Report on monitoring visit by H - DOC

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					 Report on monitoring
 visit by H. M. Stewart
 to Capacity 21 project
in Trinidad and Tobago
                        4 - 8 December 1995




Prepared for
                   Capacity 21 Unit United Nations
                 Development Programme 1 UN Plaza,
                   New York, New York 10017 USA


Prepared bv:
           Howard Macdonald Stewart, Environmental Analyst
           4048 West 19th Avenue Vancouver, B.C. V6S 1 E3
                             CANADA


                           December 1995
         Report on monitoring visit by H. M. Stewart to
        Capacity 21 programme in Trinidad and Tobago
                     December 4 - 8, 1995

                                 Outline of Report

1. Introduction: Terms of Reference, Unexpected Developments                            2

2. Observations, Conclusions and Recommendations                                        4


                    List of Acronyms and Abbreviations
EMA              Environmental Management Authority
ENGO    Environmental non-govemment organisation
GORTT   Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago
IPF     Indicative Planning Figure (of the UNDID)
MOU     Memorandum of Understanding
NETS    National Environmental Information System
NEMP    National Environmental Management Plan
NGO     non-govemment organisation
TOR     terms of reference
TRP     tri-partite review

UNDP           United Nations Development Programme
                                 List of Annexes
Annex 1 - Communication problems with the Senior Advisor and the EMA

Annex 2 - Questions for monitoring meetings in Trinidad & Tobago 4 - 8 Dec., 1995
Annex 3 - Meetings scheduled by EMA
Annex 4 - Documents related to TOR 1
Annex 5 - Documents related to TOR 2
Annex 6 - Documents related to TOR 3
Annex 7 - Documents related to TOR 4




Capacity 21 Monitoring Report 1 Trinidad and Tobago 1 December 1995             pp. 1
Annex 8 - Documents related to TOR 5
         Report on monitoring visit by H. M. Stewart, to
        Capacity 21 programme in Trinidad and Tobago
                     December 4 - 8, 1995

         1.       Introduction: Terms of Reference, Unexpected
                              Developments
The consultant visited Trinidad and Tobago from December 4 - 8 to monitor the national
Capacity 21 programme. The consultant's terms of reference, prepared by UNDP's
Regional Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean in collaboration with the Capacity 21
Unit, were to:
          "...monitor the progress of the ongoing Capacity 21 programme located in Trinidad
and Tobago, using the Capacity 21 Monitoring and Reporting Strategy as a framework... "
and "...in collaboration with the UNDP Senior Advisor, Mr. Sultan-Khan and the UNDP
office in Trinidad and Tobago,... undertake the following activities:
• Meet with a cross-section of project stakeholders to ascertain level of participation
     in programme and Environmental Management Agency (EMA) activities.
• Review the impact of the Capacity 21 programme in T and T, and identify successes
     and lessons learnt which are transferable to other Capacity 21 programmes.
• Determine the impact of activities related to Public Awareness and
     Education Programmes fostered by the EMA.
• Monitor status and impact of National Environmental Action Plan and the EMA
     following the end of the Capacity 21 programme.
• Review the study on a National Environmental Information System and make
     recommendations on its feasibility, impact and role with regard to the EMA. • Prepare
     a mission report incorporating the above-mentioned issues to be submitted not later
     than 14 days following the end of the mission."
Unfortunately, it was not possible to carry out the terms of reference effectively, due to the
Environmental Management Agency's (EMA) decision to cancel the consultant's scheduled
meetings with stakeholders, suspend all contact with the consultant and request the
termination of the monitoring mission. These problems are summarised in Annex 1.
Many questions raised during the monitoring visit went unanswered, or were answered
only very incompletely, as a result of the consultant's inability to communicate with Dr.
Sultan Khan, the EMA or a range of national stakeholders. More substantive answers will
presumably be provided in Dr. Sultan Khan's terminal report
          Another unexpected turn in this monitoring visit was the status of the Capacity 21
project activities and budget. The consultant arrived in Port of Spain with the
understanding that the Capacity 21 programme was essentially completed. The budget,
already limited by Capacity 21 standards at S150,000, was assumed to be fully disbursed
by late 1995. In the event, it turns out that less than half this budget has been disbursed;
most of the activities identified in the project document have not been supported by
Capacity 21. Apparently the only activities directly supported by Capacity 21 have been
international consultant's fees,


Capacity 21 Monitoring Report \ Trinidad and Tobago \ December 1995                     pp. 4
paid retroactively to cover services provided by Dr. Sultan Khan in early 1994 and about
$2,000 for "reporting".

          The consultant's initial intention, in line with the Capacity 21 Monitoring and
Reporting strategy, was to meet various stakeholders together with EMA and, to the extent
possible, UNDP. In the event, the Senior Advisor, Dr. Sultan-Khan and EMA
participated only in a short initial meeting with the consultant and the UNDID, during which
only a small number of the consultant's questions could be reviewed.         The UNDP
participated in meetings the first day and had intended to participate in the meetings
scheduled from Wednesday to Friday. The questions prepared by the consultant for
discussions with UNDID and EMA and with various stakeholder groups are provided in
Annex 2.
     The consultant had anticipated:

•   far more interaction with the EMA at all stages of the monitoring visit, especially with
    the Senior Advisor, Dr. Sultan-Khan, who was also acting as Managing Director of the
    EMA, •          meetings with several other NGO's, in addition to those met on 5
    December, who had participated in consultations re. the Environmental Management
    Bill and EMA's mandate, •          meetings with several representatives of private sector
    organisations who had been involved in consultations re: the Environmental
    Management Bill and EMA's mandate, • meetings with several representatives of
    Ministries, other than the Ministry of Planning, and other government agencies, such as
    the Institute of Marine Affairs, who have been involved in consultations re: the
    Environmental Management Bill and EMA's mandate,

       The consultant requested assistance from EMA and UNDID in arranging several
other meetings, in addition to those initially suggested by EMA (Annex 3). EMA agreed to
schedule additional meetings with one or two private sector representatives already
scheduled to visit EMA later in the week. UNDID scheduled meetings with two other
NGO's suggested by EMA and with a local environmental consulting firm suggested by the
Regional Bureau. Other meetings were to have been arranged with other government
stakeholders in key sectors such as tourism and the petroleum industry.

         On the afternoon of Tuesday, December 5 (the second day of the visit), all the
meetings arranged by the EMA were cancelled without warning by the EMA. Initially, the
consultant and UNDP opted to continue with those meetings arranged by UNDID. UNDID
then opted to cancel all remaining meetings. The following afternoon the EMA delivered a
letter of complaint to UNDP, alleging the consultant's "bad attitude" and attempts to disrupt
relations between the EMA and the ENGO's. The rest of the consultant's time in Trinidad
and Tobago was devoted to reviewing information available at the UNDP, de-briefing the




Capacity 21 Monitoring Report 5 Trinidad and Tobago 1 December 1995                     pp. 3
Country Office and defending himself against EMA's vague but serious allegations.
2.         Observations, Conclusions and Recommendations
          Lessons can be learned from the problems faced in this monitoring mission

         Some useful lessons emerge from this unfortunate experience, both for the
Capacity 21 Unit and the Regional Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean,
including:

External members of monitoring missions, such as the Capacity 21 consultant in this
case, should not go to monitoring meetings alone. Representatives of national partner
organisations and, whenever possible, the UNDP country office should always take part
in these meetings.

    Monitoring meetings should not begin until the questions to be raised in these
    meetings have been reviewed and agreed by both the UNDID country office and the
    national partner.        If either of these parties to the monitoring don't have time to
    review the questions, then subsequent meetings should be delayed until they do have
    time.

•    If a key person, such as the UNDP Senior Advisor in this case, is unavailable or
     uncooperative, for reasons of health, other priorities or other disposition, then the
     utility of the monitoring mission is likely to be minimal. The country office should play
     a lead role in ensuring the availability and co-operation of such key individuals,
     especially consultants contracted with UNDP.

•    An overriding lesson appears to be that visits by external members of Capacity 21
     programme monitoring teams should only take place where both the UNDID country
     office and the national partner are actively inviting this visit and likely to fully support
     it.


    Observations, Conclusions and Recommendations related to the Terms of Reference

        As a result of the communication problems with the UNDP's Senior Advisor and
the EMA described above, the consultant's observations, conclusions and
recommendations about the issues raised in the terms of reference are based upon a
limited amount of information, including:

•    several meetings with UNDP staff and review of their documentation on
     both the Capacity 21 project and the closely related IPF project of support
     to the EMA,
•    a short preliminary meeting with the EMA,

•    a limited set of meetings with several offices of the Ministry of Planning and
     Development, two parastatal agencies and two representatives of environmental
     NGO's, all of whom had participated in the development of the environmental
     management law and of the EMA itself.
Capacity 21 Monitoring Report \ Trinidad and Tobago \ December 1995   pp. 8
TOR 1.          Meet with a cross section of project stakeholders to ascertain the level of
                participation in (Capacity 21) programme and EMA activities
       Observations:

       The information available to the consultant included:
1.       Lists of organisations consulted by EMA:
           EMA's lists of organisations consulted are provided in Annex 4 . These include

1) organisations who commented on the draft Environmental Management Bill in 1994
and 2) government organisations consulted in mid - 1995 regarding the establishment of
the EMA and their prospective relationship with the EMA. EMA reported they are also
involved in ongoing consultations with partner groups, but no details were made
available.
2.       Meetings December 4 - 8:

        The consultant met with a limited group of Government organisations and NGO's
who were mostly satisfied with most aspects of their participation in the process of
reviewing and discussing the draft Environmental Management bill.        A particularly
positive feature of
the consultations was the involvement of members of the then-opposition party (now the
party in power), who's support was needed to pass the bill. Some felt the EMA's
approach to consultations could have been more open and participatory, less formal and
less dependent on controlled bilateral consultations.
     Newspaper articles:

        The UNDP's files contain a number of articles from Port of Spain newspapers at
the time of the introduction of the EMA bill in 1994 and its eventual passage in 1995
(Annex 4). As might be expected in Trinidad and Tobago's atmosphere of intense
political rivalry, these articles vary considerably in their assessments of the bill and the
EMA. In one paper the opposing views: "Government moves to save the environment"
and "It's a recipe for disaster" share the same page.

        The positive coverage provides descriptions of EMA's objectives and activities
(perhaps as they were summarised in government press releases). It also stresses the
importance of the powers to be given to the EMA ("...will not be a 'toothless tiger, but will
have the power to...") and of the resources to be made available to the EMA from the
World Bank, UNDP and GORTT.

          The negative coverage criticises the consultative process, suggesting that those
who submitted comments or criticisms should have been given some idea of how their
concerns were addressed in revisions to the bill. Another criticism was that the bill has
emerged in a policy vacuum, begging the question for example, of whether the EMA is
the right sort of institution for Trinidad and Tobago. They also question the need to give
EMA such extensive authority: "It is rubbish to give the same authority the power to




Capacity 21 Monitoring Report \ Trinidad and Tobago \ December 1995                     pp. 9
make its own rules".
         Conclusions:

       It was impossible to ascertain the level of participation among stakeholders with
any degree of confidence because it was not possible to meet with an adequate cross
section of stakeholders.

         Recommendations:

      The UNDP Country Office should support efforts by EMA to greatly improve their
ongoing monitoring and assessment of satisfaction among stakeholder organisations.


TOR 2.            Review the impact of the Capacity 21 programme in Trinidad and
                  Tobago, and identify successes and lessons learned which are
                  transferable to other Capacity 21 programmes
        Observations:

          There is apparently no formal monitoring strategy in place for this project, nor for
the larger, closely related IPF project of support for the EMA. That is to say there is no
evidence of a coherent strategy involving various participants in the use of standard
monitoring techniques, such as indicators, case studies, interviews with other
participants, etc. In the absence of this kind of strategy, and without the collaboration of
EMA, it was impossible for the consultant to effectively review project impacts, let alone
identify successes and lessons learned.        The May 1995 Tripartite Review (TPR) of
the IPF project (Annex ), for example, includes no minutes recording the participants in
this review, their discussions, observations, conclusions or recommendations. This TPR
file contained only:
•     a draft agenda,

• a copy of the project's established objectives and planned outputs and activities, •       a
copy of the proposal for the establishment of Project Implementation Unit and
Environmental Task Force, and
• copies of quarterly reports and the July 94 "status report".

         The EMA apparently is planning to establish a monitoring strategy in their first
quarter of operations but it was not possible to discuss the details of this strategy.
         Conclusions

          Based on the brief round of meetings and the additional written information
available in UNDP's files in Trinidad, it appears that most of the Capacity 21 programmes'
five objectives may have been addressed to some degree but only one or perhaps two
have actually been achieved.         Even those objectives apparently achieved are
impossible to assess with any confidence in the absence of more thorough feedback from
the Trinidad and Tobago organisations involved.




    Capacity 21 Monitoring Report \ Trinidad and Tobago \ December 1995                   pp.
                                              11
 Objectives of the Capacity 21 Project in Trinidad and Tobago

 Objective 1:     Preparation and implementation of an overall Management Action Plan,
 which will dearly indicate the relevant activities and milestones for the establishment of
 the EMA and for the processes of national consultation in support of the EMA.
         A management plan was prepared and updated regularly by the Senior Advisor.
 Examples of these updated Management Action Plans are provided in Annex 5.
 Objective 2:   To build a consensus among stakeholders on the need for, and the role
 of, the EMA.

 It was not possible to gauge this consensus with any confidence from the limited se t of
 meetings attended by the consultant and in the absence of any kind of systematic
 ongoing monitoring of this consensus.
    Objective 3:    To build a consensus among Ministers on the modus operandi of the
                                           EMA.
 It was impossible to gauge the extent to which this consensus may have been built
 because it was not possible to meet with a cross-section of participants from Ministries
 other than the Ministry of Planning and Development. Nor is there any kind of systematic
 ongoing monitoring to observe the emergence of this kind of consensus. The EMA
 promised to provide copies of a limited number of draft MOU's which have apparently
 been prepared following a meeting with 28 government agencies regarding EMA's role.
 None of these were provided prior to the consultant's departure, however. The blank
 form or template to be used when preparing these MOU's is provided in Annex 5.
 Objective 4:    To sensitise the national community on environmental issues facing the
 country and the need for, and role of, the EMA.
 It was impossible to gauge the extent to which the national community may be becoming
 "sensitised" to environmental issues or about the EMA's reasons for being, because
 there is no monitonng of national opinion or levels of understanding of these issues. No
 other information which might indicate these kind of changes was identified during the
 mission.
 Objective 5:     To establish the scope and functions of a viable National Environmental
 Information System (NEIS).
 This objective has apparently not been met to date. Only preliminary draft terms of
 reference (Annex 8) have been prepared for this study.
 Successes and lessons learned?

           In the absence of an ongoing monitoring and reporting system, with less than
 half the small Capacity 21 budget actually disbursed, and having met only a very limited
 number of stakeholders, there is not much the consultant can say about successes or
 lessons learned to date.




Capacity 21 Monitoring Report \ Trinidad and Tobago \ December 1995                    pp. 12
       Recommendations
        With a far higher degree of confidence, one can conclude there is a need for a
more rigorous and participatory approach to monitoring and reporting on the activities of
the EMA in general, and UNDP's support for them in particular. For example, systems
could be established:

• to measure how well consensus is being built among government and non-government
    partners regarding the need for and role of an EMA,
• to measure the effectiveness of sensitisation and education of the national
    population about environmental issues and EMA's role in dealing with these, and
• to measure how well the proposed NETS is being \ will be tailored to:
     1. take advantage of data available in the country, and

     2. satisfy the information needs of a wide range of potential national users.



TOR 3.          Determine the impact of activities related to Public Awareness and
                Education Programmes fostered by the EMA

     Observations
          No Public Awareness or Education Programmes have yet been financed by
Capacity 21. Activities that have begun, such as television advertisements, have
apparently been financed by the World Bank loan recently approved for support to t he
EMA.           The UNDP Country Office feels Capacity 21 funds originally allocated to
this activity may be better re-allocated or may still be used to finance some kind of public
awareness \ education activity yet to be determined. A weak draft proposal recently
submitted by EMA for "Environment Awareness Week" activities (Annex 6) appears
unlikely to be supported by UNDP.

