Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP A Guide for

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					Using Digital Media in
Microsoft Windows XP:
A Guide for Educators




                 M
  Table of Contents


Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player .......... 4
  Windows Media Player at a Glance ............................................................................................ 4
  Playing Music CDs on Your Computer ........................................................................................ 7
  Managing a Digital Music Collection .......................................................................................... 9
  Playing DVDs..............................................................................................................................18
  Creating Your Own CDs .............................................................................................................18
Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography ..........................................20
  Out of the Camera, Onto the Computer ...................................................................................20
  Organizing Your Images.............................................................................................................23
  Putting Your Pictures on Paper .................................................................................................23
  E-Mailing Photos to Friends and Family ...................................................................................25
  Posting Your Pictures on the Web ............................................................................................26
  Slide Shows and Screen Savers ...............................................................................................28
Chapter 3: Digital Video: Making the Camera and Computer Connection .30
  Connecting Your Camera to Your Computer ............................................................................30
  Downloading Video to Your Computer......................................................................................34
  AutoMovie Makes It Easy ..........................................................................................................37
Chapter 4: Creating Your First Movie ............................................................40
  Creating a Movie........................................................................................................................40
  Creating Video Transitions ........................................................................................................42
  Adding Video Effects..................................................................................................................43
  Adding Titles and Credits ..........................................................................................................46
  Adding Music .............................................................................................................................49
  Adding Narration........................................................................................................................51
  Saving and Sharing Movies.......................................................................................................52
  Send a Movie in E-mail..............................................................................................................53
Chapter 5: Editing Your Videos......................................................................55
  The Importance of Editing: Telling a Story................................................................................55
  Auto-Editing and Manual Editing ..............................................................................................57
  Creating Clips.............................................................................................................................59




                                                                                                                                                  Table of Contents 2
Introduction


   Windows XP includes an assortment of programs that make it easier for you to work with a
   digital music, photos, and videos. This booklet will show you how to use Windows Media
   Player to play music CDs, manage a digital music collection, play DVDs, and create your
   own CDs.

   It also shows you how to use the built-in digital photography features in Windows XP to
   download and organize your digital photos on your computer, as well as how to print,
   e-mail, and post them to the Web. You’ll even learn how to create slide shows and screen
   savers with your photos.

   Lastly, this booklet covers Windows Movie Maker 2, a Windows XP application that enables
   you to edit and produce your own digital videos. It covers how to connect your camera to
   your computer so you can download digital or analog video to your computer. It also
   teaches you how to use the AutoMovie feature to quickly generate finished movies that
   incorporate video effects and transitions, as well as sound tracks. Or, if you’re feeling
   adventurous, you can continue reading to learn how to assemble and produce a movie
   from scratch, and then how to share that movie with others.




                                                                                      Introduction 3
 Chapter 1: Managing
 Music (and More) with
 Windows Media Player


                         Microsoft Windows XP includes everything you need to turn your computer into a digital
                         jukebox. You can play CDs directly, using your computer’s sound card and speakers for
                         playback. You can also copy songs from your CD collection to a local disk drive and
                         download tunes from the Web. Using Windows Media Player, you can mix and match tunes
                         to play disk jockey, creating custom playlists and even burning your favorite tunes to
Note                     custom CDs that you can play back in a CD player in your home or car.
This chapter assumes
you’re using Windows
Media Player version     In this chapter, you’ll learn the ins and outs of Windows Media Player, with a special
8, which is included     emphasis on its musical capabilities.
with Windows XP and
is not available for
any earlier Windows
versions. At press
time, Windows Media
Player version 9 was
in the wings. Although
                         Windows Media Player at a Glance
it should look and act
much like version 8,
you might discover       Windows Media Player does an amazing number of things, especially when you consider
some features that       it’s included free with every copy of Windows. Most people learn all they need to know by
work differently from    clicking on various buttons and watching what happens. If you feel like exploring, go
those described here.    ahead. To open Windows Media Player, click its icon on the Quick Launch toolbar, just to
You can find out
which version you’re     the right of the Start button; if the Quick Launch toolbar is hidden, you’ll find the Windows
using by choosing        Media Player shortcut by clicking Start, clicking All Programs, and then choosing
About Windows Media      Accessories and Entertainment.
Player from the Help
menu.




                                                        Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 4
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP


                                To switch among the different functions and features available in Windows Media Player,
                                use the buttons on the Features taskbar on the left side of the Windows Media Player
                                window. Each of these seven buttons has a specific role:

                                    •   Now Playing When you click this button on the Features taskbar, the central
                                        pane displays content that’s appropriate to whatever you’re watching or listening
                                        to, as in the example shown on the next page. If you’re watching a broadcast from
                                        the Web or playing back a saved video file or a DVD, the Now Playing pane shows
                                        your movie or video clip. If you’re listening to a CD, the pane shows information
                                        about the album, including its title and the name of the artist, as well as any cover
                                        art that Windows Media Player downloaded from the Internet. This is also where
                                        you can see visualizations, which are splashes of color and geometric shapes that
                                        whirl and dance about in time with the music, like a light show from a 1960s rock
                                        concert.




    Tip
    To view a
    visualization, click
    Now Playing on the
    features taskbar,
    choose Visualizations
    from the View menu,             •   Media Guide This link turns the main window into a Web browser that displays
    and then select any                 content from Microsoft’s WindowsMedia.com. You’ll find music and video
    entry from the long                 downloads, links to movie previews, and much more here, all updated regularly.
    list of available
    visualizations. If you
    get tired of the built-in       •   Copy From CD Use this button to transfer songs from a CD to digital music files
    visualizations, choose              on your computer. See the section “Creating Your Own CDs” later in this chapter
    Download
    Visualizations from
                                        for more information.
    the Tools menu.
                                    •   Media Library All your downloaded music files and songs you copy from CD are
                                        organized neatly here, along with custom playlists you can create by mixing and
                                        matching tracks from the collection. I explain how to use this part of Windows
                                        Media Player in the section “Organizing Your Music Collection.”


                                                             Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 5
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP


                                 •   Radio Tuner No antenna required! Instead, click the links here to find radio
                                     stations that “broadcast” their signals over the Internet. The Featured Stations list
                                     includes links to stations hand-picked by WindowsMedia.com. You can also use
                                     the links and Search box in the Find More Stations list to scroll through hundreds
                                     of stations, ranging from news and talk to world music and alternative rock. After
                                     you select a station, click the Play link to begin listening. If you like it, click the Add
                                     To My Stations link, as shown below, to add it to your My Stations list, which
                                     appears just below the Featured Stations list after you click the link.




                                 •   Copy To CD Or Device Click this button to begin transferring songs from a CD to
                                     your local disk drive, or to copy songs you’ve already recorded onto a custom CD
                                     or a portable music player. I provide details about this in the section “Creating
                                     Your Own CDs” later in this chapter.

                                 •   Skin Chooser Don’t like the look of Windows Media Player? Change it! By
                                     selecting a skin from the list here (or downloading additional skins from the
                                     Internet), you can completely change the look and feel of Windows Media Player.
                                     After you select a skin from the list, look at the preview to the right of the list, as
                                     shown on the next page. If you like the look, click Apply Skin. To switch between
                                     the full Windows Media Player view and the “skinned” view, use the options on the
                                     View menu. Or use the keyboard shortcuts Ctrl+1 (Full Mode) and Ctrl+2 (Skin
                                     Mode).




                                                            Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 6
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                             Playing Music CDs on Your Computer
                             When you slide a music CD into your computer’s CD drive, Windows Media Player should
                             open and begin playing the CD immediately. If this doesn’t happen, adjust your CD
                             AutoPlay settings so that Windows automatically recognizes the new CD and starts
                             Windows Media Player. If this is the first time you’ve played a music CD, Windows displays
                             the Audio CD dialog box shown here and asks you for instructions.




                                                          Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 7
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                                 Choose Play Audio CD Using Windows Media Player, select Always Do The Selected Action,
                                 and click OK.

                                 If this dialog box doesn’t appear automatically, you can adjust AutoPlay settings for music
                                 CDs by following these steps:

                                     1. Open the My Computer window, right-click the CD drive icon, and choose
                                        Properties.

       Tip                           2. On the AutoPlay tab, choose Music CD from the drop-down list at the top of the
       If you install a music           dialog box.
       playing program other
       than Windows Media
       Player, you have the          3. In the Actions box, click Select An Action To Perform and choose Play Audio CD
       option of setting it as          Using Windows Media Player.
       your preferred player
       for CDs and songs
       that you save in
                                     4. Click OK to save your changes.
       digital format. In the
       AutoPlay Properties       When Windows Media Player opens and begins playing a CD, you see a window.
       dialog box, look for an
       option that refers to
       using that program to
       play music CDs and
       select it.




                                 Figure 1-1. Use these Windows Media Player controls to control playback and view album
                                 information.

                                 The Now Playing button at the top of the Windows Media Player taskbar should be
                                 selected, and your CD drive icon should appear at the top of the playlist. (If it isn’t visible,
                                 use the drop-down list to select the CD drive.) If you’re connected to the Internet, Windows
                                 Media Player automatically downloads the album title and the names of all the tracks on
                                 the CD and displays them for you. The next time you play the same CD, Windows Media
                                 Player finds the saved information and displays it, even if you’re not connected to the
                                 Internet.

                                 Use the playback controls to start, stop, and pause the CD, adjust the volume, and skip
                                 from song to song.


                                                                Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 8
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                             Figure 1-2. These playback controls work just like the ones on the CD player in your home
                             audio system.

                             What do you do when you’re listening to a CD and the phone rings? The Play button
                             becomes a Pause button while Windows Media Player is playing music; click this button to
                             stop the CD playback. When you’re ready to resume listening, click Play to pick up right
                             where you left off. To turn the sound down to a low volume, slide the Volume control to the
                             left. You can also click Mute to silence the speakers temporarily while the CD continues to
                             play. Click Mute again to restore the audio.

                             Don’t like a particular song? Skip right past it by clicking Next. You can also drag the Seek
                             slider left or right to jump to a different part of the song that’s currently playing.

                             Windows Media Player plays all the tracks on your CD, in order, unless you turn on Shuffle
                             or Repeat (or both):

                                 •   Click the Shuffle button (or press Ctrl+H or choose Shuffle from the Play menu).
                                     With Shuffle turned on, Windows Media Player moves through the contents of the
                                     CD in a random order. The order is different each time you play the CD.

