Question My God_ my God why have Thou forsaken me

Document Sample
Question My God_ my God why have Thou forsaken me Powered By Docstoc
					               30-Year History of The Diocese of the Holy Trinity

  September 16, 1976 in Minneapolis, Minnesota was a black day for the Episcopal Church. That
was the day the house of Bishops, clergy and the laity voted to approve the ordination of women
to the priesthood. It was known as Black Thursday to those who were faithful to the church and
its teaching.

 Several weeks after the controversy there were many meetings at St. Mary’s with the then
Father James O. Mote. All across the United States the discussion was what to do about the
situation in the church.

 On November 5, 1976 the then Father Mote spoke at the gathering of the Episcopal Convention
here in Colorado. Father Mote’s speech was as follows:

 “I was baptized an Anglican. I was confirmed at sixteen an Anglican. It will be 25 years in
February since I was priested in this diocese. I have always been a loyal Anglican.

  I have heard a lot said in the last few weeks since General Convention about pain. And I
appreciate the love expressed by people in this diocese in their sympathy for those of us who
believe that it is impossible to ordain females to the priesthood. But I have suffered pain all my
life as an Anglican. I knew when I was seventeen that God wanted me to be a priest, and I knew
that I would suffer pain as a pilgrim and sojourner in a strange land because the bulk of the
people in the American Church have never been Catholic-minded. But I can live with this as
long as the official formularies of the Church are clearly orthodox. I think this is passed.

 I am in sympathy with those people, like Lucy Pritchard, who I think is a very dear person, in
her attempt to delay the final facing of the fact that years have gone by since our separation from
the Roman Catholic Church where we have battled for the Faith and much of the time with those
people who have sworn to uphold the faith. That battle is lost, in my opinion. And I believe truly
that the General Convention founded a new, protestant denomination.

 And for those of you who are in favor of ordaining females to the priesthood, I don’t have any
quarrel, if that’s what you want. I am speaking mainly to those that I know, in this convention,
both priests and laity, who believe the catholic faith. I’m pleading with you to face the fact that
the battle is lost. It doesn’t make any difference whether we delay one year, or three months, or
three years or nine years. It is a fact of life.

 There is no possible way the General Convention in 1979 will say to 150 to 200 or 300 female
priests and female bishops, “We’re sorry; we made a mistake. You are no longer priests and
bishops.” In my opinion, and in the opinion of many people, including some 30 bishops, more
than 30 bishops, this was an unconstitutional action of General Convention…; it
denies…because it denies the historical obedience and conformity to the creeds and the catholic
priesthood.

 And since we have been denied even our own conscience, we are now forced either to conform
or be in contempt of this canon of this new, protestant denomination. For the legally constituted
Episcopal Church, by having rejected even its own constitutional allegiance to the catholic faith,
in the mind of many, including me, it is now a protestant sect. The unity of the Church is broken.
In my opinion, and in the opinion of many people, there are indeed two Episcopal Churches.

                                                 1
 I am not a married priest, and presumably if I had wanted, I could have been a Roman Catholic
priest. I did not choose so to be, and I do not now. I do not want to be an Orthodox priest and
renounce the orders that I have taken and loved…(Pause) … It is not merely the question of
rejecting two thousand years of our Catholic heritage because of the ordination of females to the
priesthood. It is a gradual erosion of the Faith in many other areas.

 This development has been a long time in coming. It was planted with the cynicism with which
portions of our Church regulated Henry VIII’s family affairs. It took root in the failure to
overcome the Puritans, which killed many of our Church’s saints. It began to bud in the 180
hounding of the non-jurors, who tried to retain some semblance of catholicity. It had full flower
in the persecution of those holy leaders in the last century … (Pause) … who sought to restore
Catholicism to the Anglican Communion. We have come to know it, that is, this development,
this erosion of the faith, through the surrender to the temporal secularism, reluctance of bishops
to speak forthrightly as strong leaders against immorality and disbelief in the Church itself,
against gross corruption, against the licensing of unworthy priests, against disregard of the
sacrament of Holy Matrimony, the family, and reverence for life.