     Conclusions
          Although it turned out that no Capacity 21 resources have yet been allocated to
public awareness or education activities, the consultant raised the issue of EMA's current
activities in this area during most meetings with stakeholders and with the UNDP.
                                                                                    Opini
ons on the EMA's television advertisements were quite diverse. While no dear
consensus emerged on the effectiveness of these ads, most people saw the ads as
simply a first step, needing to be followed by clear messages about what citizens of
Trinidad and Tobago could and should do, once they are convinced of the importance of
environmental concerns.
       Recommendations

        As mentioned earlier, there is great need to systematically assess the
effectiveness of efforts to sensitise and educate the national population about
environmental issues and EMA's role. This type of monitoring is the only way to confirm
whether desired messages
are being communicated effectively to the national population.
Capacity 21 Monitoring Report \ Trinidad and Tobago \ December 1995   pp.
                                          14
TOR 4.           Monitor the status and impact of the National Environmental Action
                 Plan and the EMA following the end of the Capacity 21 programme
       Observations

         Despite initial indications to the contrary, the Capacity 21 programme in Trinidad
and Tobago has apparently not yet ended; roughly $80,000 of its $150,000 budget are
yet to be disbursed (Annex 7).
       Conclusions

          Once again, it was impossible to accurately judge the EMA's effects or results to
date (or the effects of the process followed to establish the EMA) in the absence of
systematic ongoing monitoring and without substantive meetings involving the
consultant, the EMA and a range of national stakeholders.
         The "Report and Recommendation of the Environmental Task Force for the
Establishment of the Environmental Management Authority" (April 1995) recommended
the preparation of a National Environmental Management Plan (NEMP) instead of a
National Environmental Action Plan. The draft terms of reference for "a consultancy
assignment in the preparation of a National Environmental Management Plan for
Trinidad and Tobago (also included in the April 1995 recommendations of the
environmental task force) suggest this NEMP would be vast, vague and not very
participatory in nature.
     Recommendations

         As suggested earlier, there is considerable scope for more rigorous and
participatory monitoring and reporting on the activities of the EMA in general, and
UNDP's support for them in particular.       EMA apparently intends to initiate a
monitoring system in the coming quarter, though no details were provided about this
prospective activity.
           The proposed NEMP could be better defined and more clearly focused if it
placed more emphasis on defining the roles and meeting the needs of a wide range of
government, private sector and NGO stakeholders in Trinidad and Tobago. The NEMP,
as
it is currently proposed, would be carried out by government-appointed consultants and
government specialists, for the government. The proposed scope of work is vast and ill -
defined. It could be made far more precise, and more responsive to the needs of national
stakeholders, if a broad range of national participants were involved, for example, in:
•   identifying priority problems and priorities;

• designating environmental management
objectives; •    defining priority actions;
• analysing institutional structures and performance,

•   defining methodologies for mobilising internal and external financial resources;

•   defining approaches for the use of performance indicators;

           •   identifying options for integrating environmental concerns into development
                                                                                 objectives;


Capacity 21 Monitoring Report \ Trinidad and Tobago \ December 1995                    pp. 15
•   elaborating a "rolling agenda" for environmental action; and

•   identifying appropriate investment programmes; etc.
TOR 5.          Review the study on a National Environmental Information System and
                make recommendations on its feasibility, impact and role with regard to
                the EMA

        Apparently no study has yet been done on a National Environmental Information
System. EMA reported that detailed terms of reference for preparing this study had
been drafted, but these were not made available during the consultant's visit In their
absence, the consultant reviewed a "draft proposal for the funding of a consultancy
assignment to recommend an appropriate environmental information system" (included
in the environmental task force's recommendations, prepared by the Senior Advisor in
April, 1995).
         The approach to the NETS proposed in the "draft proposal" (Annex 8) seems
reasonable and logical. It proposes to start by assessing the needs of environmental
information users and the available environmental information, then identifying gaps
between information needs and supply and determining the best ways to close these
gaps and to ensure the availability of high quality information to a wide range of public
and private sector decision makers.
         It is not clear why this draft proposal in the April 1995 document has not yet
given rise to the proposed study.




Capacity 21 Monitoring Report \ Trinidad and Tobago \ December 1995                   pp. 17
               Annex 1




Communication
Problems with the Senior
Advisor and the EMA

   • Summary of the situation

   • EMA's December 6 letter of complaint to UNDP
9   Consultant's December 7 reply to EMA complaint
                Annex 1 - Problems with the Senior Advisor and the EMA
     Summary of the situation

         in the initial (and unfortunately only) meeting with Dr. Sultan-Khan and the EMA,
Dr. Sultan-Khan was not positively predisposed to Capacity 21. His complaints included:
•   EMA was disappointed at receiving only $150,000 from Capacity 21.

•   Dr. Sultan-Khan and the Chairman of EMA had apparently not been happy with their
    reception from Capacity 21 and the Regional Bureau officer responsible for the
    Capacity 21 programme during a recent visit to New York.
•   Numerous earlier attempts at scheduling a monitoring mission had been
    unsuccessful; Dr. Sultan-Khan seemed to feel this was the fault of Capacity 21.
    Dr. Sultan-Khan stressed, for example, that this was the reason it would be very
    difficult to meet people from industry who had been involved in EMA's
    consultations.
•   Despite previous agreement on the dates for this mission, this tumed out to be a
    bad week for EMA, with a new government elected a month ago, new expatriate
    staff at the EMA and Dr. Sultan Khan's imminent departure. This timing issue
    appeared to involve a bit of circular logic: it was necessary to carry out the mission
    before Dr. Sultan Khan's departure, but he was not available, largely due to his
    imminent departure.

       As a result of Dr. Sultan-Khan's other commitments and perhaps the other factors
mentioned above, the initial meeting with EMA was short and disappointing. We were not
able to completely review our list of questions for EMA nor our questions to be discussed
in the meetings with stakeholders (the consultant's questions prepared for these meetings
are provided in Annex 2). Nobody from EMA was available for these meetings.

       After this meeting, the consultant participated in the meetings scheduled for
Monday, December 4 and Tuesday, December 5, as described in the draft itinerary in
Annex 3. Near the end of the second day of meetings the EMA unilaterally and without
discussion of any kind with the consultant (before or after), cancelled all remaining
meetings, complaining of the consultant's "bad attitude". Copies of EMA's letter of
complaint to UNDID and the consultant's reply to this letters allegations are attached
below.

       Apparently on the basis of the initial meeting with EMA and another on the
aftemoon of the following day with two ENGO representatives, the consultant was judged
to be asking unacceptable questions and all further meetings were cancelled. It's not dear
why EMA
never attempted to discuss this issue with the consultant Not surprisingly, EMA's
approach dramatically limited the effectiveness of the monitoring visit.

         In discussions with the Resident Representative it was surmised that the
offending questions probably included: "What has been your level of satisfaction with the
process of establishing the Environmental Management Bill and the EMA?"which was
asked to representatives of several govemment and non-government groups involved in
this process. This and one or two of the other questions in Annex 2 may have been seen
as impinging on Trinidad & Tobago's sovereignty.
        ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY (EMA)
                                                                                          2nd Floor, The Mutual Centre. 16 Queen's
                                                                                               Park R Trinidad &. Tobago, West Inc
                                                                                              Tele: (809) 629-8042. Fax: (809) 628-
                                                                                                                                  9




                 Mr. Jan Van Eyndhovem Resident
                 Representative United Nations
                 Development Programme 19 Keate Street
                 PORT OF SPAIN


                 Dear Mr. Van Eyndhoven,

                                                Further to our discussions yesterday, I wish to record our
                dissatisfaction with the attitude of

                Mr. Howard Stewart, who visited our offices on Monday 4th and Tuesday 5th December, 1995 with
                respect to the UNDP Capacity 21 Monitoring Mission. Mr. Stewart's approach to his Mission left

                At one meeting yesterday, his behaviour and s%aterncnts were calculated to adversely affect the
                relationship between the EMA and the Environmratal NGO's who all complained about his
                "attitude".

                As you are aware, the UNDP, the Government and the EMA have worked closely to build bridges
                and establish a cordial and professional relationship among its representatives. We are of the
                opiaion that the continuation of the Mission of Mr. Howard Stewart could only adversely affect this
                relationship and, consequently, we cancelled the meetings he had on Tuesday 5th at 3:00 p.m. and
                on Wednesday 6th December 1995.

                The signatories to this latter have witnessed the atiitlttd- prnblú.t, uí !vu. Stewart and support the
                deci=ior, :z_.'.gin.

                Please submit this letter to the approprJate
                authorities.
                With best wishes.

                 Yours sincerely,

                  ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY


               Shafeck Sultan-Khan                                                      Patrice Le Blanc
                                                                                        CEO Designate
               UNDP Senior Adviser/Managing Director
                                                                                         Angélique Pari'sat-Joseph
                            . ..... f.
                                                                                         Corporate Secretary
                 Molly Gaskin
                 Chauman, COPE
                 and EMA Director


:3iresctorn: Sir Ellis Clarke (Chairman). Mr. John Andrews (Deputy Chairman), Dr. Shafeek Sultan-Khan (Managing Director). Ms. Molly
Gaskir Ar. Sel-,n Jutin. Mr. Nazrr Khan. Mr. Robert Lc Huntc. Mes. Rccrnatm Surine. Mr. Raye P._ Sandy, Mrs. Dorothy Sookdeo, Dr.
Aman Young 1




                                                               12/06/95 14:13              TX/RX N0.6982             P.002
much to be desired, as he has been an embarrassment to the EMA. His approach has been
extremely   aggressive,    operating   "like   a    bull    in   a     china    shop".
Consultant's reply to the letter of complaint from EMA (6 December 1995)
                      7 November 1995, Trinidad
                      Howard Macdonald Stewart, Environmental Analyst

                      4048 West 19th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. V6S 1E3 CANADA
                      FAX: 604 224 6597    Phone: 604 222 1615
                      E-MAIL: intemet:103262.2405@compuserve.com

Mr. Jan Van Eyndhoven, Resident Representative United Nations Development
Programme
19 Keate Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago


              Letter of complaint from EMA                  I am writing to follow up on our
      re:
                                                   discussions regarding EMA's letter of 6
                                                   December 1995 describing my alleged
"attitude problem" and terminating my monitoring mission. I deeply regret having to take so
much time to respond to this letter, time which clearly would be better spent carrying out
the terms of reference of my monitoring mission with EMA. My original terms of reference
can only be carried out in a very partial way in any case, as a result of EMA's decision to
cancel my remaining meetings and their refusal to meet with me. It is clear as well that the
allegations in the letter are serious and cannot be left unanswered. I understand from our
conversation of this morning that you wish to deal with this letter carefully and may not
respond to it immediately. Irrespective of how UNDP responds, I am not in a position to
ignore these kind of allegations and proceed as though nothing has happened. This
letter announced their intention to terminate my monitoring mission and it's allegations,
despite their lack of precision, are very serious.

         EMA's decision to cancel my meetings came out of the blue. They had not, and
never have, raised any of the concerns raised in this letter, with me.   Rather, it was
announced to me as a fait accompli by Ms. Parisot-Joseph, who interrupted my meeting
with two NGO representatives on Tuesday afternoon to tell me my "mission had been
aborted".                                                                I was instructed
by Ms. Pansot-Joseph to return to my hotel and discuss this issue with you on Wednesday
morning.                                                                 At that stage I
was dumbfounded. I then agreed with you on Wednesday morning that I would continue
with the monitoring mission as well as I could under the circumstances, carrying out a
review of the available documents, including those yet to be sent from EMA (including draft
MOU's, detailed terms of reference for the NETS and documents describing their various
consultative processes since the initial consultations camed out dunng the finalisation of
the Environmental Management Act).
      Then I received a copy of EMA's profoundly disturbing letter. This letter suggested
my prospects of further collaboration with EMA were limited, in any.
       Yet my terms of reference call for me to:
       "...monitor the progress of the ongoing Capacity 21 programme located in Trinidad
       and Tobago, using the Capacity 21 Monitoring and Reporting Strategy as a
       framework." and
       "In collaboration with the UNDP Senior Advisor, Mr. Sultan-Khan and the UNDID
       office in Trinidad and Tobago, the consultant will undertake the following activities:
1.       Meet with a cross-section of project stakeholders to ascertain level of participation
in programme and Environmental Management Agency (EMA) activities.
2.       Review the impact of the Capacity 21 programme in T and T, and identify
successes and lessons leamt which are transferable to other Capacity 21 programmes.
3.       Determine the impact of activities related to Public Awareness and
Education Programmes fostered by the EMA.
4.       Monitor status and impact of National Environmental Action Plan and the
EMA following the end of the Capacity 21 programme.
5.       Review the study on a National Environmental Information System and
make recommendations on its feasibility, impact and role with regard to the EMA.
6.       Prepare a mission report incorporating the above-mentioned issues to be
submitted not later than 14 days following the end of the mission."

         On Wednesday morning, before receiving EMA's missive, I was prepared to try to
make the best of an imperfect, mystifying situation. Since the arrival of EMA's letter, I have
found myself in the much more difficult situation of having to defend myself, to the extent I
can do this by myself, against these unsubstantiated allegations.
_re:     The first meeting where Wayne Tikah and I met Dr. Sultan-Khan, Mr. Le Blanc
         and Ms. Pahsot-Joseph:

         I would be grateful if you could confirm Mr. Wayne Tikah's impressions of this first
meeting where my alleged "attitude problem" was apparently first perceived by EMA. I
believe you'll find Mr. Tikah didn't find my behaviour like "a bull in a china shop". Dr.
SultanKhan, on the other hand, quickly became dismissive and unhelpful. He suggested,
for example, that

•   my monitoring mission should only require a day,

•   we should send him our questions in a letter as he didn't have time to answer them
    in person (despite the fact this mission had been planned for over a month),
•   "all the trouble" created by the Capacity 21 programme wasn't worth the $150,000,

•   few if any private sector interests involved in consultations would be prepared to see
    me as they were so fed up with all the re-, re-, re-scheduling of the monitoring mission;
    if I was lucky I might be able to see a couple who would be at EMA anyway (as though
    all previous scheduling problems had been the fault of Capacity 21),
•   the mission had no right to discuss activities financed by the UNDP IPF
    (although Richard and Wayne had just suggested I look at EMA activities
    overall,), etc.
            To be fair, UNDP should request Dr. Sultan Khan et al to provide specific and
  concrete examples illustrating my 'bad attitude" at this meeting with EMA (where I found
  Dr. Sultan-Khan's attitude unprecedented in my twenty year experience in international co-
  operation) or the other meeting, with the NGO's, where the letter's account of this meeting
  is at odds with accounts of people who, unlike the signatories of the EMA letter, actually
  participated in this meeting.
              If I bulled my way through some china at the first and only meeting with EMA, then
  I think it is important to determine in far more specific terms, what fragile items were
  damaged, how and why. I do remember being determined to discuss the monitoring
  mission and its terms of reference with Dr. Sultan Khan. I was quickly told that he was very
  busy and I should just send him a letter. Yet I continued to pursue some of the questions I
  had travelled 5,000 miles to discuss with him.     For
                                                     me it was critical to start this
  monitoring mission with a thorough understanding and overview from EMA before



re.     The second meeting, where Ms. Gaskin 'and all the other ENGO's' were allegedly
        disappointed with my attitude:

  meetings with the various "stakeholders".


           Ms. Gaskin left the room as my meeting with the NGO's began.          Here again, it is
  only fair for UNDP to confirm the events of this meeting, with the two people with whom I
  actually I did meet on Tuesday afternoon.                                      One was Ms.
  Sharon Laurel and I believe the other was a Ms. Colleen Shepherd. The only thing I recall
  saying to Ms. Gaskin before she left was that Richard Laydoo had reminded me not to
  keep her too long because she had a meeting with him at the UNPD office. It is very
  important to know how my behaviour and statements at this meeting were allegedly
  "calculated to adversely affect the relationship between the EMA and the ENGO's"
                                                                                 This is not the
  impression of "all the other ENGO's", i.e., the two women I did meet, Ms. Gaskin was not
  there for more than a minute or two. On what basis, then, has Ms. Gaskin signed this
  letter? It is only fair for UNDP to verify the details of Ms. Gaskin's complaints, which are not
  shared, despite the allegations in the letter, with "all the other ENGO's". I found this was a
  useful, productive meeting, despite the absence of Ms. Gaskin.                 The meeting
  was interrupted after about forty minutes by Ms. Parisot-Joseph who said she had
  messages for us, effectively ending the meeting.                               Ms. Laurel was
  apparently then immediately informed by Ms. Parisot-Joseph that she must not speak with
  me again.                                                                      It requires
  considerable creativity to paint my participation in this meeting as me trying to "...adversely
  affect the relationship between the EMA and the ENGO's". A little more creativity would
  have been required to explain why I would have wanted to do this. Particularly when the
  person apparently making the allegations, Ms. Gaskin, didn't participate in the meeting.