                                 •   If you want the current CD to play continuously, choose Repeat by pressing Ctrl+T
                                     or by choosing Repeat from the Play menu.




                             Managing a Digital Music Collection
    Note
    Did Windows Media
    Player start playing     Using Windows Media Player to play your CD collection is all well and good, but it requires
    your CD as soon as       that you keep your CD collection close at hand, and it doesn’t give you the freedom to play
    you inserted it? No      disc jockey. If you want to play two tracks from one CD, another three tracks from a
    problem; you can play
    and copy a CD at the
                             different CD, and two more tracks from yet another CD, you can spend more time flipping
    same time.               CDs and clicking track titles than actually listening to the music. Fortunately, you have an
                             alternative: Use Windows Media Player to copy tracks from your CD collection and store
                             them in digital format on your disk drive, where you can listen to them any time in any
                             order.



                             Copying CDs

                             Using Windows Media Player, you can copy tracks from a music CD and store them on your
                             hard disk—a process sometimes referred to as “ripping” tracks to disk. Later, you can listen
                             to the saved tracks, download them to a portable music player, or create a custom playlist
                             and burn your own CD. To copy one or more CD tracks to your hard disk, insert the music
                             CD into your computer’s CD drive and then choose Copy From CD on the taskbar in
                             Windows Media Player.



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                             Using your Internet connection, Windows Media Player retrieves details about the CD you
                             inserted, including the album title, the name of each track, the performer, and the genre.
                             (If you weren’t connected to the Internet when you inserted the CD, don’t worry. After
    Tip                      making a connection, click Get Names on the Copy From CD screen.)
    The online music
    guide has listings for
    more than half a         By default, Windows Media Player selects all the songs on your CD. If you just want to copy
    million CDs, so your     one or two tracks from the CD (or if you want to skip that one annoying song on an
    CD is probably there.    otherwise wonderful CD), click to clear the check boxes to the left of the songs you don’t
    If the listings are
    incorrect or if
                             want to copy. After you’ve made your selections, click Copy Music to begin copying the
    Windows Media            selected tracks to your local drive. Look at the Copy Status column in the track listings to
    Player doesn’t           see how the task is progressing.
    recognize your CD,
    you’ll see generic
    titles, such as Track
    1. In that case, enter
    details for each song
    (title and artist, in
    particular) manually
    before recording.
    Press Ctrl+A to select
    all the songs in the
    list, right-click, and
    choose Edit from the
    shortcut menu. Use
    the Tab key to jump to
    the next field after
    entering each bit of
    information.




    Tip
    By default, Windows
    Media Player copies
    tracks to the My
    Music folder, which is
    in your personal
    profile. If you share    Figure 1-3. Don’t want to copy one of these tracks from CD? Clear the box to the left of
    your computer with       the song’s title.
    other people and you
    want everyone to
    have access to the       The first time you copy tracks from a CD, Windows Media Player displays the dialog box
    same music               shown on the next page. If you click OK at this point, all your saved tracks will be copy
    collection, choose
    Options from the
                             protected. This makes it difficult to copy them to a portable music player and nearly
    Tools menu, click the    impossible to share with other people. Furthermore, if you ever have to reinstall Windows,
    Copy Music tab, and      you’ll find that your saved tracks will not play back on your new installation, even if it’s the
    click Change under       same computer! To avoid all these hassles, clear the Do Not Protect Content check box
    Copy Music To This
    Location. In the
                             and then click OK.
    Browse For Folder
    dialog box, choose My
    Computer, then
    Shared Documents,
    and finally Shared
    Music. Click OK to
    save your changes.
    You can also use this
    technique if you’re
    running out of room
    on your primary disk
    drive and you want
    your recordings to be
    stored on a secondary
    disk drive that has
    more capacity.

                                                           Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 10
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                             Choosing a Music Format
                             When you copy CD tracks using Windows Media Player, the saved files are stored using the
                             Windows Media Audio (WMA) format at 64 kilobits per second (Kbps). Although Windows
  Note                       Media Player refers to this setting as CD quality, most audio aficionados would disagree.
  Digital music uses
  bits to store              The 64 Kbps setting is efficient, and it sounds good enough on the small speakers that
  information about          most people attach to their computers or the headphones used with a portable audio
  each song. The more        player. However, if your PC audio components are better than average, or if you want to
  bits per second (bps)
  of music, the more
                             burn your recorded tracks to a CD and play it back on a high-quality home audio system,
  information is             you’ll want to increase the quality level. Just keep the tradeoffs of quality versus storage in
  available to play back     mind: Higher bit rates equal higher audio quality, but they also require more room on your
  that song. When you        disk drive.
  reduce the number of
  bits reserved per
  second of music (the       To adjust quality settings for all subsequent recordings, choose Options from the Tools
  bit rate), Windows         menu in Windows Media Player. On the Copy Music tab of the Options dialog box, shown on
  Media Player has to        the next page, move the slider control under Copy Settings—to the right for higher quality,
  throw out some
  information about the      to the left for more efficient storage at the expense of audio quality.
  track to squeeze it
  into the smaller
  space. Let your ears
  help you decide
  whether the tradeoff
  is worth it.




                                                          Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 11
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                             What if you prefer the MP3 audio format? Microsoft’s goal in developing the Windows
                             Media Audio format was to devise a way to store music that sounds great without
                             consuming your entire disk drive. As a result, the WMA format is more efficient than the
                             MP3 format. If you want to use Windows Media Player to record tracks using MP3 format
                             (so you can share them with devices or programs that don’t recognize WMA format), you’ll
                             need to purchase an audio plug-in for this purpose. On the Copy Music tab of the Options
                             dialog box, click MP3 Information to visit a Web site where you can learn more details.

                             Changing Song Title Formats
                             When you rip tracks from a music CD using the default settings in Windows Media Player,
                             the saved tracks appear in your My Music folder. Each artist gets a subfolder, and each
                             album gets a subfolder within the artist’s folder. Each recorded track file is saved using the
                             track number, followed by a space and the song title (which might also include one or more
                             spaces), as downloaded from the Internet. Normally, this level of detail is fine. In fact,
                             additional details about each track are stored within the saved file itself, and you can view
                             these details any time by opening Windows Explorer and looking at the contents of the
                             folder that contains your songs.

                             The contents of subfolders in the My Music folder appear in Tiles view by default. This lets
                             you see the artist and album name beneath the name of each track. If that’s not enough
                             detail, aim the mouse pointer at a track icon and wait for a Screen Tip to appear, with even
                             more details about the track, including the bit rate at which it was recorded.




                                                          Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 12
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                             Figure 1-4. Aim your mouse pointer at any recorded CD track to see additional details
                             about the song and the recorded file.

                             If you share music files with other people who don’t use Windows XP, or if you want your
                             file listings to include more information, you can set up Windows Media Player so that it
                             automatically names your files differently. Follow these steps:

                                 1. Choose Options from the Tools menu and click the Copy Music tab.

                                 2. Click Advanced.

                                 3. In the File Name Options dialog box, shown on the next page, select the check
                                    boxes for the information categories that you want to include in your file names
                                    and clear the other check boxes. Use Move Up and Move Down to change the
                                    order in which the selected pieces of information appear.




                                                         Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 13
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                                 4. If you don’t want spaces in your file names, use the Separator list to choose a
                                    different character (dashes, dots, or underlines) to separate elements of the
                                    name.

     Caution                     5. Use the Preview area to see how the names appear using your new format. When
     When downloading               the results are satisfactory, click OK.
     music to your
     collection, make sure
     you don’t
     inadvertently get
     more than you           Downloading Songs from the Web
     bargained for,
     including viruses and
     Trojan horse            The Web is an amazing source of content, and music is one of its strong suits. With even a
     programs. You should    simple search, you can probably find dozens of sites that allow you to download music that
     be especially
     suspicious of
                             you can integrate into your Media Library. Some of these sources are commercial—for
     underground file-       instance, many online CD sellers provide song files that you can download as a try-before-
     sharing services,       you-buy sample. You can also purchase songs from authorized sources, paying for the
     because no central      rights to download and play the tunes in your collection. Windows Media Player includes a
     authority has the
     responsibility for
                             set of technologies to help you manage these digital rights. Finally, you can exchange
     scanning and            music files directly with other people, either one-on-one or through online file sharing
     checking the files      services.
     available through
     these channels to
     make sure they’re
                             When you click the Media Guide link in the Windows Media Player taskbar, you can go to
     safe. It’s especially   Microsoft’s Web site and search for downloadable songs. The selection, organized
     important to use an     alphabetically by artist, is huge. If you need a digital license to play back the song,
     up-to-date virus        Windows Media Player handles the details for you. (You might need to download and install
     scanner when using
     services such as
                             an updated Windows Media Player component first.) After you fill in a few blanks, you see a
     these.                  dialog box like the one shown here.




                                                         Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 14
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                             In some cases, your license to play the downloaded song is restricted. You might be
                             allowed to play it only on the computer you originally used to download it, for instance, or
                             the license might expire after some period of time (30 days, in the example shown here).
                             What if you purchased a license for a song that allows you to play it only on your own
                             computer and you want to move it to another computer? You can usually move the song
                             (giving up your right to play it on your current computer) by backing up your licenses and
                             then restoring the licenses on the new computer.

                             To see the terms of the license for a given song, open Media Library, right-click the song
                             title, and choose Properties. The information you’re looking for is on the License
                             Information tab:




                                                          Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 15
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                             Try This!

                             If you have any licensed songs on your computer, it’s a good idea to back up your licenses
                             even if you don’t plan to copy the songs to another computer. Backing up the song files
                             themselves does not back up the licenses. Even if you restore the song files, you lose the
                             ability to play back the songs if you can’t restore the licenses, too.

                             To back up all of your media licenses, follow these steps.

                                 1. From the Tools menu in Windows Media Player, choose License Management.

                                 2. In the License Management dialog box, click Browse and then choose a location
                                    for your backup. (I recommend that you use a floppy disk, a Zip disk, or another
                                    type of removable storage for this task.)




                                     Figure 1-5. Use the License Management dialog box to make backup copies of
                                     your digital licenses.

                                 3. Click Backup Now.

                             To restore the licenses to a different computer, repeat these steps, but locate the backup
                             file instead and click Restore Now as the final step.




