EDUCATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

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					               EDUCATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT:
                         ADVANCED TOPICS

                                 Prof. Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz
                                        Teachers College
                                      Columbia University


                                           ITSF 6050
                                            3 Credits
                                          Spring 2006
                                    Tuesdays 1:00 – 3:00 P.M.


                                   COURSE SUMMARY
This course provides an advanced discussion of the links between education and economic
development, including both theoretical frameworks and empirical models. Topics discussed
include: the impact of education on economic growth, data sources in education and economic
development, the effects of the brain drain on economic development, the determinants of the rate
of return to schooling, inequities in the supply of schooling by income, gender, race/ethnicity and
location, the factors influencing student achievement, the estimation of educational production
functions, and the role of quality in the impact of schooling.

                                    COURSE OUTLINE
1.     Accounting for the Role of Education on Economic Growth: Theory

2.     Does Education Make a Difference? Empirical Evidence on the Impact of
       Education on Economic Growth

3.     The Economics of the Brain Drain

4.     The Determinants of School Enrollment in Developing Countries: Demand
       Side

5.     The Supply Side and the Quality of Education in Developing Countries

6.     Inequities in the Distribution of Education

7.     The Labor Market Returns to Education in Developing Countries

8.     Education and Labor Market Discrimination




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                      COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND EVALUATION

Students are expected to attend all class sessions. Student assessment will be based on the writing
of one original research paper whose topic will be determined in consultation with the professor.
Each student will present her or his paper at a class session in the final weeks of the semester.


                                         OFFICE HOURS

Walk-in office hours will be held from 3:00 to 4:30 on Tuesdays and from 4:30 to 6:00 on
Wednesdays. If these times are not convenient, other appointments can be arranged with the
course instructor.


                     SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Teachers College will make reasonable accommodations for persons with documented
disabilities. Students are encouraged to contact the Office of Access and Services for Individuals
with Disabilities for information about registration for these services (166 Thorndike Hall).
Services are available only for students who are registered and submit appropriate documentation.
The course instructor will be happy to discuss any specific student needs also.


                                     INCOMPLETE GRADE

A grade of incomplete is to be assigned only when the course attendance requirement has been
met but, for reasons satisfactory to the instructor, the granting of a final grade must be postponed
because certain course requirements are outstanding. If the outstanding assignments are
completed within one calendar year from the date of the close of term in which the grade of
Incomplete was received and a final grade submitted, the final grade will be recorded on the
permanent transcript, replacing the grade of Incomplete, with a transcript notation indicating the
date that the grade of Incomplete was replaced by a final grade.

If the outstanding work is not completed within one calendar year from the date of the close of
term in which the grade of Incomplete was received, the grade will remain as a permanent
Incomplete on the transcript. In such instances, if the course is a required course or part of an
approved program of study, students will be required to re-enroll in the course, including
repayment of all tuition and fees for the new registration and will be required to satisfactorily
complete all course requirements. If the required course is not offered in subsequent terms, the
student should speak with the faculty advisor or program coordinator about their options for
fulfilling the degree requirement. Doctoral students with six or more credits with an Incomplete
included on their program of study will not be allowed to sit for the certification exam.




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                                      READING LIST

1. Accounting for the Role of Education on Economic Growth: Theory

Robert M. Solow, "Technical Progress and Productivity Change," Review of Economics and
Statistics, Vol. 39, 1957, 312-320.

Paul M. Romer, "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 98,
1990, S71-S102.

Kevin M. Murphy, Andrei Shleifer and Robert Vishny, “The Allocation of Talent: Implications
for Growth,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 106, No. 2, May 1991, 503-530.

N. Gregory Mankiw, David Romer and David Weil, “A Contribution to the Empirics of
Economic Growth, Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 2002, 407-437.

Robert E. Lucas, "Making a Miracle," Econometrica, Vol. 61, March 1993, 251-272.

Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, "The Economics of Technological Progress and Endogenous Growth
in Open Economies," in G. Koopmann and H. Scharrer, eds., The Economics of High-Technology
Cooperation and Competition in Global Markets, Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 1996, 31-63.


2. Does Education Make a Difference? Empirical Evidence on the Impact of Education on
Economic Growth

Eric A. Hanushek and Dennis D. Kimko, “Schooling, Labor Force Quality and the Growth of
Nations,” American Economic Review, December 2000, 1184-1208

Lant Pritchett, "Where has All the Education Gone?," The World Bank Economic Review, Vol.
15, No. 3, 2001, 367-392.

