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PART 2 HEALTH AND SAFETY BFG SHEF MANUAL

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					                                   BFG SHEF MANUAL - PART 2 - CHAPTER 2

                                                 PART 2 - CHAPTER 2

              HEALTH & SAFETY - PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION

                                                           CONTENTS

  PART 2 - CHAPTER 2 ........................................................................................................................ 1
  HEALTH & SAFETY - PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION ............................................................ 1
  CONTENTS ......................................................................................................................................... 1
  Changes from version 2.2 ................................................................................................................... 3
  GLOSSARY ......................................................................................................................................... 4
  HEALTH AND SAFETY - PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION ....................................................... 5
  Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 5
  H&S Advice – Further Guidance ......................................................................................................... 5
  Hyperlinks to JSPs .............................................................................................................................. 5
  Leaflet 1 - Accident / Incident Reporting ............................................................................................. 6
  Annex A - Accident & Incident Notification to AINC ..........................................................................11
  Annex B - MOD F510 Accident Reporting Form ...............................................................................13
  Annex C – DEL Accident Report Form - UNFALLANZEIGE ............................................................14
  Leaflet 2 - Accident/Incident Investigation .........................................................................................20
  Annex A - Investigation Levels - Military/UKBC Personnel/Dependents ..........................................22
  Annex B - Investigation Levels - Civilian Personnel (DEL) ...............................................................23
  Leaflet 3 - Competent Persons .........................................................................................................25
  Leaflet 4 - Management of visiting workers, contractors and visitors to Barracks and
  Establishments controlled by British Forces Germany .....................................................................27
  Annex A - CO‟S Site Safety Management Responsibilities ..............................................................31
  Annex A – Appendix 1 Draft COs letter of Appointment of Site 4Cs Duty Holder ............................33
  Annex B – 4CDH Responsibilities .....................................................................................................34
  Annex C – Area Custodian Responsibilities......................................................................................36
  Annex D – Hosts Responsibilities .....................................................................................................38
  Annex E – The 4Cs Management System ........................................................................................40
  Annex F – H&S Instructions for Visitors and Contractors (English Version) .....................................43
  Annex F – H&S Instructions for Visitors and Contractors (German Version) ...................................44
  Annex G – 4 Cs Visitors trifold handout English Text .......................................................................45
  Annex H - 4Cs visitors trifold handout German Text .........................................................................47
  Annex I – General Guidance Notes ..................................................................................................49
  Annex J – 4Cs Communications Process .........................................................................................50
  Annex K – Hazard Registers .............................................................................................................51
  Annex K – Appendix 1 - Notice to Contractors & Visitors .................................................................52
  Annex K – Appendix 2 - Typical Example of 4Cs Area Hazard Register ..........................................53
  Annex K – Appendix 3 - Hazard Classification..................................................................................55
  Annex L – Glossary ..........................................................................................................................57
  Leaflet 5 – H&S Management of Events Held on Estate Controlled or Used by BFG ......................59
  Annex A - Waiver and Indemnity Form .............................................................................................64
  Annex B - Verszichts-Und Haftungsfreistellungserkl ........................................................................65
  Leaflet 6 - Electricity and Electrical Equipment .................................................................................66
  Annex A - Inspection Intervals for Portable Equipment ....................................................................71
  Leaflet 7 - Serious and Imminent Danger .........................................................................................72
  Leaflet 8 - Exposure to Vibration at Work .........................................................................................74
  Leaflet 9 - First Aid at Work ...............................................................................................................76
  Annex A – First Aid Box Contents and Check List ............................................................................79
  Leaflet 10 - Health & Safety Inspections ...........................................................................................80
  Leaflet 11 - H&S Training ..................................................................................................................82
  Leaflet 12 - Health & Safety of Young Persons and Children ...........................................................85
  Leaflet 13 - Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment .......................................................................86
  Leaflet 14 - Management of Asbestos ..............................................................................................88
  Annex A – Typical Procedure Where ACM is Suspected .................................................................91
  Contents continued on next page


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  Leaflet 15 - Manual Handling ............................................................................................................92
  Annex A – Manual handling risk assessment form/checklist ...........................................................94
  Leaflet 16 - MOD Premises (Clubs; Societies; Encroachments) ......................................................97
  Leaflet 17 - New/Expectant Mothers at Work....................................................................................99
  Leaflet 18 - Noise at Work ...............................................................................................................101
  Annex A – Noise Assessment Record ............................................................................................105
  Leaflet 19 - Occupational Health .....................................................................................................113
  Leaflet 20 - Office Safety .................................................................................................................115
  Annex A - Office Machinery – potential hazards and risks ............................................................117
  Leaflet 21 - Permit to Work..............................................................................................................121
  Annex A – Permit to Work Form .....................................................................................................124
  Leaflet 22 - Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) .........................................................................127
  Annex A – PPE Inspection Record .................................................................................................129
  Leaflet 23 – Provision & Use Work Equipment ...............................................................................131
  Leaflet 24 - Radiation Protection .....................................................................................................133
  Annex A – Common army equipment containing radioactive material ...........................................135
  Leaflet 25 - Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) .....................................................................136
  Leaflet 26 – Risk Assessment .........................................................................................................138
  Annex A - Risk assessment terms and definitions ..........................................................................145
  Annex B - Risk assessment flow diagram .......................................................................................146
  Annex C – MOD Hazard Survey Form –MOD Form 5010b ............................................................147
  Annex D- Risk assessment –MOD Form 5010a .............................................................................149
  Leaflet 27 - Safe Systems of Work ..................................................................................................151
  Leaflet 28 - Safety in Excavation .....................................................................................................154
  Leaflet 29 - Safety Signs and Signals .............................................................................................156
  Leaflet 30 - Site Risk Assessment ..................................................................................................158
  Leaflet 31 – Smoking at Work .........................................................................................................160
  Leaflet 32 - Stress at Work ..............................................................................................................163
  Annex A – 1* Stress Management Policy Framework ....................................................................165
  Leaflet 33 - Substances Hazardous to Health.................................................................................167
  Annex A – Hazard Properties ..........................................................................................................172
  Annex B – COSHH Assessment Form ............................................................................................173
  Annex C – Storage compatibility of hazardous substances ...........................................................177
  Leaflet 34 - Working in Confined Spaces ........................................................................................178
  Leaflet 35 - Working with Display Screen Equipment (DSE) ..........................................................180
  Leaflet 36 - Working at Height .........................................................................................................182
  Leaflet 37 – Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) .....................................................................185
  Leaflet 38 – Safety in Swimming Pools ...........................................................................................188
  Leaflet 39 – Climatic Injuries ...........................................................................................................191
  Annex A - WBGT Threshold Values ................................................................................................201
  Annex B – Water requirements for personnel during exercise in heat ...........................................202
  Annex C – Risk assessment aide memoir ......................................................................................203
  Annex D – First Aid Immediate Action Algorithm ............................................................................204
  Annex E - Wind chill – Its use as a planning guide .........................................................................205
  Leaflet 40 - Open water sites ..........................................................................................................206
  Leaflet 41 – Dogs in the Workplace ................................................................................................208
  Annex A – Dog Registration Certificate ...........................................................................................211
  Leaflet 42 – Workplace Safety - Vehicles .......................................................................................212
  Leaflet 43 – Lone Workers ..............................................................................................................216
  Annex A – Six Steps for Safe Lone Working...................................................................................220
  Leaflet 45 – The control and management of risk from legionella (under construction) .................221
  Leaflet 46 – Health & Safety in Germany - Main Legislation ..........................................................222




