February 2, 2007 1 The Madison Streetcar Coalition is a by fcm10941

VIEWS: 0 PAGES: 7

More Info
									February 2, 2007 


          Madison Streetcar Coalition Responses to Recent Anti­Streetcar Claims 

In recent weeks both the Wisconsin State Journal and the Capital Times have published guest 
                                                                      1 
columns sharply critical of the streetcar study process now under way.  These include two 
virtually identical articles by Randal O’Toole, an Oregon­based forestry expert turned 
“economist” who opposes public transit and urban planning from a radically libertarian 
            2 
viewpoint.  Two other columns by local commentators make points similar to O’Toole’s articles 
                                                3 
and draw on his arguments to varying degrees.  (For more information on O’Toole visit: 
http://www.1kfriends.org/Transportation/WI_Transportation_Projects_/Streetcars.htm) 

The main objective of these articles is to undermine the Madison streetcar effort by discrediting 
the Portland streetcar project that serves as one prominent model for it.  O’Toole and his local 
followers level several charges against the Portland streetcar: that investment in the streetcar 
serves an insignificant ridership at the expense of other transit service, that the development 
often attributed to the streetcar is actually the result of exorbitant subsidies, and that subsidies 
both to the streetcar and to developers along the streetcar route are draining resources from other 
vital local needs. 

While not all of these arguments are categorically false, several are, and the rest are based either 
on faulty logic, fallacious reasoning, or flimsy evidence­­or no evidence whatsoever.  Given both 
the importance of the Portland model and the credence some are giving these criticisms of it, the 
Madison Streetcar Coalition believes it important not to let O’Toole’s claims go unanswered. 
We discuss each of these claims in turn and show how a closer look at O’Toole’s evidence (or 
other evidence to the contrary) undercuts each and every one. 


The claim: survey data show that the Portland streetcar fails to get people out of their cars. 
“Does [the streetcar] at least help get people out of their automobiles?” O’Toole asks, and then 
answers: “In a word, ‘no.’ An annual census of downtown businesses revealed that in 2001, 
when the streetcar opened, 1 percent of downtown employees took the streetcar to work. By 
2005, it was still only 1 percent.” 

The facts:  There are three problems with this argument.  First, O’Toole misrepresents both the 
nature and the findings of the “census.”  Second, his narrow focus on work commutes is 
misleading.  And third, his use of the 1% figure to dismiss the streetcar’s importance is 
demonstrably silly. 

(1) The survey.  What O’Toole refers to in one article as a census and in another as a survey is 
in fact a report with two distinct parts, a “census” that obtained responses from every downtown 
                                                                                              4 
business, and an opinion “survey” of downtown business owners and managers, that did not. 

The 1% figure comes not from the census but from the survey portion, to which only a 
                                                                  5 
“statistically significant” number of businesses chose to respond.  What is more, the survey did 
not ask workers themselves how they get to work.  It merely asked business owners’ or 
managers’ opinions about how many of their workers commuted by various means.  In the end,

                                                1 
   The Madison Streetcar Coalition is a partnership of 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Downtown 
                        Trolley and the Dane Alliance for Rail Transit 
February 2, 2007 

any relationship between these survey results and actual downtown worker commuting patterns 
may be purely coincidental. 

(2) The misplaced focus on work commuting.  Even if it were true that only 1% of downtown 
workers commute by streetcar, this is largely irrelevant to the ability of the streetcar to attract 
riders or get people out of their cars. 

As a two­and­a­half­mile circulator serving a particular district, the streetcar isn’t designed 
mainly for commuter transportation to begin with.  Its purpose is to enable those people already 
downtown to get around without their cars, and to foster denser, more walkable, and less 
automobile­dependent development patterns. 

A more useful survey would have asked how many workers or residents (including students) in 
downtown Portland use the streetcar for various non­work tasks like shopping, going to class, or 
meeting up with friends, or how many visitors use it to get to restaurants, bars, or nightlife.  Had 
it done so, it might have better accounted for the nearly 9,000 trips made on the Portland 
                         6 
streetcar each weekday.  The fact that nearly as many riders use it on Saturdays and that Sunday 
ridership is well over half of weekday ridership also suggests that many trips by streetcar are not 
work commuting trips. 