                                                         Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 16
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                              When you download music files from other online sources, save them in the My Music
                              folder. (Create a new subfolder if you want to keep them separate from your existing files.)
                              To add the new files to your Media Library, open Windows Media Player and choose Search
    Caution                   For Media Files from the Tools menu. To limit the search to the location where you saved
    Your digital rights are   your downloaded files, open the Search On drop-down list and select <User-Selected
    not unlimited. Each
    time you restore a        Search Path>. Then click Browse and choose the appropriate folder from the Browse For
    digital license to a      Folder dialog box.
    new computer,
    Windows Media
    Player sends a unique
    identifier to             Organizing Your Music Collection
    Microsoft’s servers.
    You can restore your
    backed-up licenses to
    four unique               Whenever you add a music file to your collection, either by recording it from a CD or
    computers before          downloading it from the Web, Windows Media Player adds it to your Media Library. This
    being locked out. If      outlined list makes it easy to locate music and video files for playback (or for other uses,
    you reformat your disk    such as copying to a CD). Each album that you record automatically appears in Media
    drive, Windows Media
    Player considers the      Library, categorized by album title, by artist, and by genre. In addition, you can create
    newly formatted drive     custom playlists of your favorite tracks.
    to be different from
    the original computer.
                              To view the contents of your Media Library, click the Media Library link in the Windows
                              Media Player taskbar. This list consists of two panes: on the left is an outline, showing
                              albums, video clips, custom playlists, and radio tuner presets; on the right is a detail pane,
                              which shows the contents of the item that is currently selected in the left pane.

                              A playlist is a customized collection of media files that Windows Media Player can play
                              back in the order you select. Each album listed in Media Library’s left pane is a playlist.
                              When you choose a name from the Artist category, the playlist consists of all tracks from all
                              albums in your Media Library by that artist. Likewise, you can see all tracks in a particular
                              genre by selecting an item from the Genre category.




                              Figure 1-6. The Media Library appears as an outline list, organized by album, artist, and
                              genre.




                                                           Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 17
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                                 You can create custom playlists to combine your favorite tracks, to reorder tracks on a
                                 favorite album, or to mix and match tracks for use in a custom CD. Follow these steps to
                                 create a custom playlist.
      Note
      As you might guess
      from the name, a
                                     1. Click New Playlist at the top of the Media Library window.
      decoder takes the
      output from your DVD           2. In the New Playlist dialog box, enter a descriptive name for your playlist, and then
      drive and translates it           click OK.
      into a format that
      Windows Media
      Player can use to              3. Select one or more tracks from the right pane of the library and drag them to the
      display the pictures              new playlist entry in the left pane.
      and sound on the
      screen. In the early
      days of DVD
      technology, decoders
      were often hardware-
      based cards that you       Playing DVDs
      installed inside your
      computer. Today,
      however, you’ll
      typically get better
                                 Windows Media Player can play back more than music. It can also turn your PC screen into
      results (with a lot less   a personal theater capable of playing movies from DVD disks—but only if you have a DVD
      hassle and expense)        drive and a decoder. If you purchased your PC with a DVD drive and Windows XP already
      from a software            installed, you might already have both of these pieces. If you upgraded an older computer
      decoder that installs
      just like any other
                                 to Windows XP, however, you might need to download and install a software decoder from
      program.                   the Internet. Does your PC have what it takes? For starters, make sure you have a DVD
                                 drive. You can’t always tell just by looking at the drive itself, because CDs and DVDs are
                                 identical in size and shape. To make sure, look for a DVD label on the drive icon in the My
                                 Computer window, or inspect its Properties from the Device Manager window. To find out
                                 whether you have a decoder installed, pop a DVD disk into the drive. If the decoder is
                                 missing, Windows Media Player displays an error message with a link to its DVD
                                 Troubleshooter. Follow this link to locate a list of compatible decoders.

                                 Playing a DVD movie in Windows Media Player is similar to playing a music CD. Your DVD
                                 movie should start playing automatically as soon as you insert the disk. If it doesn’t, start
                                 Windows Media Player, choose DVD Or CD Audio from the Play menu, and choose your
                                 DVD drive from the submenu.




                                 Creating Your Own CDs
                                 If you’ve created a custom playlist from music tracks saved on your computer, you can
                                 burn the songs to a CD using Windows Media Player. Naturally, you need a CD-R or CD-RW
                                 drive that is compatible with Windows XP to do this, and you’ll need a blank CD as well. You
                                 don’t need any additional software or hardware.

                                 Should you use Windows Media Player to make CDs? Although this method is convenient,
                                 it might not be the best choice, especially if you have a third-party CD burning program that
                                 has more capabilities. Ask these questions before you begin burning:

                                     •   Do you want to make an exact copy of a CD? If so, use your third-party software
                                         instead. Using Windows Media Player converts the file twice, first into WMA format
                                         and then back into the format used on music CDs, causing a loss in quality. Most
                                         third-party programs can copy a CD more quickly, without any loss of quality.




                                                              Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 18
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP


                                 •   Do you mind a two-second gap between songs? Windows Media Player
                                     automatically adds this gap between tracks, and this setting cannot be changed.
                                     Most third-party programs allow you to eliminate this gap.

                             To begin creating a CD, select the playlist you want to use and then click Copy To CD Or
                             Device in Windows Media Player’s taskbar. A window like the one below opens. Your
                             playlist appears in the left pane, with all tracks selected. This list also shows the total
                             playing time for the selected tracks. The right pane shows the current content of the CD, if
                             any.




                             Compare the total time figure at the bottom of the left pane with the available time figure
                             at the bottom of the right. If the total time exceeds the available time, the Status column
                             displays the message Will Not Fit for some tracks. Clear the check box to the left of one or
                             more tracks to adjust your selection until all the tracks fit.

                             When you’re ready to copy, click Copy Music in the Copy To CD Or Device window. The CD-
                             burning process might take longer than you expect: Windows Media Player checks the
                             license for each track, converts it to a temporary file (in uncompressed CD Audio format),
                             and then burns the contents of the playlist to your CD.




                                                          Chapter 1: Managing Music (and More) with Windows Media Player 19
Chapter 2:
Picture-Perfect Digital
Photography


     Nothing shows off the amazing capabilities of your PC better than a digital camera. Snap
     all the pictures your memory card can hold. Then plug the camera into your PC and let
     Microsoft Windows XP do its magic. With the help of a handy wizard, you’ll have your
     photos neatly organized in no time, ready for a place of honor on your screen or in a picture
     frame. Now, if you can just remember where you left the lens cap...




     Out of the Camera, Onto the Computer
     Some of the most impressive new features in Windows XP make it easier for you to
     connect your digital camera to your computer so that you can download images and begin
     working with them immediately. For most new cameras, getting your digital pictures out of
     the camera and onto the PC is practically effortless.

     As with any hardware device, you’ll need to set up your camera first. If you’re lucky,
     Windows already includes a driver for your camera, and it installs automatically when you
     first connect the camera to your computer’s USB port and switch on the power. If Windows
     can’t find a suitable driver in its collection, you’ll have to download the correct driver from
     the camera maker’s Web site and supply it when prompted by the Add Hardware Wizard.

     After the correct driver is installed, you’ll find a new icon in the Scanners And Cameras
     folder in My Computer, like the one shown here. Each time you connect the camera to the
     computer, the Scanner And Camera Wizard should start automatically. To start the wizard
     on your own, double-click the camera icon.




                                                         Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 20
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




  Note
  This chapter assumes
  that your camera is
  compatible with
  Windows XP and that        The wizard’s job is to help you copy pictures from your camera to your computer. Here’s
  you’re not using any       how:
  special software that
  came with the
  computer or camera.            1. Click past the Welcome page.
  However, if your
  camera is more than            2. On the Choose Pictures to Copy page, you see thumbnail images of every photo
  two years old, it’s
  possible it won’t be              stored on your camera’s memory card. By default, all images are selected. Adjust
  able to communicate               the selections, if necessary, and click Next.
  with Windows XP, in
  which case you may
  have no choice but to
  use that third-party
  software to manage
  your camera. An even
  better option for
  transferring pictures
  to your computer from
  an older camera is to
  buy an inexpensive
  memory card reader
  that plugs into your
  PC’s universal serial
  bus (USB) port. Pop
  the card out of the
  camera, plug it into
  the reader, and take
  advantage of most of
  the features
  described in this
  chapter.



                                     Figure 2-1. Decide which pictures are keepers; clear the check box for any that
                                     you don’t want to copy to your PC.

                                 3. On the Picture Name And Destination page, enter the name you want to use for all
                                    downloaded pictures (the wizard tacks on a three-digit number—001, 002, and so
  Tip                               on—at the end of each name). Choose the location where you want the photos to
  Should you select the             be copied and click Next.
  Delete Pictures From
  My Device After                4. As the wizard transfers your photos, it displays the dialog box shown on the next
  Copying Them option?
  Only if you’re certain
                                    page. At a glance, you can see a large preview of each image, along with a
  that the pictures can             summary of the file name and location where it will be stored. After the wizard
  be successfully                   finishes copying pictures, click Next.
  transferred to your
  computer. If you’re
  still experimenting
  with your new
  camera, don’t delete
  the pictures until
  you’re sure they’ve
  made it safely across
  the cable.




                                                                              Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 21
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                                 5. On the final page, choose whether you want to publish the pictures to a Web site
                                    (such as MSN Groups), order prints from an online photo site, or just close the
                                    wizard. Click Next to finish.

                             Although the wizard is quick and easy, there’s a faster, smarter way to get your pictures
                             onto your computer without using the wizard at all. You can configure Windows XP so that
                             when you connect the camera, Windows automatically creates a new subfolder in My
                             Pictures, using the current date as the folder name, copies all your pictures to that folder,
                             and deletes them from the camera after the transfer is complete. To set up this hands-free
                             configuration, right-click the camera’s icon in the Scanners And Cameras folder and
                             choose Properties. Click the Events tab and set the options as shown here.




                                                                                Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 22
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP



                               Organizing Your Images
                               The My Pictures folder is one of several system folders that Windows XP uses to store
                               specific types of data files. Your digital camera automatically downloads its pictures into
                               this location unless you specify otherwise, and if you have a photo-editing program, it
                               probably defaults to this location as well when opening and saving files.

                               When you open the My Pictures folder in a Windows Explorer window, you’ll probably notice
                               the Picture Tasks pane, shown below, right away. The list of options varies, depending on
                               the current selection.