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Changes from version 2.2

1. This version 3.0 of the BFG SHEF Manual has some changes from version 2.2. These are clearly
   marked in blue text; tracked changes have not been used. Text which has been deleted from previous
   editions is not shown as it is of no relevance. The significant changes to which attention is drawn are
   shown in the table below

 Leaflet          Subject (Ctrl+click)                                    Changes
Number
1          Accident/Incident reporting           a. Inclusion of examples of MOD F 510.
                                                 b. Inclusion of example of DEL Accident reporting form –
                                                 Unfallanzeige.
                                                 c. Deletion of BFG Form 138. Form no longer required.
                                                 d. Provision of accident and incident analysis to 2* and 1*
                                                 HQs.
2          Accident/Incident investigation       a. Learning Accounts. Example of a short Learning
                                                 account.
                                                 b. Acting on lessons learnt.
4          4Cs                                   a. 2 new annexes – Additional trifold format handout.
                                                 advice for visitors in German and English.
                                                 b. COs Letter of appointment to 4Cs DH.
                                                 c. Short advice on DSEAR hazard assessment.
5          H&S management of events held         a. Extensive amdt to duties of CO and Event Organiser.
           on estate controlled by BFG           b. Extensive amdt of further guidance.
                                                 c. Definition of competency.
6          Electricity and electrical            a. Continental Plug Adaptors.
           equipment                             b. PAT of DII(F) equipment.
7          Serious and imminent danger           a. CO‟s duty to have a disaster/ emergency response plan.
            st                                                     st
9          1 aid at work                         a. Review of 1 aid risk assessment.
10         H&S Inspections                       a. Line manager‟s duties.
11         H&S Training                          a. Induction training.
13         Lifting operations & lifting          a. Inspection policy.
           equipment                             b. Records.
19         Occupational Health                   a. Reference to PRG for UKBC
20         Office Safety                         a. New Annex A – Office Machinery potential hazards and
                                                 risks.
30         Site Risk Assessment                  a. Revised Duties; Gar HQ, COs, Line Managers.
31         Smoking at work                       a. Inclusion of control measures for visitors and contractors
32         Stress at work                        a. Inclusion of draft 1* stress management policy.
37         Leaflet 37 – Workplace (Health,       a. Lighting for DEL workplaces/workstations to comply with
           Safety and Welfare)                   Host Nation Standards
42         Workplace safety - vehicles           b. Control of ignition keys/means of starting.
                                                 c. Movement of trailers.
45         The control and management of         Blank; awaiting DE(E) input.
           risk from legionella




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        GLOSSARY

4Cs          The procedure for coordination, control, communication and cooperation with contractors and
             other visitors to MOD controlled premises.
AINC         Army Incident Notification Cell
CE           Conformittee Europeen (Conforms with European H&S standards)
CESO(A)      Chief Environmental and Safety Officer (Army)
CHASP        Central H&S Project
COSHH        Control of Substances Hazardous to Health
dB(A)        Decibel, weighted for the human ear
DEL          Direct Employed Labour – Locally employed civilian on the German economy
DEP          Dependant Employee – Locally employed civilian with BFG status
DSE          Display Screen Equipment
EHT          Environmental Health Team
FP           Focal Point
GHSWE        Garrison H&S at Work Expert
H&S          H&S at Work
JSP 375      MOD H&S Handbook
JSP 442      MOD Accident Reporting System
LEC          Locally Employed Civilians. This collectively covers DEL and DEP
Lep,d        Daily Personal Noise Exposure Level.
MF 2000      Accident Reporting Form Required by JSP 442
MF 510       MOD Accident Proforma (In lieu of BI 510)
PAT          Portable Appliance Testing
PPE          Personal Protective Equipment
RPE          Respiratory Protective Equipment
SA to SOFA Supplementary Agreement to the Status of Forces Agreement
SHEF         Safety Health Environment (Energy) and Fire
SM           Safety Monitor
SMART        Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time Bound
SW           SHEF Warden
UK Bund      Unfallkasse des Bundes
UKBC         United Kingdom Based Civilian
USA          Unit Safety Advisor
UWC          Unit Works Council
WBV          Wehrbereichsverwaltung – The German Armed Forces Military Administration
WIS          Wehrwissenschaftliches Institut für Schutztechnologien. The German Armed Forces scientific
institute for protective technology/
WIWEB        Wehrwissenschaftliches Institut für Werk-Explosiv-und Betriebsstoffe. The German Armed
Forces scientific institute for work, explosive and fuel substances.


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HEALTH AND SAFETY - PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION

Introduction

2.      This chapter provides guidance, in leaflet form, on the best practical means of meeting Health and
Safety (H&S) obligations which are likely to be encountered in the unit environment in BFG. By ensuring that
this advice is followed commanders can be reasonably assured that their units will be able to meet their
legal, moral and financial responsibilities to deliver a safe and healthy working environment. Safer units are
less likely to suffer injury or loss to or of personnel, facilities or equipment and thus be more able to sustain
operational capability.

3. The following topics are not contained in this Manual but relevant information can be found in JSP 375 in
the leaflets shown:

      a.   Site Closure Procedures (Leaflet 16)
      b.   Diving (Leaflet 29)
      c.   Safe Use of Pressure Equipment and Systems (Leaflet 30)
      d. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)
      (Leaflet 31)
      e. H&S on Multi-Occupier Sites (Leaflet 32) as this is largely UK centric. The relevant information is
      though included in Part 1 of this manual for compliance by garrisons and commanding officers.
      f.   Home Working (Leaflet 41)
      g.   Contractor Selection (Leaflet 45).
      h.   Selling into Wider Markets (Leaflet 60).

H&S Advice – Further Guidance

4. For further guidance on any H&S issue, line managers should seek assistance from their USA, GHSWE
   or SHEF FP at Garrison HQ.

5. Where conflict arises between Host Nation and UK legislation, the issue is to be addressed at local level
   in the first instance. If the issue cannot be resolved at local level the SHEF FP at Garrison HQ is to
   consult with J4 SHEF Branch UKSC (G) for further guidance.

Hyperlinks to JSPs

6. Where possible, hyperlinks have been placed on the references in the leaflets so that units with access
   to the MOD Intranet can link to the appropriate JSPs and other documents. Links correct as at Aug 09
   but will inevitably change as the JSPs are updated or intranet sites are altered.