 And it is not only I who feel this way. These 30 bishops, who Father Spencer referred to, went
on to say, after the sentence he quoted, “We cannot accept in good conscience the action of this
house. We believe that to do so would violate our ordination vows to be faithful to and to defend
the word of God in Holy Scripture. Furthermore, we cannot recognize the authority of this
General Convention to decide unilaterally, in the face of the expressed disapproval of our
Roman Catholic, Old Catholic, and Orthodox brethren, a question which ought to be decided by
ecumenical consensus. The ordination and consecration of women priests and bishops will raise
for us the gravest questions of how far this Church can accept such ministrations without fatally
compromising its position as a Catholic and Apostolic body.”

 There will be means for those of us who intend to remain loyal to our ordination and
confirmation and baptismal vows to do so.

  I intend to remain an Anglican. And I pray that those of you, who love the Catholic Faith, as
we have received it in this part of God’s Holy Church, will face the fact that you no longer
belong to the same Church that you did before General Convention, no matter what anybody
tells you. We have been warned by the Vatican, in spite of the fact that the Archbishop of
Canterbury chose not to let this be known, that it would seriously compromise any possible
rapprochement in the re-union with ourselves and Roman Catholics.

 The Orthodox has made their position very clear. The Old Catholics, it is my understanding,
and the Polish National Catholics, with whom we were in communion, no longer regard
themselves as in communion with us.

 I simply do not see that this is anything but a Christological matter. It hasn’t got anything to do
with women’s rights. It is whether you believe that our Lord Jesus Christ is God and knew what
he was doing. If he was God and knew what he was doing when he taught us that when two
people are joined together in Holy Matrimony; that cannot be put apart. The General
Convention two years ago chose to use the word “terminate” marriage, with any question of its
validity or invalidity. I think I see my position very clearly. And I pray, I’m speaking mainly to
those of you who are Catholics by conviction: I hope you will face the reality [of the] situation.
You do not belong to the same Church that you belonged to before the General Convention.

                                                 2
 I have been a part of the diocese for 25 years … (Pause) … I have tried to … to be loyal to
my vows.

 I can’t do it with you anymore.”

 After Father Mote spoke, he and all the other delegates of St. Mary’s walked out.

 Sunday, November 26, 1976, was another sad day. That day Saint Mary’s congregation voted
to leave the Episcopal Church after three hours of debate and discussion. The total vote count
was 179 in favor and 69 against leaving the Episcopal Church, with one or two abstentions.

 A few days after we voted to leave the church, Saint Mary’s was flooded with phone calls and
lots of letters requesting information about how to leave the Episcopal Church. From January
1977 to the First Provincial Synod that met in Dallas, Texas on October 1978, there was
something called ACNA (Anglican Church of North America). On May 1, 1977 there were ten
or twelve priests meeting at Saint Mary’s of the Angels, in Hollywood, California, with retired
Episcopal Bishop of Springfield, Illinois, the Rt. Reverend Father Albert Chambers. The priests
at this meeting, who were to form the Diocese of the Holy Trinity, were as follows:

              Father James O. Mote, Saint Mary’s, Denver
              Father St. John Brown, Saint Mathis, Sun Valley
              Father Ogden Miller, Our Savior, Los Angeles
              Father John Clendenin, Holy Apostle, Glendale
              Father John Barker and Elwood Trigg, St. Mary of the Angels
              Canon Albert Dubois, American Church Union
              Father Anthony Rasch, Blessed Sacrament

  At Saint Mary’s in Denver about the second week of May, 1977 we had the visitation of the
Right Rev. Father Albert Chambers to perform the 1st confirmation class since leaving the
Episcopal Church. There were 9 to be confirmed and about 5 people to be received from the
Roman Catholic Church. Solemn High Mass started at 6:30 p.m. and we had a marvelous
potluck for about 225 people.