Even if work commutes were all we were interested in, because the streetcar connects with other 
modes, including the MAX light rail system and TriMet bus routes, the survey may undercount 
those who commute into downtown by these other means but use the streetcar to complete their 
journey.  The survey does not appear designed to account for such combination trips. 

On the other hand, that survey does show a steady increase, from year to year, in the percentage 
of workers reported by their employers to be biking or walking to work.  Were we more 
confident of the survey’s validity, we would be tempted to say it shows the streetcar achieving 
exactly what it is supposed to. 

(3) The nonsensical “1% argument.” Even if “only” 1% of downtown workers use the 
streetcar for work trips—or for any trips, for that matter—a reasonable response is: so what? 
The idea that 1% is automatically insignificant, and that major funding for anything serving so 
small a percentage is unjustified, doesn’t bear examination. 

Consider the roughly 400,000 work commute trips, based on 2000 US Census worker flow data, 
that occur in Madison on a typical weekday.  Are we to decommission those city of Madison 
streets that don’t account for at least 4,000 individual work trips (which translates  into about 
                      7 
2,500 cars) per day?  That would include, just on the isthmus, Blount, Brearly, East Mifflin, and 
Hancock Streets, as well as portions of Martin Luther King Boulevard and State Street, to name 
just a few.  The 100 block of King Street would barely make the cut; at least two blocks of Henry 
                   8 
Street would not. 

The consequences are even more dire if we use the Madison Metropolitan Planning 
Organization’s estimate of 979,500 daily trips of any kind in the city of Madison as the basis of 
the 1% calculation, placing the threshold at just over 6100 cars per day.  All four streets that
                                                2 
   The Madison Streetcar Coalition is a partnership of 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Downtown 
                        Trolley and the Dane Alliance for Rail Transit 
February 2, 2007 

make up the Capitol Square would fall short, as would all but one block of Lake Street and, 
beyond downtown, most of Sheboygan and Sherman Avenues (before the latter becomes North 
Sherman)—again to name just a few examples.  Meanwhile Williamson Street (save for its 
intersection with Blair) accounts for less than 4% of city of Madison trips, and so does East 
Gorham; no block of Midvale carries more than 5%.  But no one would seriously question the 
value of any of these streets, or decades’­worth of spending on them, based on the seemingly 
small percentages of local trips they support. 


The claim: Transit commuting in Portland has declined with the advent of the streetcar. 
Referencing the same downtown business survey, O’Toole asserts that “At the same time…the 
number of downtown commuters who took other forms of transit to work declined by more than 
20 percent, while the number who drove to work increased.” 

The facts: This isn’t what the survey reports.  That survey says nothing about actual commuting 
numbers.  It merely indicates the percentages of workers who, again, in the opinion of their 
employers (and based only on a sampling of those employers) were estimated to commute by 
various means. 

Year to year from 2001 to 2004 the combined percentage for bus and MAX light rail commuters 
reported in the survey fluctuated between 40% and 45% before dropping from 44% in 2004 to 
37% the following year.  The difference between 2001 and 2005 happens to have been 8 
percentage points; calculating this as a percentage of a percentage appears to be the sleight of 
hand by which O’Toole arrives at a “20%” change that he then misleadingly refers to as a 
decline in numbers of downtown workers using transit to get to work.  But given that the survey 
has an acknowledged error margin of plus or minus 3 percentage points, even that 8­point 
difference between 2001 and 2005 may indicate little underlying change in commuting patterns. 

Actual ridership data from the Federal Transit Administration’s National Transit Database tell a 
very different story from the tale O’Toole tries to spin from the Portland Business Alliance 
survey.  According to those data, between 2001 and 2005 bus passenger trips in Portland 
increased by just over 5% and bus passenger miles increased by 13.4%.  During that same period 
light rail passenger trips increased by 39% while light rail passenger miles increased by almost 
24%. 

