Global Megatrends in Tourism 08 by lifemate

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									          Michael Nowlis,
    Consultant and Director for the
     Tourism Control Intelligence
  emphasized the following global
megatrends revolutionizing the tourism
   industry at the dawn of the third
             millennium.
 The B U Z Z words
“EXPERIENTIAL
                TREND
         IN A
            SLOW
              LANE”
    “Travel is the one social and cultural
phenomenon that can overcome the “fear of the
 other’,” suggests Louis D’ Amore, founder of
 the International Institution of Peace through
  Tourism, who describes tourism as the first
               “peace industry.”
“Tourism and peace are inseparable. The forces
 unleashed by tourism are so powerful that they
  can change apparently irreversible situations
 and bring about reconciliation where none was
             considered possible.”

                        Secretary-General Franceao Frangialli
                                 World Tourism Organization
THE MAIN TENDENCIES
The cruise industry will experience
         explosive growth.

An older, better-educated population
  in Europe and North America will
 increasingly seek ecotourism and
       cultural travel products.
“ Slow cities” and slow food” trends
   will expand from Italy to much of
   Europe and soon Asia/Oceania.
 Non- residents will pay significantly
higher entry fees to tourist attractions
  than those paid by locals (Venice,
           Petra, Bath, etc).

Prayer rooms and compasses will be
installed on most passenger aircraft
     serving the Islamic world.
Antarctica will become an ecotourism
  destination complete with hotels,
  restaurants and full service tours.
Shopping, from mega-malls to folk craft
   centers, will increasingly become a
 critical feature for tourism destinations.


  Airlines, travel agents and tour
 operators will ally themselves with
   financial institutions to offer
       consumer travel loans
China will be the first country to receive
  100 million international arrivals in a
   12-month period, sometime around
   2018 – France will follow within 2-3
                   years.
PRODUCTS & SERVICES
     TRENDS
 Hotel meeting and dining area will be
designed less formally in an attempt to
 attract the casual business traveler.

 Hotel and restaurant facilities will be
designed for an aging population with
 lower rise steps, more handrails and
              wider doors.
 Travel guidebooks will become highly
specialized and issued more frequently
   consulted – primarily on the web.

The distinction between business and
 leisure hotels will erode as business
clients seek fitness and entertainment
activities and vacation guests demand
   advanced telecommunications IT.
“ 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed” will
   replace “Let the Buyer Beware.”

 Growth in demand for home food
 delivery will outpace all other food
         service segments.
       Rise of Healthcare Facilities

    An aging population and growing
infatuation with healthful living will bring
  a wave of European holistic spas and
 „health-tels‟ to North America and Asia.

Luxury resorts that once shunned children will
  welcome them with an expanded array of
    activities and tailored dining options.
INVESTMENT CHALLENGES
       & FINANCE
     Airlines will continue to rack up
significant losses as they struggle to deal
with security requirements, an onslaught
       of no-frills carriers and brutal
       competition from „open skies‟
                 agreements.
 By the end of the decade, a score of
management companies will control the
world inventory of branded hotel rooms.
HUMAN RESOURCES
Critical shortages of Hospitality skilled staff.

The introduction of new technologies in the
  upscale tourism industry will not replace
 the human element in service delivery – to
    the contrary, it will gain importance.

Tourism and hotel management schools will
 move out of the classroom and out of the
  library, onto the web and into the field.
SAFETY & SECURITY
• Consumers will systematically consult
  travel health sites before checking
  ticket or room availability.

• Crime and terrorism will render some
  traditional tourist destinations
  unsellable.

• Guest room safes will be enlarged to
  accommodate standard laptop
  computers.
Hectic 10-city, 10-day package tour is a
            thing of the past.
Travel will be closer to home – not to
   overlook what‟s in your doorstep



Nature of trips: smaller in scope and
      more off-the-beaten-path
RURAL TOURISM
       RURAL TOURISM
is when rural culture is a key component of
           the product we offer


                                WTO, Belgrade 2002
    Some activities considered part of the
          concept of rural tourism:

•   Climbing
•   Eco-tourism
•   Agri-tourism
•   Riding
•   Adventure tourism
•   Educational travel
•   Sport and Health Tourism
        RURAL TOURISM

is estimated to be growing at an annual
   rate of around six (6) percent, higher
   above the growth rate for all tourism
                 products
 Every country, region, city and leisure spot competes
      with the tourism-generating markets to have a
                       larger share.

