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					Science Unit – Lesson Plans

Day One:
   Name:       Shannon Overdahl Date: April 22, 2009        Grade Level: 6th
   grade
Subject: Physical Changes - Science    Title of Lesson: What do you know?

Objectives of Lesson/Learner Objective:
Students will be able to establish what they know about physical and chemical changes to
matter.

Minnesota Academic Math Standards:
6th grade
2. Physical Science
1. Matter
3. Substances can undergo physical and/or chemical changes which may change the
properties of the substance but do not change the total mass of the system.

Materials Needed/Preparation:
KWL Chart – handout
writing utensils
blackboard/whiteboard

Anticipatory Set/Motivation/Snappy Launch:
Let's talk about change.

Procedure/Instructional Method Steps
Teacher will have students brainstorm what they know about the three states of matter –
solid, liquid, gas. Teacher will guide with probing questions about ways to change matter.

Teacher will record all of the ideas on the board. When the discussion has completed,
students will copy the information onto the “K” portion of their KWL chart.

When done with the K portion, teacher will have students pose questions about what they
want to know more about – the “W” part of the KWL chart. Students will brainstorm
again and copy the “W” questions into the “W” portion.

After K and W are completed, teacher will introduce a video on physical and chemical
changes of matter. (Students will keep their KWL sheet until the end of the unit.
Students will add to it and complete the “L” portion at the end of the week).

Classroom Management: Routines:
Students in desks.
Student Assessment & Check for Understanding:
This is pre-assessing what they know and guiding them into creating good questions of
what they want to know more about. The final assessment will be the completion of the
KWL Chart.

Lesson Evaluation & Reflection:
I think this is a great way to assess prior knowledge and begin learning something new. I
wonder what information they have learned thus far to have knowledge to fill out the “K”
portion, but I am sure a little guidance from the teacher will help them realize what they
already know.

Day Two:
   Name:       Shannon Overdahl Date: April 22, 2009        Grade Level: 6th
   grade
Subject: Physical Changes - Science    Title of Lesson: What have you learned?

Objectives of Lesson/Learner Objective:
Students will be able to describe forms of physical changes.
Students will describe how physical changes affect matter.

Minnesota Academic Math Standards:
6th grade
2. Physical Science
1. Matter
3. Substances can undergo physical and/or chemical changes which may change the
properties of the substance but do not change the total mass of the system.

Materials Needed/Preparation:
Writing Paper
Writing Utensils

Anticipatory Set/Motivation/Snappy Launch:
Let's discuss what you have learned so far about physical and chemical changes.

Procedure/Instructional Method Steps:
Students will be paired up to create Venn Diagrams comparing physical and chemical
changes in matter. Students can use their KWL charts as well as notes from previous
lessons.

Teacher will explain to the students what a Venn Diagram is and draw a picture on the
board. Depending on student knowledge, teacher might choose to run through a sample
Venn Diagram.

Classroom Management: Routines:
Students in pairs.
Student Assessment & Check for Understanding:
Venn Diagrams will prove what areas might be missing, what areas might need more
flushing out and what areas the students have a firm grasp on.

Lesson Evaluation & Reflection:
I think this is a good way to review what they have learned from the video as well as
show the teacher what areas need more focus.


Day Three – Inquiry!
   Name:       Shannon Overdahl Date: April 22, 2009        Grade Level: 6th
   grade
Subject: Physical Changes - Science    Title of Lesson: Bouncy Ball

Objectives of Lesson/Learner Objective:
Students will be able to describe forms of physical changes.
Students will describe how physical changes affect matter.
Students will use scientific inquiry to generate questions, describe, explain and predict
what will happen.

Minnesota Academic Math Standards:
6th grade
2. Physical Science
1. Matter
3. Substances can undergo physical and/or chemical changes which may change the
properties of the substance but do not change the total mass of the system.

6th grade
1. History and Nature of Science
3. Scientific Inquiry and Engineering Design
1. Scientific Inquiry is a set of interrelated processes used to pose questions about the
natural and engineered world and investigate phenomena. There is no one prescribed
sequence for the process of inquiry.

Materials Needed/Preparation:
Supplies (per lab table):
borax
cornstarch
glue, white, clear or colored. (each will make a different colored ball)
warm water
food coloring
measuring spoons
spoon or craft stick to stir the mixture
2 small plastic cups or other containers for mixing (per student)
marking pen
watch with a second hand
metric ruler
zip-lock plastic bags

Anticipatory Set/Motivation/Snappy Launch
Inquiry Lab! Students will get a hands-on experiment combining ingredients to create a
bouncy ball.

Procedure/Instructional Method Steps
Safety First: Teacher will remind students of the contract they signed about safety in lab.
Teacher will emphasize that students are NOT to eat anything in the lab. Students will be
told that any horseplay will result in immediate removal. Students will be working with
messy ingredients and should keep their hands away from their face.

At their table, students will find the box containing all of the supplies needed for this
experiment as well as a handout listing the steps (below).

Teacher will read the steps clearly to the class, asking if there are any questions. Once
questions have been answered, students are allowed to begin the experiment.

Steps:
Label one cup 'Borax Solution' and the other cup 'Ball Mixture'.
Pour 2 tablespoons warm water and 1/2 teaspoon borax powder into the cup labeled
'Borax Solution'. Stir the mixture to dissolve the borax. Add food coloring.
Pour 1 tablespoon of glue into the cup labeled 'Ball Mixture'. Add 1/2 teaspoon of the
borax solution you just made and 1 tablespoon of cornstarch. Do not stir. Allow the
ingredients to interact on their own for 10-15 seconds and then stir them together to fully
mix. Once the mixture becomes impossible to stir, take it out of the cup and start molding
the ball with your hands.

When all students have made their ball, teacher will tell students to try bouncing the ball.
Teacher will emphasize that balls should be gently bounced on their lab table, not on the
floor and not around the room.

After a few minutes of experimenting with the bouncy balls, teacher will ask individuals
to explain what they did and what their result was. Did the ball bounce? Was it sticky or
hard? Teacher will ask the following questions:

      When you combined the ingredients, did you change them? Was it a physical or
       chemical change? Why? Explain.

      Did these changes result in a change of mass? Why/why not?

Let's do some predicting for tomorrow's experiment...
When we do this again tomorrow, we are going to add more cornstarch. What do you
think will happen? What if we added more borax? What if we added more glue?

With more cornstarch: do you think it will take more or less time to solidify? More or
less sticky? How will the bounce be affect?
Teacher will ask the same questions about adding more borax and adding more glue.

(Teacher will write down all the predictions which will be tested in the next lab. Next lab
will be the same, but students will experiment with more or less of the ingredients.)

Classroom Management: Routines:
Students will already be in the lab.
Students will listen to teacher's instructions and work individually on the lab.
Once complete, students will place their balls in the plastic bag, wash their work area,
clean the utensils, wash their hands, and return all supplies to the appropriate container.

Student Assessment & Check for Understanding:
Teacher can observe during the experiment as well as during the Q&A wrap up
afterward.

Lesson Evaluation & Reflection
I think this can be completed in one lab. I wish the experimenting with adding more of
one ingredient could be done the same day, but I don't think there would be enough time,
which is why I chose to list it as the following day. I think the students will be excited to
make the bouncy balls, but I wonder how much they actually learned about mass, matter
and physical changes.

source: http://chemistry.about.com/od/demonstrationsexperiments/ss/bounceball.htm

				
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