          Another perplexing question emerges from this letter. If EMA found my attitude so
  inappropriate at the Monday morning meeting, then why did nobody from EMA speak with
me about my inappropriate behaviour or accompany me to any of the other meetings they
had scheduled? I had understood, from my terms of reference, that this monitoring mission
was to be carried out in collaboration with Dr. Sultan-Khan. If he had misgivings about my
"attitude" after this first meeting (as I certainly had about his attitude), then why did he not
raise                            them                          with                         me?
I gather from discussions here at the UNDP that other events, not cited in the letter of
complaint, are considered likely causes of this letter and its tone.       For example, I
discussed my impressions of our Monday morning at EMA with Wayne Tikah in the back
seat of the car taking us back to the UNDP. Wayne listened as I described my
impressions of the EMA meeting; as I described to you later that afternoon, my
impressions were negative. The principal reasons for my disappointment have already
been described above. This private discussion between Wayne and me was apparently
reported back to Dr. Sultan-Khan by the driver. In this private discussion, I complained and
expressed my amazement at Dr. Sultan-Khan's unfriendly, unhelpful and dismissive
attitude towards the Capacity 21 monitoring mission. It had been a very poor beginning for
the monitoring mission.      At my request, Wayne and I raised these concerns with you
later in the day Monday, asking if I should send Dr. Sultan-Khan a formal letter with all our
various requests for information, as he had suggested in the meeting. At that point we
accepted your suggestion not to send a letter, in light of Dr. Sultan-Khan's recent health
problems.
I regret that this monitoring mission will not be able to provide a more complete review of
the Capacity 21 project and related activities in Trinidad and Tobago and look forward to
the results of UNDP's enquiry into the details behind EMA's unfortunate allegations.
Yours sincerely,
H. M. Stewart.
Annex 2
Questions for
monitoring meetings
in Trinidad &
Tobago 4 - 8
December, 1995
    • Questions for UNDP, EMA, Sultan Khan

• Questions for government, business, NGO, institutional
meetings
          Annex 2 - Questions for monitoring meetings in Trinidad & Tobago 4 - 8
                                    December, 1995

A. Questions for:

UNDP, Port of Spain EMA,
Sultan Khan

1. What kind of monitoring strategy, framework, system, indicators, are in place, if not
   for C21 programme alone, then for their UNDP programme in T & T overall ?

2. Have they done anything to establish or carry out an M & R strategy to date (for C21
   or the national programme as a whole?
3. Who has preparing itinerary and arranging meetings? Sultan-Khan? UNDP?
4. Why not more:
• NGO's

•    Business people or

• World Bank or
• IADB?
• people with interests in the oil industry

•    people with interests in the tourist industry

•    people with interests in the marine environment, especially fishing industry (one only,
     from the Institute of Marine Affairs)
5. Should we have a round table \ workshop or two with national participants?

6. How does my list of visits relate to the nine board members to be selected for the
   Board of Directors of the Authority? the five of these nine who are to be Trustees for
   the "Environmental Trust Fund"?

7. What do you think has been national participants' level of satisfaction with their
   participation? Any attempts to gauge this?

8.    Do we have lists of the people from: "Parliament, business, labour, NGO's,
      Communitybased organisations and other stakeholders..." who have been
      consulted in the process of "..forging the national consensus..." Yes and no: yes
      they were consulted by only about the proposed bill.
9.    Task 2: Consultations with people from: "Parliament, business, labour, NGO's,
      Community-based organisations and other stakeholders..." who were to have been
      consulted in the process of "..forging the national consensus..."

   April 12, 1995 note from Dr. Sultan-Khan to UNDP (in response to Gabriel Labbate's
   query)
"...senior advisor prepared a programme of consultations with rep's from the opposition,
senate, business, labour, environmental NGO's, the scientific community, governmental
agencies and other stakeholders..."
•    Where is this programme? Any evaluation of its results?

  "Report on the public comment process of the draft Environmental Management Bill,
  1994" prepared by Dr. Sultan-Kham et al. October 1994:
•    Where does this fit in relation to the six tasks identified for the C21 programme?

   "...s.a. served as leader of a Cabinet appointed team to manage the public comment
   process and to make recommendations for the revision of the Environmental
   Management Bill...
"...s.a. is at present serving as the coordinator of the Environmental Task Force which has
been established by Cabinet to prepare the ground work towards the establishment of the
EMA before the appointment of its Board of Directors. A copy of the Management Action
Plan of the ETF is attached...

•    Where does this stuff fit in C21 programme?

     Has the revised bill been passed?
•    Why no NGO's on the distribution list?     ( a lot of them submitted comments)

•    Any formal written or interview-style evaluations done with these participants?
10. How does this new body relate to the old ministry, its activities and mandate?
11. Do we have clear statements of desired impacts?
 Sort of. six tasks and five objectives described.
12. Do we have any indicators, case studies, interviews or any other kind of information
    about our performance and effects to date?

13. Task 1: Preparation of a Management Action Plan for "achieving establishment of EMA
    and for the capacity building activities in support of the EMA".
     S.K.'s time line and three page matrix is it?
 April 12, 1995 note from Dr. Sultan-Khan to UNDP (in response to Gabriel Labbate's
 query)

 "...copies of all outputs of the UNDP Senior Advisor have already been submitted in
 accordance with the Terms of Reference of his engagement..."
 MAP has been revised monthly
• Where are the more recent versions? (last I have is December 1994)

14. Task 3: Interministerial consultation leading to an MOU among the Ministers
   reponsible for the 28 agencies with environmental management functions re: the co-
   ordination role of the EMA

   April 12, 1995 note from Dr. Sultan-Khan to UNDP (in response to Gabriel Labbate's
   query)
"..s.a. prepared a draft MOU which is at present being considered by the Environmental
Task Force....
"...consultations are at present being held with rep's from the various gov'tal agencies with
envir'al managment functions with the objective of formulating a (sic) MOU among these
agencies and the proposed EMA.... working with members of the ETF in the finalisatoin of
the MOU before submission to the Ministers for their consideration."

   •   That was in early April. Where are they now? Advanced draft? Finished version?

 revised bill requires:"... not later than three months after the effective date of this Act....
 memoranda of understanding or other intersectoral agreemnts between the authority
 and such other governmental entities, which shall establish the mechanisms for co-
 ordination across jurisdictional lines and provide fo the implementation of integrated
 environmental management programmes as provided for in this Act." well...
15. Task 4: Preparation and implementation of Public Awareness and Education
    Programmes to sensitise the national community on critical environmental issues
    facing the country and the need for effective environmental management

•    Details, contents of the Public Awareness and Education Programmes fostered by the
     EMA?

    S.K. reported in April 1995 note that draft material exists and consultants being
    engaged: nothing more on this in the material I have received however.

    Benchmarks / indicators and who's been measuring? Participants evaluations,
    interviews or case studies? Impartial observers?
16. When did C21 programme end?                       Sept.\Oct. 95
17. Status and impact of NEAP and EMA following the end of the C21 programme?

18. Who have been \ will be our national (and perhaps international) partners in this type
    of monitoring of NEAP and EMA?

19. Task 5: Seminar \ workshops on the role and function of the EMA intended for people
    from business and labour organisations, professional associations, community groups,
    and 28 government environmental agencies. This task (#5) seems to have
    disappeared from the detailed description of project objectives and outputs. Was gibt?

    April 12, 1995 note from Dr. Sultan-Khan to UNDP (in response to Gabriel Labbate's
    query)

    "...s.a. has prepared a draft programme and other preparatory work towards the
    organisation of a seminar \workshop to sensitise the national community on
    environmental issues and the role and functions of the EMA.... to be considered by the
    ETF..."

    "...Consultants are to be engaged to formulate public awareness and educational
    programmes on the envir't."

•    That was in early April. Where are they now? Outputs? Results? Plans to monitor or
     evaluate changing attitutudes among the "national community", effects of "public
     awareness and educational programmes"?

•      Who are the nine board members called for in the Bill?

•      Who are the five trustees (drawn from the nine board members) for the
       "Environmental Trust Fund" called for under the Bill?

20. Task 6: Study on the scope and functions of a National Environmental Information
    System
    April 12, 1995 note from Dr. Sultan-Khan to UNDP (in response to Gabriel Labbate's
    query)

    "...s.a. and a committee of the Task Force have revised the Terms of Reference for a
    study on the scope and functions of the NETS. This document is at present being
    studied by the ETF..."
    • That was early April. Where are they now? My terms of reference suggest that a
         study has been done.

• Where is the study on a National Environmental Information System?
• Does this study indicate what would be the feasibility, impact and role of NETS?
21. "Report on the public comment process of the draft Environmental Management Bill,
    1994" prepared by Dr. Sultan-Khan et al. October 1994" - Where does this fit? How
    does it relate to the six tasks identified for the C21 programme?
22. Where are the following documents?
• MOU among the Ministers responsible for the 28 agencies with
    environmental management functions re: the co-ordination role of the EMA
• Details of the Public Awareness and Education Programmes, their activities and
    results, including any evaluation or feedback?
• Reports on \ evaluation of \ feedback from seminars \ workshops on the role
    and function of the EMA intended for people from business and labour
    organisations, professional associations, community groups, and 28
    government environmental agencies
• Terms of Reference for a study on the scope and functions of the NETS

•    The actual study on the scope and functions of a National Environmental
     Information System
23. Our initial hypotheses (based on what we can see from available information):
•    most of the project's outputs have not yet been produced

•      principal consultant did many things other than C21, but only fully carved out one or
       two of the project's six tasks
                     B. Questions for.

                     Govt, Business,
                     Institutional,
                     NGO meetings:


                     1.    Will you be \ who will be the nine board members to be selected for the Board of
                           Directors of the Authority? One of the five of these nine who are to be Trustees for
                           the "Environmental Trust Fund"?

  2.                       What has been your level of satisfaction with the process of establishing the EMB and
EMA?

                3. Was there effective consultation with people from: "Parliament, business, labour,
                   NGO's, Community-based organisations and other stakeholders..." consulted in the
                   process of "..forging the national consensus..."?
                 4. How does this new body relate to the old ministry, its activities and mandate?
                 5. With your \ your organisation's \ your type of organisation's participation in the process?

                6. Have you participated in seminars \workshops on the role and function of the EMA
                   intended for people from business and labour organisations, professional associations,
                   community groups, and 28 government environmental agencies?
                7.    If   yes, how did you find content \ process?
                8.    If   no, do you know anyone who did?
                 9. Any formal written or interview-style evaluations done with participants in these events?
                10. If     yes, how well done were they?

11. If   no, was there any other kind o f attempt to determine participants' satisfaction with the process?
12. Have you been involved in \ exposed to \ heard of interministerial consultation leading
    to an MOU among the Ministers reponsible for the 28 agencies with environmental
    management functions re: the co-ordination role of the EMA?
    Draft MOU has reportedly been prepared but is not in the material I received.

13. Have you had any involvement with the development or implementation of the Public
    Awareness and Education Programmes to sensitise the national community on critical
    environmental issues facing the country and the need for effective environmental
    management, to be fostered by the EMA?
  14. If yes, how have you found the content of this \ these programmes? their delivery?
15. If no, do you know anybody who has been involved?
 S. K. reported in April 1995 note that draft material exists and consultants being
 engaged: nothing more on this in the material I have received however.

16. Any evidence of the use of benchmarks, indicators or any other measures of status
    and changes in public awareness and knowledge about critical environmental issues
    facing the country and the need for effective environmental management?
17.

18. If yes, who's been measuring?
19. Any participants evaluations, interviews or case studies? Impartial observers?
20. Status and impact of NEAP and the EMA following the end of C21 programme?
21. Will you have any role in monitoring of NEAP and EMA?
22. Have you had any role in developing \ carrying out \ contact with or info about study on
    scope and function of National Environmental Information System?
23. What do you think would be the feasibility, impact and role of NETS?
24. Were you involved with public comment process for the draft Environmental
    Management Bill, 1994?

25. If yes, were you satisfied with this process and revisions introduced to the bill as a
    result?
Annex 38
Meetings scheduled
by EMA,
                                 H O W A R D     S T E W     A R T


                             UNDP Capacity 21 Mordtoring Mission
                              Appointments December 4 - 8 1995
                                                                                  ~' ~n ~ ~2~ Z52(
 Monday 04 December 1995

 9.0') -11.00 am        Meet with UNDP

 11.00 am               Meeting with the EMA at EMA's Office, 2nd Floor, The Mutual Centre, 16
                        Queen's Park West, Port of Spain

2.00 pm             í Mr Glen Goddard, Ag Chief Executive Officer, Solid Waste Management

                                                                              FOtx_ { 3 3 = 6 5 . 3 4

                   :i Mr Lennox Ballah, Executive Director, Institute of Marine Affairs,
                      Chaguaramas -r-ft

Tuesday 05 December 1995

9.00 am              Mr
                   .~ Bertrand Harnanan, Head Testing Division, Trinidad & Tobago Bureau
                      of Standards, Century Drive, Trincity Industrial Estate, Macoya,
                      Tunapuna f--' 6 ~ _ t{ 3 3 5
11.00 am
                        Mrs Victoria Charles, Director, Town & Country Planning Division,
                        Mirustrv of Planning & Development, Level 16, Eric Williams Finance Bu
                             ing,Independence Square, Port of Spain         -I

 1.00 p;n                                                  F- 6;L 25 - ?I-'
                        Joint meeting with Mr Wayne Maughan, Director, Project Planning and
                        Reconstruction, Ministry of Planning & Development, and Ms Kay



 2.00 pm           cí
                        Nls Molly Gaskin, Chairman, COPE (Council of Presidents of _ th
                        Environmental Non-Government Organisations) atêr?éF sT~,_

X3.00 pm 1              Mr Selwvn Dardame, Director, Forestry Division, Long Circular Road
                        (Opp. Long Circular Mall) F 6 . ~ $ - 5
                    Soi
Wednesday 06 December 1995

5.00 am                  V Mr Ramnarine Ramnasibsingh, Manager Finance & Corporate
                         Secretary, Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARip, UW1
                         Campus, St
                         Augustine F:~ b _ I

3.00 - 5.00 pm           EMA

Thursday 07 and Friday 08 December 1995 Meetings with UNDP
-
  ppred. 1995-11-30                     Z        v
Rudder, Ag Director, Technical Cooperation Unit, Ministry of P:aTning -
Development, at Mr Maughan's Office, Level 16, Eric Williams Finance
Building-, Eependence          Square,      Port        of       Spain
Annex 41
Documents related to
TOR 1
• Lists of organisations consulted by EMA
• Articles from Trinidad and Tobago newspapers re: EMA
        ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AUTHORIT

                         Workshop Auzust 15. 1995
                                       On




                                      AGENDA




30 a.m. - 8.15 a.m.       • BREAKFAST (will be provided).

                          • Registration of Partici..ants.
15 a.m. - 9.15 a.m.           Opening of Workshop - UNDP Senior Advisor/Project
                              Manager and Managing Director of EMA,
                              Dr. Shafeek Sultan-Khan.

                          • Update with respect to the establishment of the EMA.

                          • Obiectives of the Worksho , •~.
15 a.m. - 10 15 a.m.            Clustering of Environmental Issues - Dr. Roland Hosein,
                                Facilitator.
 15 a.m. - 10.30 a.m.           BREAK
1.30 a.m. - 11.30 a.m.          Clustering of Environmental Issues continued -
                                Dr. Roland Hosein, Facilitator
 30 a.m. - 1-7.00 noon          Introduction of Board of Directors of EMA -
                                Sir Ellis Clarke.
                          • Comments from Governmental Agencies.
.. noon - 1.00 p.m.
  VO                      • LUNCH (will be provided)
D0 p.m. - 3.00 p.m.             Workshops with Dr. R. Hosein & Dr. S. Sultan-Khan with
                                respect to the Memorandum of Understanding.  1



D0 p m. - 3.45 p .m.
                                                I • Group Discussions 1
                      • Presentation by Group Leaders.

45 p.m. - 4.00 p.m.        Summary and Conclusion.
                                                                         APPENDIX D

                                      LIST OF GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATIONS
                                        WITH ENVIRONMENTAL FUNCTIONS




        ;.

        JINISTRY




             Planning and Development



             Agriculture, Land and Marine

    Resources 3     Works and Transport
    t      National Security



d   5        Energy and --nergy-based Industries 5. Health
             Local Govc:nment


    3        Labour and Co-operatives



    ?        Community Development, Culture and Women s

    Affairs :0         Public Utilities

    !i education :_

             Foreicn A", -

    airs _ rinance
        Ofi..... of ..,_ ?"me



        Ministers:rv and Tourism



        kcal A.`fa:rs



N'STITLTIONS


     National i: suture of richer 'ducanon (Res.arc , Science & Technology)   Qv
     iHFRST)
S    University of the West Indies (UWI)


:9   Caribbean Industrial Research. institute (CARIRI)
                                                        D-2

 STATUTORY BODIES




      Airports Authority



      Water and Sewerage Authority (WASA)

      Trinidad & Tobago Bureau of Standards

      Institute of Marine Affairs
20.    Port Authority 21.