William Easterly and Ross Levine, “It’s Not Factor Accumulation: Stylized Facts and Growth
Models,” The World Bank Economic Review, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2001, 177-219.

Yoshihisa Godo, “Catching Up in Education in the Economic Catch-Up of Japan with the United
States, 1890-1990,” Economic Development and Cultural Change, July 2002.

Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, “Democracy, Governance and Economic Growth: Theory and
Evidence,” Review of Development Economics, Vol. 6, No. 2, June 2002, 225-247.

Sharmistha Self and Richard Grabowski, “Does Education at all Levels Cause Growth? A Case
Study of India,” Economics of Education Review, 2004, 47-55.

Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, “Is Education an Engine of Economic Growth?,” mimeo., Program in
Economics and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, January 2005.




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3. The Economics of the Brain Drain

Simon Commander, M. Kangeshian and L. Alan Winters, “The Brain Drain: Curse or Boon?,
Institute for the Study of Labor, Bonn, IZA Discussion Paper No. 809, June 2003.

Alejandra Cox Edwards and M. Ureta, “International Migration, Remittances and Schooling:
Evidence from El Salvador,” National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts,
Working Paper No. 9766, June 2003.

Gordon Hanson, “Emigration, Labor Supply and Earnings in Mexico,” National Bureau of
Economic Research, Working Paper No. 11412, Cambridge, Massachusetts, June 2005.

Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, “The Impact of the Brain Drain on Economic Growth: Theory and
Evidence,” paper prepared for the conference on Science, Technology and Innovation,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 18, 2005.

Frederic Docquier and Abdeslam Marfouk, “International Migration by Educational Attainment,”
in Caglar Ozden and Maurice Schiff, eds., International Migration, Remittances and the Brain
Drain, Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2006, 151-200.


4. The Determinants of School Enrollment in Developing Countries: Demand Side


Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, “Child Labor Patterns and Legislation in Relation to Fertility,” in
George J. Stolnitz, ed., Quantitative Approaches to Analyzing Socioeconomic Determinants of
Third World Fertility Trends,, The Futures Group, Washington, D.C., 1984, chapter 3.

Ranjan Ray, “Child Labor, Child Schooling and their Interaction with Adult Labor: Empirical
Evidence for Peru and Pakistan,” World Bank Economic Review, May 2000, 347-370.

Emmanuel Skoufias and Susan W. Parker, “Conditional Cash Transfers and Their Impact on
Child Work and Schooling: Evidence from the PROGRESA Program in Mexico,” Economia,
Vol. 2, No. 1, Fall 2001, 45-96.

Abhijit Banarjee, “Educational Policy and the Economics of the Family,” Journal of Development
Economics, Vol. 74, No. 1, February 2004, 3-32.

T. Paul Schultz, “School Subsidies for the Poor: Evaluating the Mexican PROGRESA Program,”
Journal of Development Economics, 2004, 199-250.

Michael Kremer, Edward Miguel and Rebecca Thornton, “Incentives to Learn,” Bureau for
Research in Economic Analysis of Development, Harvard University, October 2004.

Eric Edmonds and Nina Pavcnik, “Child Labor in the Global Economy,” Journal of Economic
Perspectives, Winter 2005.




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5. The Supply Side and the Quality of Education in Developing Countries

Joshua D. Angrist and Alan B. Krueger, “Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling
and Earnings?,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 151, No. 4, November 1991.

Victor Lavy, "Investment in Human Capital, Schooling and Supply Constraints in Rural Ghana."
Living Standards Measurement Study, Working Paper No. 93, World Bank, Washington, D.C.,
1992.

Eric Hanushek, Joao Batista Gomes-Neto and Ralph Harbison, “Efficiency-Enhancing
Investments in School Quality,” in Nancy Birdsall and Richard Sabot, eds., Education in Brazil:
Opportunity Foregone, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 1996, 385-424.

Esther Duflo, “Schooling and Labor Market Consequences of School Construction in Indonesia:
Evidence from an Unusual Policy Experiment,” American Economic Review, Vol. 91, No. 4,
September 2001, 795-813.

Emmanuela Di Gropello, “An Assessment of the Impact of Decentralization on the Quality of
Education in Chile,” in S. Devarajan and F. Halsey Rogers, eds., World Bank Economists’ Forum,
The World Bank, Washington, D.C., 2002, 117-154.