 In June 1977, the Fellowship of Concerned Churchmen met at Saint Mary’s Church, Denver.
This meeting lasted for two days and later met in Estes Park to plan the meeting in St. Louis,
Missouri for the congress of Saint Louis in September of that year.

 In July of 1977 the 1st meeting (synod) of the Diocese of the Holy Trinity met at Saint Mary’s
Church, Denver, with Father John D. Barker presiding and 12 clergy and about 95 laity present.
The basement hall was full. The discussion was about constitution and cannons and the
upcoming meeting at Saint Louis.

 On September 14-16, 1977 the fellowship of concerned churchmen held the great Congress of
St. Louis. The meeting took place at the Chase Park Plaza Hotel at the same time the Diocese of
Holy Trinity held their synod. It started with a solemn high mass with about 3,500 people in
attendance. After mass we broke for dinner, and then about 8 p.m. the main program started
with Perry Laukhuff giving the opening speech. Other speakers were Dorothy Faber and Father
George Clendenin. Father George Rutler, from the Church of Good Shepherd, Rosemont, PA,
gave the keynote address. The best line in the speech was about the presiding Bishop of the

                                               3
Episcopal Church. The line went something like this: “He has a throne in Washington, D.C., a
desk in New York City, and a bed in Connecticut.”

 At this meeting the Diocese of the Holy Trinity had a booth, which was very busy. On
Thursday, September 15, 1977, there were workshops and seminars all through the day. At 9
p.m. Mary Horning, Paula Pina, and Wayne Gill started to gather up the people from St. Mary’s
Denver, and other people who were members of the Diocese of the Holy Trinity. At 11:30 p.m.
a mass for the Holy Spirit started and the election of the first Bishop of the Diocese of the Holy
Trinity was held. After only one ballot, Father James Orin Mote was elected Bishop. On Friday
September 16, 1977 Father Mote was presented to the whole congress. At the same time the
Affirmation of St. Louis was presented. When the 12 delegates from St. Mary’s returned to
Denver there were 75 people from the church who greeted the plane. When Bishop Elect Father
Mote entered the terminal there was a thunderous applause and the people gathered sung the
Doxology. All who gathered went back to St. Mary’s Church for a reception celebrating the
election of the new Bishop.

 On Thursday, January 26, 1978, the Diocese of the Holy Trinity met for the synod of the
consecration at St. Mary’s Church. The basement of the church was full of people. At that time
the Diocese of the Holy Trinity consisted of 35 parishes. The running joke was that the Diocese
of the Holy Trinity was coast to coast and border to border and all the ships at sea.

  On Saturday, January 28, 1978 at 10:30, on the feast of St. Thomas of Aquinas at Augustan
Lutheran Church, the consecration for Bishops took place. The church was full and the over
flow of people went downstairs and watched it on closed circuit television. Father Kent Boman
sang the litany and Father George Rutler from the Church of Good Shepherd in Rosemont, PA,
gave the sermon. The priests that were to consecrate the Bishop were: Rev. Canon Father James
Orin Mote, Diocese of the Holy Trinity, Rev Father Robert Morse, Christ the King, Rev. Father
Dale David Doren, Diocese of the Mid West and, Rev. Father Peter Waterson, Diocese of the
South. The co-consecrator were Right Rev. Father Albert Chambers retired Episcopal Bishop of
Springfield, IL, Right Rev. Father Mark Pae of Korea, who was absent and sent a letter of
consent, and the Third Bishop was Right Reverend Father Francisco J. Paghgkhan from the
Philippines, Independent Catholic Church. The first one to be consecrated was Father Dale
Doren, because he knew Bishop Mark Pae. Then Father Doren became Bishop; he was the
substitute for Bishop Mark Pae. Then it was Father Mote, Father Morse, and then finally it was
Father Waterson. After the service we all went over to the Marriott Hotel where lunch was
served for about 2,000 or more people. The only sad note was that Bishop James O Mote’s
brother, Richard, his sister-in- law, Joyce, and others could not attend because of inclement
weather from the Midwest to the east coast.