22. 23. 24.
25.     Law Commission
26.       Chaguaramas Development Authority
27.       Trinidad and Tobago Solid Waste Management Co. Ltd.
28.   Tobago House of Assembly
APPENDIX IV


SCHEDULE OF CONSULTATIONS HELD MONiDAY 26TH SEPTEMPER 1994 TO WEDNESDAY 19
OCTOBER. 1994.




    DATE                            AGENCY/INDIVIDUAL/GROUP

Monday 26      I.    Council of Presidents of the Environment (COPE)

               2.    The Pointe-a-Pierre Wildfowl Trust

               3.         The Trinidad and Tobago Biological Society

               4.    The Trinidad and Tobago Field Naturalists' Club

               5.    Ronald ms ICar.'rbean Environmental Engineering Consultants
                     -c

Tuesday 27     l.    The Employers Consultative Association

               2.    Consortium of Companies:

                     Alcoa Steamship Company, Incorporated
                     Amoco Trinidad Oil Company
                     Arcadian Trinidad Ammonia Lintited
                     Conoco Tnnidad. Incorporated
                     Enron Gas and Oil Trinidad Limited
                     Exxon Trinidad Limited
                     Texaco Trinidad, Incorporated
                     Unolocal Trinidad Limited
                     Terry Thompson (PAHO)
Wednesday 28   1.
                                                              _

               2.    Chnstine Allahar and D. Shurlan (REAL)

               3.    Keith Gibson, Ralph Brown, Isrefil Sahideen (Steel Workers Union)
4.   Senator Professor john Spence (UWI)
     DATE                    AGENCY/INDIVIDUAL/GROUP

Wednesday 28        5. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND INST=IONS
Cont'd
               - J. Ramoutar (Ministry of Finance)

               - E. LLewyn (Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards)

               - S. Laurent (CARIRI)

               - S. Laurent (CARIRI)

               - G. Pargass (Ministry of Social Development)

               - A. Chin (Ministry of Tourism)

                          - T. Sinanan (Ministry of Local Government)

               - L. Espinoza (Ministry of Local Government)

                          - J. Seenram (Ministry of Consumer Affairs)

               - A. Stew (Ministry of Consumer Affairs)

               - G. Goddard (Solid Waste Management Co. Ltd.)

               - R. Nedd (Town and Country Planning Division)

               - L. Saney (Town and Country Planning Division)

               - H. Farabi (UWI)

               - A. Drakes (Ministry of Labour and Cooperatives)

               - ti. Matthew (Chaguaramas Development Authority)

               - E. George (Ministry of Works and Transport)

               - O. Adams (Mitustrv of Energy and Energy Based
                       Industnes)

               - ti. Maharaj (Ministry of Housing and Settlements)
    DATE                          AGENCY/INDIVIDUAL/GROUP

Thursday 29    1.   Dr. 1. Chang Yen (UWI - Natural Sciences)

               2.   Selwyn John, Robert Guiseppi, Joe George (NUGFW)

               3.   Errol Cupid

               4.   L. Doodnath (UWI Biological Society)

               5.   S. Laurent (Orchid Society)

               6.   Jan Van Eyndhoven, Ruma Tavorath (UNDP)

Friday 30           Rosanna Hospedales, Dr. Ahamad Khan (PETROTRIN)

Monday 17           Office of the Chief Personnel Officer

Tuesday 18          Head of Public Service, Mr. Ainsley Tim Pow

Wednesday 19   1.   Ms. Louise Horne

               2.   United National Congress (UNC) Parliamentary Caucus:

                    - Mr. Ramesh Lawrence-Maharaj (Chief Whip)
                    -   Mr. John Hunphrey
                    -   Mr. Trevor Sudama
                    -   Mr. R. Pallackdharrysingh
                    -   Mr. C. Sharma
                    -   Mr. G. Hanoomansingh
                    -   Dr. Carl Sineh
                    -   Ms. Indera Sagewan
                    -   Senator Muntaz Hosein
                    - Senator Suren Capildeo

                    - Members of the Research and Administrative Offices
                                                                                                                                  TRINIDAD




                o of over the EMA                                                                    veloped Z= t maybe so. Neverthel one
                      `YOU CANT fight City                                                           gets feeling (and rumours fi outside TT
     Hall" is the saying, .that comes to                                                             have added to that feeling) t TI' would
     mind when reading the Cudrdian's                                                                only get the money on offer pro , ed
     report of the presentation of the                                                               government could prove, by passing
     Lrnvironment Management Authority                                                               dated environment legislation, that we
     (EMA) Bill in the Senate on January                                                             are rious; that we truly intend to use
    11,                                                                                              every me possible to protect and
    pr,'' After waiting two and a half years                                                         preserve our fral tropical, opical, island
    for the P;VM to keep the election                                                                ecosystem.
    promise to produce irow environmental                    ...the Senator has                        This environmentalist's comment is th
    legialAtim that would (and could) actually
    protect the environment of IT, last August               vigorously denied any                     I were to be handing out millions of
    the Ministry of and De. velopment                        my i payers' money to preserve the environmer
    graciously allowed the public to see what         accusation that the EMA `, wantsmall countrythat that money was u
                                                                                                     a to make sure thousands of miles
    had been decided in back-room committee was being set up to take
                                                      away,                                        to good effect.
rooms since the party came to power and advantage of grants from                                   However, few North American and Et
promptly abolished the NAR's Ministry of the
Environment                                          international agencies                        peen bureaucrats and bankers are also et
   Given just four short weeks to study the
                                                                                                               experts and fewer
                                                     and the developed world." ronmental studied the specialstill are
                                                                                                   like] have                      conditions
Bill and submit criticisms and comments to
                                                                                                   perte ing to tropical island ecosystem.
the Minister, environmentalists as ignorant       management agency" proposed in the Bill
                                                                                                   Nor are th same bureaucrats and bankers
of Parliamentary procedures as I, thought         really "include the ability to establish proce -
that our comments would be taken                                                                   famous checking to see that the funds
                                                  dures for the registration of sources from
seriously-, that there would be an open,                                                           they hand are well spent. As long as there
                                                  which pollutants may be released into the
                                                                                                   are laws on recipient countries' books to
public meeting to discuss the Bill and any        environment and the characterisation of
                                                                                                   presen e the vironment, so long will the
re-drafting resulting from our comments.          such sources (ie over-usage of fertilisers
                                                                                                   donors congra late themselves on their
But we were to have only one bite et the          and pesticides killing wildlife and fish in
apple of discord.                                                                                  generosity in help the less fortunate - and
                                                  Nariva)..,will that kind of obscure verbiage
What the committees and powers-that-be                                                             call it George.
                                                  really save Nariva, prevent littering a nd
thought about our comments, whether or not                                                         At the very end of that Senate report. N'
                                                  dumping, stop bush fires, preserve the
                                                                                                   ister Saith was proud to announce that
the Bill had been re-drafted to take account      unique plants of the Aripo Savannah, stop
                                                                                                   Bill "is Trinidad and Tobago driven. It is
of our criticisms, we were not to know until      soil erosion, protect water resources?
                                                                                                   a copy of some other country's legislation
the Bill was presented to the Senate with         What environmentalists really want to know
                                                                                                   which is a pity. Our past record is dismal.
only two or three days' notice to the public.     is "where's the teeth in the Bill?"
None of those most concerned had the op-                                                           the other hand Canada. Germany and A
                                                  We feel that so long as whet is laughingly
portunity to find out what changes, if any,                                                        tralia have (so I'm told) excellent envir
                                                  called our legal system is the one and only
                                                                                                   mental laws that really work because they
had been made. Such, it seems, is life in the     means of enforcing the law and punishing
                                                                                                   be enforced.
democratic Republic of Trinidad and               environmental offences, the EMA will be
                                                                                                   One local environmental lawler's opir
Tobago. We've been asked for our opinions         spinning top in mud The new legislation
- which "1 of us t a record number) have                                                           of the original Draft was that ours
                                                  may look good - on paper - may even
given. Yet, so far as I am aware, not one of                                                       couidn' enforced - at the very least, not
                                                  impress people reading it in conference
those submitting comments or criticisms                                                            in the mediate future. By which time
                                                  rooms of the developed world but, to date,
were told whether or not their views had                                                           Nari%a. vader's Bay, the Àripo
                                                  we've little evidence that they can be
been considered or that the Bill had been re- enforced any more than our existing -                Sdvarinah. w'nat s of Buccoo Reef. and
drafted. When tabling the legislation                                                              who knows w hat of precious natural
                                                  legislation is enforced.
                                                                                                   resources - maç have appeared forever.
Minister Saith is reported as saving that - « - e Thcre was one curious point in that Senate
                                                                                                   It may be that the Bill currently in Pa
want an Environmental Management                  Report. Senator Saah had been dealing with
                                                                                                   ment has some pleasant surprises in
Authority which is not a toothless tiger,         the Trust Fund to be set up "to help defray
should 1 say bulldog?" (One feels some one                                                         stor environmentalists. But while the
                                                  the operating and capital expenses of the
                                                                                                   myers-t be blatantly ignore the
left something out at that point).                Authority." He is reported as saying that re-
                                                                                                   comments. critics advice and expertise
A bulldog is what all environmentalists           sources mobilised from multilateral and bi-
                                                                                                   of local consen atio: and
would like to see - beginning with that dog       lateral donors, international foundations will
taking a firm grip on Nariva. However, on                                                          environmentalists who have studiec
                                                  be handled by the Fund.
reading the column adjacent to the Senate                                                          local scene, know what is happening
                                                  Not once, but many times, the Senator has
report we read, "Government still unable to                                                        arc terrible consequences of legislators
                                                  vigorously denied any accusation that the
                                                                                                   paying lip-service to the environment,
                                                  EMA was being set up to take advantage of
                                                                                                   one won whether the EMA will do any
                                                  grants from international agencies and the
                                                                                                   good at i Apart from providing nice
                                                  de
                                                                                                   cool comfortab fice work and juicy
                                                                                                   grants from overseas
Move Farmers at Nariva Swamp," which ap-
peared to be tied up in the sort of legal wran-
gling that has defeated almost even other effort
to enforce existing environmental legiaia tion.
Will the "regulatory, co-ordinating and
  Debate on Environment Bill
  Daly: Rubbish
"RUBBISH" is how
much of the                                         this bill, it's a very shal-
Environment                                         low exercise."
Management Bill was                                 UNC Senator Kamla
categorised by                                      Persad-Bissessar and
IndependentSenator                                  lade ndent Se or Rev
Martin Daly, who said                               Denrel Teeluckaingh
that he refused. to                                 also criticised the Bill,
swallow it.                                         respective)y, for
     Daly, speaking in                              contravening the
the Senate Tuesday,                                 Constitutional right to
presented 27 amend-                                 property and for its
ments to the Bill, in-                              likely impotence in the
cluding recommenda-                                 face of multinational
tions for the deletion of                           companies.
eight entire clauses and
eight sub-sections. He                                   "If Government
felt the Government                                 could not control the
had been "left high and                             pollution of the Cipero
dry by its advisors"
who ignored common                                  and Couva Rivers or
law traditions of,ustice.
                                       stop the death of fishes in our rivers
"It is rubbish to give the same        by Caroni Limited, could we MARTIN
Authority the power to make its own    DALY       manage those industrial
rules," he said.                       giants here?" asked Teelucksingh,
"We went through all of this in the
Financial Legislation Act when the     who referred to the destructive
Central Bank wanted to make its        Japanese, Korean and Taiwanese
own bylaws."
The environmental issue is one «hich   practice of drift-net fishing. "The
involved "big bucks", said Daly, who   same Taiwanese visitors in those
cited the recent T&TEC divestinent     days, who so disregarded our laws
contract which indemnifies Fo-
erGen against any new pollution        now own National Fisheries: if they
emission standards.                    disregarded government when they
C    Daly also noted that the Bill     were tourists, now they are owners I
came without any policy statement
on the Government's approach to        don't think they will take on the
the environment, including wildlife    EMA."
such as hornbills, leatherbacks and    Attorney General Keith Sobion,
the "rarelys otted and even            while admitting the Bill needed a
protected" lizards. " 'ith no policy   few amendments, nevertheless
position accompanying
argued that the Opposition and
Independent Senators' fears were
unfounded.
Describing the Bill as "user-friendly",
Sobion said that it represented new
concepts in It ialative drafting. He also
argued that it is trite law that regulations
don't infringe the Constitution', using the
example of traffic regulations.
jmmers go through a pracUae session on their drums for the
.) by KRISHNA MAHARAJ.

                         BU set to make a
                         world áf

                         Polluter:
abago and West
3ra, was bowled          difference:
---16,y as the

                          beware
West w against
North:atch
before the ad
atHeadingley             By KRIS RAMPERSAD
rr flew home to Trini-   FIRE-.STARTERS and polluters can
veek to sort out some    now be called upon to face charges by
ersonal business," in-   the      Environmental        Management
etting the deed from     Authority (EMA) which has the power
inister Patrick Mane     to take direct action against any person
land which the Gov-      in violation of environmental laws.
oromised him, for a          So said interim managing director of
                         the newly established EMA, Dr Shafeek
                         Sultan-Khan, yesterday.
 ,r report on the
                             The EMA board members,
 match oked as           appointed on June 1, were introduced to
 though his ll in the    the public yesterday - World
 clouds at .y Ground     Environment               Day          -
 when he golden          throughamodiaconferenceatStollmeycr's
 opportunity practice    Castle.
 before the Test           The Board, chaired by former
   fished back the       President Sir Ellis Clarkc, includes
   first        former   former permanent secretary John
                         Andrews as deputy chairman. Sultan-
                         Khan as managing dir ectcr and eight
continues on Page 32     other members, as well as O BEWARE
                         canttinues on Page 2
England aul Taylor
- then into an
intended
      PART OF the board of the new Environment Management Authority (from left) envirorvner0fist
   Molly Gaskin, interim managing director Shaleek Sultan40m, chairman Sir ENs Clarks and deputy
   chairman
                        John Andrews at yesterday's news conference. Photo by ANDRE ALEXANDER.


