned the post World War I lost generation. Published in 1920, when he was just twenty-three, the novel was an overnight success and shot Fitzgerald to instant stardom as dauphin of the Jazz Age.

More Info
									This Side of Paradise
Fiction

Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald



Age Group: Ages 12 to Adult
Table of Contents

BOOK ONE The Romantic Egotist 3
CHAPTER 1 -- Amory, Son of Beatrice 3
CHAPTER 2 -- Spires and Gargoyles 26
CHAPTER 3 -- The Egotist Considers 61
CHAPTER 4 -- Narcissus Off Duty 81
BOOK TWO The Education of a Personage 109
CHAPTER 1 -- The Dibutante 109
CHAPTER 2 -- Experiments in Convalescence 134
CHAPTER 3 -- Young Irony 151
CHAPTER 4 -- The Supercilious Sacrifice 164
CHAPTER 5 -- The Egotist Becomes a Personage 172
Description

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise describes life at Princeton among the glittering, bored, and
disillusioned the post World War I lost generation. Published in 1920, when he was just twenty-three, the
novel was an overnight success and shot Fitzgerald to instant stardom as dauphin of the Jazz Age.
Excerpt

AMORY BLAINE inherited from his mother every trait, except the stray inexpressible few, that made him
worth while. His father, an ineffectual, inarticulate man with a taste for Byron and a habit of drowsing over
the Encyclopedia Britannica, grew wealthy at thirty through the death of two elder brothers, successful
Chicago brokers, and in the first flush of feeling that the world was his, went to Bar Harbor and met
Beatrice O'Hara. In consequence, Stephen Blaine handed down to posterity his height of just under six
feet and his tendency to waver at crucial moments, these two abstractions appearing in his son Amory.
For
many years he hovered in the background of his family's life, an unassertive figure with a face half-
obliterated by lifeless, silky hair, continually occupied in "taking care" of his wife, continually harassed by
the idea that he didn't and couldn't understand her.
Author Bio
F. Scott Fitzgerald
F(rancis) Scott Fitzgerald<br><br>Born: 9/24/1896<br><br>Birthplace: Saint Paul,
Minnesota<br><br>Novelist and short-story writer credited with chronicling the Jazz Age and considered
one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. His novels, which include The Great Gatsby (1925),
Tender Is the Night (1934) and The Last Tycoon (1941), often center on morally weak characters prone to
heavy drinking and talking a mirror of Fitzgerald's own lifestyle.<br><br>Died: 12/21/1940
12/21/1940

								
To top