                        Why?

 The expenditure of the tourists circulates at all three
                 levels of the economy:

1. National
2. Regional
3. Local
As rural tourism becomes established as an
 economic activity, marketing strategies
 concentrate on increasing the volume of
                 visitors.


                                 Vlaipur, 2001
Marketing Trends for 2008 and Beyond



                Fletcher Knight US Marketing Consultant
                         and Bob Lindike, 2007
      Marketing Trends for 2008 and
                 Beyond
•   The New Luxury: Expertise vs. Prestige
•   The Weight Management Gap
•   Beyond Green to Transparent
•   The rise of the Male Influencer
•   Beautiful Food
•   Purity and Safety
•   The Sound of Products
•   Authenticity: Brand Soul
•   Ads in the great outdoors
•   Information and Communication Technology
•   Focus on the experience
•   Marketing as a service
          Hail to the Chief

The chief marketing officer will rise in stature
as a C-suite player, not only serving as chief
  brand architect and marketing discipline
   integrator, but also as the enterprise‟s
 business system innovator organizational
  teacher/motivator and, most importantly,
            chief revenue builder.
    Unconventional Outreach
Marketing will increasingly be unconventional
  – tapping into social networking, word-of-
        mouth, local events and more.

With the use of the Internet, mobile and other
     new media forms, combined with the
       innovative use of traditional media,
 marketers will find ways to reach and engage
      reluctant consumers and customers
“ Key to marketing your destination is to
  learn to Differentiate and Coordinate.”

                             Rich Dyess
                             Publisher
                      Adventure Travel Business
Marketing strategies must be consistent
   with local goals and be sensitive to
  sustaining a community‟s character
  and tradition (Malasag Eco-Village).
Promotion of Rural Tourism


                   Belgrade 2002
                  Branding
  By Developing a brand name or “identify”, rural
tourism destination can help position themselves in
        an increasingly competitive market.

Branding a country/province for tourists requires
vision, honesty and citizens who love themselves.

No one should expect to shape a national/provincial
 brand without taking into account the people who
  live in the area and the places that haven‟t quite
      succeeded are those that don‟t quite love
                     themselves.
           Tour Operator

A Tour Operator can be used to promote rural
   locations. For new entrants, they offer the
advantage of knowing the tourism marketplace,
and can present a “one-stop-shop” approach to
                   marketing.
       Co-operative Marketing


Given high costs of marketing, combined with the
     need to offer the consumer a full range of
   accommodation with activities, a cooperative
    approach to marketing is recommended for
      rural tourism. This type of co-operative
    marketing activity could be led by the local
     rural tourism organization on behalf of its
                     members.
        Direct Marketing

1. PRINT MEDIA
2. THE INTERNET
3. TV/RADIO/FILM
Effective Marketing Plan
“Make your plan, then work your plan” is the mantra of
       nearly every successful business person.

• An inventory of your products attributes, as well as
  those of the market sectors you are planning to teach;
• Realistic budget parameters;
• Ambitious, but achievable goal-setting;
• Well-defined strategic positioning;
• Carefully-chosen marketing tactics that are selected
  for their ability to achieve your goals, while
  remaining within your budget.
VISITORS WANTED
    A New Marketing Campaign

GREECE:

“Greece Invites People To Explore your Senses”

Intercontinental asks:
“Are you living an International Life”
            Special Projects

   2006 Designed by China National Tourism
   Administration “China Rural Tourism Year”

Uganda prefers to advertise the fact that it is “gifted
        by nature”, not plagued by the past.
   Good Governance is more likely to boost
     tourism than any clever ad campaign.



Perhaps the best way to turn your province into
 an attractive rural destination for visitors is to
   make it a place you’d like to visit yourself.
                CHINDIA

There lies a sleeping giant. Let him sleep! For
 when he wakes, he will shake the world.”

                                   Napoleon Bonaparte
If China is the workshop of the world
    and India is the global office,
      why can’t the Philippines
         be the vacation site.

								
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