While these data don’t distinguish “commute” trips from other trips, unlike the survey response 
data they deal directly in actual transit ridership numbers, and clearly show these to be 
increasing, not decreasing, during the 2001­2005 period.  And although, according to the latest 
figures from the Portland transit agency, transit ridership has leveled off and even declined 
slightly since 2005, that does not make O’Toole’s misrepresentation of the 2001 to 2005 survey 
                           9 
data any more legitimate. 


The claim: Subsidies to the streetcar have hurt other transit service.  O’Toole writes that “the 
large subsidies required for the streetcar and the developments along the streetcar line led to 
budget and service cuts in Portland's bus and light­rail schedules.  Because of those cuts
                                                3 
   The Madison Streetcar Coalition is a partnership of 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Downtown 
                        Trolley and the Dane Alliance for Rail Transit 
February 2, 2007 

Portland's total transit ridership has been flat despite high gas prices.”  The lesson, according to 
O’Toole, is that subsidies related to the streetcar “end up hurting the average transit rider.” 

The facts: As we discuss below, the “subsidies” to which O’Toole refers appear to relate mainly 
to tax incremental financing and urban redevelopment tax exemptions, the fiscal impact of which 
would be on property tax revenues.  But TriMet bus and light rail service in Portland isn’t funded 
by property taxes.  Its primary source of funding is a regional payroll tax, with additional funding 
coming from federal transit aids and transit fares.  So it is hard to see how these subsidies could 
be affecting transit services in the manner O’Toole claims. 

Here again, National Transit Database data directly challenge those claims.  Far from indicating 
sharp drops in transit spending or service levels, these data show spending on both buses and rail 
increasing between 2001 and 2005, with substantial increases in light rail service levels more 
than compensating for marginal decreases in bus service to make for substantial growth in 
overall transit service overall.  Specifically, these data show, from 2001 to 2005:
    ·  Bus operating expenditures up 31%
    ·  Light rail operating expenditures up 70%
    ·  Bus vehicles in service down 6%
    ·  Light rail vehicles in service up 50%
    ·  Bus annual vehicle miles up 3%
    ·  Light rail annual vehicle miles up 34%
    ·  Bus annual vehicle hours up 1%
    ·  Light rail annual vehicle hours up 48%. 

It is true that starting in 2005 a regional economic recession appears to have cut into the revenues 
from that payroll tax.  That and sharp increases in fuel costs have created a budget squeeze as 
                                                                   10 
TriMet tries to meet continuing high regional demand for transit.  But there is no basis for 
arguing that any of this has to do with funding diverted to pay either for the streetcar or for 
incentives to developers along the streetcar route. 


The claim: Streetcar­related development is exorbitantly subsidized.  O’Toole dismisses the 
development associated with the streetcar by claiming that the Portland streetcar’s champions 
“don’t tell you” that developers have received “huge tax subsidies in the form of tax waivers, 
infrastructure subsidies, and direct grants,” putting the figure at “$250 million…not counting 
the cost of the streetcar or the 10 years of property tax waivers that the city routinely grants to 
new construction along the streetcar line.” 

The facts: O’Toole does not explain how he arrives at the $250 million figure, and mentions tax 
waivers twice in a way that leaves unclear which ones are and are not included in that figure. 

It seems clear, thought, that the main “subsidies” at issue here are tax incremental financing, 
which has helped fund both construction of the streetcar route and development nearby, and tax 
                                                                     11 
exemptions associated with various urban development programs.  But neither of these types of 
subsidy are unique to the areas served by the streetcar or to Portland more generally.  They are 
standard types of development incentive used throughout Portland for specific urban
                                                4 
   The Madison Streetcar Coalition is a partnership of 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Downtown 
                        Trolley and the Dane Alliance for Rail Transit 
February 2, 2007 

redevelopment purposes (not necessarily in conjunction with the streetcar, nor automatically 
provided along the streetcar route) and in many other cities (most of which don’t have 
streetcars).  They are popular in part because they do not in fact require taxpayers to “shell out” 
funds, but simply to forego revenue temporarily in anticipation of higher revenues later. 

