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									SYDNEY PORTS CORPORATION
Maritime Security
Identification Card
Security Guide
If you hold an MSIC you are a
member of the security team.
You are responsible for the security
and safety of everyone within the
maritime security zone you work in.
Contents




2    Message from the CEO

3    Introduction

4    The importance of having more
     secure ports

5    The International Ship and
     Port Facility Security Code

6    Maritime security zones

7    What is the Maritime Security
     Identification Card (MSIC)?
8    Why do I need an MSIC?
8    What access will having an MSIC
     provide me?

9    What does a valid MSIC look like?
10   Tamper evident features

11   Conditions of issue and use
11   Properly displaying your MSIC
12   Lost, stolen or destroyed MSICs
13   Returning your MSIC
13   Monitoring or escorting visitors

14   Important security information
14   Maritime security levels
15   Unattended items and White Level
     Inspections (WLIs)
15   Security breach or concern

16   Reporting and contacts
Sydney Ports Corporation

Message from the CEO




The Maritime Security Identification Card (MSIC) is an integral
component of Australia’s efforts to improve maritime security
nationally. The programme provides some assurance that
people who have been issued with an MSIC do not pose
a risk to maritime security.

Ports across Australia have been strengthening their security
measures and the implementation of the MSIC card is a further
step in ports’ response to increased security concerns.

There are a number of obligations that you as a holder of an
MSIC, need to be aware of. This Guide is designed as a useful
reference tool for all MSIC applicants and holders and will help
you prepare for your MSIC Induction.

The Guide summarises your personal requirements in the MSIC
application process as well as providing you with important
information for your ongoing responsibilities as an MSIC holder.

It is important that we maintain the highest safety and security
standards in order to protect our very important maritime
infrastructure and all those who work at, and those who visit,
our port precincts.




Grant Gilfillan
Chief Executive Officer




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Sydney Ports Corporation

Introduction




A security culture is an important        The Commonwealth Government has
aspect of effective security.             introduced the Maritime Transport and
It is important that all employees        Offshore Facilities Security Act 2003
undertake security awareness              and Maritime Transport and Offshore
training to understand:                   Facilities Security Regulations 2003. This
                                          legislation was enacted in Australia in
– Basic security measures.                order to introduce the provisions of the
– Individual security obligations.        International Maritime Organisation’s
                                          International Port and Port Facility Security
– What is expected in relation to         Code (ISPS Code). The ISPS Code was
  observing and reporting suspicious      introduced around the world in the wake
  activity, crime or security breaches.   of perceived threats to international
                                          shipping. The Act is designed to safeguard
                                          Australian maritime transport including
                                          ports, port facilities, vessels and offshore
                                          oil or gas facilities against unlawful
                                          interference.




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Sydney Ports Corporation

The importance of having
more secure ports




Ensuring our ports are safe and
secure is fundamental to the
national economy.
As an island nation, Australia relies on
its sea ports for much of its international
trade with 99 per cent by volume of
trade being transported by sea. Ships
and vessels carrying this trade make over
20,000 calls at Australian ports a year.

Ports are a significant generator of both
employment and income throughout the
economy, not just the port sector.
Ports play a pivotal role in linking the
Australian market with the rest of the
world, whether it be sending our goods
to overseas markets, or importing those
items which help make our life easier.
It is therefore fundamental that
appropriate measures are taken
to secure our ports and port facilities.




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Sydney Ports Corporation

The International Ship and
Port Facility Security Code




                     The ISPS Code         The IMO required compliance with ISPS
                     was released          Code from all its member States prior to
                     in 2002 by the        1 July 2004. In Australia the Code was
                     International         adopted through the development of
                     Maritime              maritime legislation titled the Maritime
                     Organisation (IMO)    Transport and Offshore Facilities Security
                     in the wake of the    Act 2003. This legislation is regulated
                     September 11,         by the Department of Infrastructure,
                     2001 attacks in       Transport, Regional Development and
                                           Local Government. It applies to:
                     the United States.
                                           – Security regulated ships.
The ISPS Code is implemented through
the International Convention for the       – Security regulated ports.
Safety of Life at Sea. In essence, the
                                           – Port facilities.
Code states that the security of ships
and port facilities is a risk management   – Offshore oil or gas facilities.
activity. In order to determine what
                                           This legislation includes the requirement
security measures are appropriate, an
                                           that individuals who have an operational
assessment of the risks must be made.
                                           need to be in a maritime security zone
The purpose of the Code is to provide
                                           unmonitored, or unescorted, hold and
a standardised, consistent framework
                                           display a Maritime Security Identification
for Governments to evaluate and treat
                                           Card (MSIC). Those individuals who
maritime risk.
                                           do not hold an MSIC must not enter a
                                           maritime security zone unless they are
                                           constantly monitored or escorted by an
                                           MSIC holder.