 On Sunday, January 29, 1978 the Right Reverend Father James O. Mote celebrated his first
mass as the 1st Bishop of the Diocese of the Holy Trinity at St. Mary’s Church.

 In October 1978 we held the 1st Provincial Synod in Dallas, TX. The first four Bishops
presided as the chairs of the synod. We then separated into groups by location: Diocese of the
Holy Trinity, Diocese of the Mid West, Diocese of the Southeastern USA, Christ the King. We
then chose the name “The Anglican Catholic Church”. The original Diocese of the Holy Trinity
was Southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho,
Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Indiana Oregon, and Washington State.


                                                4
 In 1978 Bishop Morse and Bishop Waterson had a disagreement about the minimum age of a
Bishop to be considered for election. The canon states the minimum age to be 40 or 42. They
wanted to lower it to be 35 or 37 years of age.

  Another disagreement was about the sizes of the dioceses. The ACC wanted small dioceses,
like they are now; however, Bishop Morse wanted to make large mega dioceses. The synod
rejected them both and Bishop Morse and Bishop Waterson walked out.

  From 1980 to 1987 the Diocese of the Holy Trinity consisted of Southern California,
Colorado, Oregon, Washington State, New Mexico, Arizona, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, and
Alaska.

 After the Mobile, Alabama 3rd Synod in October 1980, and before the 1982 IV provincial in
Kansas City, there was another split in the Diocese of the Holy Trinity. At that time there was
the Diocese of the Holy Trinity, Diocese of the Missouri Valley, Diocese of the South Mid-
Atlantic States, Missionary Diocese of New England, and Diocese of Resurrection and D.N. O.
The new Diocese was the Diocese of the Missouri Valley and they elected Reverend Father
Louis Falk. The consecration took place on February 1981 in the city of Des Moines, IA.

 At the VI Synod in May 1983 the Diocese of the Holy Trinity at Saint Mary’s Magdalene of
Orange, CA celebrated with a brand new church. After the mass when Bishop Mote consecrated
the church at the reception, one of the ladies from Saint Mary’s Denver presented him with
purple mouse ears and the parish Rector Rev. Anthony Rasch with scarlet colored mouse ears.
At that time we elected delegates for the October 5th Synod for the province originally scheduled
for Milwaukee, Wisconsin but due to a change of plans was held at Orlando, FL.

 In 1983 we held our 5th Provincial Synod in Orlando, FL. We elected Rt. Rev Father Louis
Falk from Diocese of Missouri Valley to the 1st Metropolitan and Archbishop of the original
provincial of the ACC.

  In 1986, at the IX Synod, we met at Saint Luke in Laverne CA. It was a special synod because
it was the last time we met as the Diocese of the Holy Trinity. After 1987 we would be the
Diocese of the Holy Trinity and the Diocese of the Pacific and South West.

 In 1987 at the 7th Provincial Synod the Diocese of the Holy Trinity split again to Diocese of the
Holy Trinity and Diocese of the Pacific and South West. Diocese of the Holy Trinity consisted
of Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Utah and New Mexico. Diocese of the Pacific and South
West consisted of Nevada, Southern California, Arizona, Oregon, Washington State, and Alaska.
Father Richard Willars was elected the 1st Bishop of the Dioceses of the Pacific and South West.
Also at the New Orleans Synod, Father Joseph Deyman was elected the 3rd and new Bishop of
the Diocese of the Mid West. Father Daymen was consecrated on January 8, 1988 in
Indianapolis, Indiana when Bishop Lewis moved to become the new Bishop of the South.

 On January 28 1988 at Saint Mary’s of the Angles, Father Williars was consecrated the 1st
Bishop of Dioceses of the Pacific and South West. It was a special event! The church was
packed and the beautiful music was Mozart was played.