                          EMA to get
• BEWARE from Page l
                         $6.51V! from
                         World Bank
                              a corporate secretary.
                              Sultan-Khan noted
that unlike many other statutory authorities, the
Environment Management Act endows the
                                                       He revealed that the EMA is in the process of
                                                       finalising a lease arrangement with Barbados Mutual
                                                       and its offices will be located in the Mutual Building
                                                       on Queen's Park West. Clarke said the next meeting,
Environment Management Authority with the              to be held on June 22, will begin to prioriti se
teeth to enforce environment laws.                     environmental issues based on a list to be submitted
He further explained that the work of some 28 other    by environmentalist Molly Gaskin, who is a member
agencies that impact on the environment will be        of the board.
harmonised with the work of the EMA, including
the Town and Country Planning Division and the         Initial activities of the board will include an EMA
tourism sector.                                        logo competition which is expected to generate
  Sir Ellis revealed that the Board is finalising      public awareness about the board and its mission.
arrangements to access a $6.5 million loan from the    Furthermore, advertisements for the positions of a
World Bank; $950,000 from the United Nations           managing director, corporate secretary and five ad-
Development Fund and $900,000 from Govern-             ministrative managers will be placed in the local and
ment's budgetary allocation to help the EMA in its     foreign media and journals soon.
work.                                                  Otherboard members are trade union IeaderSelwyn
  He said the Board intends to take its mandate        John, corporate representative Nazir Khan, scientist
seriously, hence the convening of its first meeting    Beematee Narine, banker Robert Le Hunte, Raye
yesterday, the Whit Monday public holiday, because     Sandy of the Tobago House of Assembly, Dorothy
of the significance it places on World Environment     Sookdeo of the Ministry of Planning and Develop-
Day.                                                   ment and Dr Aman Young Hoon of the Faculty of
  "We are not only about enforcement, but co-          Chemical Engineering, UWI.
operation. We are hoping that through persuasion           Interim corporate secretary is Joan Ferreira.
we will encourage people to do the right thing, with
enforcement as a last resort," he said.
~ 72m start-up
for"' Environment
Act
 EMILE VALERE
 1H   ACCESS to $72 million -
                                  e Environment ManageBill is
                                  law: it was approved rliament
                                                                           Saith assured: "The emphasis of
                                                                       this law is not `command and
                                  last month and red Presidential      control" but "persuasion and vol-
  art-up capital, Government
  ends        to     put      the Assent last                          untary compliance.'"
  Environment magement Act                                                    The success of this Act, he
  in full effect r the next four                                           says,      depends     on     its
  years, says nning and                                                    enforcement provisions and
  Mobilisation Minr Lenny                                                  the "goodwill of the various
  Saith.                                                                   stakeholders       who     must
  'his budget, including a                                                 ensure that the objectives of
UnitNations Development                                                    the legislation are achieved.
Pro-nme (UNDP) grant of                                                  President of the Family Plan-
$5.6 ion, a World Bank loan                                            ning Association, Emile P Elias,
of $36 .ion and a                                                      said at the meeting that there
Government alloon of $6                                                was a strong link between
million, will be used >tablish                                         preservation of the environment
the Environmental iagement                                             and population control. He
Authority (EMA). ernment                                               suggested        that    an     FPÁ
will also put up ;t $24 million LENNY SAITH                            representative sit on one of the
in accessing the 'Bank loan.                                           EMA's boards.
                                  week Tuesday. "Now that the Act
  .c total figure will cover                                             Concerning fines, he said, poor
                                  has been proclaimed, the next,
  the of UNDP technicians                                              people who were damaging the
                                  stage of our efforts is now to be
  and re~nt expenditure,                                               land to grow produce cannot
                                  focussed on the implementation
  such as huand material                                               easily be blamed since they have
                                  of the Act," said the Senator. "It
  resources. It also help                                              no other way to make a living.
                                  will take sometime for it to be
  defray the operatind                                                 "Making polluters pay is for one
                                  fully operational."
  capital expenses of the 1.                                           sector      of     the     polluting
                                      The law is yet to be gazetted
  ie Senator, who was                                                  population," he noted.
                                  and several management ap-
  speaki Tuesdays monthly                                                  Another member of the audi-
                                  pointments are to be made.
  meet; the the American                                               ence questioned whether the en-
                                  However,       a     nine-member
  Chamber iustry and                                                   vironment bill was sensitised to
                                  Environmental Task Force has
  Commerce (Am                                                         the pollution created from elec-
                                  been established by Cabinet. It
    said      payments       for                                       tromagnetic fields.
                                  will be chaired by former
services  -esources from the
                                                                           He explained that in the US
                                  President, Sir Ellis Clarke, who
EMA, inng fees for permits                                             studies have proved that
                                  will be aided by representatives
and lits, will help support                                            electromagnetic energy, such
                                  from the labour, business and
and ine the financial                                                  as that which comes from
                                  Government sectors as well as
resources of rganisation.                                              electricity wires, has caused
                                  Non-Governmental               Or-
                                  ganisations.                         cancer and premature babies.
     "This is a great
hazard, invisible as it
is," he said
     One pregnant business
woman added that there are
two companies operating
close to her business and
they      pollute     dangerous
substances, including lead.
She asked whether the bill
could brine'
this to a halt.
                                                                          The release was sled by Molly Gaskin, environmentalist ana
          ARMENT,is       concerned about the growing                     president of the Points-a-Pierre Wild Fowl Trust and Kxrilyn
        incidence of `dh'virodàiental degradation", Planning              Shephard, director of the Trust, and honorary secre
and Development 9ltiister Dr l.enny Saith said in the Senate          environmental trust fund and an environmental commission. Saith
recently.                                                             declared that the new agency will not be a "toothless tiger" but will
' Government plans to deal with the problem by creating an            have the power to, among other things, establish procedures for the
Environmental Management Authority (EMA). The legtstative             registration of sources from which pollutants many be released into
framework in which this will occur was laid last Tuesday and          the environment and the characterization of such sources; specify
debate is scheduled to continue at tomorrow's eitting.                the quantity, condition or concentration of pollutants or substances
   S&ith, whose portfolio also carries responsibility for the envi-   containing pollutants which may be released into the environment
ronment, said the degradation was manifest in such areas as:          and designate hazardous substances or cats of hazardous
forest destruction (especially in the Northern Range); river pol-     substances, and the performance standards, procedures,
lution, irresponsible quarrying of limestone, gravel and sand;        safeguards and licensing or pe rmitting requirements in accordance
water pollution, particularly in the west coast; soil pollution       with which such hazardous substances shall be handled.




                                                                      'It's a recipe
resulting from indiscriminate use of agricultural chemicals;
improper disposal of liquid and solid wastes, etc."
     He attributed the problems to inadequate existing legal, reg-
ula•,ry and institutional framework and improper environmen-
inagement.
       eclaring that Government planned to fix this problem, he




                                                                      for
said it is intended that the act will:
     • build national environmental awareness;

     • encourage the private and public sectors to integrate envi-
ronmental concerns into their decisions;
     • achieve adequate                                                                                the principal architect of the




                                                                      disas
integration of the                                                                                     bill before the House. Perhaps,
country's environmen-     Key aspects of the new legislation                                           this could be the reason why it
tal management            comprise the creation of an environ                                          was said that this bill has been
system;                                                                                                a headache for parliamentary
                             ental management authority, an
     •           develo                                                                                counsel," said Dean.




                                                                      ter'
appropriate                                                                                            Bad law results if a legislative
environmental                   policies       and        efTective                                    purpose is not logically derived
institutionaF                   arrangements for carrying out or                                       and clearly stated, said Dean.
enforcing those policies.                                                                              A proper dingnosis of the
                                                                                                       environment would show that
                                                                                                       the most pressing need is to
                                                                      THE Environmental                control the discharge of pollu-
                                                                      Management Authority (EMA)       tants into the air, land, rivers
                                                                      is a recipe for disaster, said   and seas. Dean said that legis-


~OPE: flore dower
                                                                                                       lation is sorely needed to con-
                                                                      Senator Everard Dean.            trol pollution.
                                                                      Dean spoke during debate in      An understanding of envi-
                                                                      the Senate last Tuesday on       ronmental management would


 to the EMA
                                                                      the EMA bill. The debate con-    show that this bill, in "trying to
                                                                      tinuos tomorrow.                 be all things to all men,
                                                                         The lúll also Promises the    stumbles clumsily into territory
                                                                      u"tnblú+hmcnt of an environ-     already catered for" by other
                         THE Environmental Management                 mental trust fund and an         acts and agencies, said Dean.
                         Authority IEMA) should be an inde-           environmental commission.             Pollution control is the one
                         pendent statutory body, said the             "One has to conclude that an
                         Council of       Presidents of    the                                         (prong) that cries out most for
                                                                      EMA is being set up in a         comprehensive legislation," said
                         Environment (COPE).                          policy vacuum." said Dean.
      COPE is supporting the bill which i          is now before                                       Dean.
                                                                      The establishment of an          Natural resources management
the Senate.                                                           environment protection
                              The EMA said COPE in a release,                                          is already under the control of
                                                                      agency, he said, "did not        The Forests Act, The
                         should have the authority to handle          appear to be generated by a
                         such      emergency      environmental                                        Conservation of Wildlife Act,
                                                                      proper diagnosis of our envi-    The Fisheries Act, and the
                         disasters as lead poisoning in               ronmental situation".
                         Wallerfield, ecnd mining in Tobago,                                           Marine Areas (Preservation and
                                                                      The question of whether such
                         raw sewage effluent in the Tobago            an agency is appropriate for     Enhancement) Act.
                         seas and drift net fishing in local          Trinidad and Tobago has not
                         waters.                                      been addressed, said Dean.
                              COPE said it was concerned about        He said it is not clear why the
                         the reduction from          two repre-       government decided to rename the proposed institution the
                         sentatives to one of non-profit envi-        Environmental Management Authority when the `relatively easily
                         ronmental organisations on the EMAs          understood protection of the environment', already exists.
                         board of directors. It stated that the       It's understood that an American lawyer unfamiliar with our legal
                         national environmental policy should         traditions, was
                         have been tabled in Parliament before
                         its formulation.
                              COPE's concerns extend to inde-
                         pendent and opposition senators'
                         suggestion to reduce the EMA's
                         authority regarding its rule-making
                         authority.
Annex 5
Documents related to
TOR 2
         • Example of updated Management Action Plan for the EMA
• Template for preparing MOU's between EMA and government
agencies with environmental management responsibilities
 REVISED MANAGEMENT ACTION PLAN (MAP)
 FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY (EMA) EMA TIME LINE
 1995



                                                                                  1995
                     ACTIVITIESLTASKS                                                               0
     -                                                           JUN   JUL   AUG SEp     OCT                DEC
7 rF7 . Legal Legalr Matters                                                                   M.
a. Execution of subsidiary aim Nreement
4 _Execution of lease
                                   ies
                   -
 8. Financial MaUe rs
 a Designabon of Trustees
 b. Establishment of Trust Fund
 c. A funds for "start-up" of EMA
 d. Preparation of bud:pt.
                                                                                                        ,


                                                                                                                a
 9. Establishment and OV9.z! ration alization of EMA                                      =     WW
 a Appointment of Co                                                                           14", "I .
P. Appointment of Chief Executive Officer                                                                   W

                                                                       -mi
     Appointment of short-term Consultants                                                                          ,
                                                                                                            SAWA
                                                       ,
 d, Ypointment of Secretarial and Administrative SuF* rt Staff
e. Installation of manajffiement and technical ckmacity          -            ,
f. Ojeje rationalization of the EMA




 For Discussion Only S.G. Sultan-Khan Managing Director Environmental Management Authority June 1995
10. Public Awareness/Education
a Worksho"
b Public Awareness and Education ProjIM11107
                                            _
    Consultations with Stakeholders (Gfreiic ' y 21)
              -1 _j




                                                                           DRAF


TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO


       MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE
  ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY of......... (hereinafter
    referred to as the "EMA") on the one part and THE INSTITUTE OF
  MARINE AFFAIRS of............... (hereinafter referred to as the "IMA")
                              on the other part

WHEREAS, the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago
(hereinaRo called "the Government") is committed to developing a national
strategy fc sustainable development, being the balance of economic growth wit
environmentally sound practices, in order to enhance the quality of life and met
the needs of present and future generations and


WHEREAS, management and conservation of the environment and the impac
of environmental conditions on human health constitute a shared responsibility
an benefit for everyone in the society requiring co-operation and co-ordination
c public and private sector activities and
    WHEREAS, the IMA and other institutions have been performing varioL
environmental functions and services under existing laws, there is need for a cc
ordinated approach to ensure the application of those laws is consistent with th
Government's commitment and


WHEREAS, sustainable development should be encouraged through the use c
economic and non- economic incentives, and polluters should be held
responsib for the costs of their polluting activities and
WHEREAS, in furtherance of its commitment, the Government has establish
an EMA to co-ordinate, facilitate and oversee execution of the natior
environmental strategy and programmes, to promote public awareness
environmental concerns, and to establish an effective regulatory regime which w
protect, enhance and conserve the environment and
WHEREAS, in furtherance of Section 32 of the Environmental Management
Ac 1995, the EMA and the IMA are desirous of formulating an arrangement
whi shall establish tire mechanisms for co-ordination across jurisdictional lines a
provide for the implementation of integrated environmental managemt
programmes
IT IS HEREBY AGREED AS FOLLOWS.



(1) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        ------




(2) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        ------




(3)      ------------------------------------------------------------------ - ------
                                    --- --- - -




(4)      --------------------------------- --------------------- - ------------ -

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          -


(5)      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      ------ -




                     SIGNED FOR AND ON BEHALF OF

'Me EMA                                                  The IMA




                                    WITNESS
Dated &A .   day of   1995
     Annex 6
Documents related to
TOR 3
EMA's proposal for "Environmental Awareness Week"
       ENVIRONMEN'I'AI,                                                                                              I (EMA)
                    2nd Floor, The Mutual Centre, 16 Queen's Park West, Trinidad & Tobago, West Indies. Tele: (809) 628-8042. Fax: (809) 628-
                                                                                                                                        9122.




                November 6, 1995

                Mr. Jan Van Eyndhoven Resident
                Representative United Nations
                Development Programme 19 Keate Street
                PORT OF SPAIN


                Dear Mr. Van Eyndhoven,

                Further to our recent discussions, we hereby confirm that our proposal for Environmental
                Awareness Week has been postponed to next year June, to coincide with World
                Environment Day on June th, the anniversary of the establishment of the Environmental
                Management Authority (EMA).

                Enclosed is a draft proposal as a working document for your consideration and we would
                appreciate your participation and involvement for the planning of this programme of
                activities for next year. We would also appreciate if you can assist us in sourcing funds
                from         UNDP/TCDC,           UNEP        and        any        other        agencies.

                «'e would also like to take the opportunity to advise you that our executive management
                team, which has been recruited in furtherance of the selection process, will be available for
                an orientation programme in the first two weeks of December, before my departure on 16th
                December, 1995.
                1
                 ~~~'e plan to have a consultation with the stakeholders to introduce the Executive
                Management Team and to clarify the role of the EMA, explaining the programmes for
                1996-1998. We also invite your participation in this exercise.

                With best wishes.

                Yours sincerely,

                ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY
                   ~-_5 ~ \~t,.. -    Y, ~(~,
                                        t,

                Shafeek Sultan-Khan
                UNDP Senior Advisor/Project Manaáer
                Environmental Management Project
                SSK.mj
                wwk 96




Directors: Sir Ellis Clarke (Chairman), Mr. John Andrews (Deputy Chairman), Dr. Shafeek Sultan-Khan (Managing Director), Ms. Molly Gaskin.
Mr. Selwyn John, Mr. Nazir Khan, Mr. Robert Le Hunte, Mrs. Beematee Narine, Mr. Raye A. Sandy, Mrs. Dorothy Sookdeo, Dr. Aman Young H(
INTRODUCTION




ENIIRDMMENTAL

AWARENESS WEEK PROTECT

CONCEPT r PROJECT OBJECTIVES

PROJECT

DESCRIPTION

PROJECT ACTIVITIES
                               3    4
PROTECT RESOURCES
                               5    6

FINANCIAL                      7    8
                               9 10
PROJECT JUSTIFICATION
                               11
TIME TABLE
SEMINAR                        12

ITINERARY                      13

SEMINAR                        14

ITINERARY                      15

SEMINAR                        16

ITINERARY COSTS                17

BRUNCH SEMINAR (RAVEL -        18
AIRLINE
                               19
                               20
GRAVEL - AIRLINE AND GROUND

-WIRaNMENTAL AFFAIR 2OPOSED

MENU
  TPPORT

  ACTIVITIES JEVtJE

       GET
INTRODUCTION


                                                                    1
EMIIRONMENTAL AWARENESS WEEK
                                                                    1
PROJECT CONCEPT -      VL--C~
                                                                    2
(_
PROJECT OBJECTIVES PROJECT
                                                                    2
DESCRIPTION PROJECT ACTIVITIES PROJECT RESOURCES     3
FINANCIAL    4
PROJECT JUSTIFICATION      5
TIME TABLE   6
SEMINAR ITINERARY   7
SEMINAR ITINERARY   8
SEMINAR ITINERARY   9 COSTS .    10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20




BRUNCH SEMINAR TRAVEL -

AIRLINE



TRAVEL - AIRLINE AND GROUND

ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIR PROPOSED

MENU

SUPPORT ACTIVITIES

REVENUE

BUDGET

BUDGET
                    ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY

                                     PROPOSAL


FROM:          Shafeek Sultan-Khan Managing Director


TO:            Technical, Public Awareness & Education Committee DATE:

               October 17, 1995
SUBJECT:       Public Awareness Programme: Environmental Awareness Week

The following Proposal is hereby submitted for the consideration of the Committee:
INTRODUCTION:
As part of the Public Awareness & Education Programmes of the EMA the Board of
Directors has approved the following:
              i)      `EMA Logo Competition' - UNO Advertising Agency

             ü)       `EMA and You' - AMPLE Agency

             iii)     `Building a National Consensus on the Environment' - Aleong
                      & Agostini Advertising Agency
E., 'V I7R ONMEA'TAL A WA RENESS WEEK:
The E,,LA Logo Competition would be an ad-hoc project for the month of October,
while the other two projects will run from October to December 1995.
It is being proposed that an Environmental Awareness Week be held from Sunday
January 7th to Friday January 1-7th, 1996 as a separate environmental project to be
part of the Public Awareness and Education Programmes of the EIv1A.


PROJECT CONCEPT:
There is need to sensitize the public on the importance of the "Environment", not only
through the print and electronic media, but also through the mobilization of the people
of Trinidad and Tobago This mobilization must include:
                a)       people participation from all stakeholders

                b)       a national thrust towards sustainable development

                c)       illustration of commitment from all interest gro ups


PROJECT OBJECTIVES.

The main objectives of this project are:
a)        to sensitize the public utilizing interpersonal relationships and public
          participation to supplement and complement the EMA's efforts in the print
          and electronic media;
               b)      to initiate a programme of environmental activities

                       which could be the start of an annual project by the EMA
                       towards sustainable development;
               c)      to ensure that the EMA's image is not restricted to legal and
                       institutional activities, but instead is linked to community base d
                       organizations and the public at large;
d)        to involve all stakeholders and interest groups in environmental management
          activities so that the impression would not be that only the EMA is
          responsible for environmental management;
e)        to make an impact on the community that the environment is multi-sectoral,
          multi-disciplinary, multi-religious, multi-cultural and is God's creation which
          unites everyone, including politicians and political parties into one
          community,
     f)                    to educate the public that "Environment" is a concern for all.