    Tip
    Do you have a favorite
    picture that you never
    tire of looking at?
    Then why not use it as
    the background
    image on your
    Windows desktop? In
    the My Pictures
    folder, select the
    image and then, in
    the Picture Tasks list,    In the My Pictures folder, different views offer different perspectives on your digital photo
    click the Set As           collection. For instance, in Filmstrip view, you can select a single image from the list along
    Desktop Background
                               the bottom and see it in a large preview pane at the top of the window. In Details view, you
    option.
                               can still see preview images of each picture. Look at the bottom of the Task pane: the
                               Details pane previews the selected image and provides details about its size, the date on
                               which the photo was taken, and so on.




                               Putting Your Pictures on Paper
                               Digital pictures are great for e-mail, but how do you show them off when you run into a
                               friend at the market or the mall? With an inexpensive color printer and some high-quality
    Tip                        paper, you can turn out good-looking images that are suitable for framing (or for carrying in
    If you’re tired of         your wallet). With the help of a professional photo-finishing service, you can turn high-
    wasting paper on less-     resolution photos into eye-popping museum-quality prints.
    than-perfect prints,
    get in the habit of
    performing a test first.   Printing digital photos on a color printer isn’t that different from printing any document on
    Choose the black-ink       any printer. The unique challenge with color printers, however, is to keep costs down by
    settings for your
    printer and use
                               making the most efficient use possible of expensive color ink and glossy photo-finishing
    ordinary paper             paper. Windows XP can help. When you send a digital photo to your printer, Windows offers
    instead of expensive       a handy wizard that lets you choose exactly which size image you want and squeeze as
    glossy paper. You          many pictures as possible onto that expensive paper.
    won’t want to keep
    the resulting images,
    but you can see at a       To use the Photo Printing Wizard, perform the following steps:
    glance whether the
    cropping you selected          1. Select one or more images from the My Pictures folder and in the Picture Tasks
    is right for your
    images.                           list, click Print This Picture or Print The Selected Pictures. The Photo Printing
                                      Wizard opens.



                                                                                   Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 23
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP


                                 2. Click Next to skip the Welcome page.

                                 3. On the Picture Selection page, use the check boxes above each image to confirm
                                    that you’ve selected the right pictures to print, and then click Next.

                                 4. Use the selections on the Printing Options page to choose a printer. If your color
                                    printer lets you choose from several paper types, click Printing Preferences and
                                    choose the correct one. (In the example shown below, I’ve selected HP Premium
                                    Photo Paper for my Hewlett-Packard color inkjet printer; if you have a different
                                    printer, your options will probably be different.) Click Next to continue.




                                 5. On the Layout Selection page, choose the way you want to arrange your photos on
                                    the printed page. You can take your choice of a wide range of layouts. Click Next to
                                    send the job to your printer.


    Caution
    If you’re particular
    about your photos,
    you’ll want to look
    carefully at the results
    of each layout before
    selecting it. In all but
    a few cases, Windows
    has to crop the
    images you selected—
    that is, trim away a
    part of the top,
    bottom, or sides of
    the image—to make
    them fit in the
    selected layout.
    Before you waste
    paper, check the
    cropping to be sure
    it’s acceptable.


                                     Figure 2-2. Choose the right layout to make sure you use expensive paper and
                                     ink efficiently.



                                                                               Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 24
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP


                              You say your printer turns out less than perfect printed copies? For your very best images,
                              use an online photo-printing service instead. From the My Pictures folder, select one or
                              more images and choose Order Prints Online from the Picture Tasks list to access the
                              Online Print Ordering Wizard, shown below. Follow the instructions to select one of the
                              available photo-finishing firms, choose which sizes you want for your prints, and supply a
                              credit card number. Then all you have to do is wait for your prints to arrive in the mail.




                              E-Mailing Photos to Friends and Family
    Note
    A pixel is a single dot   Today’s digital pictures can capture a staggering amount of data. With 5 megapixels or
    of color in an image. A
    megapixel is a unit of    more of resolution, they even approach the quality of conventional film. The problem with
    measurement that          those super-high-density images, of course, is that the resulting image files are huge! That
    equals 1 million          poses special problems when you want to send a photo to a friend or family member. If you
    pixels. The more          attach the file to an e-mail message, you run the risk that the message will be rejected by
    megapixels your
    camera can capture        one or more mail servers along the line. Not only that, but when the recipients open the
    on each image, the        attached file, they might discover that it’s too large to view comfortably, especially if they’re
    more detail you’ll see.   using an older version of Windows and their system is configured to open images in
    Of course, those high-    Internet Explorer.
    resolution images
    also take up tons of
    disk space, and high-     So how do you shrink the pictures to a manageable size that’s safe for sending?
    resolution cameras
    cost significantly more
    than those that are
                              No problem. Just perform the following steps:
    limited to lower
    resolutions. Make the         1. From the My Pictures window, select the image or images you want to send.
    tradeoffs based on
    your budget and how
    you plan to use your          2. Right-click and choose Mail Recipient from the Send To menu.
    camera.




                                                                                   Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 25
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP


                                   3. In the Send Pictures Via E-Mail dialog box, click Show More Options. This expands
                                      the dialog box so that you see the three choices under Make My Pictures This Size,
                                      as shown below. (To restore the smaller, simpler dialog box, click Show Fewer
                                      Options.)




                                   4. Select the size you want to use for the converted images. When in doubt, choose
                                      the Small option.

                                   5. Click OK. After a brief pause as the files are converted, a blank e-mail message
    Tip                               window opens, with the selected (and now shrunken) images attached.
    Using this technique
    causes some loss of            6. Address the message, add any text to the body of the message, and click Send.
    image quality in the
    shrunken copy. If
    you’re intent on           When you use this trick, your files are converted, if necessary, to JPEG format, shrunk in
    sending the best           size, and compressed. The results can be very impressive. When I used this option on an
    possible copy, use the     original digital image in bitmap format, it went from more than 800 kilobytes (KB) in size to
    Compressed Folder
    feature, found on the      approximately 56 KB, a reduction of more than 90 percent!
    Send To menu, to zip
    the picture or pictures
    and send that zipped
    archive through e-
    mail. You won’t save
    as much space, but
                               Posting Your Pictures on the Web
    the recipient can see
    the full, original image
    with no loss of detail.    When you want to share a collection of photos with a group of people, e-mail is a woefully
                               inefficient distribution mechanism. Instead, post the pictures to a free or inexpensive Web-
                               based service and send a link to that site through e-mail. This technique offers several
                               advantages over the e-mail route: You can use thumbnails to let your audience quickly
                               preview pictures and then download the larger, high-resolution versions of only those
                               they’re really interested in. Your audience can view the pictures from any Web browser,
                               even if they’re away from the computer where they receive e-mail. In most cases, you can
                               restrict access to the Web site to only those persons you select, by using logon credentials
                               and a password to protect the site.




                                                                                  Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 26
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP


                               The Web Publishing Wizard built into Windows XP lets you post pictures directly to either of
                               two Web-based services: MSN Groups (a free service) or XDrive Plus (a paid service). (By
                               the time you read this, additional options might be available.) In either case, you must sign
                               on with a Microsoft Passport to access the account. If you select the MSN Groups option,
                               you can choose to upload your files to a private folder, or you can create a new group and
                               make it visible in the public directory, where others can find it and view it.

                               The wizard’s steps are straightforward. Before uploading the photos, it offers to adjust the
                               sizes of your pictures, as shown on the next page. This process is similar to the wizard you
                               use to shrink and compress images for sending through e-mail.
    Note
    If you’re a skilled
    Webmaster, you can
    also post your images
    to a personal Web site
    that you purchase
    from a Web hosting
    service. You don’t
    have to go to that
    extent, however, if all
    you want to do is
    share pictures with
    other people. The two
    services currently
    available through the
    Web Publishing
    Wizard are simple to
    manage and
    convenient to use. In
    addition, you can find
    a variety of third-party
    alternatives, including
    Shutterfly (http://
    www.shutterfly.com),
    Ofoto (http://
    www.ofoto.com), and
    PictureTrail (http://
    www.picturetrail.com),
    to name just a few. To
    find many more, go to
    a good Internet
    search engine and
    search for free photo
    services.
                               When you’re finished with the Web Publishing Wizard, your photos are available for you at
                               the URL listed on the wizard’s final screen. Using options at this address, you can share the
                               site with other people.


    Tip
    As a general rule,
    resize images to 800
    × 600 resolution for
    posting on the Web. A
    large number of
    Windows users have
    their screens set to
    this resolution, so if
    you choose the larger
    1024 × 768 size,
    they’ll be forced to
    scroll to see the entire
    image.




                                                                                  Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 27
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                             Slide Shows and Screen Savers

    Note                     After you’ve built up a big enough collection of digital photos, you might want the option to
    Don’t mistake this       display those photos on the screen using something other than Windows Explorer. In
    Web Publishing           addition, you might want to create slide shows for special occasions, taking a group of
    Wizard with the tools    images and converting them to a format that you can display one after the other, using the
    you use to send files
    to a Web site created
                             entire screen, without requiring any input from the viewer.
    using Microsoft
    FrontPage or other       For these tasks, Windows offers two useful tools. The first gives you the ability to create a
    professional-quality     slide show on the fly, using a group of pictures you select. To choose this option, open the
    Web site development
    tools. The purpose of    My Pictures folder and select the images you want to use for your slide show. Then, in the
    the Web Publishing       Picture Tasks list, click the View As A Slide Show option. The first image you selected
    Wizard is to help you    appears on the screen, with each additional image following a few seconds after the
    quickly transfer files   previous one. The slide show view is cool because it adds a dramatic black border around
    to and from a
    standard storage         each image, clearing away all the normal Windows screen elements. You can use the VCR-
    location. For more       style controls to start or pause the slide show and to move through the pictures one at a
    intricate Web site       time.
    development tasks,
    you’ll need more
    powerful tools.




                             Figure 2-3. If these play controls aren’t visible in your slide show window, just move the
                             mouse pointer.




