; The Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES) guidelines
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

The Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES) guidelines

VIEWS: 1,574 PAGES: 3

The Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES) guidelines

More Info
  • pg 1
									      The Modified Falls
      Efficacy Scale (MFES)
      guidelines




                                                            Working together to prevent falls

Guidelines developed by: National Ageing Research Institute and North West Hospital Falls Clinic
A one-page form, consisting of 14 questions each related to a particular activity (eg getting dressed,
taking a bath, crossing roads etc). Unlike the original Falls Efficacy Scale (developed by Tinetti et al,
1990), this scale includes a broader range of indoor and outdoor activities. The questions aim to
determine how confidently seniors feel they are able to undertake each activity on a scale of 0 (not
confident at all) to 10 (completely confident).

An evaluation of the MFES was reported in: Hill, K., J. Schwarz, et al (1996). Fear of falling
revisited. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 77: 1025-1029. These preliminary
findings indicated that the MFES was both a reliable and valid measure of falls self-efficacy.
                                                                                       (Downloadable)


                                           ---✻✻✻✻✻✻✻✻✻✻✻---

In 2005 the Department of Human Services funded the National Ageing Research Institute to review and
recommend a set of falls prevention resources for general use. The materials used as the basis for this
generic resource were developed by the National Ageing Research Institute and the North West Hospital Falls
Clinic, Parkville (adapted from Tinetti et al., 1990). This and other falls prevention resources are available
from the department’s Aged Care website at: http://www.health.vic.gov.au/agedcare.




Department of Human Services
                                                          Working together to prevent falls

               MODIFIED FALLS EFFICACY SCALE (MFES)
                                          GUIDELINES

The guidelines aim to provide users with information to conduct and interpret the results obtained by
the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale. This information has been taken from the Manual for clinical
outcome measurement in adult neurological physiotherapy (2nd edition, available from the Australian
Physiotherapy Association).


Type of measure:
Self report measure of falls efficacy, also commonly called fear of falling. Modification of original 10
item Falls Efficacy Scale (Tinetti et al, 1990).


Equipment required: 14 item questionnaire


Time required to perform test: Varies, 5 – 15 minutes

Test procedure:
Has been reported as interviewer administered questionnaire (Hill et al, 1996). Subject is asked to rate
their confidence in performing each of 14 activities without falling on a 0 – 10 scale. An overall score
is calculated by averaging the scores for all items which were rated (ie – score out of 10).

Normative scores:
Average score of 9.8 (range 9.2 – 10) for sample of healthy women (mean age 74.1 years, sd 4.0)
(Hill et al, 1999)

Reliability:
•   High retest reliability in older sample of fallers and non-fallers (ICC=0.95) (Hill et al, 1996).

Validity:
•   Significantly lower MFES score in female stroke subjects who had returned home and were
    community ambulant (mean score 7.4, sd 1.1), compared to age matched controls (Hill, 1998).
•   Significantly lower MFES score in female Parkinson’s disease subjects who were community
    ambulant (mean score 7.2, sd 1.5), compared to age matched controls (Hill, 1998).
•   Significantly lower MFES score in people with polio compared to aged and gender matched
    controls (Hill and Stinson, 2004).
•   Improved MFES in high falls risk older women who wore hip protectors (Cameron et al, 2000).
Strengths and limitations:
•    appears sensitive to mild levels of loss of confidence
•    needs further validation in neurological samples

References:
1. Cameron I, Stafford B, Cumming R, Birks C, Kurrle S, Lockwood K, et al. Hip protectors improve
     falls self-efficacy. Age and Ageing 2000; 29: 57-62.
2. Hill K, Schwarz J, Kalogeropoulos A, Gibson S. Fear of falling revisited. Archives of Physical
     Medicine and Rehabilitation 1996; 77:1025-1029.
3. Hill K. Studies of balance in older people. [PhD]. The University of Melbourne, 1998.
4. Hill K, Schwarz J, et al. Falls among healthy community dwelling older women: A prospective
     study of frequency, circumstances, consequences and prediction accuracy. Australian and New
     Zealand Journal of Public Health 1999; 23:41-8.
5. Hill KD, Stinson AT. A pilot study of falls, fear of falling, activity levels and fall prevention
     actions in older people with polio. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research 2004; 16: 126-31.
6. Tinetti M, Richman D, Powell L. Falls efficacy as a measure of fear of falling. Journal of
     Gerontology 1990; 45: P239-43.




In 2005 the Department of Human Services funded the National Ageing Research Institute to review and recommend a set of falls
prevention resources for general use. The materials used as the basis for this generic resource were developed by the National Ageing
Research Institute and the North West Hospital Falls Clinic, Parkville (adapted from Tinetti et al., 1990). This and other falls prevention
resources are available from the department’s Aged Care website at: http://www.health.vic.gov.au/agedcare.

								
To top