PROJECT DESCRIPTION.
The Project will utilize the following vehicles:
               a)      the church in a multi-religious thrust, linking the environment
                       with God's creation, and a commitment from religious leaders
                       to illustrate their commitment in sermons and other religious
                       projects;
                b)       schools as an important vehicle, not only in creating an
                         environmental awareness, but also in influencing a change
                         in attitude and cultural behaviour;
                   c) culture - calypsoes, art and drama as a mechanism for
                       communicating to the publics of these art forms;

              d)        awards as incentives and recognition of outstanding
                        contributions from individuals, corporate citizens,
                        schools, communities and environmental NGO's;

              e)        a social function to end the programme.



PROJECT ACTIVITIES.

The project activities will be:


              a)        Inter-Religious Services, "Savannah             and Brunches
                                        Walks"
      POS:              Wildflower Park       Queen's Park Savannah   Stollmeyer's Castle




             b)        an Environmental Seminar to run for four days from Monday
                       January 8th to Thursday January l Ith, 1996. Lecturers will be
                       sourced from UNDP, World Bank, UNEP and the academic
                       community.

              c)        a Debating Competition for Schools

                  d)      an Environmental Affair, which will include an Awards

Ceremony                                  honouring competition winners


PROJECT RESOURCES:

It is proposed that the resources to manage this project shall be as follows:

              a)        Organizing Committee:

The Managing Director would chair an Organizing Committee comprising
representatives from the EMA's Board and Staff who are prepared to work on a
voluntary basis and abnormal hours.
S.F'DO:   Skinner's Park     Around the Park    Skinner's Park
TOBAGO:   Scarborough Mall   Scarborough Mall   Scarborough Mall
                      to achieve the project objectives. Coopted on the Organizing
                      Committee would be volunteers from the public and private
                      sectors and other stakeholders;

               b)     Project Coordinator/Project Assistants:
                      A Project Coordinator and two Project Assistants shall be
                      engaged to assist in the management of the project;
               c)     Advisory Committee:
The Chairman of the Organizing Committee would seek advice from the Public
Awareness Committee of the Board, and other members of the Board, on policy
issues and would seek their assistance on a voluntary basis to assist in project
implementation. He will also consult with UNDP, World Bank and other institutions.

FINANCIAL:

Partial funding for the activities of this week will be sought from:

• the local business community

• multi-lateral institutions:
                                - World Bank
                                - ÜN'EP -
                                PAHO
                                - VVHO
                                -UNDP -
                                IADB


%Vhile the Managing Director shall be accountable to the Board generally for the
project, he will report to and liaise with the Chairman of the Board, the Chairman of
the Trust Fund, and members of the Public Awareness Committee of the Board with
respect to formalities on protocol, finance and policy issues as deemed necessary.




.S$K gm

a mof oooora
PROTECT JUST IFICATION:


The main objectives of this project are met in the following activities:
a.       The "Savannah Walk", the Logo Competition, and the debates will sensitize
the public and supplement and complement the EMA's efforts in the print and
electronic media
b.       The "Savannah Walls", the Debates and the Environmental Affair will be
         instituted as annual events.

e.       The Logo Competition and the "Savannah Walk" ensure that the EMA's image
is not restricted to legal and institutional activities but instead is linked to Community
based organizations and the public at large.
d.       The Seminar involves all stakeholders and interest groups in environmental
management activities so that the impression would not be that only the EMA is
responsible for environmental management.
e.       The Interfaith Service, the "Savannah Walk" and the Logo Competition

              will make an impact on the community by showing that the environment is
              multisectorial, multi-disciplinary, multi-religious, multi-cultural and is
              God's creation which unites everyone, including politicians and
              political parties into one community.
f.            The Debate. the Logo Competition and the Seminar will help to educate the
              public and instill in them that "The Environment is everybody's business."




1995-10-19
a \cnv«eckI
    SUNDAY                 MONDAY                    TU1;SDAY                WEDNESDAY               THURSDAY                  FRIDAY
 JANUARY 7 1996          JANUARY 8 1996            JANUARY 9 1996          JANUARY 10 1996        JANUARY 1 1 1996         JANUARY 12 1996

6.30 AM                 7.30 - 8.30 AM
Interfaith Service at   Registration
Wildflower Park
                        8.35 AM
7.00 AM                 Opening address by
"Savannah Walk"         Chairman of EMA
                                                                                                                           6.30 - 7.30 PM
8.00 AM                 9.00 - 9.30 AM            9.00 - 9.30 AM           9.00 - 9.30 AM         9.00 - 10.00 AM          Cocktails
Brunch at               Lecture #1                Lecture # 1              Lecture #1             Workshop Sessions
Stolltneyer's Castle
                                                                                                                            7.30 - 8.10 PM
                        9.30 - 10.00 am           9.30 - 10.00 AM          9.30 - 10.00 AM        10.00 - 10.30 AM         Welcome by the
4.00 - 5.00 I'M         Lecture #2                Lecture #2               Lecture #2             BREAK                    Chairman and
Pre-Registration at                                                                                                        Other Speeches
Trinidad Hilton
                        10.00 - 10.30 AM          10.00 - 10.30 AM         10.00 - 10.30 AM       10.30 - 11.30 AM
San Fernando            Questions / Discussions   Questions / Discussions Questions/Discussions   Workshop Presentations   8.15 - 9.30 PM
Skinner Park                                                                                                               Dinner
                        10.30 - 11.00 AM          10.30 - 11.00 AM         10.30 - 11.00 AM       11.30 - 12.00 Noon
Tobago                  13REAK                    BREAK                    BREAK                  Acknowledgements         9.30 PM
Scarborough Mall                                                                                  and presentation of       Presentation of
                                                                                                  Certificates             Awards
                        11.00 - 12.00 Noon        11.00 - 11.30 AM         11.00 - 11.30 AM                                Auction/Entertainment
                        Lecture #3                Lecture #3               Lecture #3                                      Vote of Thanks
                                                                                                  12.00 Noon
                                                                                                  Lunch
                                                  11,30 - 12.00 Noon       11.30 - 12.30 PM                                10.30 - 2.00 AM

                                                  Lecture # 4             Workshop Session                                 Dancing
                           ENVIRONMENTAL WEEK


 Sunday 7th January,. 1996


        Start at 6:30 A.M. with inter-faith service at designated venues, then walk
around allotted area and proceed to final destination for brunch.


Environmental Seminar
                                                         WC~`

 Title: "The Fundamentals of Environmental Management"

 Monday 8th January, 1996
       7.30-8.30 A. M.        Registration


         8.35 A.M.             Opening address by the Chairman of the E.M.A.
                             Lecture Topics will cover - The Introduction to the
                             elements of environmental economics, accounting and
                             other fundamental pre-requisites to environmental
                             mangement.

        9.00-9.30 A.M.       Lecture #1 - Environmental Economics.( Dickson)

        9.30-10.00 A.M.      Lecture #2 - Environmental Accounting.( Peirce )

       10.00-10.30 A.M.      Questions/ Discussions

       10.30-11.00A.M. BREAK

      11.00- Noon            Lecture #3 - The Mechanisms for a co-ordinated and
                             integrated approach to Environmental Management.
Registration for foreigners at the Hilton between the hours of 4- -5 P.M.. ~-
                                                                             ,
Tuesday 9th January. 1996

      Lecture Topics will Cover -The balance between economic and ecological
             considerations -Issues of relevance for Trinidad and Tobago,the
             Caribbean and other Small Island Developing States on the road to
             sustainable development.

  9.00-9.30 A.M. Lecture #1 - The Balance Between Economic and Ecological
                  Considerations.(World Bank Lecturers)

9.30-10.00 A.M.      Lecture #2 - Resource Management - Issues of Relevance
                     for Trinidad and Tobago, The Caribbean and other Small
                     Island Developing States - Natural Resources. (Winston
                     Rudder)
10.00-10.30 A.M.     Questions/ Disscussions
10.30-11.00 A.M.     BREAK

11.00- 11.30 A.M.    Lecture #3 - Resource Management - Issues of Relevance
                     for Trinidad and Tobago, The Caribbean and other Small
                     Island Developing States - Pollution. (Dr. Ivan Chang-Yen)
11.30-12.00 Noon     Lecture #4 - Resource Management - Issues of Relevance
                     for Trinidad and Tobago, The Caribbean and other Small
                     Island Developing States - Health.(Dr. Le Maitre)


Wednesday 10th January-. 1996

9.00-9.30 AM         Lecture #1 - Monitoring and compliance with respect to
                     Pollution Control (Dr Hosein)
9.30-10.00 AM        Lecture #2 - Information Systems - IMA (Mr Duncan)

10.00-10.30 AM       Discussions/Questions
10.30-11.00 AM       BREAD:

11.00-11.30 AM       Lecture #3 - The Trinidad & Tobago Model for Legal and
                     Institutional Framework for Environmental Management
                     (Dr Sultan-Khan)

11.30-12.30 PM       Workshop Session
Thursday 11th January. 1996
9.00-10:00 AM
                    Workshop
10.00-10.30 AM
                    Sessions BREAK
10.30-11.30 AM      Workshop Presentations


11.30-12.00 Noon

12:00 Noon          Acknowledgements and Handing out of Certificates

                    Lunch


Friday 12th January. 1996
8.00 PM
                    Welcome by Chairman
8.15-9.30 PM
                    Dinner
9.30 PM             Auction (if necessary) followed by Vote of Thanks
                    After Auction, Dance until 2.00 AM
BRUNCH

Sunday, 7th January 1996



STOLLMEYER'S CASTLE:
            Rental                    $400.00
               Insurance              $200.00

OUTDOOR BANNERS (for three venues)   $1,050.00


RELIGIOUS REPRESENTATIVES (gifts)     $600.00




                                       SDC 0
CATERERS (to be contracted out)   $2,250.00
                            SEMINAR

   Monday January 8th - Thursday January 11th, 1996
             (325 participants for 4 days)

TRINIDAD HILTON BALLROOM
EQUIPMENT:
        Overhead Projector (1)              $404.80
        Screen & Flipcharts
Microphones (6)                            1" S o e /Z
                           COFFEE / PASTRIES (4 days)
                                          $27,031.55
                                                      '

LUNCH (1 day)                                        $-33,,4,1/-,
                                                              8`/

FLOWERS                                                 $400.00

GIFTS (Presenters/Facilitators)                       $1,000.00

NAME TAGS (Plastic clips $3.80 ea / pins $3.00 ea)      $975.00

SEMINAR KITS                                          $2,794.00

CERTIFICATES FOR PARTICIPANTS                         $3,000.00
AIR FARES (see attached breakdown)
                                                      $115,483.
10 GROUND TRANSPORTATION - 5 Lecturers
(to and from Piarco - St Christopher Taxi)
                                                      $1,600.
00 (Bacchus Taxi Service Mini Buses -

SECRETARIAT      /ñ~NrAi-   3   Da YS                 7 Soc c

                                             50 regional


    _   ,I't.,.') 4 ,iCnl       //~   L                   yc/ ~C 2
    1`C"M5
                                                          l! lv ~ ~
  participants)               $3,000.00
DEPARTURE TAX (56 persons)     $4,200.00
FIELD TRIPS ($800 each) to:
    Nariva Swamp

   Point Lisas / Wild Fowl

 Asa Wright ! Maracas Bay     $2,400.00
VIDEO RECORDERS AND SCREENS
Telephone Installation          $175.00

Telephone Calls                 $500.00
                        A'S TRAVEL SERVICE LTD


AIR FARES




                                    @ $1,168.78      $11,687.80


                                    @ $2,334.00      $70,020.00


     Regional                       @ $1,073.75      $10,737.50
                          10
     Barbados
                          tickets
                          30                          $8,538.00
     St Kitts / Nevis
                          tickets
                                        $3,728.60     $7,457.20
                          10
     Guyana
                          tickets
                                                      $3,728.60

                                                      $3,314.00


                                                    $115,483.10




*   Subject to the rate of exchange on the date of booking


* Discount will be given for booking more than 10
tickets
International

London          1 ticket
                2 tickets
Washington
                @
Boston          1 ticket
Toronto         1 ticket
TRANSPORTATION COSTS



INTERNATIONAL:
   Air Fares               $23,037.80

   Ground Transportation     1,600.00     $24,637.80

REGIONAL:

   Air Fares               $92,445.30 '
   Ground Transportation     3,000.00     $95,,445.30
$120,083.10
ENVERONMENTAL AFFAIR (500 persons)




DINNER                               $So,.ngz: b


MUSIC (DJ)                           $1,800.00


INVITATIONS (Printing)                  $430.10


600 PROGRAMMES                          $600.00


PAINTINGS                            $15,000.00


DECOR (Balloons)                      $3,000.00



7 0, y1 z    /3
FLOWERS (Tables)
                      DINNER MENU

                        CLASSIC CALLALOO SOUP



                     CHICKEN IN CARIBBEAN SA UCE
                     BAKED PLANTAIN COOK-UP RICE


     CHEF'S SPECIAL SELEC77ON OF GARDEN FRESH VEGETABLES


                            CREME CARAMEL


                             COFFEF.l7EA




(Chef will prepare some Vegetarian Dinners and some Fish Dinners)
 SUPPORT ACTIVITIES




T-SHIRTS                                  $110,100.00

SCARLET IBIS AWARD

 (Winner - School Debating Competition)     $1,500.00

RIBBONS: Printing                            $450.00

             Ribbons                          $82.00


PENCILS PRINTED (500)                        $800.00


PHOTOGRAPHER                                $2,000.00


PRIZES                                      $1,500.00
$116,432.00
                     REVENUE


AUCTION (15 paintings @ $10,000)    $150,000.00
SALE OF T-SHIRTS (5,000 @ $40.00) $200,000.00
DINNER/DANCE TICKETS (400 @ $125.00)
                          $50,000.00 (100
                          complimentary)



                                           $400,97.00
                                                                                                                     AUTHORITY_ _ __
                                                                                                                                -       -

                                      _
                                                                             Spclal ENIVRONMENTAL_MANAGEMENT
                                                                                              Events _1 996____


                                   Brunch        Seminar       Environ Affalr        Genera__I      T-S_h_Irts       Auction                -   Total_
                                  Sun 7,Jan)     Mon 8,Jan                      _                                                                        -

Revenue                          S-                            $ 50 000.00                        $ 200 000.00 $ 150,000 .00 $ 400 000.00


Costs:
                                   $ 40.00                                                                                         _$ 4000          _
Stollmeyers Castle: Rent          $ 200.00                                                                                      _$ 200.00_
Stollmeyers Castle: Insurance    $ 1050.00                                                                                        $ 1,0%00
Banners(three venues)             $ 600.00                                                                   -                    $ 60&00_
Religious Rep.(gitts) Caterers   $ ,250.00                                                                                        $ 2,25000
two venues): Equipment:                           $ 404.80                                                                        $ 404;80
projector Equipment:                             $ 1,80012                                                                      $_1.800.12_ - _
microphone(6)                                  __$_27,0,0_3                                                                     $ 27,031.55
Coffee/pastry(4 days)                           $ 92,445.30
                                                    _1.55                                     _                  _             $ 92445.30 -                _
Air tares: Regional Air tares:
                                                $ 23.037.80                                   _                                 $ 23,037.80
International Ground
                                                S 3.000.00                                                                      $ -3-000,00
Transport :Regional Ground                       S1,600.00                                                       _              _$ 1,6000000
                                                                                                                                    ^
Transport :Intenational
Departure Tax                                    $ 4,200.00                                                                      $ 4.200-00
                                               $ 166,40&22                                                              -      $ 166,40622_
Accomodation (56 rooms)
Secretariat: Rental (3 days)                         750000                                                                      S 7,500.00
Secretariat:      Telephone                    S 175.00_                                                   __                      $ 1 500 _
                                                S 500.0_0_
Instal.          Secretariat                                                                                                                    2,400-00__
                                                 $ 2,400.00                                                                       $ 500.00
:Telephone calls Field Trips
                                               _$ 33,441.89                                                                    $$ 33.441.89              -
Lunch Flowers Gifts                               $ 400,00                                                                        $ 400 00_
         _ Name tags                                1,000.00                                                                    !_-1,000.00
Seminar kits                                      $ 975.00                                                                        $ 975.0_0
                                                _$ 2.794.00                                                  _                   $ 2.794.00
Certificates for                                 $ 3.000.00                                                  _                     _3,000-00
Participants Dinner                                            $ 50,082 63                                                               _$ $
Music                                                           $ 1,80_0.00                                                     $ 1,800_00
                                                                                                                                    50,08163
Invitations                                                      $ 43010                                                          $ 430.10
Programmes                                                            _                                                          -$ 600 000
Entertainme                                                          60000
nt Paintings
Decor - balloons                                                           _    _- -                                           $ 15,000 00 _
                                                                  15,000 00                                                     -



                                                                                    Page 98
$--   $ 3,00000
                                                                                               t~enls 1696


                                     Brunch   Seminar     Environ Affalt   General             T-Shlits --     Auctlon ---
                                                                                                             ---               TOtaF
                                 jjun 7")          jan)

T-Shirts                                                                                               n6
Scarlet Ibis Award                                                              1,500-00                                       1,500 00

Ribbons: ribbons                                                               s 8?-00                                              '00
                                                                           -
Photographer                                                               2,000 00                                          S 2.00000
                                                                                1     5 0000
                                                                                    1- -




                             -
     Rate of conversion at
     25110/95

 Page z




 "   r
Al ate
   -
Annex 7
Documents related to
TOR 4
UNDP Port of Spain's budgets for their national Capacity 21 project
Draft terms of reference for preparation of a National
Environmental Management Plan (NEMP)
AMOUNT OF FUNDS SPENT ON SPECIFIED BUDGET LINES                4"

TRI/94/G81        Capacity 21



Budget Line       Amount(US$)           Budget Lire   Amount(US$)       TOTAL
11-51                       10000       52-01                1781.34
11-51                     1722.13       52-01                 182.34
11-51                     1604.12
11-51                       10000
11-51                     1264.57
11-51                       14000
11-51                       14000
11-51                           36.41
11-51                           7000
11-51                           7000



FMAI\ : ` G FUNDS ON SPECIFIED BUDGET LINES




TRI/94/G81          Capacity 21



Budget Line         Amount(US$)         Budget Line   Amount(US$)       TOTAL
11-51                           68000   52-01                   4000


Amount Spent              66627.23                            1963.68      68590.91

Remaining funds            1372.67                            2036.32
TOTAL   66627.23   1963.68   68590.91
             UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

                                Proiect Revision


 COUNTRY:                  Trinidad and Tobago


 PROJECT NO.               TRI/94/G81/B/99/99


 PROJECT TITLE:            National Consensus on EMA (Capacity 21)

 The above-mentioned project is amended for the following purposes: (1)

        Reduce Line 17-002 (National consultants) by $7,000.