Even assuming the $250 million figure is correct, the fact remains that between $2 billion and 
$2.5 billion in development, or close to ten times the subsidy amount O’Toole alleges, has been 
generated along the streetcar route, much of it in post­industrial areas where little or no 
development was occurring before.  The fact that subsidies were provided is less important than 
the private investment these public funds and the streetcar together helped leverage. 

In the short term, that development is creating jobs and commercial activity, which itself 
generates revenues—to say nothing of creating vibrant, high­quality urban places where large 
numbers of people want to live.  Furthermore, one specific purpose of many of these tax 
abatement “subsidies” is historic preservation, while others are aimed at keeping at least some of 
the new residential development along the streetcar affordable.  Both of these policies further 
contribute to the district’s vitality. 

Eventually (and in the case of 10­year exemptions granted in the late 1990s, very soon) these 
neighborhood properties will be back on the tax rolls at a much higher value than before, thus 
generating even more tax revenue for the city for many decades to come.  That’s what TIF 
financing and these exemption programs are meant to accomplish.  In other words, these 
“subsidies” are doing exactly what they are supposed to do. 

That may be why, far from being a secret (and being, in any case, a matter of public record), 
these development incentives form part of the story of the Portland streetcar project as a case 
study in public­private partnership to advance urban redevelopment objectives. 


The claim: Those subsidies, not the streetcar, are responsible for development along the 
Portland streetcar route.  O’Toole further asserts that “the streetcar had nothing to do with the 
new construction. Without the subsidies but with the streetcar, virtually no new construction 
would have taken place. With the subsidies but no streetcar, virtually all of the new 
developments would have been built anyway.” 

The facts: No one has suggested the streetcar caused this development all by itself.  In calling 
the streetcar a development “catalyst,” streetcar advocates are saying it and other factors 
combined to foster this new development through a public­private redevelopment partnership. 

So the statement that “with the streetcar but without the subsidies no new construction would 
have taken place” is true in a sense, but misses the point.  Had new development not been 
envisioned for these districts, there would have been no reason either for development incentives 
(“subsidies”) or for the streetcar. 

But the claim that virtually all this development would have happened anyway without the 
streetcar is very dubious given the history of how these developments came about.  The high
                                                5 
   The Madison Streetcar Coalition is a partnership of 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Downtown 
                        Trolley and the Dane Alliance for Rail Transit 
February 2, 2007 

density of development that was both a goal of these district redevelopment projects and needed 
to ensure an enticing return to investors would have been impossible had it been necessary to 
provide the levels of parking or automobile access typical in more conventional development. 
The streetcar has clearly helped these developments meet their densification goals, as indicated 
                                                                                        12 
by the close association between increased density and proximity to the streetcar route. 

In short, the streetcar was critical to attracting the investment needed to make the development 
happen, and in creating the kind of non­automobile access needed to make the development 
work. 


The claim: the streetcar has siphoned funding from other urban priorities.  Not only has 
transit service suffered as a result of streetcar spending, O’Toole maintains; he also argues that 
other services have been harmed as well.  Thus, he notes that “Portland schools, fire, police, 
public health, and other essential services have all seen budget squeezes.” 

The facts: O’Toole offers no evidence to substantiate these claims, just the unsupported 
implication that any funding going into streetcar investments is necessarily being diverted from 
other needs. 

But cities nationwide have seen budget squeezes and face hard choices concerning how to 
provide services.  There is no reason to believe Portland’s are substantially greater than or 
different from those anywhere else, or that any of these have any specific connection with the 
streetcar.  Blaming the streetcar or related development subsidies in any simple way for school 
budget woes, for example, is problematic given that most school funding in Oregon comes from 
                                                13 
the state rather than from local property taxes. 

As already noted, most of the subsidies O’Toole refers to do not involve diverting current 
resources, but rather temporarily deferring revenues on new development, in anticipation of even 
higher revenues over a much longer period into the future.  In any case, O’Toole can’t have it 
both ways.  He can’t claim that this development would not have occurred without these 
financing mechanisms, then argue that foregoing, temporarily, the full tax revenue from the 
resulting development represents a net loss to the community. 

