Isaac Asimov's Aurora by P-Ibooks

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The Third Law of Robotics states that a robot must protect its own existence, as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws. In MIRAGE and CHIMERA, Mark W. Tiedemann explored the fear and hatred toward robots - and their offworld owners - held by the people of Earth, and the animosity toward Terrans expressed by all Spacers. Now, all the plot threads of Tiedemann's epic story come together in this exciting conclusion to Isaac Asimov's Robot Mysteries cycle. After the diplomatic failures of the Spacer mission on Earth - which began with the assassinations of key diplomats and politicians, and culminated with the uncovering of a vast plot to create cyborgs from terminally-handicapped human infants - Ambassador Ariel Burgess and roboticist Derec Avery are recalled to their home planet, Aurora. Unfortunately, their situation only worsens when they arrive, as they become suspects in yet another murder - one that, based on the evidence, could only have been committed by a non-human. On a world with a 20-to-1 robot-to-human population, is it possible a robot could have violated the Three Laws governing its behavior - and if so, why? Or is something far more sinister at work...?

More Info
									Isaac Asimov's Aurora
Author: Mark W. Tiedemann
Other: Isaac Asimov
Description

The Third Law of Robotics states that a robot must protect its own existence, as long as such protection
does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.

In MIRAGE and CHIMERA, Mark W. Tiedemann explored the fear and hatred toward robots - and their
offworld owners - held by the people of Earth, and the animosity toward Terrans expressed by all
Spacers. Now, all the plot threads of Tiedemann's epic story come together in this exciting conclusion to
Isaac Asimov's Robot Mysteries cycle.

After the diplomatic failures of the Spacer mission on Earth - which began with the assassinations of key
diplomats and politicians, and culminated with the uncovering of a vast plot to create cyborgs from
terminally-handicapped human infants - Ambassador Ariel Burgess and roboticist Derec Avery are
recalled to their home planet, Aurora. Unfortunately, their situation only worsens when they arrive, as they
become suspects in yet another murder - one that, based on the evidence, could only have been
committed by a non-human.

On a world with a 20-to-1 robot-to-human population, is it possible a robot could have violated the Three
Laws governing its behavior - and if so, why? Or is something far more sinister at work...?
rk...?

								
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