                                                                                Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 28
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                               Try This!
    Tip
    Out of the box,
    Windows XP doesn’t         If you have a collection of especially good looking pictures, why not use them as your
    include any way for        screen saver? One of the choices in the list of built-in Windows XP screen savers is called
    you to package a slide
    show and save it for
                               My Pictures Slideshow. Follow these steps to customize it for maximum results:
    other people to view.
    However, a pair of             1. Click Start and then click My Pictures on the right side of the Start menu.
    tools available at
    Microsoft’s Web site
    lets you do this with          2. In your My Pictures folder, click Make A New Folder from the File And Folder Tasks
    ease. Visit http://               list in the left pane. (If this link isn’t available, choose New and then Folder from
    www.microsoft.com/                the File menu.)
    windowsxp/pro/down-
    loads/powertoys.asp
    and download the               3. Give the newly created subfolder a descriptive name, such as My Screen Saver.
    HTML Slide Show
    Wizard or the CD Slide         4. Select the photos you want to appear in your screen saver and move or copy
    Show Generator from
    the collection of
                                      them into the newly created folder.
    PowerToys for
    Windows XP. The                5. Click Start and open Control Panel. Click the Appearance And Themes category
    latter is an especially           and then click Choose A Screen Saver from the Pick A Task list. (If you’re using
    effective way to send
    large collections of              the Classic view of Control Panel, double-click Display and click the Screen Saver
    photos to people who              tab to reach the exact same place.)
    don’t have high-speed
    Internet access. If
    you’re intrigued by
                                   6. On the Screen Saver tab of the Display Properties dialog box, choose My Pictures
    these PowerToys and               Slideshow from the Screen Saver list and then click Settings.
    want to learn more,
    pick up a copy of the          7. In the My Pictures Screen Saver Options dialog box, shown below, select the
    Microsoft Windows XP
    Power Toolkit by
                                      options you want for your screen saver. If you’re not sure what an option does,
    Walter Bruce, Paul                click the question mark icon in the top right corner of the dialog box and then
    Thurrott, and David               click the option to see a pop-up help message.
    Chernicoff (Microsoft
    Press, 2002).
                                   8. Click Browse, select the subfolder you created at the beginning of this procedure,
                                      and click OK.

                                   9. Click OK again to close the My Pictures Screen Saver Options dialog box.

                                   10. In the Display Properties dialog box, adjust the Wait time, if necessary, and then
                                       click OK to save your changes.

                               Now, keep your hands off the keyboard and mouse for a few minutes and wait for your
                               screen saver to kick in. When it does, you’ll see the pictures from your new subfolder, with
                               nifty transition effects and a tasteful black border.




                                                                               Chapter 2: Picture-Perfect Digital Photography 29
Chapter 3: Digital Video:
Making the Camera and
Computer Connection


     This chapter will show you how to connect your digital or analog video camera to your
     computer. It covers several different connection types, as well as the hardware required for
     each one. The chapter also gets you started using Microsoft Movie Maker 2 for Windows
     XP, a video capture and editing software application. You’ll learn how to download digital
     and analog video to your computer and how to capture live video. And you’ll learn how to
     use Movie Maker’s AutoMovie feature to quickly produce a finished movie.




     Connecting Your Camera to Your Computer
     Before you can start editing video with Windows Movie Maker 2 for Windows XP, you have
     to make sure you’re set up with the right hardware.

     Because there is such a wide variety of hardware available, it is impossible to detail every
     possible configuration. The following list describes some of the basic capture devices and
     explains how to connect them to your computer. Depending on the capture device and
     associated hardware you have on your computer, you could use none, one, or several of
     the listed configurations.



     Digital Camera Connected to an IEEE 1394 Card

     To get the best quality from your digital video (DV) camera or mini–DV camera, you should
     have an IEEE 1394 capture card installed on your computer. An IEEE 1394 card is a piece
     of hardware that passes the information from the DV camera to your computer. Because



                              Chapter 3: Digital Video: Making the Camera and Computer Connection 30
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP


                             the data is already in digital form, it can be read and transferred directly to your computer
                             without any processing or conversion. That means you'll enjoy the highest–quality video
                             that is possible with a consumer video camera.




                             Figure 3-1. Connecting a DV camcorder to an IEEE 1394 capture card.



                             DV Camera Connected to an Analog Video Capture Card

                             If you use a DV camera, but don't have an IEEE 1394 card installed on your computer, you
                             can still capture video recorded with your DV camera as long as you have another video
                             capture card installed on your computer. Because the data that is passed to the capture
                             card must be processed before the computer can use it, when you transfer video from a
                             digital device to an analog capture card, there will be some loss in quality.

                             When you connect a DV device to your PC using an analog capture card, there are two
                             main types of input: S-video or composite video. If you have the appropriate connectors
                             and your hardware can use either S-video or composite video, you’ll probably want to use
                             S-video because it delivers higher-quality picture and sound.




                             Figure 3-2. Connecting a DV camcorder to analog composite or S-video inputs.



                             Analog Camcorder Connected to an
                             Analog Video Capture Card

                             Analog camcorders include cameras that record in formats such as 8mm, Hi-8, VHS, and
                             S-VHS. When you transfer video from an analog camera to an analog capture card, you
                             won't be able to achieve the picture quality of a DV camera and an IEEE 1394 capture
                             card. However, with analog devices, you can use the software that came with your capture
                             card to adjust the hue, saturation, brightness, contrast, and sound volume levels of your
                             video.



                                                      Chapter 3: Digital Video: Making the Camera and Computer Connection 31
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                             Figure 3-3. Connecting an analog camcorder to an analog capture card.




                             Figure 3-4. Using separate video and audio connections.



                             Web Camera Connected to Either
                             USB or Analog Video Capture Card

                             The best way to connect a Web camera to your computer will depend on the type of
                             camera you own. While some cameras can connect to any video capture card, others
                             require that you use a specific capture card for the camera to work. The documentation
                             that came with your Web camera will help you determine what kind of capture card you'll
                             need to use.

                             In addition, some Web cameras have a built in microphone, while others do not. If your
                             Web camera does not have a built–in microphone, you will need a separate microphone to
                             capture sound. Plug it into the jack (often labeled Mic) on your computer or sound card. If
                             you do not have a microphone and your Web camera does not have one built in, you will
                             not be able to record sound without another audio recording device, such as a camcorder.




                                                     Chapter 3: Digital Video: Making the Camera and Computer Connection 32
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                             Figure 3-5. Connecting a Web camera.



                             VCR Connected to an Analog Video Capture Card

                             As video capture cards and TV tuner cards become more common, it is becoming easier to
                             use a computer monitor as a TV. If you have cable television, you can attach a coaxial
                             cable from the cable outlet or the cable decoder box to your VCR, and then attach the
    Note                     video and audio connections to your computer: The video out connects to the video in jack
    If both your VCR and     on your video capture card (possibly labeled composite), and the audio jack connects to
    video capture card
    provide S–video          the line in jack of the sound card.
    connections, you can
    connect them with a      If you have home movies on standard VHS tapes, this is one way to import them into Movie
    single S–video cable
    to transmit both video
                             Maker.
    and sound. See the
    documentation
    provided with your
    VCR and capture card
    for more information
    about S-video
    connections. S-video
    provides higher–
    quality pictures and
    sound than composite
    video connections.

                             Figure 3-6. Connecting a VCR to a video capture card.




                                                     Chapter 3: Digital Video: Making the Camera and Computer Connection 33
Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP




                             Downloading Video to Your Computer
                             Once you have your hardware configured, you can capture video and audio to your
                             computer. Using Movie Maker 2 with Windows XP, it's easy to capture video and audio from
                             tape or live action. This article explains how.



                             Capture Video from a Tape in a DV Camera

                             Connect your DV camera to your computer; as discussed earlier, in most cases this
                             requires an IEEE 1394 adapter on your PC and an IEEE 1394 cable to connect your
                             camera. On the camera, set the camera mode to play the recorded video. (This is often
                             labeled VTR or VCR on a DV camera.)

                                 1. Start Movie Maker. To start Movie Maker, click Start, point to All Programs, point to
                                    Accessories, and then click Windows Movie Maker.

                                 2. On the File menu, click Capture Video. Alternatively, in the Movie Tasks pane,
                                    under Capture Video, click Capture From Video Device.

                                 3. On the Video Capture Device page, in Available Devices, click the DV camera.

                                 4. In the Enter A File Name For Your Captured Video box, enter a name for your
                                    captured video file. Then, in the Choose A Place To Save Your Captured Video box,
                                    select the location where you want your video to be saved, or click Browse to
                                    select a location.

                                 5. On the Video Setting page, choose the video setting you want to use for capturing
                                    video and audio.

                                 6. On the Capture Method page, click Capture The Entire Tape Automatically. The
                                    tape in the DV camera will rewind. Capture will begin automatically and ends when
                                    the video tape ends.

                                 7. Select any of the following commands:

                                     •   To separate the video into smaller clips, select the Create Clips When Wizard
                                         Finishes check box.

                                     •   To stop capturing before the end of the video tape, click Stop Capture, and
                                         then click Yes in the resulting dialog box to save the video that has been
                                         captured.

                                 8. To close the Video Capture Wizard, click Finish.

                             The captured content will be imported into a new collection with the same name as the
                             specified video file.




                                                     Chapter 3: Digital Video: Making the Camera and Computer Connection 34
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                             Capture Parts of a Video from a Tape in a DV Camera

                             If you want to capture parts of a video from a tape on your DV camera, rather than the
                             entire video, perform the first five steps in the procedure above, and then the following
                             steps:

                             1. On the Capture Method page, click Capture Parts Of The Tape Manually.

                             2. To separate the video into smaller clips, select the Create Clips When Wizard Finishes
                                check box.

                             3. To prevent audio from playing while capturing video, select the Mute Speakers check
                                box.

                             4. Locate the video and audio you want to capture from your tape by using either the
                                controls on your DV camera or VCR or the DV Camera Controls in the wizard.

                             5. To begin capturing video, click Start Capture. The tape will play automatically and
                                capture will begin.

                             6. When the tape reaches the point at which you want to stop capturing, click Stop
                                Capture. Repeat these steps for each part of the video tape that you want to capture.

                             7. When you have finished capturing, click Finish to close the Video Capture Wizard.

                             The captured content will be imported into a new collection with the same name as the
                             specified video file.



                             Capture Video from Tape in an Analog Camera or VCR

                             Analog video capture is useful when you have older video content, such as VHS tape, and
                             want to convert it to digital. Or you may have an older camcorder that only provides analog
                             outputs, such as composite or S-Video. Performing analog capture requires a hardware
                             device that can take video input from a composite or S-Video signal and convert it to digital
                             data.

                             To capture video from an analog source, connect your analog camera or VCR to your
                             computer's capture device, and then set the camera mode to play recorded video (often
                             labeled VTR or VCR on an analog camera). Start Movie Maker and start the video capture
                             as described in the procedures above.

                             1. On the Video Capture Device page:

                                     •    In Available Devices, click the analog device you want to use to capture video.
                                          In the Video Input Source list, click the input line you want to use.

                                     •    If you want to adjust and configure the video capture device settings, click
                                          Configure.