     (2)    Establish Line 16-001 (Missions) at $2,000.


     (3)    Establish Line 33-001 (In-Service Training) at $5,000.


           $5,000.                                                      (4)
                                                                        Re
Previous Budget "A"                         US$150,000.00    duce Line 47-
                                                                       001
Revised Budget "B"                          US$150,000.00     (Equipment -
                                                             International)
 Increase/Decreas                                -              by $5,000.
                e

                                                                     (5)
                Establish Line 46-001 (Equipment - Local Procurement) at




 Agreed on behalf of the Government                   Date



 Agreed on behalf of the Executing Agency             Date
Agreed on behalf of UNDP   Date
~uun~nI          : irinioaa ana iooago                        I   DATE PRINTED: 12/09/95 j PAGE    1 --
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 PROJECT NUMBER : TRI/94/G81/B/99/99                            I  SHADOW BUDGET I LAST REV: 12/09/95
 PROJECT TITLE : NATIONAL CONSENSUS ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL EiVIRONMEN
                  T AGENCY


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PROJECT BUDGET COVERING UNDP CONTRIBUTION (in U.S. dollars) -----------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------


                                                                                                  021 001 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL
        ---------------------------------------------------------------------                     INFO                             1   20,0001
             PROJECT COMPONENTS                  1   TOTAL AMT        1994 AMT       1995 AMT
              M/M M/M M/M
        --------------------------------------------------------------------
'010 PROJECT PERSONNEL
'11 Experts:
011-051 INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANTS                        68,0001                 1     68,0001
                                                            5 . 0 1          1            5.01
  11-99 Subtotal (•)                                     68,0001             1         68,0001
                                                            5.01             1            5.01

'16 Mission costs:
016-001 MISSION COSTS                                     2,0001             1          2,0001
  16-99 Subtotal (•)                                       2,0001            1          2,0001
--------------------------------                     -------------------
---------                                            -------------------
   •17 National Professionals:                       -------------------
 017-001 NATIONAL CONSULTANTS                        ---------
                                                          10,0001                       10,0001
                                                            5.01                           5.01
017-002 NATIONAL CONSULTANTS                 1           13,000                         13,0001
                                             1              7.01                           7.01
  17-99 Subtotal                      (')                23,0001                        23,0001
                                             1              12.01                         12.01

019 COMPONENT TOTAL                    (")   1           93,0001                 1      93,0001
                                             1       17.01           1     17.01
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
'020
        SUBCONTRACTS


           -CMDONENT TOTAL            (") 1         20,0001          1
                                      20,0001 ----------------- -----------------
             -----------------------------
'
_3- -R.i"ING       I         I         1         I NSERVICE -TRAINING -------
    ..-.- - .---..5,0001--..-..-.-------5,0001 - - - -     _         -


'39       CZM,-ONENT TOTAL           (•') 1          5,0001         1     5,0001
          -------------------- -------------------------- -----------------
                    ~rinicaa ana iooago                          DATE PRINTED: 1Z/U9/9S j PAGE      Z -
 --------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PROJECT NUMBER : TRI/94/G81/B/99/99                           I SHADOW BUDGET I LAST REV: 12/09/95 I
  PROJECT TITLE : NATIONAL CONSENSUS ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL EAVIRONMEN I T AGENCY
                                                                                                    I
                                                                                                    I



 --------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1
              PROJECT COMPONENTS             I TOTAL ANTI 1994 AMT i 1995 AMT I

I                                                I       M/M (    M/M i        M/M
1'040 EQUIPMENT
I                                            I               I        I
                                                       .
1 046 001 LOCAL EQUIPMENT                  1           • .
                                                         5,0001     1
                                           5,0001
1 047 001 INTERNATIONAL EQUIPMENT          1         10,0001        1
                                           10,0001 ----------------------------
------------------------------------------------ 15,0001
1 049    COMPONENT TOTAL             (") 1                          1     15,0001
                                                                                         1

__________________________________.._________________________________
                                                                             ,0001 `
_-4 1'050 MISCELLANEOUS                      I               I       I
1 053 001 DOCUMENTATION
1 052 001 REPORTING                          1
                                             I         10,0001
                                                       4,0001        1
                                                                     1    10,0001
1 054 000 FIELD OFFICE ADMIN. COSTS          1         3,0001        1    3,0001

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1 059     COMPONENT TOTAL            (") 1        17,0001           1   17,0001
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
1
099         BUDGET TYPE              TOTAL         (" •)            150,0001 1
            150,0001 I 17.01         1 17.01 -------------------------- --------
-----------------------------------------
999      UNDP TOTAL                 ("•) 1           150,0001        1    150,0001
                                             1           17.01       1      17.01
PROJECT BUDGET COVERING UNOP CONTRIBUTION (in U.S. -- -----------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------      dollars) I -------------------------------------
                                                      ---------
          DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR A CONSULTANCY
          ASSIGNMENT IN THE PREPARATION OF A NATIONAL
          ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN (NEMP) FOR
          TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO



1,0 BACKGROUND


         The Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago (GORTT) is
committed to the rationalization and strengthening of the legislative and institutional
framework for enwnnmental management in Trinidad and~Tobago and has already taken
a number of initiatives in identifying appropriate policies and strategies needed to address
the environmental concerns of the country.



         Over the last few years a number of studies has been undertaken with the view
to establishing a rational basis for the environmental management of Trinidad and
Tobago. These studies hay e indicated that measures need to be insti tuted to develop a
regulatory and a Iministrative framework appropriate to the challenges of sustainable
development The studies and consultations which address the priority environmental
issues of the country include -



            e        the Trinidad and Tobago National Report on
                     Environment and Development submitted to
                     LACED 1992,


                e      the Medium Term Policy Framework 1993 -
             DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR A CONSULTANCY
             ASSIGNMENT IN THE PREPARATION OF A NATIONAL
             ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN (NEMP) FOR
             TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO



1.0 BACKGROUND


            The Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago (GORTT) is committed
to the rationalization and strengthening of the legislative and institutional framewurk for
environmental management in Trinidad and'Toba~ and has already taken a number of
initiatives in identifying appropriate policies and strategies needed to address the
environmental concerns of the country.



            Over the last few vears a number of studies has been undertaken with the view to
establishing a rational basis for the environmental management of Trinidad and Tobago
These studies have indicated that measures need to be instituted to develop a regulatory
and administrative frame«ork appropriate to the challenges of sustainable development The
studies and consultations which address the priority environmental issues of the countr`
include -



               e        the Trinidad and Tobago National Report on
                        Environment and Development submitted to
                        U'.tiCED 1992;


                   e      the 14edium Term Policy Framework 1993 -
                          lÛ~:,
the Policy Brief adopted by Cabinet in
July 1993 as the basis for the instructions
for the drafting of an Environmental
Management Bill which will establish the
Environmental Management Authority as a
regulatory, coordinating and management
authority for the environmental
management of Trinidad and Tobago;
the position paper of the Trinidad and
Tobago delegation to the Regional
Technical Meeting of the Global
Conference on the Sustainable Development
of Small Island Developing States
(GCSIDS),
the Programme of Action of the GCSIDS
conference which Trinidad and Tobago
adopted in %lay 1994,

a % ariety of studies, programmes and

policies prepared by the sectoral agencies

with responsibilities in the environmental

management area A list of these studies is

attached as Appendix I.
            Pursuant to its commitment towards sustainable industrial, socio-economic and infrastructural
 development, the GORTT is seeking the services of a consultancy firm to formulate a comprehensive,
 strategic management programme, a ong with appropriate
institutional and management systems, necessary for integrating environmental
ustainability concerns into the broader

planning


           PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION



           The consultancy   wil l   be funded from resources made available to the Government of
Trinidad and Tobago by the World Bank.


           The Environmental Management Authority           (ENLk)   in conjunction with the Ministry
of Planning and Development, w i l l be the joint executing agencies for the project.


           A Project Coordinator will be appointed by the Ministry of Planning and                          Government
Development The onsultancy firm will be contracted to the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of                  agencies
Planning and Development, and           wil l   report to the Permanent Secretary through the Project       vtith
Coordinator         .ill recommendations made by the consultancy firm         wil l   be revie~~ed by the   environment
Project Coordinator and a specially appointed multidisciplinary team to ensure that the                     al functions
priorities of the Government of Trinidad and Tobago are adequately reflected and that the
recommendations and strategies are consistent and
                                                               environmental management. The
can be integrated into the overall strategy for sound,
national
multidisciplinary team will comprise contracted consultants as well as representatives of


           The multidisciplinary team of representatives of Government agencies will provide specific expertise
 in.
                       natural resource
                       management, waste
                       management; environmental
                       health,
                       coastal, wetlands and marine matters,
                       land use management,
                       demography, socio-
                       economic planning.


         The consultants on the multidisciplinary team will provide expertise in -



                       disaster management, pollution
                       control, environmental
                       economics, legal and
                       institutional analysis,
                       communications,
                       social sector poverty analvsis




 3.0 INPUTS



          The Government of Trinidad and Tobago will provide furnished office
 accommodation, secretarial and administrative support, project related transportation, local

                                                          Gy

                                                                       ess to relevant
         The Government of Trinidad and TobaLlo v,111 facilitate
databases, governmental agencies, N'GO's and other local organisation as are reasonable
and feasible.
telephone   and   fax   services
 4.0 OBJECTIVE



             The objective of the consultancy is to produce a comprehensive National Environmental

 Management Plan (NEMP).


       The NEMP is envisaged to be a strategic planning tool which will. inter alia,



                         elaborate a comprehensive strategic environmental

                         management programme, establishing an antic ,         ipat
                         ry and preventative approach towards environmental
                         problems, and directed towards both the immediate

                         and   long-term     environmental   issues   facing    the




                        1~ r establish a policv basis for ensuring integration
                        of environmental concerns into the overall national
                        socio-e n mic and physical development strategies r




                                  country,

5.0     SCOPE OF WORK



            The consultancy, which will be undertaken in consonance with "best practice"

criteria, will identify the key elements of an environmental management strategy and will

include -

                         of the Government
    identification of environmental problems and
 priorities selection of priority areas for immediate
and long term action,
designation of environmental management
objectives,

                               definition of priority actions,


   consultation ~tiith key stakeholders (i e            affected

 population, polluters, resource users, Government

 agencies, experts and NGOs);           `ÍQ :   -J h-U..l ?




analysis of the institutional structure and

performance




methodologies for mobilising financial resources
from both internal and external sources,




 methodologies for setting and

 monitoring performance indicators,


                policy options for integrating environmental
    concerns into the broader de%elopmental objectives

 and for the formulation of a National Environmental

 Policv for the country (see Clause 18 Environmental

 Management ,pct, 1995),

                  ¡.- -% elaboration of a rollin_u auenda
 for environmental action, W~


 identification of (an) appropriate investment
 programme(s) to satisfy the long term requirements '1 ~
 to sustainable environmental management
    Among other activities the Consultancy team will be required
                                 to:


                   provide an overview of the state of the Environment
                    utilising the available environmental data and other
                  information,



                 identify critical environmental information gaps, as

                 well as, areas of insufficient baseline data,
                                                                         Crv

       •          review, analyse and assess existing macro-economic

                  policies, as well as, legislation and standards with

                  environmental implications recommend policy, legal

                  and institutional initiatives required for sustainab le
                                                                 1
                t, em ironmental development,       L", .   I.       ?



•          prioritize the existing environmental problems and issues

           and establish a comprehensive, strategic management plan

           to address specific environmental problems, including the

           legal and institutional requirements for implementation




                 analyse and e, aluate the environmental impact of

                 solid waste, water waste, water supply and liquid

                 waste management and prepare a comprehensive
                 waste management plan,
In formulating the \- E%LP the consultants shall be required to -
prepare
            a comprehensive natural                 resource
                                       with
management plan, consistent                      carrying      -

capacity - based planning processes and, which
specifically includes mechanisms for:


          forestry resources, watershed, land-
          use, fisheries, marine, wetland and
          coastal management,


          the preservation of natural bio-
          diversity   and    the    protection    of
          environmentally sensitive areas and
          species

recommend appropriate strateLies to control air,

water, land and noise pollution for the maintenance of
environmental and public health,


review, assess and make recommendations on disaster
preparedness plans which include natural and man-




elaborate specific guidelines for the control of


             the use of aurochemicals


          quarrying and sandmining


          loss of forested lands,



                         s
made hazards as well as industrial accidents and toxic
and         hazardous          waste         disposal,
- GZ- review the impact of demo~a~phy, poverty and other
         socio-economic factors including t unsm/ecotourism
         on       the   environment      and      make      specific

         recommendations with regard to these -,-~   7
review and propose mechanisms for the
development of sites of natural heritage including
those of historical, cultural and ecotourism
       significance,
   7

  l ~ identify the environmental educational, training and
            public awareness needs of the country and make
         appropriate recommendations ldentifv the roles and
functions of the national institutions, including the
public information systems such as N.-kLIS, in


        review and analyse the international conventions and


       increasing tl~ national awareness of environmental
       issues,


        define the roles of Government, the public and
        pri\ate sectors and the NGOs in environmental
        management, „i)


       treaties relating to the environment to which Trinidad
       and Tobago is a party or contemplates becoming a
       party, with specific regard to the legal, institutional and
       management obligations and requirements of the
       country,
                            propose policy options towards the formulation of a

                            National Environmental Policy for the country (see

                            Clause 18, Environmental Management Act, 1995)

                   I   ,1

                            prepare policy recommendations which encourage

                            investments in both the adoption of internationally

                            accepted enui¿ónmentally sound technologies, as well

                            as, in environment management technologies %~h ich

                            are consistent with national environr-.ental policy,



                            recommend an appropriate organisational structure

                            for the Environmental Management Authority




6.0   TRANSFER OF TECHNOLOGY



        The Go-ernment of Trinidad and Tobago will provide counterpart staff to work

alongside the project consult ants The counterparts are required to have full exposure to the




7.0      INDICATIVE TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR MEMBERS OF THE

         CONSULTANCY TE.01



         T he consultancy team assembled by the appointed consultancy firm shall, inter

a1ia, include consultants with the following specific expertise and experience
» ork of the consultants and the transfer of technical know ledge, skills, methodologies and

capabil'it'ies   as     required     for     each     component       of     the     project
7.1      LEGAL/INSTITUTIONAL ANALYST


      The consultant will be required to



(a)      conduct a comprehensive review and analysis of the country's
         exiling environmental legal/institutional framework, taking into
         consideration the work done in the preparation of the
         Environmental Management Act, 1995, and the need for
         consolidation, codification and overall rationalization of all laws
         with environmental implications Make recommendations with
         respect to the formulation of an environmental code for "green
         and brown issues" and other measures fundamental to effective
         enforcement provisions,


review the existing legal/ institutional framework for international
cooperation on environmental issues. Conduct an analysis of conventions,
treaties, international agrecments and other instruments to %~hich Trinidad
and Tobago is a party, identifying the respective national obligations and
requirements of these agreements and instruments. Make further
recommendations with respect to future agreements, international
Conventions and other instruments to which Trinidad and Tobago should
become a party and the benefits, obligations and resource implications
resulting therefrom,




                                             It
(c) analyse existing environmental legislation and
regulations and their implementation and enforcement to
determine the adequacy of the legal authorities to address
the principal issues pertaining to noise, air, land and water
pollution control, biodiversity protection, and natural
resources management,
(d) analyse existing institutional arrangements to determine
the adequacy of the institutional infrastructure and the
national institutional capacity to perform the necessary
planning, regulatory, monitoring and enforcement functions,
Íe)       e,,aluate the puNic awareness of environmental
issues, the ueneral environmental av~areness of the IeLal
and business community, environmental education and
outreach efforts by the Government and non-governmental
organisations (NGO's) and the level of the national
environmental consciousness,
define the roles of the key stakeholders in the integration of
environmental management into national de,elopment
4ualifications and Experience



                     Formal training as evidenced by a higher degree in

                     Laws from a recognised University with specific

                     specialisation or experience in Environmental Law.