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Sydney Ports Corporation

Maritime security zones




There are a number of maritime              On-board security zones – used to
security zones across Australia             control access to areas or parts of
where the MSIC provisions apply.            regulated Australian ships or vessels.
These include:                              Offshore security zones – used to
Land side restricted zones –                control access around and within an
these zones are used to provide             offshore oil or gas facility.
controlled access and appropriate
standoff distances to land side areas.

Cleared zones – to facilitate the
screening of persons and/or goods
that have to move on and off vessels.

Water side restricted zones –
used to provide controlled access and
appropriate standoff distances (generally
from a berth) to waterside areas.

Ship security zones – used to
control access around a moving ship
or vessel which is not necessarily
moored at a wharf.




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Sydney Ports Corporation

What is the Maritime Security
Identification Card (MSIC)?




The Maritime Security                           An MSIC holder has undergone three
Identification Card:                            levels of background checks:

– Is a nationally recognised maritime           A criminal history check against specific
  industry identification card.                 terrorism related offences undertaken by
                                                the Australian Federal Police.
– Has a standard appearance to facilitate
  easy recognition around Australian            Politically motivated violence check
  ports, Australian security regulated          undertaken by the Australian Security
  vessels and offshore oil or gas facilities.   Intelligence Organisation (ASIO).

– Is available to all individuals that need     Australian citizenship check or right to
  to work unescorted or unsupervised in         work in Australia through the Department
  a maritime security zone.                     of Immigration and Citizenship.

– Is a personal identity card which
  shows that the holder is cleared to
  enter and work in maritime security
  zones of ports, ships and offshore oil
  or gas facilities.




                                                                                        7
Sydney Ports Corporation
What is the Maritime Security Identification Card (MSIC)?



Why do I need an MSIC?                        What access will having an MSIC
The MSIC scheme is part of the                provide me?
Australian Government’s programme             Having an MSIC will not entitle the holder
to strengthen maritime security. The          to automatic entry to any or all security
Department of Infrastructure, Transport,      zones. Holding an MSIC however, does
Regional Development and Local                show that the holder has successfully
Government is responsible for the             completed the background checking
overall delivery and management of            process required to enter these zones.
the programme and is responsible for          MSIC holders need to have a genuine
approving applications for organisations      work-related reason to be in a security
to become MSIC issuing bodies.                zone and need to follow the facility
                                              operator’s standard occupational health
The Department of Infrastructure,
                                              and safety procedures (OH&S) when
Transport, Regional Development and
                                              entering these zones. A separate site
Local Government state that:
                                              induction and/or access card issued by
– The MSIC assists to reduce the risk         your employer or facility operator may
  of potential terrorists infiltrating the    be necessary to gain automated access.
  maritime sector by legitimate means.

– The MSIC delivers some assurance
  that people who have been issued
  with such a card are not a security risk.

– The MSIC provides some access
  control benefits by providing photo
  identification for authorised people.




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Sydney Ports Corporation

What does a valid MSIC look like?




All MSICs issued in Australia will be   The card will be blue in colour and will
in the following form:                  have the MSIC watermark on the bottom
                                        third of the card.

                                        The card will have the following features:

                                        – A recent passport style photograph of
                                          the MSIC holder.

                                        – The holders first and last name.

                                        – The date of the card’s expiry. The date
                                          is displayed on the left hand side of the
                                          photograph. The month is abbreviated
                                          to the first three letters only (e.g. a card
                                          with an expiry date of 19 July 2010 is
                                          shown as 19 JUL 2010).