                                     •    In the Audio Device list, click the audio capture device you want to use, and
                                          then, in Audio Input Source, click the input line you want to use.



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                                     •    To adjust the volume of your captured audio, move the Input Level slider.

                             2. Where prompted, enter a file name for your captured video, and choose a place to
                                save your video. Then select the video setting you want to use for capturing video and
                                audio.

                             3. To separate the video into smaller clips, select the Create Clips When Wizard Finishes
                                check box.

                             4. To prevent audio from playing over your speakers while capturing video, select the
                                Mute Speakers check box.

                             5. Using the controls on your analog camera or VCR, locate the video and audio you want
                                to capture from your tape. In Movie Maker, click Start Capture, and then press the Play
                                button on your analog camera or VCR.

                             6. When the tape reaches the point at which you want to stop capturing, click Stop
                                Capture, and then press the Stop button on your analog camera or VCR. Repeat these
                                steps for each part of the video tape you want to capture.

                             7. When you have finished capturing, click Finish to close the Video Capture Wizard.

                             The captured content will be imported into a new collection with the same name as the
                             specified video file.



                             Capture Live Video

                             When your camera is connected to your computer, you can use Movie Maker to capture
                             video directly to your hard drive without saving the video to tape first. Start by connecting
                             your camera to your computer as described above. Set the mode on your camera to
                             capture live video and audio. (This is often labeled Camera mode.) Start Movie Maker on
                             your computer and begin the video capture as described above. Choose your device and
                             configure device settings as explained above. Enter a file name for your video and choose
                             a place to save your video.

                             1. On the Video Setting page, select the video setting you want to use for capturing video
                                and audio.

                             2. To separate the video into smaller clips after the wizard completes and the video is
                                captured, select the Create Clips When Wizard Finishes check box.

                             3. To prevent audio from playing over your speakers while capturing video, select the
                                Mute Speakers check box.

                             4. To begin capturing, click Start Capture. To stop capturing, click Stop Capture.

                             5. Repeat these steps to capture another segment of live video.

                             6. Click Finish to close the Video Capture Wizard.

                             The captured content will be imported into a new collection.




                                                      Chapter 3: Digital Video: Making the Camera and Computer Connection 36
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                             AutoMovie Makes It Easy
                             Once you have captured video onto your computer, you’re ready to make your own movies.
                             Windows Movie Maker 2 has a new built-in feature called AutoMovie, which does exactly
                             what its name implies: it automatically makes a home movie for you. Now, you can create
                             great home movies with just a few clicks. All you have to do is select the footage, select an
                             audio track, and choose an editing style. AutoMovie does the rest. It analyzes the selected
                             video, pictures, and music, and combines the different elements with transitions and
                             effects to make a movie.

                             Best of all, AutoMovie will create a storyboard and timeline for you, so if there's anything
                             you want to change about your AutoMovie, you can easily do that later.

                             When using AutoMovie, you must first complete the following steps:

                                 •     Select a clip collection or choose multiple individual clips in the Collections pane
                                       or Contents pane.

                                 •     Make sure the clips you chose contain video and/or pictures, as well as at least
                                       one audio clip.

                                 •     Make sure the audio clip is long enough to play for the total duration of all of the
                                       clips you've selected.

                             To use AutoMovie:

                                 1. Select a collection or multiple clips in the Contents pane.

                                 2. On the Tools menu, click AutoMovie.

                                 Or:

                                 1. In the Movie Tasks pane, under Edit Movie, click Make an AutoMovie.

                                 2. In the Select An AutoMovie Editing Style dialog box, click on a style.




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                                     Figure 3-7. Select an editing style.

                                 3. Under More Options, click Enter A Title For The Movie.

                                 4. In the Enter Text For Title dialog box, type the text you want to appear as the title.

                                 5. Under More Options, click Select Audio Or Background Music.




                                     Figure 3-8. Add audio and music files.

                                 6. Under Audio And Music Files, do one of the following:

                                     •   Select an audio or music file from the current list.




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                                     •    Click Browse to import an audio or music file on your hard disk into Windows
                                          Movie Maker 2 to use in your movie.

                                     •    Select None if you do not want any audio or music added to your movie.

                                 7. If your movie will include audio or music, you can do one of the following:

                                     •    To increase the audio level of an audio clip on the Audio/Music track, drag the
                                          slider bar towards Audio/Music.

                                     •    To increase the audio level of the audio on the Audio track that is part of a
                                          video clip, drag the slider bar towards Audio From Video.

                                 8. Click Done, Edit Movie to create the AutoMovie and add the clips to the
                                    storyboard/timeline.

                             The time it takes for the AutoMovie to be processed and added to the storyboard/timeline
                             depends on the duration of the movie, and the size of the audio, video, and picture files.
                             Generally, it will take about 1/3 the time of the overall length of the clips to complete the
                             process.

                             After you create an AutoMovie, you can save it as a movie using the Save Movie Wizard or
                             you can make further edits, just as you would when creating a project and movie on your
                             own in Windows Movie Maker. You can learn how to perform those procedures in
                             Chapter 4, “Creating Your First Movie.”




                                                      Chapter 3: Digital Video: Making the Camera and Computer Connection 39
Chapter 4:
Creating Your First Movie


     Creating a Movie
     Windows Movie Maker 2 makes it easy for just about anyone to make movies on their
     computer. Chapter 3 showed you how to use Movie Maker’s AutoMovie feature to
     automatically generate a movie with an audio track, transitions, and video effects. When
     you use AutoMovie, most of the directorial decisions are made for you.

     But you can also have complete control over your movie, from building the storyboard to
     editing clips, to selecting and adding transitions, effects, titles, music, and narration. This
     chapter will show you how, as well as how to save and share your finished movie.



     Build a Storyboard

     Movie Maker automatically divides your video into segments to make it easier to drag and
     drop the parts you want onto the storyboard where you put your movie together.

     To build a storyboard:

         1. Import video to your PC. You’ll see your clips in the Collections view.

         2. Double click on each clip to see how it looks in the preview window.

         3. Once you’ve decided which ones you want to put in your movie, click and drag the
            clips to the Storyboard in the order in which you’d like them to appear in your final
            movie.




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                                      Figure 4-1. The Storyboard.

                             To rearrange your clips on the storyboard, just drag and drop them to a different location.



                             Edit Your Clips

                             Trim your clips to get exactly the footage you need.

                             To edit clips:

                                 1. In the Timeline view, click on the clip you’d like to trim.

                                 2. In the Preview window, drag the scroll bar slowly and watch as the video
                                    progresses.

                                 3. Stop at the point where you want to trim the clip.

                                 4. On the Clip menu, click Set Start Trim Point.

                                 5. Now continue to drag the progress indicator until you reach the desired end point
                                    of your clip.




                                      Figure 4-2. Editing a clip.

                                 1. On the Clip menu, click Set End Trim Point.

                             You will now have your trimmed clip.

                             After selecting and editing your clips, you’re ready to add other movie features to your
                             timeline. The remaining sections of this chapter will show you how.




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                             Creating Video Transitions
                             With Windows Movie Maker 2 for Windows XP, you can make your home movies look more
                             polished and professional by adding video transitions. A video transition controls the way
                             one clip or picture in your movie moves to the next. You can add a transition between any
                             combination of video clips, pictures, and titles on the timeline or storyboard view.

                             Transitions are stored in the Video Transitions folder in the Collections pane. Windows
                             Movie Maker 2 has over 130 new titles, effects, and transitions. You can control the
                             playback duration of a video transition, but it can't be any longer than the shorter of the
                             two adjacent clips. Select the clip or picture to which you want to transition. Drag it over
                             the clip or picture from which you want to transition on the timeline. A cross–fade is the
                             default transition that is automatically added between the two clips.

                             Any transitions you add appear on the Transition track of the timeline. Expand the Video
                             track to see the Transition track. The video transition length, highlighted in the square, is
                             determined by the amount of overlap between two clips.




                             Figure 4-3. A timeline with an added video transition.




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                             Figure 4-4. A project on the storyboard with a video transition.

                             To add a transition:

                             1. On the storyboard/timeline, select the second of the two video clips or pictures that
                                you want to transition between.

                             2. On the Tools menu, click Video Transitions.

                             Or :

                             1. In the Movie Tasks pane, under Edit Movie, click View Video Transitions.

                             2. In the Contents pane, double click on the video transitions to preview them.

                             3. Select the one you want, click on it, and drag it to the appropriate place on the
                                storyboard or timeline.

                             4. On the Clip menu, click Add To Timeline or Add To Storyboard.

                             You can also add a transition between two clips by going to the Clip menu, clicking Add To
                             Timeline or Add To Storyboard. Or, on the storyboard, you can drag and drop a transition to
                             the video transition cell between two clips.




                             Adding Video Effects
                             Windows Movie Maker 2 for Windows XP makes it easy to add a wide variety of eye–
                             popping effects to your home movies.




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                             A video effect determines how a video clip, picture, or title looks in your final movie. For
                             example, you might have video that would look great if it had a classic, old–time movie
                             look. With Movie Maker, you can add one of the Film Age video effects to give it that old–
                             fashioned look. A video effect is applied for the duration of the video clip, picture, or title.
                             You can add any of the video effects that appear in the Video Effects folder in the
                             Collections pane.

                             Video effects are maintained when you split, cut, copy, or move a video clip or picture. For
                             example, if you add the Grayscale video effect, and then split the clip, the Grayscale video
                             effect is applied to both clips. If you combine two video clips, the video effects that were
                             associated with the first clip are applied to the new combined clip. The video effects that
                             were associated with the second clip are removed.

                             The following illustration shows a project on the timeline with an added video effect. An
                             icon appears on the video clip or picture that you applied the effect to.




                             Figure 4-5. Project on timeline with an added video effect.

                             The following illustration shows a project on the storyboard with an added video effect. An
                             icon, highlighted in the red square, appears in the video effects cell to indicate that a video
                             effect is applied.




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                             Figure 4-6. Project on storyboard with an added video effect.

                             To add video effects to your video clips, pictures, or titles:

                                 1. On the storyboard/timeline, select the video clip, picture, or title that you want to
                                    add the video effect to.

                                 2. On the Tools menu, click Video Effects.

                                 Or:

                                 1. In the Movie Tasks pane, under Edit Movie, click View Video Effects.

                                 2. Double-click the effects to see how they look in the preview window.

                                 3. Drag the effect you want to use onto the clip in the storyboard and place it on top
                                    of the star in the lower left-hand corner of the clip.