S. Dercon, J. Das, J. Habyarimana and P. Krishnan, “Teacher Shocks and Student Learning:
Evidence from Zambia,” World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 3602, May 2005.

Kenneth T. Chay, Patrick McEwan and Miguel Urquiola, “The Central Role of Noise in
Evaluating Interventions that use Test Scores to Rank Schools,” American Economic Review, Vol.
95, No. 4, September 2005.

Abhijit Banarjee, Shawn Cole, Esther Duflo and Leigh Linden, “Remedying Education: Evidence
from Two Randomized Experiments,” mimeo., Department of Economics, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 2005.


6. Inequities in the Distribution of Education

Stephen Jenkins, “The Measurement of Income Inequality,” in Lars Osberg, ed., Economic
Inequality and Poverty: International Perspectives, M.E. Sharpe, London, 1991, 3-38.

Deon Filmer and Lant Pritchett, “The Effects of Household Wealth on Educational Attainment:
Evidence from 35 Countries,” Population and Development Review, Vol. 25, No. 1, 1999.

Vinod Thomas, Yan Wang and Xibo Fan, “Measuring Education Inequality: Gini Coefficients of
Education,” World Bank Policy Research Working Paper, December 2000.

Philip Brown and Albert Park, “Education and Poverty in Rural China,” Economics of Education
Review, Vol. 21, 2002, 523-541.




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Shang-Jin Wei and Yi Wu, “Globalization and Inequality: Evidence from Within China,” The
Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C., 2001.

Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson, “The Political Economy of the Kuznets Curve,” in
Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz and Luis A. Rivera-Batiz, eds., Democracy, Participation and
Development,” Special Issue of Review of Development Economics, Vol. 6, No. 2, June 2002,
183-203.

Ximing Wu and Jeffrey Perloff, “China’s Income Distribution and Inequality,” mimeo.,
University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, January 2004.

Graziella Bertocchi and Michael Spagat, “The Evolution of Modern Educational Systems,”
Journal of Development Economics, Vol. 73, No. 4, December 2004, 559-582.


7. The Labor Market Returns to Education in Developing Countries


George Psacharopoulos, "Returns to Investment in Education: A Global Update," World
Development, Vol. 22, No. 9, 1994, pp. 1325-1343.

Gordon Hanson and Ann Harrison, “Trade Liberalization and Wage Inequality in Mexico,”
Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 271-288, 1999.

Daron Acemoglu, “Technical Change, Inequality and the Labor Market,” Journal of Economic
Literature, Vol. 40, No. 1, March 2002, 7-72.

Nina Pavcnik, “What Explains Skill Upgrading in Less Developed Countries?,” Journal of
Development Economics, Vol. 71, 2003, 311-328..

James J. Heckman, L. Lochner and P. A. Todd, “Fifty Years of Mincer Earnings Regressions,”
National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. 9732, May 2003.

George Psacharopoulos and Harry Anthony Patrinos, “Return to Investment in Education: A
Further Update,” Education Economics, 2004.

Haraounan Kazianga, “Schooling Returns for Wage Earners in Burkina Faso,” Yale Economic
Growth Center, Working Paper No. 892, New Haven, August 2004.


8. Education and Labor Market Discrimination

T. H. Gindling, “Why Women Earn Less than Men in Costa Rica,” in G. Psacharopoulos and Z.
Tnatos, eds., Case Studies on Women’s Employment and Pay in Latin America, The World Bank,
Washington, D.C., 1992.




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Francine Blau and Lawrence Kahn, "Wage Structure and Gender Earnings Differentials: An
International Comparison," Economica, 63, No. 250(S) (May 1996 Supplement): S29-S62.

Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, “Undocumented Workers in the Labor Market: An Analysis of the
Earnings of Legal and Illegal Mexican Immigrants in the U.S.,” in Klaus F. Zimmermann and A.
Constant, eds., How Labor Migrants Fare, Springer Verlag Publishers, Berlin, 2004, 307-332.
Reprinted paper originally published in Journal of Population Economics, 1998.

Stefano Paternostro and David Sahn, “Wage Determination and Gender Discrimination in a
Transition Economy: The Case of Romania,” World Bank Policy Research Working Paper, The
World Bank, Washington, D.C., May 1999.

Abigail Barr and Abena Oduro, “Ethnicity and Wage Determination in Ghana,” World Bank
Policy Research Working Paper, The World Bank, Washington, D.C., December 2000.




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