                                        – The MSIC’s unique 10 character
                                          alpha-numeric identifying number.
                                          The identifying number is unique to
                                          the issuing body. The abbreviation SPC
                                          is applicable for all MSICs issued by
                                          Sydney Ports Corporation.

                                        – A tamper evident feature which
                                          protects the card and photograph
                                          against tampering.




                                                                                    9
Sydney Ports Corporation
What does a valid MSIC look like?



Tamper evident features include:               Pumping contour – The contours of the
Image flip – By tilting the card from          letters MSIC are realised using colourless
left to right the tamper evident feature       structures. By tilting the card about the
alternates between two images. In one          horizontal axis, the letters seem to slightly
image, the letters MSIC appear in front        expand (‘pump effect’). By changing
of repetitive minitexts. In the other image,   the direction of the tilting, the effect is
the Australian Coat of Arms can be seen.       reversed.

Colourful letters MSIC and colourful           Coat of Arms – The Australian Coat of
minitexts – The fillings of the four           Arms and its background appear bright
letters MSIC and the repetitive minitexts      and colourful with different light intensity.
‘Maritime Security Identification Card’
are realised using various colourful
shades so that different design elements
blink on and off, appearing bright and
colourful at various tilts. As an additional
authentication and identification measure,
the letter ‘c’ in the word ‘Security’ is
reversed and positioned directly above
the letter ‘S’ in the word MSIC. The
minitexts have a height of 0.4mm. The
different design elements appear with
different light intensity.                     If you notice any MSIC that does
                                               not conform to the above standard,
                                               please report it immediately to the
                                               facility operator.




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Sydney Ports Corporation

Conditions of issue and use




As you are about to be issued with           Properly displaying your MSIC
your MSIC, it is important that you          Your MSIC must be:
are aware of the conditions of issue
                                             – Attached to your outer clothing.
and use. This next section focuses on
your obligations as an MSIC holder           – Worn above the waist.
and covers a range of conditions
                                             – Displayed at the front or side of
such as:
                                               your body.
– Properly displaying your MSIC.
                                             – The whole front of the MSIC must
– When and where to display your MSIC.         be clearly visible.

– What to do if your MSIC is lost, stolen
  or damaged.                                     Front View               Side View

– What to do if you change your name.

– What to do if you no longer need an
  MSIC or your MSIC expires.

These conditions are outlined in the
Maritime Transport and Offshore Facilities
Security Regulations 2003.

It is an offence under these regulations
not to comply with these conditions of
issue and use and offences can attract
substantial fines.




                                                                                       11
Sydney Ports Corporation
Conditions of issue and use



Your MSIC is not properly displayed if        From time to time you may be directed to
the photograph or anything else on it is      show your valid MSIC to a security officer.
obscured. If this is the case the holder      In giving this direction, the security officer
has committed an offence.                     (either a law enforcement officer or a
                                              maritime security inspector) must present
For failing to properly display your
                                              their official identification card.
MSIC, the penalty for a first offence is
five penalty units (approximately $550).      Failure to comply with a lawful request to
A second offence within two years             display your MSIC can result in a fine of
of the first offence attracts a penalty of    10 penalty units (approximately $1,100).
10 penalty units (approximately $1,100)
                                              If you encounter someone who is not
with the third or subsequent offence
                                              displaying an MSIC you should immediately
being 20 penalty units (approximately
                                              challenge them (if safe to do so) and ask
$2,200).
                                              them to display their MSIC. You should
Your MSIC has been issued only to you.        also immediately report the event to the
                                              facility operator.
You must not give your MSIC to any
other individual.                             Lost, stolen or destroyed MSICs
For the MSIC to be valid within a             It is important that you keep your MSIC
maritime security zone, the photograph        secure at all times, even when it is not
must be that of the wearer. If this is        in use. You must report the loss, theft or
not the case the MSIC is invalid and the      destruction of your MSIC to Sydney Ports’
wearer has committed an offence.              MSIC Service Centre or Authorised Agent.