 In 1989 the Diocese of the Holy Trinity and Saint Mary’s Church sponsored and hosted the 8th
Provincial Synod. It was at the Raffles Hotel. The synod mass was held at Augustana Luther to
celebrate eleven years of the consecration.
                                                5
 In 1991 Archbishop Falk resigned for personal reasons. We then elected Bishop William O.
Lewis the 2nd Metropolitan and Archbishop of the ordinary ACC. This election was done at the
9th Provincial Synod in Charlotte, North Carolina.

 At this time the Diocese of the Missouri Valley became the Diocese of the Great Plains. In
1992 Father James McNeeley became the Bishop of the Diocese of the Great Plains.

 In 1994 we held an electoral synod at Blessed Sacrament in Casper, WY. It was not a success.
We had 22 ballots and there was no one elected. Replacing Bishop Willars, who died in 1993,
and chairing the synod was the Right Reverend Father David Seeland.

 In August 1994 Bishop Mote left for West Palm Beach, FL. At the following meeting with the
College of Bishops it was decided to combine the Diocese of the Holy Trinity with the Diocese
of the Great Plains and it became the United Diocese of the Holy Trinity and Great Plains.
Bishop Neeley became the Bishop of this new Diocese.

 In 1995 we met at the 11th Synod in San Mataoe, California. That was the first synod in 18
years that we did not have Bishop Mote represent the Diocese of the Holy Trinity.

 In August 1997 at Holyrood Seminary there was a disagreement with the canons such that there
was a split with the Diocese of the Pacific and South West, United Diocese of the Holy Trinity,
and the Diocese of the Great Plains and others.

 In September 1997 Archbishop Lewis died.

 In October 1997, we had an electoral synod at the 12th provincial in Norfolk, Virginia. There
we elected the Right Rev. Father Dean Michael Stevens to be the 3rd Metropolitan and
Archbishop of the original province. Archbishop Stevens was from the Diocese of New Orleans.

 Palm Sunday 1998 was a sad day because Archbishop Dean Michael Stevens died.

 We were without a Metropolitan and Archbishop for about 18 months.

 In October 1999 we held an electoral synod to replace the Most Right Reverend Father Dean
Michael Stevens. The 13th Providential Synod took place in Indianapolis, Indiana where we
elected the Right Reverend Father John T. Cahoon. Also at the 13th provincial was consideration
for approval of the merger between Diocese of the Holy Trinity, Great Plains, and Diocese of the
Pacific South West. This was the first time a merger was considered.

 On October 5, 2001 Archbishop John T. Cahoon died.

 In 2001 the 14th Provincial Synod was almost cancelled because of the attacks of 9-11 but it
was decided to go ahead with the meeting. We met in Denver, CO for the 14th Provincial Synod.
At this Synod we elected the Right Reverend Father Brother John Charles (John C. Vocker) to be
the Metropolitan and Archbishop. Brother John Charles was from the Diocese of New Orleans.

 The 14th Synod was also the second time for consideration for a merger of the Diocese of the
Holy Trinity, Great Plains, and Diocese of the Pacific South West. In 2002 Father Scott was

                                               6
elected to be the next Bishop to replace Archbishop Cahoon, but sadly he died a month after his
consecration.

 When Brother John Charles was enthroned, we held the synod mass at a not so complete new
building of the church of Saint Mary’s. It was still under construction. It was noted that the
crowd that day was over capacity of the church, which holds 180 people. People were
overflowing down the stairs to the basement in Mote Hall. Not since Bishop Chambers 1st visit
had Saint Mary’s been so full.

 In 2003 at the 15th Synod in New Orleans, LA the synod approved the merger between Diocese
of the Holy Trinity, Great Plains, and Diocese of the Pacific and South West. This merged
diocese was named The Diocese of the Holy Trinity.

 The new Bishop consecrated for the Anglican Catholic Church was Reverend Father John
Agustine of the Second Province. It was noted that this was the first Provincial Synod not
attended by Bishop Mote in 25 years. He was greatly missed.

 At the next College of Bishops meeting, The Right Reverend Father William McClean was
named Episcopal Visitor for the Diocese of the Holy Trinity. Bishop McClean replaced Bishop
Scott who died in 2002.