                             You can also add an effect by clicking on the effect, then going to the Clip Menu and
                             clicking Add To Timeline or Add To Storyboard.




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                             Adding Titles and Credits
                             Windows Movie Maker 2 for Windows XP includes features that make it easy to add titles
                             and credits to your movies. You can add any text that you'd like, including the title of your
                             movie, your name, the date, and the names of the actors. You can also place the titles
                             anywhere you want—at the beginning or end of a movie, before or after a clip, or even
                             overlaying a clip. You can also specify the length of time that the title will appear.




                             Figure 4-7. A project with a title that displays before a video clip.




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                             Figure 4-8. A project with displays as an overlay title over a video clip.




                             Figure 4-9. A project with credits that appear at the end of the project.




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                             Choosing the Title Animation

                             With title animation effects, you can control the way titles play back in your movies. For
                             example, the Typewriter title animation displays title text one character at a time.

                             Windows Movie Maker includes three categories of title animations:

                                   •   Titles, One Line As the name suggests, the title animations in this category are
                                       best suited for titles that contain a single line of text. When you select a title
                                       animation from this category, the text area for entering the title appears as one
                                       large text box. The text you enter then appears all at once in your movie, even if
                                       your title actually runs to more than one line of text.

                                   •   Titles, Two Lines The title animations in this category work best for titles that
                                       contain two or more lines of text. When you pick a title animation in this category,
                                       you'll see two areas for entering text. The first line of text you enter appears first
                                       and then the second line of text appears shortly after the first line of text is
                                       displayed.

                                   •   Credits Movie Maker also makes it easy to add credits to your home movies.
                                       When a title animation is selected in this category, the text area for entering the
                                       credits appears as a small grid. Use the top row to enter the title of your movie.
                                       The rows below provide two columns where you can enter information about your
                                       movie. You can use the first column for entering titles such as director and
                                       scriptwriter, and the second column to enter their names, for example.

                             For each category, if the title will appear as an overlay, you'll see the notation (overlay) at
                             the end of the title animation description.



                             Entering Titles and Credits

                             Here’s how to use title and credit features of Windows Movie Maker 2:

                             1. On the Tools menu, click Titles And Credits.

                             Or:

                             1. In the Movie Tasks pane, under Edit Movie, click Make Titles Or Credits.

                             2. On the Where Do You Want To Add A Title? page, click a link that corresponds to the
                                place where you want to add the title.

                             3. In the Enter Text For Title page, type the text you want to appear as the title.

                             4. Click Change The Title Animation, and then on the Choose The Title Animation page,
                                select a title animation from the list.

                             5. Click Change The Text And Font Color, and then on the Select Title Font And Color
                                page, choose the font, font color, formatting, background color, transparency, font
                                size, and position of the title.

                             6. Click Done, Add Title To Movie to add the title to your movie.


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Using Digital Media in Microsoft Windows XP



                             Adding Music
                             Adding a soundtrack is a great way to enhance the meaning and excitement of the movies
                             you create. With Windows Movie Maker 2 for Windows XP, it's easy to add favorite songs,
                             evocative mood music, or any other audio you'd like to include as part of a soundtrack.

                             Once you’ve assembled the elements of your home movie on the storyboard, you’re ready
                             to add music. Here's how:

                             1. In the Tasks Pane, click Import Audio Or Music (or click on File menu, then Import Into
                                Collections)

                             2. Your My Music folder will open. Navigate to the song that you want and click on it, then
                                click the Import button in the lower right-hand corner. This will bring your music clip
                                into your collection.

                             3. Click on the Show Timeline button above the storyboard, or use the View drop-down
                                menu and click on Timeline

                             4. Drag the audio file down to the Audio/Music track

                             5. You can move the audio clip left to right to coincide with a particular video clip. And if
                                the music is too long for your video, you can trim it. Simply scroll along the Timeline all
                                the way to the right, so you can see the end of the audio clip. Move the cursor onto the
                                end of the song, and a red double arrow will appear. Drag the clip to the left as far as
                                you want to create the end point of the music.




                                 Figure 4-10. Adjusting the audio.




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                             You can adjust the volume of the music you add in relationship to and the volume of the
                             audio on the video clip. For example, or you can turn the audio track on the video clip all
                             the way down so that only the music is heard, or adjust the levels so that both are audible.

                             To adjust the volume of an audio clip:

                             1. On the Audio or Audio/Music track of the timeline, select the audio clip that you want
                                to adjust the volume for.

                             2. On the Clip menu, point to Audio, and then click Volume.

                             3. To adjust the volume, do one of the following:

                                 •   To reduce the volume, move the Audio Volume Level slider to the left.

                                 •   To increase the volume, move the Audio Volume Level slider to the right.

                                 •   To mute the clip, select the Mute Clip check box.

                                 •   To reset the volume to the original volume, click Reset.

                             To adjust the volume of an audio clip relative to the audio from the video clip:

                             1. Just above the Timeline view, click on the Volume icon on the left.

                             2. A slider will appear, and you can drag it left or right, depending on whether you want
                                the audio from the video to be more prominent or the music to be more prominent.




                                 Figure 4-11. Setting audio levels.




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                             Adding Narration
                             With Windows Movie Maker 2 for Windows XP, you can easily add a voice-over to your
                             home movies. Adding narration lets you use your own words and voice to describe the
                             scene that viewers are seeing.

                             To add voice narration to your movie, you need a microphone installed on your PC.

                             Once you’ve assembled the elements of your home movie on the storyboard, you are ready
                             to start your narration:

                             1. On the View menu, click Timeline (or click Show Timeline in the Storyboard section).

                             2. Move the playback indicator on the timeline, which appears as a square with a vertical
                                line, to a point on the timeline where the Audio/Music track is empty and where you
                                want to begin your audio narration.

                             3. Click on the microphone icon above the timeline, or go to Tools menu and select
                                Narrate Timeline.

                             4. To see more options, click Show More Options, and do the following:

                                 •   If you have added other audio clips to the Audio/Music track and you do not want
                                     the other clips to shift on the timeline, select the Limit Narration To Available Free
                                     Space On Audio/Music Track check box.

                                 •   In the Audio Device list, click the audio capture device you want to use. Then, in
                                     Audio Input Source, click the line that you want to use.

                                 •   To adjust the volume of your captured audio, move the Input Level slider to the
                                     level you prefer.




                                     Figure 4-12: Adding narration.

                                 •   Select the Mute Speakers check box to prevent the audio from a video clip on the
                                     timeline from playing back over your speakers while you are narrating the timeline.
                                     This keeps unwanted audio from being captured in your narration.

                             5. Click Start Narration and begin narrating the content on the timeline.

                             6. Do one of the following:

                                 •   If the Limit Narration To Available Free Space On Audio/Music Track check box is
                                     selected, narrate the timeline until the time limit expires.




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                                 •   If the Limit Narration To Available Free Space On Audio/Music Track check box is
                                     cleared, click Stop Narration after you have finished narrating the contents on the
                                     timeline.

                             7. In the File Name box, type a name for your captured audio narration, and then click
                                Save.

                             The audio narration you captured is imported automatically into the current collection and
                             the narration is added automatically to the point on the Audio/Music track where the
                             narration was first started.




                             Saving and Sharing Movies
                             Once you've finished editing, added all the effects, and inserted titles and credits, the Save
                             Movie Wizard in Windows Movie Maker 2 for Windows XP makes it easy to save your
                             project as a final movie. Timing, layout, and content are all saved as one complete movie.
                             You can save and store the movie on your computer or on a recordable CD. You can send it
                             as an attachment in an e–mail message. Or upload it to a video hosting provider on the
                             Web. You can also choose to record your movie on a tape in a digital video camera. Keep
                             in mind that when you save your movie, you must decide how to balance quality against file
                             size: the better the quality, the larger the resulting file size.

                             Options offered by the Save Movie Wizard include:

                                 •   My Computer Choose this option when you want to store your finished movie on
                                     your PC. You’ll be able to play it back on your computer using Windows Media
                                     Player.




                                     Figure 4-13. Save a Movie Wizard.

                                 •   Recordable CD Use this option to save your movie to a CD–ROM so your friends
                                     and family can view it on their own computers. To save movies to a CD, you must
                                     have a rewriteable or recordable CD drive attached to your computer.

                                 •   E–mail If your movie is short, you may want to send it directly in e–mail. This
                                     option will save your movie as an e–mail attachment. You’ll probably want to
                                     select a lower bit rate (for example 56 kbps) in order to keep the file size down.




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                                 •   The Web You can post your movie to a Web hosting provider directly through
                                     Windows Movie Maker 2. If you don't already have an account at a video hosting
                                     provider, Movie Maker will walk you through the steps necessary to sign up with
                                     one of two providers that currently offer free trial accounts. Once your movies are
                                     posted, simply send a Web address to friends and family.

                                 •   DV camera You can also save your finished movie back to the tape in your digital
                                     video camera when connected through a FireWire cable. This option enables you
                                     to view your movie on a television (when you connect the camera to a TV).




                             Send a Movie in E-mail
                             E–mail can be a great way to share your movies with friends and family. Windows Movie
                             Maker 2 for Windows XP makes it easy to do that by automatically sending a movie as an
                             attachment to an e–mail message in your default e–mail program.

                             When you save a movie to send in an e–mail message, it usually takes less time to save it
                             than when you choose other saving options. That's because Movie Maker automatically
                             chooses the best movie setting based on the length of your movie. Often, you will need to
                             restrict the movie file size because of the size limits some e–mail providers set for
                             attachments by (for example the largest attachment you can send using Hotmail is 1MB).

                             Here's how you can save your movie to send as an e–mail attachment:

                             1. On the File menu, click Save Movie File, and then click E–mail.




                             Figure 4-14. Save Movie Wizard window – Saving Movie.




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                             Or:

                             1. In the Movie Tasks pane, under Finish Movie, click Send In E–Mail.

                             2. After the movie is saved, do any of the following:

                                   •   To play the movie in your default player before sending it, click Play The Movie.




Note
If you cannot attach
your movie to an e–
mail message
automatically using                Figure 4-15. Save Movie Wizard – Ready to Send By E–mail.
Movie Maker, you can
still send it by saving
it to your computer,               •   To save a local copy of the movie on your computer in addition to sending as an
and then manually                      e–mail attachment, click Save A Copy Of My Movie On My Computer, enter a
attaching it to a                      movie file name in the File Name box, and then click Save.
message in your e–
mail program.
                             3. In your default e–mail program, enter the e–mail address of the person you are
                                sending the movie to, add any additional text to the body, and then send the message.