That said, it is true that a recent regional economic downturn along with revisions to the property 
tax law and structure have complicated the economics of TIF districts in Portland and brought 
calls for reform of TIF policy as well as a reassessment of some to the tax abatement programs 
used to encourage development in renewal districts.  But these are issues of municipal finance 
that are much broader than the question of the streetcar as such.  It is absurd to try to reduce this 
                                                                                           14 
complex situation to a single­factor explanation like funding for the Portland streetcar. 

1 
   Randal O’Toole columns “Don’t Fall for the Streetcar Hoax” in Wisconsin State Journal December 19, 2006 and 
“Portland Streetcar Success Just a Hoax” in Capital Times January 9, 2007.  Both of these columns are versions of 
an article dated December 12, 2006 at http://www.ti.org/vaupdate67.html. 
2 
   Thoreau Institute – www.ti.org and The Antiplanner blog “Dedicated to the sunset of government planning” 
www.ti.org/antiplanner/
                                                  6 
     The Madison Streetcar Coalition is a partnership of 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Downtown 
                          Trolley and the Dane Alliance for Rail Transit 
February 2, 2007 


3 
   Mitch Henck column “Rush Hour Remedy? Or Trolley Folly?” in Wisconsin State Journal, December 17, 2006, 
and Mike Roach column “Trolleys Undermine Value Of Bus System,” in Capital Times, January 10, 2007. 
4 
   The full report on the Portland Business Alliance census and survey can be found at 
http://www.portlandalliance.com/pdf/2005census.pdf; the latest version of the survey instrument can be accessed at 
http://www.downtownportland.org/survey.html. 
5 
   When contacted, the Business Alliance would not reveal the actual response rate except to say that it was “more 
than 1000”—out of a total of over 4,120 downtown businesses. 
6 
   Portland streetcar ridership statistics are available at http://www.portlandstreetcar.org/pdf/ridership.pdf 
7 
   Based on National Household Travel Survey estimate of an average of 1.6 people per car; see Highlights of the 
2001 NHTS, U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, p. 11. 
8 
   Maps indicating traffic flows on Madison streets can be found on the city of Madison web site at 
http://www.ci.madison.wi.us/transp/Flowmaps/Flowamps.htm. 
9 
   The latest ridership data from Portland TriMet can be found at http://trimet.org/pdfs/ridership/busmaxstat.pdf.; see 
also http://trimet.org/pdfs/publications/factsheet.pdf. 
10 
    For more information on TriMet’s financial situation see a recent Citizens’ Advisory Commission report on the 
TriMet budget: http://trimet.org/pdfs/publications/cacreport07budget.pdf.  In the web­based version of his article 
O’Toole cites a June 6, 2006 Portland Tribune article (see http://portlandtribune.com/ news/story.php? 
story_id=35639) in support of his claim of budget cuts, but that article actually presents a much more complex 
picture than the oversimplified account he offers, and makes no mention of the streetcar or related subsidies as the 
cause. 
11 
    When, in another of his web site articles, O’Toole raises the development subsidy issue he specifies these two 
forms: see http://www.ti.org/vaupdate60.html. 
12 
    These development impacts are discussed in greater detail in “Portland Streetcar Development Impacts,” October 
2005, (http://www.reconnectingamerica.org/pdfs/BriefingbookPDF/ Hovee%20Exec%20Summary.pdf ) and 
“Portland Streetcar Development­Oriented Transit Report,” January 2006 (http://www.portlandstreetcar.org/pdf/ 
development.pdf). 
13 
    See the Portland Development Corporation’s Urban Renewal Primer http://www.pdc.us/pdf/about/urban_ 
renewal_ primer.pdf, p. 5. 
14 
    A recent City Club of Portland report on the Portland Development Commission and its urban renewal programs 
both figures in and offers a revealing discussion of this issue.  It is available on line at 
http://www.pdxcityclub.org/pdf/pdc_2005.pdf.




                                                  7 
     The Madison Streetcar Coalition is a partnership of 1000 Friends of Wisconsin, Downtown 
                          Trolley and the Dane Alliance for Rail Transit 

								
To top