                     Experience in Public Administration will be a distinct

                     advantage.



            (ü)      Considerable experience in analysing and advising on

                     environmental laws relating to both localised and

                     trans-boundary issues and concerns affecting all

                     environmental media



            (iii) Familiarity with environmental legislation, regulat ions and

                     procedures in a common la%ti jurisdiction such as

                     Trinidad and Tobago will be an asset




        ENVIRONNIENT-kL ECONOMIST



        Within the context of a broadly-based analysis of the economics of sustainable

developmental paradigms for Trinidad and Tobago, the co nsultant will specifically.



                     provide      an     economic     qua:~:ification     of    the

                     environmental costs implicit in various environmental

                     problems, with a view to establishing priorities for

                     policy     intervention   The     environmental      problems

                     assessed     will   include     those   identified   by    the

                     multidisciplinary                                         team
(b)      analyse economic policies (i.e. incentive

         framework) to identify those that:



have an adverse impact on the environment, such as grants

for clearing land, quarrying or subsidies for use of

agrochemicals, or that


(ii)     discourage efficient use of scarce resources, such
as below-market pricing of resources, and recommend
necessary policy changes,

(c)      identify an appropriate mix of economic and

regulatory incentives and analyse the environmental

management capability in terms of available skilled labour,

equipment and technology,

(d) analyse the consistency of long-term macroeconomic

         policies for sustainable development implications

         in the light of short-term policy effects, and

         recommend necessary policy changes,



(e) define the roles of the key stakeholders in

         environmental policy formation
Oualifications and Experience



Formal training as evidenced by a higher degree in Economics from a

recognised University with specific specialisation or experience in

Environmental Economics Experience in sustainable Development will be

a distinct advantage



(ii)      Considerable     experience     in   analysis   and   quantification   of

           environmental     costs      and    the   economic    implications    of

           environmental policy



  (iii)     Familiarity with economic accounting an d macroeconomic police

            formulation




   7.3         NATURAL RESOURCES INIANAGENIENT SPECLALIST


       The consultant gill be required, inter alia, to



(a)         Identifti measures to alleviate adverse environmental impacts

            which result from the current system of land tenure/ownersh ip

            and threaten the sustainable development of the natural resource

            base
Qualifications and Experience



(í)     Formal training as evidenced by a higher degree in some aspect
        of Natural Resources Management from a recognised University
        Further specialised training or experience in Environmental
        Planning will be essential



(ü)     Considerable experience in the determination and analysis of
        environmental impact and the design and implementation of
        appropriate mitigation measures.



(iii) Familiarity with the issues of planning and management of national
        parks and protected areas and the conser-ation of biological
        di~ersity in small tropical islands


(iv) At least five (5) years experience as a Senior executive in Natural
        Resources       Management         at   the     national        level




            0)
                    At least ten (10) years consultancy experience in
                    Natural Resources Management
(b)      Perform a comprehensive review of the existing

         issues pertaining to management of resources in

         the coastal zone, including wetlands, beaches,

         coral reefs, seagrass beds, fisheries and coastal

         waters, identifying gaps and weaknesses and

         recommending measures to improve management


(c)    Evaluate existing forestry protection programmes,
       analyzing recommendations proposed under the FAO
       Tropical Forestry Action Plan, and OAS National
       Parks Plan and recommending measures to
       strengthen forestry resources and watershed
       management, prevent soil erosion and protect
       wildlife habitats
(d)    Review management of the existing, or proposed
national park's and protected areas and recommend
measures to prevent further destruction of wild life habitats
and conserve areas of ecological significance b~
implementing; carrying - capacity - based de-elopment
planning processes

(e)      Identify sensitive environmental areas and species

         (see clause 41 of the ENIA Act)



Define the roles of the Government, the public and private

sectors and the local NGOs in natural resource management




                               1
                               6
7.4      POLLUTION CONTROL SPECIALIST


      The consultant will be required to -



(a) Perform a comprehensive review of the environmental issues

       pertaining; to the management of noise, air, land and water

       pollution, solid and hazardous wastes disposal from industrial and

       agricultural sources and recommend measures to provide sound,

       cost effective environmental management practices and procedures.



(b)      Evaluate the status of pollution arising from industrial practices

         (oil spills from oil extraction, transportation and processing;

         operations) including the impact on ground water quality and

         make recommendations accordingly



Investigate the relationships between socio-cultural factors and attitudes

to%~ards vaste management, pollution control, etc , and define roles for

the Government. public and private sectors and NGOs involvement



Assess the particular problems of the country with respect to receipt,

storage, collection, treatment and disposal of ship-generated wastes and

review the need for port reception facilities and final disposal in the

management of these wastes




                                              is
               (e)     Evaluate the environmental impact of



(1)      existing collection, storage and disposal facilities for solid wastes,

         and



(ü)      waste %%ater collection, treatment. recycling and disposal

         systems for liquid wastes.



Based on these analyses, prepare a comprehensive waste management plan,

recommending environmentally sound, cost effective opti ons for collection,

storage, treatment, recycling and disposal of liquid and solid wastes.




Qualifications and Experience



Formal training as evidenced by a higher degree in Environmental

Sclencesi'Envifonmental     Engineering    Specialised    further   training   or

experienced in pollution control ~~íll be a distinct advantage



(ii)     Knowledge of the development of environmental standards and at

         least five (5) years experience in the preparation of emironmental

         standards in a developing country



(iii) At least five (•) years industrial experience in pollution control and

         mitigation measures




                                               19
(iv)      At least ten (10) years consultancy experience in pollution

          control.




7,5       SOCLAL SECTOR/POVERTY SPECL-1 LIST


       The consultant will be required to.



(a)       Identify and analyse the environmental impact of existing

          population        density,         poverty,      and        related    living

          standards/conditions e g housing, energy use, water and sanitation

          use, natural resource use (including farming, livestock rearing,

          manufacturing          or     gathering    systems)    on      environ mental

          sustainabiht\



              (b)         Analvse the environmental impact that may result

                          from        existing/planned    Governmental      efforts   to

                          enhance livinv conditions in various areas



Evaluate the existing infrastructure for water supply, drainage, ~tiaste

disposal, etc . and the environmental and public health implications arising

therefrom



Evaluate the status of environmental public health with regard to morbidity

and mortality due to environmental factors e g effects of pollution,

sanitation and hvgienic conditions (including disposal of medical ~~aste

materials) and food quality control



                                                     lu
             (e)    Define the roles of the Government, public and

                    private sectors and NGOs in addressing the policy and

                    practical issues which arise.




Qualifications and Experience

                    Formal training as evidenced by a higher degree in

                    Sociology.    Specific    further    specialisation   or

                    experience     in   Physical     Planning       and   /or
                    Environmental Economics



            (ü)     Considerable experience in the issues of population

                    and poverty in relation to the environment and

                    infrastructural development will be essential



                    At least five (5) years consultancy experience in the

                    socio-economic      dimensions      of   environmental
                    n;anaLement in a de\eiopinu country




8.0 OUTPUT/DELIN'ERABLES

      The intended output of the consultancy is a comprehensi%e National

Environmental Management Plan



        The consultancy firm will be required to produce the following outputs and

submit them to the Project Coordinator as scheduled below
(a)       At the end of the first month of the assignment, a

          combined inception report and a progress report
          which will include:


a review of the terms of reference for the assignment,
a work programme for the duration of the assignment,
                an interim framework for the contents of the
               ivEMP.



A comprehensive mid-term Report at the end of the third

month of the assignment. detailing all aspects of the work

accomplished to date


A draft NEN-IP at the end of the fifth month of the
assignment

At the end of the assignment, the final \EMP which

incorporates the revie%~ comments on the draft document

by the multi-disciplinary team The final N'ENIP shall be

submitted in such format and number of copies as the

Project         Coordinator          may          determine
9.0    TIMING TARGETS
The duration of the consultancy will be six (6) months        The
expected date of commencement of the assignment is ...... ... . .. and the
expected date of completion is
Annex 8
Documents related to
TOR 5
• Draft terms of reference for the preparation of a National
Environmental Information System (NETS)
       DRAFT PROPOSAL FOR THE FUNDING OF A CONSULTANCY
      ASSIGNMENT TO RECOMMEND AN APPROPRIATE NATIONAL
           ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION SYSTEM (NEIS)


1.0 INTRODUCTION

       The Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago proposes to establish an
Environmental Management Authority (EMA).


       In order to fulfill its responsibilities, the EMA will require access to environmental
information in as comprehensive a manner as possible. Such environmental information will
need to be drawn from several national, regional and international sources. To this end,
there is a need for the establishment of a National Environment Information System
(NTEIS) which shall be the coordinan or the collections of the environment in Trinidad
                                        T



and Tobago and which shall have multisectoral and horizontal linkages with existing
organizations and Government Ministries.




2.0 BACKGROUIND


2.1      Concept of Environmental Information



         Environmental Information is multifaceted and embraces data and information on
natural resources and on the human and physical problems associated with the sustainable
development of these resources          With respect to an island ecosystem, the natural
resources on which data and information will need to be collected and analysed will include.



              coastal and marine resources
              freshwater resources
              renewable resources
              bio-diversity resources non-
              renewable energy resources.



Environmental problems associated with island ecosystems on which data and
information will also need to be collected, analysed and disseminated include:



              climate change, sea-level rise and climate variability;
              natural and environmental disaster preparedness,
              pollution control and management of wastes.



In addition to the above, baseline data for all economically and environmentally
important ecosystems in Trinidad and Tobago will form part of the concept of
environmental information.



There is a worldwide trend towards the integration of socio-economic and environmental
information into the decision-making process This trend demand that high priority be
given to providing decision-makers in Trinidad and Tobago with relevant and up-to-date
data and information which will allow them to



            (a)      assess existing environmental conditions and trends in
                     particular ecosystems with reference to aspects which
                     might include for example


                              the depletion of the stock of a particular


                              the ca   acity of a particular ecosystem to

                              absorlZ primary, secondary or tertiary
                              industrial activity
natural resource,
                              depletion of wild life - endangered species.


                              depletion of fish stock - endemic species.



               (b) become attuned to the caused and effect relationships of
                       environmental degradation and costeffectiveness of
                       identified    solutions      for     addressing   specific
                       environmental problems.


              (c)      be supportive of the development of appropriate
                       programmes for increasing public awareness of
                       environmental       issues         through    educational
                       programmes and activities at all levels.


              (d)    participate in regional and global environmental
                       research programmes and reporting requirements,
                       including programmes on the conservation of
                       biological diversity, climate change, ozone depletion,
                       etc.



3.0     DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE



      The overall objective of the establishment of a National Environment          formation
System is the application o£ an inte!rated information management approach to data and

information pertaining to t~l,e environment in Trinidad and Tobago, utilizin the new
information technologies for compiling and disseminating this information to environmental

governmental organisations.
decision-makers   in   the   public   and   private   sectors   and   in   the   non
4.0      SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES



Circumscribed within the overall developmental objective, the following
specific objectives are elaborated:


                        Identification of the types of environmental           (e)         mu anon desi~_
                (a)
                        information reports required by decision-makers in

                        the public and private sectors, non-governmental

                        organizations and in academia.

                (b)     Determination of the location of existing data bases

                        of environmental information to support the needs

                        identified at (a) above.

                (c)     Identification of gaps in the supply of data and

                        information to meet the needs of decision-makers

                        and other interested publics.

                (d)     Determination of existing and potential application

                        of new information technologies for the supply of
                        t ual and spatially related environmental data and

                        information



                  framework - for the proposed National Environmental Information System
                  (NEIS)
5.0 BENEFICIARIES



      The following are expected to be beneficiaries of the National Environmental

Information System:


                    the EMA and other national agencies requiring
                    environmental information,


                      decision-makers in the public and private sectors and
                    in NGO organizations,


                    Educators and researchere.



                    Communications specialists who prepare material for

                    public awareness programmes.




6.0   ACTIVITIES RELATED TO OBJECTIVES


6.1   Objective 1: Identification       of the      type   of environmental
information and reports required


      Activities


      The following activities will be undertaken
                       an Environmental Consultative mille with
                       representation from the various Ministries, the Town
                       and Country Planning Division, --1
                       Industry, Local Government and the concerned NGOs
                       as well as, inputs from the public information services
   Formation of        such                       as                       NALIS




     Update of the 1990 CAIURI contribution to the PAHO report to:




     establish the type of environmental information most commonly
     requested,



     (ii) assist in prioritizing environmental information needs.



To this end it will be necessary to identify and survey users of environmental information from
Government Ministries and other agencies of the State, industry, educational and
                                                                    environmental NGOs, Local
research organizations, professional organisations, the
Authorities and the financial and banking sectors_


                        Hosting of a conference or workshop to

                        complement the survey.
6.2      Objective 2:      Determination of the location of existing data bases to meet needs
identified above.

       Activities



                    (a) Location of existing environmental data and information,
                           building on general information provided in the 1990
                           CAIRIRI report for PAI -10. This inventory will
                           include the location of baseline environmental data for
                           various ecosystems within Trinidad and Tobago. The
                           inventory will encompass the level of detail required
                           for input into Geographic Information Systems.
                (b)        Contracting the services of a GIS consultant in an
                           advisory capacity,




                (c)        Preparation of profiles of the main institutions in the
                           public and private sectors which acquire or process
                           environmental data and information. These profiles

                           should include information on organisational structure,
                           human resource inventory of technical expertise,
                           projects executed and bibliographic references to
                           significant local reports Plans for future execution of
                           environmental projects will be
                           included
6.3      Objective 3: Identification   of    gaps   and constraints     within   the
         national environmental information capacity.


      Activities



(a)      Review of the findings of activities carried out in pursuance of objectives I and 2
         .


             (b)     Assess the current environmental information flow
                     from generators to users in terms of information and
                     reporting formats and periods.


                     Review   )0,   the legislation governing the release of

                     environmental data and information from the identified
                     generators, and users of primary and secondary
                     environmental data and information


                     Determine the gaps and constraints in the flow of
                     information to decision-makers, paying particular
                     attention to hardware and software and availability and
                     expertise of the human resource base. The level of
                     information management (sourcing and acquisition of
                     data, analysis of information, storage, generation of
                     reports for users at various decisionmaking levels)
                     within organizations should also be determined.



              (e)      Identify possible national, regional and international
                       data and information resources building on those
                       identified in the PA1-10 report



                                               s
6.4      Objective 4: Application of New Information Technologies.


      Activities


             (a)         Review of findings from activities to meet objectives
                         1,2and3.



             (b)         Review of relevant new information technologies
                         applicable   to     the   acquisition,   reporting   and
                         dissemination of environmental information.


                   (c)     Assess the current use and application of modern
                             Information technology by the generators of
                         environmental data and information in relation to the
                         end usage of such data and information.




6.5      Objective 5:       Recommendation of an operational system for the acquisition
and dissemination of environmental data and information


       Activities


                         (a) Review framework recommended in the 1989
                         PARO report



                          Incorporate further details from the findings of this
                          study, including
        priority data requirements identified by generators and users;


                  (ü)     priority sectoral and multi-sectoral needs for
                  environmental information,
(iii)   legal, technological, information and human resource constraints
        identified.
        Preparation of draft recommendations including the identification of the
        required hardware, software, manpower and training needs.



        (d) Discussions of draft recommendations with generators, users and
                 decision-makers at all levels.


                      (e)     Preparation of final report.




        ^.0      DRAFT PROVISIONAL BUDGET



                 It is estimated that approximately TTS145,000 will be required
        for the conduct of this project_
8.0      PROVISIONAL TIME FRAME
The duration of the assignment will be six (6) months from the signing of
the contract, the expected date for which is
Output
An operational and installed framework for a National Environmental
Information System for Trinidad and Tobago.

				
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