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January 11_ 2010 On Wednesday_ January 13th is the 100th

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January 11_ 2010 On Wednesday_ January 13th is the 100th Powered By Docstoc
					January 11, 2010
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                        On Wednesday, January 13 is the 100 anniversary of radio broadcasting. We talked about the
                        anniversary of the transistor a couple weeks ago and the changes it brought. It was Lee De Forest's
                        invention of the vacuum tube which made radio a commonplace thing in our homes. At that time the
                        main media was newspapers and magazines. Radio brought in a lot of experiments in programming
                        and news delivery. From that, came a long list of celebrities as new personalities learned to make
                        good use of the radio format. When television came along later many of these people and the things
                        they learned on radio helped TV get off to a quicker start. Names like George Burns, Milton Berle,
                        and Jack Benny come to mind. I would enjoy hearing about radio memories from some of our more
                        senior readers. Radio was a big change in their lives.

                          Many of the radio celebrities of that era are featured on our biography shelves. While many of us
                          enjoy novels with intriguing characters and inventive story lines, biographies often offer life stories
that rival those of fiction books. Of course, biographies may include some exaggeration or some creative perspectives on
what really happened. That said, these life histories tell a story of our past. If you read several of them and combine what you
learn from each you get a better picture of the experiences that your parents or grandparents might recall. If it has been a
while since you last read a biography, I would like to encourage you to visit this section of the library. I think that you will
enjoy it.
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Next week, January 18 is POOH Day. A. A. Milne, the author or the original “Winnie the Pooh” stories was
born on this day in 1882. These amazingly popular stories have been a continuing favorite with young readers.
Do yourself a favor; read a Winnie the Pooh story to give you a smile and some warm memories. Even though
it is not necessary, it is even better if you share the story with a young audience.

Last year, we had an Adult Reading Program titled “Winter Jackets”. This is a book club for our adult readers.
The program was a hit with our customers last year and we hope to have great participation again this year.
Winter Jackets 2010 will run from January 11 to February 28. Stop in at the library to sign up and receive your packet with
bookmark and book review forms. Return the review forms to get in for the drawings held during each month.
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We will start up Story Time with the theme of Libraries on this Friday, January 15 at 10:30 a.m.

The Belle Plaines Friends of the Library are asking members to renew their membership for the 2010 year. The dues are:
$5.00 per adult and $1.00 per child. The committee is offering a cool book bag for $10.00 or if you join the Belle Plaine
Friends of the Library, you only need to pay $1.00 more for the bag.
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New Arrivals January 13 , 2010
Reference: NADA Official Used Car Guide January 2010
                  Non-Fiction: Fearless Imagine Your Life Without Fear by Max Lucado; TABE Level A Math Workbook
                  by Richard KU; The Eye of the Elephant The Epic Adventure in the African Wilderness by Delia and Mark
                  Owens; Always on Sunday by Jim Klobuchar with Bud Grant
                  Fiction: Hard Winter by Johnny D Boggs; Hills Like White Hills by W.D. Wetherell; The Honor of Spies by
                  W.E.B. Griffin; Crawl Space by Sarah Graves; The Bone Chamber by Robin Burcell; The Hidden Flame by
                  Davis Dunn & Janette Oke; Burn by Ted Dekker and Erin Healy; Pier Pressure by Dorothy Francis; Iorich
                  by Steven Brust; Americans in Space by Mary E. Mitchell; In the Absence of Iles by Bill James; Sorceres
                  of Karres by Eric Flint & Dave Freer; Mutiny by Julian Stockwin; Ecotopia by Ernest Callenbach; Not My
                  Daughter by Barbara Delinsky
Large Print Fiction: Trail By Fire by J.A. Jance; Drifter by Karl Lassiter; Half Broke Horses by Jeannett Walls
Paperback Fiction: Ask Anyone by Sherryl Woods
Young Adult Fiction: Thirst by Christopher Pike
Easy: The Gingerbread Pirates by Kristin Kladstrup; Dog and Bear Three to Get Ready by Laura Vaccaro Seeger
January 4, 2010
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January 6 is the birth anniversary of Carl Sandburg. Carl Sandburg was an author and a poet born in
1878. After military service, he attended Lombard College and joined the “Poor Writers' Club”. This
was a group that got together to read, write, and discuss poetry and literature. It is similar in concept to
today's book clubs. It was in this setting that a Lombard professor, Philip Green Wright, saw a talent
that he felt needed encouragement and a bit of polishing. He encouraged Carl Sandburg to write and
to try many different writing styles. The result was a wide range of books written by Mr. Sandburg.
“Rootabaga Stories” is a famous children's book of his. He became a famous biographer of Abraham
Lincoln. Working as a journalist, he wrote articles that appeared in magazines and newspapers. His
poems showed up in many different places. Carl Sandburg was a very versatile writer. If you are like
many of us you remember his name but not many details of his accomplishments. Now may be a good
time to refresh your memory and re-visit his works. If you have never read his writing this might be that “something new” I
often hear people looking for. Give the literary works of Carl Sandburg a try. We will be glad to help you.