You must wear your MSIC whenever              – If your MSIC is stolen, you should
you enter and remain within a maritime          immediately report the theft to the
security zone. If you do not display your       appropriate State or Territory Police.
MSIC you have committed an offence.             A copy of the Police Report or any
                                                other information issued by the
For failing to properly display your
                                                Police must be forwarded to the
MSIC in a maritime security zone the
                                                Sydney Ports’ MSIC Service Centre or
penalty for a first offence is five penalty
                                                Authorised Agent within seven days of
units (approximately $550). A second
                                                becoming aware of the theft.
offence within two years of the first
offence attracts a penalty of 10 penalty      – If your MSIC is lost, stolen or
units (approximately $1,100) with the           destroyed, you must submit a statutory
third or subsequent offence being 20            declaration to the Sydney Ports’ MSIC
penalty units (approximately $2,200).           Service Centre or Authorised Agent
                                                within seven days of becoming aware
                                                of the loss, theft or destruction.


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Sydney Ports Corporation
Conditions of issue and use



Failure to report the loss, theft or          If your circumstances have changed and
destruction of an MSIC can result in a        you no longer have an operational need
fine of 10 penalty units (approximately       to hold an MSIC for a period greater than
$1,100).                                      12 months, you must return your MSIC to
                                              the Sydney Ports’ MSIC Service Centre or
Your MSIC may be replaced by the
                                              Authorised Agent.
Sydney Ports’ MSIC Service Centre if:
                                              You have 30 days to return your MSIC
– It has been lost, stolen or destroyed and
                                              from the moment that you become aware
  you have properly reported the event.
                                              of a change in your circumstances.
– You have changed your name and have
                                              Failure to return your MSIC to the
  provided written evidence of your name
                                              Sydney Ports’ MSIC Service Centre
  change to the Sydney Ports’ MSIC
                                              or Authorised Agent is an offence and
  Service Centre or Authorised Agent
                                              can attract a fine of five penalty units
  and your name change has been
                                              (approximately $550).
  acknowledged by the Department of
  Infrastructure, Transport, Regional         Monitoring or escorting visitors
  Development and Local Government.
                                              A person who requires access to a
Your replacement MSIC will have the           maritime security zone and who does
same expiry date as the MSIC it replaces.     not hold an MSIC will be treated as a
                                              visitor. All visitors need to be monitored
Returning your MSIC                           or escorted whilst they are in a maritime
You must return your MSIC to Sydney           security zone by a valid MSIC holder.
Ports’ MSIC Service Centre or Authorised
                                              As a valid MSIC holder you may be
Agent within 30 days or less in the
                                              asked to provide to continuously
following circumstances:
                                              monitor or escort a visitor. This should
– Your MSIC has expired.                      be undertaken in accordance with the
                                              procedures set out in the maritime
– You have been notified in writing that
                                              security plan, ship security plan or
  your MSIC has been cancelled.
                                              offshore oil or gas facility security plan of
– Your MSIC has been damaged, altered         the respective marine industry participant.
  or defaced either permanently or
                                              Failure to properly monitor or escort
  temporarily.
                                              a visitor is an offence and can
Failure to return your MSIC to the            attract a fine of five penalty units
Sydney Ports’ MSIC Service Centre or          (approximately $550).
Authorised Agent can result in a fine of
10 penalty units (approximately $1,100).




                                                                                        13
Sydney Ports Corporation

Important security information




Maritime security levels                      The Secretary can only declare that
The Maritime Transport and Offshore           MARSEC Level 2 or 3 is in force if:
Facilities Security Act 2003 provides         – A heightened risk to maritime transport
for three maritime security levels              has be identified.
(MARSEC Level):
                                              – That risk is appropriate for a higher
– MARSEC Level 1 (Default or Routine).          level of security to apply.
– MARSEC Level 2 (Heightened).                MARSEC Level 3 is appropriate when:
– MARSEC Level 3 (Extreme).                   – A security incident is probable or
                                                imminent.
Various security measures will apply at
designated ports, port facilities, vessels    The declaration of increased MARSEC
and offshore oil or gas facilities across     Level remains in force for the period
different MARSEC Levels.                      specified in the declaration or until it
                                              is revoked by the Secretary.
MARSEC Level 1 is the minimum
level that will apply at all times and        Increasing from MARSEC Level 1
to all designated ports, port facilities,     to MARSEC Level 2 could mean the
vessels and offshore oil or gas facilities.   introduction of additional security
The Secretary of the Department of            measures including:
Infrastructure, Transport, Regional
                                              – Additional patrols.
Development and Local Government
(Secretary) may declare in writing, that      – Limiting access points.
MARSEC Level 2 or 3 is in force for
                                              – Increasing searches of persons,
designated ports, port facilities, vessels
                                                personal effects and vehicles.
and offshore oil or gas facilities port, or
part thereof.                                 – Denying access to visitors and using
                                                patrols to enhance water-side security.