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Leaflet 1 - Accident / Incident Reporting

                                     ACCIDENT / INCIDENT REPORTING

References:

A.    LFSO 3216
B.    DIN - 2008DIN06-015.
C.    Sozialgesetzbuch SGB VII.
D.    BGV-A1-Art 24.

Introduction

1.     The employer has a legal obligation to report specified injuries, ill health and dangerous occurrences
to the relevant authorities. In order to meet these legal obligations, employers are duty bound to ensure a
system is developed where all work related accidents and incidents are correctly captured and collated so
that the data can be examined to determine the effectiveness of their risk management system. This
information is also vital to identify root causes through formal/informal investigation procedures so that
potential recurrences can, at best, be eliminated or, at least, minimised. This can also be used to benchmark
an organisations H&S performance.

2.    Within the Army, there is a centralised procedure for accident and incident notification, detailed at
References A & B. The organisation created within CESO(A) to manage this procedure is the Army Incident
& Notification Cell (AINC), based at Airfield Camp, Netheravon, Wiltshire.

3.    AINC operates a 24/365/7 call centre principle. It is the single point of contact for notification of all
reportable accidents and incidents that have taken place within the Army worldwide.

4.     It should be noted however, that Gars/Units will still be required to make accident and incident reports
to other MOD organisations and in addition, in the case of BFG, the German authorities in accordance with
References C & D. These requirements are shown at paragraph 17 below.

Duties

5.     Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit complies fully with the
requirements detailed at References A to D and that adequate arrangements have been made to ensure this
is achieved. The arrangements are to be maintained, monitored and reviewed as necessary. They will be
audited

6.    Line Managers. Line managers are to ensure all accidents and incidents that take place within their
areas of responsibility are reported correctly in accordance with this leaflet and with References A to D.

7.    Employees. Employees have a duty to report all accidents, incidents, dangerous occurrences and
near misses in accordance with this leaflet and References A to D.

Guidance for line managers

8.     Any accident and/or incident that occurs in the workplace, however trivial, is to be recorded in either
the revised HMSO accident book BI 510 (used by some MoD organisations) or the MoD Form (MF) 510
used throughout BFG. A copy of the MF 510 form to be used is at Annex B.

9.      Any accident and/or incident that meet the criteria laid down at References A & B are to be notified to
AINC by fax or e-mail using the MF 510. Accidents or incidents that do not meet the criteria should not be
notified. In such cases, the MF 510 is to be retained and actioned locally by the line manager responsible.

Note: Where a notifiable accident/incident occurs and an MF 510 is not available, the line manager must still
ensure AINC is notified by any other means available. See also paragraph 13 below.



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10. The information received by AINC will be recorded on behalf of Gars/Units in accordance with UK
legislative requirements.

11. Accidents and/or incidents that are deemed notifiable to the AINC must be notified within the
stipulated timeframe (i.e. within one HOUR of the accident/ incident occurring whenever possible). See also
paragraphs 14 and 15 below.

12. The AINC will maintain a valuable database containing accidents and incidents notified, results of any
investigations made and, a record of any subsequent remedial action. Guidance on the nature of accidents
and/or incidents that require to be notified to AINC and points of contact details are shown at References A
and B and for ease of reference are summarised within Annex A to this leaflet.

13. Although all accidents and incidents submitted to AINC may meet the notification criteria as laid down
at Annex A of this leaflet, AINC will decide on those which they wish to record on their database before
issuing the unique reference number. Those accidents and incidents notified by Gars/Units and
subsequently not recorded on the AINC database will be brought to the attention of the USA and GHSWE by
AINC. These accidents and incidents will not generate a unique reference number.

14. It should be noted however, that regardless of whether AINC decide to record the accident/incident or
not when notified in accordance with the requirements of References A & B, the line manager or person
responsible for the injured person or activity must nevertheless ensure that any investigative or follow up
action is carried out in accordance with the manual Part 2, Leaflet 2.

15. Notwithstanding the notification requirements of References A to D, the USA is to be made aware of
any such accident/incident that occurs as soon as reasonably possible after the event so that further action
may be taken where required. In particular, USAs must be sent a copy of the MF 510 within the stipulated
timeframe (i.e. within one HOUR of the accident/ incident occurring whenever reasonably possible). Note:
Where a notifiable accident/incident occurs and an MF 510 is not available, the line manager must still
ensure the USA is notified by any other means.

16. Although the guidance in References A & B states that notification should ideally be within ONE hour
of an accident/incident occurring, common sense should prevail. If the full details are not readily available
within ONE hour, including the Injured Persons expected time off work then, notification may be made within
a reasonable time scale thereafter. It is a matter for local judgement to decide if the incident is so serious
that it must be reported without delay ahead of the full facts becoming known.

17. In accordance with References A & B, there is no requirement for Gars/Units to create their own
database containing records of any accidents or incidents that may have occurred within their areas of
responsibility. The original intent of the AINC reporting system was to capture all accidents/incidents that met
their criteria and recorded on the weekly summary sheet returns, thus negating the need for local records to
be prepared. However, where AINC decide to reject a notification made by an injured person or their line
manager, these accidents/ incidents will not be included in the weekly summary sheets and the possible
opportunity to investigate may be lost by the Unit. For this reason, Units are strongly recommended to record
all accidents/incidents so that further local action can be taken where necessary. Alternatively, if USAs
decide a database is inappropriate, a simple method may be to retain indexed copies of all MF510s in a file
for future reference when required.

18. Gars/Units will continue to be required to make immediate reports of accidents and/or incidents to
other MOD organisations in accordance with Service Instructions, (also the German authorities where
applicable), to:

        a. Joint Casualty & Compassionate Cell (JCCC). In the case of death or listed casualties
        reported by NOTICAS in accordance with JSP 751.

        b. The LAND Accident Investigation Team (LAIT). In the case of death, serious injury or serious
        equipment failure. Telephone 94321-8593 or +44 (0) 1980-62-8593.

        c. Serious Equipment Failure Inspection Team (SEFIT) and LAIT. By Serious Equipment
        Failure Signal with copy to AINC NETHERAVON. If there is any doubt regarding the reporting of


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        incidents/accidents where equipment failure is suspect or claimed, SEFIT can be contacted as
        follows:

                   Location        Mil Telephone            Civ Telephone           Mobile Telephone
                      (a)                  (b)                    (c)                       (d)
                      UK              9355 67940          +44 (0)12254 67940       +44 (0)7979 700996
                   Germany            94881 3437         +49 (0)521 9254 3437      + 49 (0)1722 021434
                    BATUS                                  +1 403 544 5336           +1 403 952 2448
                   Op TELIC         926091 9623137
                  Op HERRICK       926096 6494/6467

        d. Joint Service EOD Operations Centre. In the event of ammunition incidents, faults and
        failures contact Joint Services EOD Ops Centre, with a copy to AINC NETHERAVON. Telephone:
        94234-3360/3361/3362 or +44 (0)1235-513360.

        e. Chain of Command. In the event of any environmental incidents reports should be made to the
        Chain of Command, in accordance with JSP 317, with copy of relevant signals to AINC
        NETHERAVON.

        f.     Local Fire Adviser. In the event of fire notify the Garrison Fire Advisor.

        g.     RTA. In the event of an RTA report, in accordance with JSP 800, by F/MT3.

        h.     HQ LAND Log Sp Svcs-Cbt Fuels; HQ DFG Inspectorate; CESO(A) SO2 EP Poln

        j.     Locally Employed Civilians (DEL). See para 22 below.