                     Last year, we had an Adult Reading Program titled “Winter Jackets”. This is a book club for our adult
                     readers. The program was a hit with our customers last year and we hope to have great participation
                     again this year. Winter Jackets 2010 will run from January 11 to February 28. One of the things we did
                     last year was to do a short review of the books that you read for the program. More details will be
                     coming soon.
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We will be taking a few Fridays off from Family Story Time. We will start up again on Friday, January 15 at 10:30 a.m.

No new books this week. Sorry, on holiday.



December 28, 2009

How many books have you read this year? We have readers who are approaching one hundred books with a few who have
               surpassed that mark. I would be interested in hearing totals from readers who keep track of their reading
               totals for the year. Most of us read fewer books. If you have kids at home or in school, it can be a challenge
               to have quiet, uncommitted time to enjoy a book. I have been there and I understand it. In 2010, you can
               challenge yourself to read more. I am not really suggesting a New Year's resolution. That is too much
               pressure. It is just that if you want to record your reading, a fresh calendar is a good place to start. You
               could make a goal of coming to the library once a week and checking out a few books to read.

                   Different types of books have different meanings to different people. Books can be very popular for a
                   variety of reasons. They may make you feel good. A book can offer an adventure which is beyond our daily
                   experience. Some books get to be popular because they are well advertised or associated with a movie
series. If you run across a book that was meaningful or enjoyable for you, it is a good book, even if it is not wildly popular with
other readers. Your experience may prompt you to tell others. If you want to write a review for this column that would be
great. We may not use the entire review because of space considerations, but we will try to use your most descriptive
thoughts. You can choose to be identified or as many prefer, stay anonymous.

All of this leads to our kick-off of our winter Adult Reading Program. Last year, we had an Adult
Reading Program titled “Winter Jackets”. This is a book club for our adult readers. The program was a
hit with our customers last year and we hope to have great participation again this year. “Winter
Jackets 2010” will run from January 11 to February 28. More details will be coming soon! One of the
things we did last year was to do a short review of the books that you read for the program.

This week on Thursday, New Years Eve our hours will be 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. CLOSING EARLY! On Friday, January 1, 2010
the library will be closed and reopen on Saturday, January 2, 2010 from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. as usual. Have a safe
weekend.
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We will be taking a few Fridays off from Family Story Time. We will start up again on Friday, January 15 at 10:30 a.m.

New Arrivals December 30, 2009
Reference: Sports Illustrated Almanac 2010; The World Almanac and Book of Facts 2010; The World Almanac for Kids 2010
                    NonFiction: Really Bad Girls of the Bible More lessons from less-than-perfect women by Liz Curtis
                    Higgs; Failing Forward
                    Turning mistakes into stepping stones for success by John C Maxwell; Mind-RainYour favorite authors
                    on Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies Series by Scott Westerfeld; Truce by Jim Murphy
                    Fiction: The Justice Game by Randy Singer; Run A Crooked Mile by Janet LaPierre; Little Lamb Lost by
                    Margaret Fenton
Graphic Novel: The Zombie Survival Guide Recorded Attacks by Max Brooks
Paperback Fiction: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Young Adult Fiction: Kingdom’s Call by Chuck Black
Easy Board Books: Bibs and Boots by Alison Lester; Waddle! A scanimation picture book by Rufus Butler Seder

Weekly Update December 21, 2009
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In a way, December 23 is a birthday for many of the gadgets in your house and car. It is the birthday of the transistor. Do
you remember when transistors were so special, it became part of the name? What we refer to as a
radio now was a “transistor radio” when I was growing up. It would even say “5 Transistor Radio” right on
the radio. Now the cell phone in your pocket has tens to hundreds of thousands of transistors in it. The
watch on your wrist may have hundreds of transistors in them. Hearing aids, MP3 players, and digital
players are loaded up with them. The change that this little electronic component has caused in your life
is almost impossible to measure. The science, chemistry, physics and electronics is overwhelming for
most of us. You can carve out a bit of understanding for yourself. The life stories of the three main
inventors might be interesting reading for you. If electronics is your interest, there is a lot to read. The
history of technology can be outright amazing. If you wish to explore the transistorized world around you,
we can help.