                                                                                            Chapter 4: Creating Your First Movie 54
Chapter 5:
Editing Your Videos


     We have already covered the steps you take when editing your videos in Movie
     Maker. In this chapter, we’ll discuss the reasons you might choose to make edits to
     your video footage.

     When you first consider video editing, you may think of it mostly as a way to correct
     mistakes; to cut out the 10 minutes of video you shot when you accidentally left the
     camcorder running inside your camera bag, for example. You may also see editing as
     a way to shorten a video; to trim two hours of vacation footage down to a more
     manageable 30 minutes.

     When you actually sit down and start to edit, however, you’ll quickly recognize other
     possibilities.

     Editing enables you to create a story, to turn disconnected shots into a great home
     movie that has real meaning. The truth is, movies are made in the editing room.
     When you sit at the computer with Windows Movie Maker and begin to pull apart the
     pieces and move them around, new possibilities arise. You'll notice, for example, that
     following a close–up shot of the kids smiling with a shot of the sunset over the ocean
     has a completely different feel than a following shot of the kids at the airport. You
     see that it can be jarring to cut directly from one shot of a person running to a
     different shot of the same person running taken a few moments later.




     The Importance of Editing: Telling a Story
     Editing is really the art of telling a story. Even if you’re just using Windows Movie
     Maker to cut time out of the video you shot at your kid’s soccer game, you are still
     making editorial decisions about how you want to tell a story. The soccer game is
     reality. As soon as you start videotaping, you make editorial decisions and alter that
     reality. The location you shoot from, whether to zoom in or zoom out, whether to



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                             move the camera with the ball or stay with a group of players—these are all decisions
                             that shape the story you tell. You must also consider your audience. You may shoot
                             the video differently if it's for the end–of–season team party than you would if it is for
                             the grandparents to see.

                             If you take the raw video you shot of the game and edit it further in Movie Maker, you
                             can fine–tune the story: cutting out the boring parts, the bad angles, the parts where
                             the other team scores. When you edit, you have complete control over what the
                             audience sees and experiences, and ultimately what the audience thinks and feels.
                             You can create stories that educate, that promote teamwork, that bring people
                             together and change lives. If the purpose of the video is team training, you can focus
                             on good plays and mistakes, and remove shots of the audience and the post–game
                             celebration. If you’re making the video for the team party, you can select just the
                             highlights—the great plays, the goals scored, and the team members cheering and
                             smiling. You can also add music that further enhances the feelings that you want to
                             convey.



                             Home Movies as Art

                             Editing does more than enhance the use of a camera, like adding lights and a tripod.
                             Editing enables you to turn a simple camcorder into a moviemaking device. It can
                             dramatically change the way you think about using a video camera, and it has the
                             potential to change the way you communicate. Instead of writing a letter or making a
                             phone call, why not make a movie and share it with the world?

                             By planning before you shoot and edit, and using the same approach that
                             professionals use, your movie will be more than just a record of things or events. You
                             can create a story that touches people's lives.



                             The Storytelling Power of Windows Movie Maker

                             An editing tool opens up a new world of possibilities. That is what Windows Movie
                             Maker is all about. With Windows XP and Movie Maker, you can easily capture video
                             from a tape to a file on your computer. Movie Maker then automatically divides the
                             video into clips that you can arrange in any order. A clip, roughly speaking, is a
                             section of the video that has similar visual content: a shot out the window driving as
                             you head to the shore for vacation, a shot of the kids playing on the beach, a shot of
                             the kids in the water, and so forth. You can remove clips, copy them, and change
                             where a clip starts and ends. By enabling you to select and order the clips, then
                             adjust their timing, Movie Maker gives you the means to turn a series of
                             disconnected shots into a story.

                             From Raw Footage to an Edited Tape

                             With Movie Maker, you can think of a piece of video as being edited or unedited. The
                             tape that comes out of your camera is unedited raw footage. With Movie Maker, you
                             can take that raw footage and create an edited tape called the master. But just
                             because a video has been edited doesn’t mean it is a finished movie. You can, for
                             example, edit some disconnected shots together to see what they look like, or you
                             might decide to edit together a short sequence of shots to make sure you have shot
                             enough coverage.




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                             Editing together a series of disconnected shots definitely has value. For example, you
                             can trim a 1–hour video of a swim meet down to an essential 20 minutes by cutting
                             out everything but the events that include the swimmers you are interested in. An
                             edited piece like this would be very useful for showing to the team. In a classroom
                             situation, the video becomes support media for the speaker. The edited video
                             doesn’t have to be a complete story because the instructor is there to narrate and
                             control playback. She can replay selected pieces, freezing and slowing down sections
                             as needed to answer questions or illustrate particular points. In this case, the story is
                             not in the video, but is provided by the instructor in real time.

                             You can also edit different versions of the same video for different audiences. A team
                             training video might only include shots of swimmers competing in individual events,
                             while a video for the team’s awards dinner might include shots of swimmers
                             receiving their medals. All of the raw footage came from the same swim meet, but
                             Movie Maker gives you the tools to put the pieces together in different ways for
                             different reasons.

                             Turning Tape into Stories

                             To go a step further and create a movie that has a point of view and tells a story, you
                             don't need extra tools or a bigger computer. All you need is a camera, Movie Maker,
                             an idea for a story, a plan for how to execute the idea, and the drive to follow it
                             through. Movie Maker gives you the power to be a storyteller.

                             Editing is all about creating your own reality by giving you the power to make choices.
                             It's one thing to shoot a 30–minute wedding scene and play it back in its entirety
                             from beginning to end. But when you start to use editing tools to create your own
                             reality, you can begin to insert your own vision. You do that by showing the viewer
                             what you want them to see, in the order you want them to see it. If that 30–minute
                             wedding scene included a power outage, you probably have great raw footage of the
                             guests reacting to the unexpected interruption. As an editor, you have a choice. If
                             your vision is to show how perfect the wedding was, you'll probably edit out that
                             footage. If, on the other hand, you're putting together a blooper reel of the wedding,
                             this might be the first thing you show.

                             As editor, you can choose your own take on an event, and then spin it any way you
                             want. You can smooth out a rough wedding or give a face–lift to a bad vacation. You
                             can change how the viewer feels about a subject. With a camcorder and Movie
                             Maker, you have all of the tools you need to influence public opinion, or promote a
                             cause, or simply make people smile.




                             Auto-Editing and Manual Editing
                             Windows Movie Maker 2 for Windows XP was created to provide you with easy–to–
                             use tools for turning your video clips and collections of video clips into movies. To
                             make the movie–creation process even easier, Movie Maker 2 includes an
                             AutoMovie tool, which will automatically transform a collection of video clips into a
                             movie. And while manual editing provides greater flexibility and greater control, if you
                             are in a hurry or want a new approach to assembling a movie, AutoMovie provides a
                             great alternative. To learn how to use AutoMovie, see Chapter 3 - Digital Video:
                             Making the Camera and Computer Connection.




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                             Editing Clips

                             A clip is a smaller segment of a larger video file. Movie Maker provides several
                             options for editing clips.

                                 •   Splitting a clip. You can split a video clip into two clips. This is useful if you
                                     want to insert either a picture or a video transition in the middle of a clip.
                                     You can split a clip that appears on the storyboard/timeline of a current
                                     project, or you can split the clip in the Contents pane.

                                 •   Combining clips. You can combine two or more contiguous video clips.
                                     Contiguous means the clips were captured consecutively so that the end of
                                     one clip is immediately followed by the beginning of the next. Combining
                                     clips is useful if you have several short clips and want to view them as one
                                     clip on the storyboard/timeline. You can combine contiguous clips in the
                                     Contents pane or on the storyboard/timeline.

                                 •   Trimming a clip. You can hide the parts of a clip that you do not want to
                                     appear in your project. Trimming does not remove the information from the
                                     source material; you can restore the clip to its original length at any time.
                                     Clips can only be trimmed after they have been added to the storyboard/
                                     timeline. You cannot trim clips in the Contents pane. To trim a clip, drag the
                                     trim handles to remove the unwanted portions of the clip.




                                     Figure 5-1. Drag the trim handles to remove the unwanted portions of the
                                     clip.


                                 •   Creating Clips. You can also create clips from any video any time after it
                                     has been imported or captured in Movie Maker. By separating longer pieces
                                     of video into smaller clips, you will make it easier to find a specific shot to
                                     use in your movie.




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                             Creating Clips
                             To make it easier for you to manage and edit video clips, Windows Movie Maker 2 for
                             Windows XP divides the video you import to your PC into discrete segments.

                             Clips are automatically created if you have selected the Create Clips For Video Files
                             check box when you import a video file into Windows Movie Maker 2. If the check box
                             is not selected, the video is imported as a single continuous clip, rather than a series
                             of shorter clips. You can use Movie Maker's clip detection feature later to divide a
                             video file into smaller, more manageable clips.

                             Clips are created in a number of different ways, depending on the video file and video
                             source.

                                 •    Video from a digital video camera. If you capture video from a digital video
                                      (DV) camera that is connected to an IEEE 1394 port, clips are created based
                                      on the time stamp inserted in the video by the DV camera. If there is no time
                                      stamp, a new clip is generated whenever there is a significant change in one
                                      frame of the video compared to frame that follows.

                                      If you import a DV-AVI file that is time stamped, the file is separated into
                                      clips according to the time stamp information.

                                 •    Capturing video from an analog video camera or Web camera. If you
                                      capture video from an analog camera or Web camera, a clip is created when
                                      there is a significant frame change. This method is used for both live and
                                      recorded content from an analog source. The length of clips is also based in
                                      part on the duration of the entire video file: Longer video files will have clips
                                      that are generally longer in duration than those created when clip detection
                                      is used on a shorter video file.

                                 •    Windows Media files. If you import a Windows Media file with an .asf or
                                      .wmv file name extension that includes file markers, a clip is created for
                                      each marker. If there are no markers—or only one marker—clips are
                                      generated based on significant frame changes.

                             The time it takes to detect clips in a video file increases as the length of the video file
                             increases. If you click Cancel while clip detection is occurring, the process stops at
                             that point in the video file. The clips that have been detected are segmented out. The
                             final clip includes all of the video in the file that remained when clip detection was
                             cancelled. You can resume clip detection for this part of the file at any time.




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