19.   AINC will provide the following service:

      a.     Take calls, faxes, e-mails, internet or signal notifications directly from any Army personnel.
      b. Inform other Tri-Service organisations or Agencies (RAF, Navy, DSDA, DFRMO, SCE etc.) of
      accidents and incidents occurring to their personnel when on Army establishments or involved in Army
      business.
      c. Create and maintain a Database of accidents and incidents notification, results of any
      investigation, together with a record of any subsequent remedial action.
      d. Produce statistics to Gars/Units relating to the notifications received and details of current status
      and outcomes as required. Provide information on accidents/incidents to auditors and/or other
      permitted authorities in the event of any pending legal actions.

MOD Personnel Accidents and Incidents (Detachment/Training Exercises)

20. Individuals who have accidents or involved in incidents whilst outside their normal geographic area are
to notify AINC as previously described. In addition, parent Gar/Unit may decide to implement local
arrangements to ensure that they are notified of any such accidents and/or incidents through Gar Focal
Points located in the location where the accident occurred. This should take place as soon as possible after
the event so that further action may be taken where required. It is also recommended that the UIN of the
injured person‟s home unit is included on the MF 510 to assist in tracking them when they depart from their
temporary location.




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On-Duty and Off-Duty Accident Liability

        Military

        Mil are considered to be ON-DUTY when undertaking officially ORGANISED sporting activities as it
        fulfils part of the Terms & Conditions of their employment with the MOD (i.e. to maintain fitness
        levels) and therefore, MOD will accept any liabilities which result from their participation in such
        events.

        Mil are considered to be OFF-DUTY when undertaking sporting activities for PRIVATE teams or
        clubs and therefore, MOD will NOT accept any liabilities which result from their participation in such
        events.

        UKBCs & DEPs

        UKBCs and/or Deps are always considered to be OFF-DUTY when undertaking sporting activities
        and are therefore PERSONALLY LIABLE for any injury or damages that occur (including all costs for
        Med and Physio treatment). They should always ensure they have Personal Liability Insurance.

        NOTE: Even if they are participating in an ORGANISED event arranged by MOD against Mil
        personnel, they are not considered to be on-duty and therefore must ensure they are personally
        insured. Any civilian participating in any officially ORGANISED event must take leave to do so –
        effectively they are not entitled to participate during working hours).

21. Annex A to this leaflet is to be widely publicised on Division and Brigade Routine Orders and Unit Part
1 Orders and included in all Exercise Instructions and Duty Folders.

Reporting of Accidents and/or Incidents to DEL

22. All workplace accidents and/or incidents that occur to DEL personnel, which meet the reporting criteria
at References A & B, must be notified to the AINC for further action using MF 510.

23. Accidents involving injury or death to a DEL must also to be reported to the German Federal Executive
Authority for Accident Insurance (UK Bund) by the employing Gar/Unit through the GLSU and Garrison HQs
in accordance with References C & D. This process is explained below.

        Note: Accidents that occur to DEL personnel during travelling to and from home to their place of
        work must also be recorded on the MF 510. The line manager must ensure it is faxed to the AINC if
        it meets the notification criteria at Reference B and copied to the USA as described at paragraph 13
        above.

24. Reports for DEL accidents are to be made on an “Unfallanzeige” held by the GLSU and completed in
quintuplicate. The “Unternehmensnummer” number box is to be annotated with 421 followed by the GLSU
code (Army/RAF units), and 422 followed by the GLSU code (all other units). These forms are at Annex C in
German and in English. Only the German version is to be submitted; the English version is to aid
understanding by non-German line managers

25. When completed, the GLSU are to forward one copy of the DEL Unfallanzeige to the following
address: Area Claims Officer (NWE)‟ HQ UKSC (G), BFPO 140 and the remaining copies to the “Lohnstelle”.
There is now no need for units or GLSUs to complete BFG F 138 – that form has been discontinued.




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Review of Risk Assessments

26. In the event of any accident and/or incident occurrence, all related risk assessments must be reviewed
to ensure that they are still valid. Where it has been identified that the assessment(s) require to be re-
evaluated/rewritten then this must be carried out as soon after the accident / incident occurred as is
reasonably practicable.

27. All original assessments relating to the accident and/or incident must be retained for a minimum of 5
years after the event for use as potential evidence in case of claims against MOD (See also paragraph 31
below).

Accident / Incident Statistics

28. In order to ensure accidents / incidents are being accurately captured; Units need to collate the
accidents/incidents recorded in the weekly summary sheets provided by AINC and the data recorded locally.
AINC issue the weekly accident/incident summary sheets to all key personnel at Gars. AINC also notifies
COs by letter. See also paragraph 16 above.

Provision of reportable accident and incident analysis to 2* and 1* HQs

29. CESO(A) will provide quarterly statistical reports to the 2* OPCOM Chain of Command, copy to HQ
UKSC. It is important to note that:

     a.     These are compiled from RIDDOR reportable reports submitted to AINC.

     b. The data is always provisional and subject to change in subsequent 6 months as more information
     becomes available.

30. The purpose of these reports, which will be broken down to bde level with an attachment showing the
detail of every reportable injury, is to inform the OPCOM Chain of command about accident, incidents and
trends in order for the commander to make an informed assessment of safety performance and to direct
improvements as necessary.

31. These reports are to be seen by the Safety Champion of the formation and are to be briefed to the
commander and the command board as a formally tabled item.

32. These reports are to be disseminated from 2* down the 1* OPCOM Chain of Command with value
adding comment and direction for safety improvement being added by the disseminating OPCOM HQ

Records

33. Accident and incident records are to be retained for a minimum of 5 years from the date of the event.
Retention of records after this time is for local management discretion. Records on personal files are to
remain on the file until it is destroyed.

34. In accordance with Reference A, the Nominated Responsible Person (in this case the USA or
designated person) shall establish a system, either on paper or electronically, to store the completed MOD
Form 510s such that they can be retrieved if required for legal or investigation purposes. The records should
be secure such that they cannot be accessed without the consent of the person whose information is held.
Forms should, however, be made available for inspection by appointed safety representatives on request.




