Plant Growth _ Development - PowerPoint by chenshu

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									                                    Photo courtesy WFP


Plant Growth & Development
  Initial Use Training for WA LASER
        prepared and presented by Mary Moore
         Goals for Plant Growth &
         Development: Concepts
•   Many plants follow a life cycle
    that begins with growth from a
    seed and proceeds through the
    production of seeds.
•   Plants have distinct stages in
    their life cycle.
•   To live and grow plants need
    light, water, and nutrients from
    the soil.
•   Flowering plants must be
    pollinated in order to produce
    seeds.
•   Many plants are pollinated by
    bees.
•   A flowers pollen sticks to a bee,
    but some rubs off when the bee
    feeds at other flowers.
•   One seed produces one plant;
    one plant can produce many
    seeds.
         Goals for Plant Growth &
           Development: Skills
•   Planting and caring for Brassica
    plants.
•   Observing, describing, and
    recording changes in plants.
•   Comparing and discussing
    changes occurring in plants over
    time.
•   Measuring and recording the
    growth of plants.
•   Using graphs to display and
    compare growth patterns.
•   Predicting future growth from
    observations and measurements.
•   Reading to learn more about
    plants.
•   Communicating results and
    reflecting on experiences through
    writing, drawing, and discussion.
      Goals for Plant Growth &
      Development: Attitudes
• Developing interest in
  studying the life cycle
  of plants.
• Developing sensitivity
  to the needs of plants.
• Developing an
  awareness of the
  interaction between
  plants and animals.
      What Is Inside a Seed?




Students observe how the bean seed has changed
after being soaked in water overnight. Students record
their observations, open the bean seed and observe
the inside, and draw and label the parts of a bean seed.
Graphic courtesy WFP
                      Day 0
Each seed contains a
tiny, new plant, called
an embryo. The
outside of the seed is
called the seed coat.
A seed can remain
dormant (sleeping)
for years, as long as
it stays dry and cool.

                              Photo courtesy WFP
          Planting the Seeds




Students collect and
organize their own
materials for planting.
Students set up their
planters with wicks,
fertilizer, potting mix
and seeds.
Planting the Seeds - continued




Students pick up the tiny
Brassica seeds with a damp
toothpick and place them in
the soil. Students write their
names on plant markers
and insert them into the soil
near the edge of the quad.
                 Day 1 - 2




                        Photos courtesy WFP

A day or two after planting and watering, the tiny
seed germinates. During germination, the seed
takes up water and swells until its seed coat
cracks. The embryonic root emerges first, followed
by the stem and two cotyledons (seed leaves).
                Day 2 - 3




                     Photo courtesy WFP

The stem pushes through the soil, pulling the
cotyledons along with it. No longer needed, the
seed coat drops from the cotyledons to the soil.
          Day 4 or 5




                         Photo courtesy WFP


The stem elongates as the plant
reaches upward for light. Students
discuss the purpose of thinning and
transplanting and learn how to carry
out these two tasks.
                     Day 5, 6, 7, or 8




Photo courtesy WFP

          The true leaves emerge once the plant has
          used up the energy stored in the
          cotyledons. Students learn how to measure
          their plants to the nearest centimeter.
          Students begin keeping records of their
          plant growth on a bar graph
              Day 7, 8, or 9




                   Photos courtesy WFP

Stems elongate at the internodes, which is the space
between the nodes (where the leaves attach).
Students observe two major developments: the true
leaves and the flower buds. Students record their
observations in their notebooks and review the life
cycle of a plant through this stage of development.
Observing the Growth Spurt
       Days 9 to 13




  Students measure plant height in
  centimeters and record it on a graph
  every day for one week. Students
  predict how much their plant will grow
  each day and analyze their data on the
  growth spurt.
    Why Are Bees Important?




Students use a hand lens to observe dried bees. Students
make bee sticks to be used as a tool for pollination.
The Anatomy of a Bee
     Looking at Flowers




                              Photo courtesy WFP

Students observe details of the flower’s
anatomy and identify the major parts.
Students learn more about the crucifer
family.
      Pollinating Flowers
          Day 12 -18




Students use the bee sticks to cross-pollinate
their plants. Students read more about the
interdependence of bees and flowers.
                  Observing Pods
                   Day 17 to 35




     Photo courtesy WFP

Students observe the development of the fertilized
pods between Day 17 and Day 35. Students record
their observations by drawing, writing, and graphing.
       Harvesting and Threshing
              the Seeds




              Photo courtesy WFP

Students harvest and thresh the seeds. Students count
the seeds and compare that number with the original
number of seeds planted to determine their profit or loss.
Students think about additional questions they have about
plants and experiments that might help answer them.

								
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