Last week, I told you about an overdue book returned to a library after sixty years. Not to be outdone, a library in New
Bedford, Massachusetts took in a book that was ninety nine years overdue. Aren't you glad that you were not on that waiting
list? The fine came out to $361.35 for the borrower. The library system forgave the fine. You can see the story at
http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2009/12/book_99_years_overdue_returned.html on the internet. I am starting to
suspect that this type of thing happens more often than I would imagine.

The Belle Plaine Friends of the Library and the staff at the Belle Plaine Branch wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a
                 Happy New Year. The Scott County Library System will be closed on Thursday, December 24 and Friday,
                 December 25, 2009 for Christmas. For New Year's Eve on Thursday, December 31, 2009 all open Scott
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                 County Public Library branches will close at 5:00pm. On New Year's Day, Friday, January 1 , 2010 all
                 Scott County Libraries will be closed. You may return your books in the return box. Renew your books on
                 the phone renewal line 952-890-9184. You can also renew using the catalog with your library card and
                 PIN number.

                   Last year we had an Adult Reading Program title “Winter Jackets”. This is a book club for our adult
                   readers. The program was a hit with our customers last year and we hope to have great participation
again this year. Winter Jackets 2010 will run from January 11 to February 28, 2010. More details will be coming soon.
                                                                                                       th
We will be taking a few Fridays off from Family Story Time. We will start up again on Friday, January 15 at 10:30 a.m.
                            rd
New Arrivals December 23 , 2009
Non-Fiction: Clara’s Kitchen Wisdom, Memories and recipes from the Great Depression by Clara Cannucciari; Years Of
Dust The story of the Dust Bowl by Albert Marrin; National Geographic Illustrated: Birds of North America by Jon L Dunn and
Jonathan Alderfer; The Pioneer Woman Cooks Recipes from an accidental country girl by Ree Drummond; The Book of
Basketball The NBA according to the sports guy by Bill Simmons; San Francisco 2010 by Fodor’s; France 2010 by Rick
Steves’; California 2010 by Fodor’s; Spain 2010 by Fodor’s; Paul McCartney A Life by Peter Ames Carlin; Add 10 Years to
Your Life With some best of Dr. Douglass’ writings by William Campbell Douglass II, MD
Juvenile Non-Fiction: Mallard Ducks by Shannon Zemlicka; Floating Jellyfish by Kathleen Martin-James; Alpine and
Freestyle Skiing Winter Olympic sports series by Kylie Burns
Adult Fiction: Southern Lights by Danielle Steel; From Cradle to Grave by Patricia MacDonald; Leaving Yesterday by
Kathryn Cushman; I, Alex Cross by James Patterson; Dream Chasers by Gloria Cook; Desert Lost by Betty
Webb; Faces Of The Gone by Brad Parks; Predators by Frederick Ramsay
Adult Paperback Fiction: Eggs Benedict Arnold by Laura Childs; Dying Scream by Mary Burton; Comfort
and Joy by Fern Michaels, Marie Bostwick, Cathy Lamb, and Deborah J. Wolf
Large Print Adult Fiction: No Less Than Victory by Jeff Shaara; Pilgrims A Wobegon Romance by
Garrison Keillor
Young Adult Fiction: Slam by Nick Hornby; Witch Wizard by James Patterson
Juvenile Graphic Horror: Tell-Tale Heart by Joeming Dunn; Indian Jones and the Kigdom of the Crystal
Skull Volume 1-4 by John Jackson Miller
Juvenile Graphic Novel: Star Wars The Clone Wars: The Battle for Ryloth by Zachary Rau
Talking Book on CD: Going Rogue by Sarah Palin
CD: Gold and Green by SugarLand; This Is It by Michael Jackson; Crazy Love by Micahel Buble; Peace on Earth by
Casting Crowns; Raditude by Weezer
Easy: Fancy Nancy Splendiferous Christmas by Jane O’Connor
Easy Kits Book and CD: Dr. Seuss’s ABC

				
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