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                                                                                                               Leaflet 1

                                                                 Annex A - Accident & Incident Notification to AINC

ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT NOTIFICATION TO ARMY INCIDENT NOTIFICATION CELL (AINC)

(To be repeated quarterly on divisional and brigade orders and to be included in ALL exercise
instructions)

1.   The following incidents involving Army personnel are to be notified to Army Incident Notification Cell
(AINC) by telephone, or by way of MOD Form 510. A learning account is to be submitted with each report.

            a.    Incidents resulting in death or injuries to military, civilian and contractor staff. These include:
                                                                                   1
                  (1)     Major injuries requiring professional medical treatment .

                  (2)   Injuries resulting in more than 3 days‟ light duties or off work including occupational
                  stress-related absence.

                  (3)    Climatic injuries including hyperthermia, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, hypothermia,
                  freezing cold and Non-Freezing Cold Injury (NFCI).

                  (4)     Injuries resulting from sporting activities or adventurous training.

                  (5)     Injuries resulting from on and off duty Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs).

            b. Near Misses which may have potentially caused death or injury or loss of property or
            equipment.

            c. All environmental incidents. These may include, but not be limited to tier 1-3 spillages of fuel,
            oils and all Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) listed chemicals.

            d. Serious damage to equipment and Equipment Serious and Safety Failure as defined by JSP
            336 Volume 12 Part 2 Pamphlet 2. SEFIT signals should be copied to AINC NETHERAVON.

            e. Occupational diseases and dangerous occurrences in accordance with Reporting of Injuries,
            Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR)

            f. Ammunition incidents in accordance with Pamphlets 1, 4, 19, 21 and 300 and JSP 482 Vol 2,
            Chap 8.

            g.    Range incursions by land, sea or air.

            h.    Fire, in the event of any incidents, report to AINC in lieu of MOD Form 1059.

            i.    Enforcement action by HSE, EA, local authorities or their equivalents.

            j.    Traffic accidents resulting in injuries to MOD personnel.

2.        If in doubt, notify AINC. Full Contact Details for AINC are below:

            a.    Telephone: 94321-8458 or (+44) 01980-62-8458 (24 hours).
            b.    Fax: 94321-8450 or (+44) 01980-62-8450.
            c.    MOD E-mail: CESO(A)-AINC-(Mailbox).
            d.    E-mail: cesoaincgm@land.mod.uk.
            e.    Signal: AINC NETHERAVON.


1
    Treatment by a doctor or at hospital.

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3.   Units are to provide the following information:

     a.    Notifier‟s Details.

           (1)      Name, Rank, Regimental or Staff No.

           (2)      Point of Contact if other than notifier.

           (3)      Unit and UIN if known.

     b.     Injured Party‟s Details.

           (1)      Name, Rank or title, Regimental or Staff No.

           (2)      Unit and UIN if different to above.

     c.    Incident Details.

           (1)      Date and Time of incident.

           (2)      Location/Place of incident.

           (3)      Summary of event.

           (4)      Outcome (eg death, hospitalisation, time off or light duties disposal).

4.   In addition units are to notify the following as necessary:

     a.    JCCC for NOTICAS in accordance with JSP 751.

     b.    LAIT on 94321-8593 or +44 (0)1980-67-8593.

     c.    Jt Svce EOD Ops Centre on 94234 3360 or +44 (0) 1235-513360.

     d.    SEFIT          -      UK 9355 67940
                                 Germany 94881-3437
                                 Op TELIC 926091-9623137
                                 Op HERRICK 926096 6494/6467

     e.    Local DFRMO by telephone in event of fire.

     f.  HQ LF Log Sp Svcs-Cbt Fuels; HQ DFG Inspectorate; CESO(A) SO2 EP Poln - (see
     LANDSO 4420, Paras 35, 36 and 37).




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Annex B - MOD F510 Accident Reporting Form
                                            RESTRICTED – STAFF (WHEN COMPLETED)


Injured Person‟s details                      Surname                                        Rank/Grade

First Name                                                        Address          Enter Home or Work Address Here
Staff/Service No:
Status (please select)
Contact Phone No:                                                 Postcode/BFPO                                      UIN
NOTE: Reporting Person details need only be completed if not the Injured Person
Reporting Person details                        Surname                                     Rank/Grade

First Name                                                     Address             Enter a contact address here


Staff/Service No:
Status (please select)
Contact Phone No:                                              Postcode/BFPO

                                                            About the Accident
Date                                               Time
How did the Accident Happen (include whether you were on or off duty, absent from work as a result of the accident, where it happened and
what were the injuries).




Immediate First Aid Applied                 Details
(E.g. Dressing applied or ambulance
requested)


Please Sign and Date this Form
Person Completing the Form                 Name                                     Date                       Signed
If the person completing this form is not the injured person then the injured person should sign below to confirm they agree these details are a
true and accurate record of the event.                                                      Continue on reverse or a blank sheet if necessary

Name                                                       Date                                      Signed
Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995
Is this a RIDDOR Reportable event?                          Yes        No               Passed to the NRP on               {date}
This section is to be completed on behalf of the Employer by the Nominated Reporting Person (NRP)
(person nominated to be responsible for reporting to AINC.)
Organisation /Unit/Branch                                                                           AINC Ref No:

NRP‟s Name.                                                                    How was it reported?
Signature                                                                                                   Date




Note: In accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998, the Ministry of Defence will collect, use, protect and retain the information on this form
for the purposes of performing rights and obligations in connection with employment legislation. The information will be disclosed to your line
manager and person nominated to retain the record NRP, to ensure they are able to comply with any legal obligation. If you have any concerns
consult your line manager.




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Annex C – DEL Accident Report Form - UNFALLANZEIGE
  1 Name        und Anschrift des Unternehmens                                                      2 Unternehmensnummer des Unfallversicherungsträgers

  3 Empfänger




  Unfallkasse des Bundes
  Weserstrasse 47
  26380 Wilhelmshaven


  4 Name, Vorname des Versicherten                                         5 Geburtsdatum


  6 Strasse                                                                Postleitzahl             Ort


  7 Geschlecht                         8 Staatsangehörigkeit               9 Leiharbeitnehmer

     männlich           weiblich                                                 ja                       nein
  10 Auszubildender                    11 Ist der Versicherte
                                            Unternehmer                                   Ehegatte des Unternehmers
     ja             nein                    Mit dem Unternehmer verwandt                   Gesellschafter/Geschäftsführer
  12 Anspruch auf Entgeltfortzahlung                                       13 Krankenkasse des Versicherten (Name, PLZ, Ort)

  besteht für              Wochen
  14 Tödlicher Unfall         15 Unfallzeitpunkt (Tag/Monat/Jahr/Stunde/Minute)       16 Unfallort (genaue Ort- und Straßenangabe mit PLZ)

     ja             nein
  17 Ausführliche Schilderung des Unfallhergangs (Verlauf, Bezeichnung des Betriebsteils. Ggf. Beteiligung von Maschinen/Anlagen/Gefahrstoffen)




  Die Angabe beruht auf der Schilderung              des Versicherten                                 anderer Personen
  18 Verletzte Körperteile                                                 19 Art der Verletzung