                                              At MARSEC Level 3 evacuation may be
                                              considered where practicable.

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Sydney Ports Corporation
Important security information



Unattended items and White Level                  If you identify items that are HOT
Inspections (WLIs)                                contact security or your facility
Unattended items are a potential security         operator immediately.
issue within all maritime security zones and      Remember, DO NOT put yourself at
all places of work. It is the responsibility of   further risk. Unattended items that
all MSIC holders to be vigilant and aware         are deemed suspicious should only be
of any changes within work areas which            approached by qualified security staff.
includes identifying unattended items that
could pose a risk to staff and public.            Whilst waiting for assistance to arrive:

WLIs undertaken by employees                      1. Try to recall who was last in the area
encourages a strong security culture                 or why the item is suspicious to you.
within all work environments. A WLI is            2. DO NOT approach the item.
an inspection by all workforce members
of their respective workplaces for any            3. DO NOT allow any other person to
articles that are unusual, suspicious or             approach or sit in the area of the item.
unable to be accounted for.                       4. DO NOT touch, open or move the item.
WLIs are conducted by staff members               5. DO NOT allow any other person to
because they know their own work areas,              touch, open or move the item.
better than anyone else. They are therefore
more likely to identify any unattended or         6. Pass all relevant information to qualified
suspicious items in their particular work            security staff upon their arrival.
area. Staff should use the HOT principle.
                                                  Security breach or concern
Is the item:                                      – If you observe a security breach or
– Hidden.                                           access infringement – REPORT IT to
                                                    your Security Unit or facility operator.
– Obviously Suspicious.
                                                  – If you observe MSIC misuse or non
– Typical of the area.                              display – REPORT IT to your Security
WLIs should be implemented:                         Unit or facility operator.

– Daily, upon arrival at work or at the           – If you see something that is not right
  commencement of a shift.                          or suspicious – REPORT IT to your
                                                    Security Unit or facility operator.
– On a random basis, as determined
  by a manager or Security Unit.                  Remember that the safety of you and
                                                  your work colleagues may be directly
– When instructed by a manager, the               affected by these actions. It is important
  Security Unit or supervisor, in response        to act immediately if you identify a
  to a specific incident or threat.               security breach or concern.


                                                                                               15
Sydney Ports Corporation

Reporting and contacts




If you need further information or
assistance in relation to your MSIC,
including:
– Reporting a lost, stolen or
  damaged MSIC.

– Advising of your name change.

– Surrendering your MSIC.

– Renewing your MSIC.

In the first instance, please contact
your employer or Authorised Agent.
Alternatively you can contact the Sydney
Ports’ MSIC Service Centre on:

Telephone 61 2 9296 4500
Facsimile 61 2 9296 4785
msic@sydneyports.com.au

Dedicated MSIC Service Centre staff will
be happy to assist you with any issues
or concerns you have with your MSIC or
related issues.




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Level 8, 207 Kent Street                  Please contact the Sydney Ports’ MSIC Service
Sydney NSW 2000, Australia                Centre via any of the below methods:

PO Box 25                                 Telephone 61 2 9296 4500
Millers Point, NSW 2000, Australia        Facsimile 61 2 9296 4785
Telephone 61 2 9296 4999                  msic@sydneyports.com.au
Facsimile 61 2 9296 4742
enquiries@sydneyports.com.au
www.sydneyports.com.au




Disclaimer The information contained in this publication is produced in good faith and according
to the knowledge available to Sydney Ports Corporation at the time of publication. No warranty
is given or representation made as to its accuracy.

Sydney Ports Corporation Security Guide – January 2009

								
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