 For the first time in ten years the Diocese of the Holy Trinity held an electoral synod in May
2004 at the XXVII Synod. This synod was held at St. Matthews in Newport Beach, CA. After
many ballots there was not a conclusive election. Bishop McClean, of The Diocese of Mid-
Atlantic States, presided as the chairman of the synod.

 In May 2005, at the XXVIII Synod, we elected the delegates for the first time as the re-united
Diocese of the Holy Trinity.

 In the fall of 2005 the Most Right Reverend Father Brother John Charles submitted his
resignation to the College of Bishops, with regrets the College accepted.

 Brother John Charles returned to his homeland down under (Australia). We will miss him very
much, especially his sense of humor.

 In October 2005 we held an electoral synod for a new Archbishop, which was the 15th Synod in
Grand Rapids, Michigan. We elected the Right Reverend Father Mark Haverland from the
Diocese of the South.

 The enthronement was held at Saint Paul’s Church. This was the second Provincial Synod
Bishop Mote missed.

 On April 29, 2006 we lost a very, very good friend to the Anglican Catholic Church: The Right
Reverend Father James Orin Mote died in Indianapolis, Indiana at the age of 84.

 At the XXIX Synod, on May 1, 2006, we met at Saint Mary Magdalene in Orange, CA, with
Bishop McClean as the Episcopal Visitor and Bishop D. Presley Hutchens, Visitor. Bishop
Hutchens became the Bishop when Archbishop Brother John Charles resigned and returned to
Australia.

                                                7
 At the next college of Bishops, the Right Reverend Father D. Presley Hutchens from the
Diocese of New Orleans became the Episcopal Visitor.

 In May 2007 the Diocese of the Holy Trinity celebrated its 30th anniversary. The celebration
was at Saint Matthew’s Parrish in Newport Beach, California. Bishop Hutchens presided as the
chair of the synod.

 In the fall of 2007 we had another celebration: The 30th anniversary of the Congress of St.
Louis and the Affirmation of St. Louis.

                                             Faithfully Submitted,



                                             Michael Keith Moore

Dedicated to the memory of my friend and my Brother in Christ, my favorite bridge partner,
Right Reverend Father James Orin Mote.

                                     In Memory Of:

 Reverend Father Gustav A. Lehman Priest and Founder of Saint Mary’s Church, in Denver,
 Colorado
 Most Right Reverend Father William D. Lewis, II Metropolitan and Archbishop, Diocese of the
 South
 Most Right Reverend Father Dean Michael Stevens III, Diocese of New Orleans
 Most Right Reverend Father John T. Cahoon IV, Diocese of the Mid-Atlantic States
 Right Reverend Father Harry B. Scott, Diocese of the Mid-Atlantic States
 Right Reverend Father Richard Willars, Diocese of the Pacific and Southwest
 Right Reverend Father Joseph Deyman, Diocese of the Midwest
 Reverend Canon John McCamey, Prolocutor for The House of Clergy, Canon and, Vicar
General for The Diocese of Holy Trinity


               And the Honor and Glory to Almighty God To:

 Most Right Reverend, Brother John Charles, V, Metropolitan and Archbishop, Diocese of New
  Orleans
 Most Right Reverend Mark D. Haverland, VI, Metropolitan and Archbishop, Diocese of the
   South
 Right Reverend William McClean, Bishop Diocese of Mid-Atlantic States
 Right Reverend D. Presley Hutchens, Diocese of New Orleans
 Right Reverend Father Stanley F. Lazarczyk, Assistant Bishop of the South and Retired Bishop
 Reverend Father Dewitt F. Truitt, Rector of Saint Mary’s Anglican Catholic Church, Denver
 Reverend Canon Philip A. Nevels, Canon for the Diocese of Holy Trinity and, Curate Eurtimus
 of Saint Mary’s Church A.C.C. Denver, Colorado




                                                8

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:10
posted:4/17/2010
language:English
pages:8