  20 Wer hat von dem Unfall zuerst Kenntnis genommen? (Name, Anschrift des Zeugen)
                                                                                                                      War diese Person Augenzeuge?
                                                                                                                          ja              nein
  21 Name und Anschrift des erstbehandelnden Arztes / Kranken-             22 Beginn und Ende der Arbeitszeit des Versicherten
  hauses                                                                               Stunde       Minute                Stunde           Minute
                                                                           Beginn                               Ende
  23 Zum Unfallzeit beschäftigt als                                        24 Seit wann in dieser Tätigkeit?
                                                                                              Monat                             Jahr

  25 In welchem Teil des Unernehmens ist der Versicherte tätig?


  26 Hat der Versicherte die Arbeit eingestellt?                                                                    Tag          Monat         Stunde
                                                     nein               sofort            später, am


  27 Hat der Versicherte die Arbeit wieder aufgenommen?                                                            Tag          Monat         Stunde
                                                                        nein              ja, am


  28 Datum                 Unternehmer / Bevollmächtigter               Betriebsrat (Personalrat)            Telefonnr. für Rückfragen (Ansprechpartner)




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                                                                                                                                  ACCIDENT REPORT
1 Name and Address of the Organisation                                                                                         2 Client Number with the Insurer

3 Recipient




Unfallkasse des Bundes
Weserstrasse 47
26380 Wilhelmshaven


4 Surname, First Name of the Insured Person                                5 Date of Birth


6 Street                                                                   Postcode                Town


7 Gender                           8 Nationality                           9 Short Term Contract Labourer

      Male          Female                                                     yes                         no
10 Trainee                         11 Is the Insured Person
                                        Employer                                      Spouse of the Employer
      yes           no                  related to the Employer                       Associate/Manager
12 Entitlement to Continued Payment of Wages:                                   13 Insured Person‟s Health Insurance (Name, Postcode, Town)

for            Weeks
14 Fatal Accident         15 Time of Accident (Day/Month/Year/Hour/Minute)      16 Place of Accident (precise details, i.e. Town, Street, Postcode)

      yes      no
17 Detailed Statement as to how the Accident occurred (Course, Part of the Organisation, if applicable, involvement of Machines, Equipment, Hazardous
Materials)




This Statement is based on the Account by             the Insured Person                                 other Persons

18 Injured Parts of the Body                                               19 Type of Injury


20 Who was first aware of the Accident? (Name, Address of the Witness)
                                                                                                                   Was this Person an Eyewitness?
                                                                                                                        yes             no
21 Name & Address of Doctor/Hospital who treated the Insured first         22 Start and End of the Insured Person‟s Working Day
                                                                                         Hour        Minute               Hour               Minute
                                                                           Start                                 End
23 At the time of the Accident employed as                                 24 Since when in this Type of Employment?
                                                                                              Month                              Year

25 In which Department is the Insured Person regularly employed?


26 Did the Insured Person stop working?                                                                                  Day         Month            Hour
                                                       no           immediately              later, on


27 Has the Insured Person returned to work?                                                                              Day        Month             Hour
                                                                     no                      yes, on




28 Date                  Employer/Authorised Person                       Works Council                                  Telephone No. for Enquiries (Contact)


        Accident Report Explanatory Note

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I. General




Who has to report the accident, i.e.       It is the duty of the employer or his deputy to report any accidents. Deputies are persons who have
complete the accident report?              been tasked by the employer with the reporting of accidents.


                                           A report is to be drawn up if a work or commuting accident (e. g. accident on the way to work
                                           occurring between your home and your place of work) causes you to be off work for more than 3
When is an accident report to be           calendar days or results in the death of the insured.
completed, i.e. when does an accident
have to be reported?


                                           2 copies are to be sent to the appropriate statutory accident insurance provider (e. g. Employer‟s
                                           Liability Insurance Association, Accident Insurance Provider)
How many copies are needed of the          If the company falls under the general industrial safety inspectorate (for agricultural companies who
accident report?                           employ staff) one copy has to be sent to the appropriate regional authority for industrial safety
Where are they to be sent?                 (e. g. industrial inspectorate, Federal Authority for Health & Safety) If the company fall under the
                                           inspectorate for the mining authority the appropriate mining authority will receive one copy
                                           One copy is for archiving at the company
                                           One copy is given to the works council, if one is in place.


                                           Insured persons for whom the accident report is being completed have to be informed that they
                                           have a right to a copy of the accident report.
Who has to be informed of the              The occupational health & safety practitioner and works doctor are to be informed of the accident
accident report?                           report through the employer or his deputy


                                           Either send it via the normal postal services or via data transmission if the insurance provider offers
                                           this for example on their homepage.
How is the accident report to be
distributed?


                                           The employer or his deputy has to complete and send off the accident report within 3 days after
                                           being informed of the accident.
In what time frame is the accident
report to be completed and sent off?


                                           Fatal accidents, mass accidents (such as pile ups) and accidents resulting in severe injuries are to
                                           be reported immediately to the appropriate statutory accident insurance provider and for companies
What has to be taken into                  that fall under the general industrial safety inspectorate or inspectorate for the mining authority, the
consideration at severe and serious        regional authority for industrial safety also has to be informed immediately. (Telephone, fax or e-
accidents, mass accidents and deaths?      mail)




II. Explanatory Notes to the questions of the accident report
2     Please insert your client number (membership number) with the statutory accident insurance provider (you will find this on the fee
      notification or jurisdiction notification)

9     Any employees from a temporary employment agency is considered a temporary worker ( A employee labour supply contract is on
      hand).

10    For statutory health insurances with the entitlement for sick pay the name, postal code and location of the health insurance will suffice; in
      all other cases please annotate the type of insurance (e. g. private health insurance, pensioners health insurance, family health
      insurance, voluntary health insurance with a statutory health insurance).

17    The statement on how the accident occurred should be detailed in reference to the accident und the circumstances (where, how, why,
      under what circumstances, details on equipment and machines involved). The following should be particularly detailed:
      in which part of the work place the accident occurred, e. g. office, workshop etc.,
      Please note what type of work the injured party carries out, e. g. was carrying documents to the office etc.
      Please note what caused the accident (how it came about, which work materials were used, i.e. on which machines and plants work was
      carried out. E. g.:
      …bent down too far to one side causing the ladder to slide and the person on the ladder fell a total of 3 metres,
      …jammed the wood and was caught by the circular saw (Manufacturer, Type, Year of Manufacture),
      …slipped on rubbish/dirt on floor.



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     Were there work conditions such as heat, cold, noise, dust, radiation that could be associated with the accident? Were dangerous
     substances being handled – something that could be associated with the accident?

     A supplementary sheet can be used for further details of the accidents as well as the back of this paper.

18   Examples: right lower arm, left finger, left foot and right side of the head

19   Examples: Bruising, broken bones, sprains, burns, laceration, cuts

23   Please insert, for example, sales person, accountant, bricklayer, electrician, nurse, farmer, gardener and do not put „labourer‟, „office
     worker‟ or „employer‟
25   Examples: Office, store, locksmiths, laboratory, food department, factory yard, builder‟s yard




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    Erläuterungen zur Unfallanzeige
    I. Allgemeine Erläuterungen

Wer hat die Unfallanzeige                    Anzeigepflichtig ist der Unternehmer oder sein Bevollmächtigter. Bevollmächtigte sind Personen,
zu erstatten?                                die vom Unternehmer zur Erstattung der Anzeige beauftragt sind.
Wann ist eine Unfallanzeige                  Die Anzeige ist zu erstatten, wenn ein Arbeitsunfall oder ein Wegeunfall (z. B. Unfall auf dem Weg
zu erstatten?                                zwischen Wohnung und Arbeitsstätte) eine Arbeitsunfähigkeit von mehr als 3 Kalendertagen oder
                                             den Tod eines Versicherten zur Folge hat.

In welcher Anzahl ist die                    2 Exemplare sind an den zuständigen Unfallversicherungsträger (z. B. Berufsgenossenschaft,
Unfallanzeige zu erstatten?                  Unfallkasse) zu senden.
 Wohin ist sie zu senden?                    Unterliegt das Unternehmen der allgemeinen Arbeitsschutzaufsicht (bei landwirtschaftlichen Be-
                                             trieben, nur soweit sie Arbeitnehmer beschäftigen), ist ein Exemplar an die für den Arbeitsschutz
                                             zuständige Landesbehörde (z. B. Gewerbeaufsichtsamt, Staat!. Amt für Arbeitsschutz) zu senden.
                                             Unterliegt das Unternehmen der bergbehördlichen Aufsicht, erhält die zuständige untere Berg-
                                             behörde ein Exemplar.
                                             Ein Exemplar dient der Dokumentation im Unternehmen.
                                             Ein Exemplar erhält der Betriebsrat (Personalrat), falls vorhanden.

Wer ist von der Unfallanzeige                Versicherte, für die eine Anzeige erstattet wird, sind auf ihr Recht hinzuweisen, dass sie eine
zu informieren?                              Kopie der Anzeige verlangen können.
                                             Fachkraft für Arbeitssicherheit und Betriebsarzt sind durch den Unternehmer oder seinen Bevoll-
                                             mächtigten über die Unfallanzeige zu informieren.

Wie ist die Unfallanzeige zu                 Neben der Versendung per Post besteht auch die Möglichkeit der Anzeige durch Datenübertragung,
erstatten?                                   wenn der Empfänger dies z. B. auf seiner Homepage anbietet.

Innerhalb welcher Frist ist die              Der Unternehmer oder sein Bevollmächtigter hat die Anzeige binnen 3 Tagen zu erstatten, nach-
Unfallanzeige zu erstatten?                  dem er von dem Unfall Kenntnis erhalten hat.

Was ist bei schweren Unfällen,               Tödliche Unfälle, Massenunfälle und Unfälle mit schwerwiegenden Gesundheitsschäden sind
Massenunfällen und Todesfällen               sofort dem zuständigen Unfallversicherungsträger und bei Unternehmen, die der allgemeinen
zu beachten?
                                             Arbeitsschutzaufsicht oder der bergbehördlichen Aufsicht unterliegen, auch der für den Arbeits-
                                             schutz zuständigen Landesbehörde bzw. der unteren Bergbehörde zu melden (Telefon, Fax, E-Mail).

       II. Erläuterungen zu den Fragen der Unfallanzeige
Anzugeben ist die Unternehmensnummer (Mitgliedsnummer) beim Unfallversicherungsträger (z. B. enthalten im
Beitragsbescheid oder im Bescheid über die Zuständigkeit).
9     Der im Unternehmen tätige Beschäftigte einer Zeitarbeitsfirma/eines Personaldienstleisters ist ein Leiharbeitnehmer. (Es
     liegt ein Arbeitnehmerüberlassungsvertrag vor)
10                     Bei gesetzlicher Krankenversicherung mit Anspruch auf Krankengeld genügt Name, PLZ und Ort der Kasse; in anderen
                       Fällen
     bitte zusätzlich Art der Versicherung angeben (z. B. Privatversicherung, Rentnerkrankenversicherung, Familienversicherung,
     freiwillige Versicherung bei gesetzlicher Krankenkasse).
17 Die Schilderung des Unfallhergangs soll detaillierte Angaben zum Unfall und zu seinen näheren Umständen enthalten
   (wo, wie, warum, unter welchen Umständen, Angabe der beteiligten Geräte oder Maschinen). Insbesondere auf die folgenden
   Punkte sollte die Schilderung des Unfallhergangs eingehen.
     Anzugeben ist der Betriebsteil, in dem sich der Unfall ereignete: z. B. Büro, Schlosserei, Verkauf in der Herrenkonfektion, Betriebs-
     hof, Gewächshaus, Stall.
     Anzugeben ist die Tätigkeit, die den verletzte Person ausübte. Z. B. . . . bediente einen Kunden, . . . trug Unterlagen zum Meister-
     Büro, . . . schlug einen Bolzen heraus, . . . entlud Lieferwagen, . . . reparierte Maschine (Art, Hersteller, Typ, Baujahr).
     Anzugeben sind die Umstände, die den Verlauf des Unfalls kennzeichnen (Unfallauslösende Umstände, welche Arbeitsmittel wurden
     benutzt bzw. an welchen Maschinen und Anlagen wurde gearbeitet). Z. B.:
     . . . beugte sich zu weit zur Seite aus, dadurch rutschte die Leiter weg und die Person stürzte 3 m in die Tiefe,
     . . . verkantete das Holz und wurde von der Holzkreissäge (Hersteller, Typ, Baujahr) erfasst,
     . . . rutschte durch auf dem Boden liegenden Abfall/Schmutz/ÖI/Dung aus.
     Waren Arbeitsbedingungen wie Hitze, Kälte, Lärm, Staub, Strahlung gegeben, die mit dem Unfall im Zusammenhang stehen könnten?
     Wurde mit Gefahrst6ffen umgegangen, die mit dem Unfall im Zusammenhang stehen könnten?
     Die Unfallschilderung kann auf der Rückseite oder auf einem Beiblatt fortgesetzt werden.
18 Beispiele: Rechter Unterarm,. linker Zeigefinger, linker Fuß und rechte Kopfseite



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19 Beispiele: Prellung, Knochenbruch, Verstauchung, Verbrennung, Platzwunde, Schnittverletzung
23 Hier einsetzen z. B. Verkäuferin, Buchhalter, Maurer, Elektroinstallateur, Krankenschwester, Landwirt, Gärtner und nicht
   "Arbeiter", “Angestellter" oder "Unternehmer".
25   Beispiele: Büro, Lager, Schlosserei, Labor, Lebensmittelabteilung, Fabrikhof, Bauhof.




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Leaflet 2 - Accident/Incident Investigation

                                    ACCIDENT/INCIDENT INVESTIGATION

References:

A.   JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 14.
B.   JSP 441, Chapter 5.
C.   DCI(Gen) 41/05 dated 28 Feb 05.
D.   Sozialgesetzbuch SGB VII.
E.   BGV-A1-Art 24(6).
F.   LANDSO 3207.

Introduction

1.     As part of a legally compliant H&S management system, all workplace accidents or incidents should
be investigated to determine the root cause(s) and associated reasons relating to the event(s). Remedial
action should be taken, lessons learned and longer-term objectives introduced.

2.     Accident and incident investigation may be carried out for a number of reasons, but the primary aim
should always be to conduct a thorough examination and gather all relevant information for evaluation so
that positive steps are taken to prevent future recurrence. Accident and incident investigation should be
carried out using the methodology at Reference A. It should be noted however, that in certain circumstances
there might be a requirement for specialist investigation, for example, the involvement of the Service or
Civilian Police, Land Accident Prevention Investigation Team (LAIT) or the Serious Equipment Failure
Investigation Team (SEFIT). In these circumstances the specialists‟ investigation methodology and
procedures will take precedence.

Duties

3.    Commanding Officers. Commanding officers are to ensure that their Gar/Unit has adequate
arrangements in place to conduct suitable and sufficient accident or incident investigations. These
arrangements are to be maintained, monitored and reviewed as necessary.

4.     Line managers. Line managers are to investigate all accidents, incidents, dangerous occurrences
and near misses and to use any relevant information from the findings of the investigation to further improve
H&S performance, in accordance with Reference A. The extent of the investigation will vary according to the
specific accident or incident and may involve other parties as detailed at Annex A & B.

5.     Employees. All employees have a duty to co-operate and contribute to any accident or incident
investigation as required by the investigating team.

Guidance for line managers

6.     The objective of an investigation is to determine the facts of the event(s) and determine possible
shortfalls in, for example, training, management or procedures that led to the accident or incident so that
steps can be taken to review and eliminate/ minimise the likelihood of recurrence. All minor accidents and
incidents should also be investigated to eliminate/minimise the potential of more serious events occurring in
the future. It is not the function of the investigation to apportion blame or to recommend disciplinary action.

7.     The severity and consequences of any accident or incident will determine the level of investigation
required but initially this will start with the line manager responsible for the activity, process or location where
the event took place. It is then most likely that the investigation will extend to involve key personnel with any
relevant level of technical or professional competency relating to the event.

8.     Incidents (or a near miss) where no injury to persons or property has occurred should also be
investigated as they may have the potential for real harm under different circumstances.



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Accident and Incident Investigations

9.     Whilst the principle of complying with Host Nation legislation is acknowledged, different insurance
systems and external reporting agencies negate the use of a single investigation procedure. Therefore,
guidelines for investigation levels and types where military personal and UKBCs are involved in an accident
or incident are outlined at Annex A. Investigation levels and types related to civilian employees (DEL)
involved in an accident or incident are outlined at Annex B.

10. When the accident or incident involves DEL or German equivalent, the investigation team is to include
the Safety Monitor, the GHSWE and a member of the UWC. The team may also include the USA. The UWC
must be informed about accidents and incidents at the earliest opportunity. In cases of death or serious
injury, the German Civil Police (GCP) will almost certainly wish to investigate and they must be given access
except where this is not possible for security reasons.

11. If, as a result of security restrictions, the GCP are likely to be refused entry, advice must be sought
from the local SLO before this decision is taken. The insurance carrier for BFGs DEL workforce, UK Bund,
have the right to investigate accidents. In all but the most minor accidents, UK Bund must be asked whether
they wish to exercise their right to conduct an investigation. The question is to be routed through the BFG
German Health & Safety at Work Expert at HQ UKSC (G).

12. Reference F, conduct and management of service inquiries, non-statutory inquiries and learning
account s, is to be complied with unless directed otherwise by a higher convening authority.

Learning Accounts

13. It is army policy that learning accounts shall be submitted for all incidents reported to AINC. Full
details are in Reference F. For the most usual of accidents and incidents there is no need to produce, in the
first instance, anything more than a simple learning account. AINC will advise if further work is needed by
the unit. The more complex and/or serious cases are normally investigated by LAIT or SEFIT or the service
police.

14.    For the simple learning account units are advised to use and submit the format at Annex C.

Acting on Lessons Learnt

15. It is vital that lessons learnt from accident investigations are considered by commanders and action
taken to prevent a reoccurrence. To achieve this commanders are to ensure that :

      a. The appropriate level of command group is briefed by their safety champion or advisor on the
      findings and recommendations of any inquiry, learning account or other investigations. This is caveated
      in that matters sub-judice may have privacy or restricted access limitations.

      b. Their appropriate SHEF committee studies all lessons learnt and directs further action as required.

Guidance and training

16. Guidance on accident and incident investigation can be found at Annex A-E of Reference A. Training
in accident and incident investigation techniques is also incorporated into the All Arms Unit Safety Advisors
Course. See also Chapter 4 of this Manual.

Records and forms

17. Details of accident investigations and associated evidence should be retained in accordance with the
direction given in the references.




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                                                                                                           Leaflet 2

                                        Annex A - Investigation Levels - Military/UKBC Personnel/Dependents

INVESTIGATION LEVELS – MILITARY/UKBC PERSONNEL/ DEPENDANTS

   Nature of Accident /
                                  Kind of Investigation            Carried out by:                 Report to:
        Incident
Trivial / Slight                Local                      Line Manager and injured party.     Line Manager by
     Injuries requiring no                                                                  MoD Form 510.
professional treatment and      Supported by Accident                                           Local HSWA (If
less than 3 days off work.      Book entry. (MoD Form                                            local procedures
(Not requiring AINC             510).                                                            have been
notification action).                                                                            instigated).
     Incidents causing
minor damage to
equipment / materials. (Not
requiring AINC notification
action).
Serious                         Learning account           Line Manager and/or USA /               CO//HoE.
      Generally resulting in                              GHSWE. (Special investigation         AINC Team by fax
over 3 days off work                                       teams may be involved in some     or phone for MF 2000
and/or requiring                                           cases).                           action & records.
professional treatment.                                                                          USA / GHSWE.
      Failure or corruption
of safety measure or
procedure (egg broken or
damaged device).
Major                           Formal                     CO/HoD, line manager and             CO/HoE.
     Generally involves        Fully documented.          GHSWE, (Note: Police or special      BLB, HLB & TLB
hospital treatment.             Supported by relevant      investigation teams may be        SHEF FPs.
     Damage to system,         documentation from AINC    involved in some cases).             Summary to
facility, and failure of        Team.                                                        Service Principal FPs.
safety measure or                                                                               AINC Team by fax
procedure.                                                                                   or phone for action &
                                                                                             records.
Critical                        Inquiry                    Appointed Officers in                CO/HoE.
     Fatality or severe        Service Inquiry. Fully     accordance with Queens               BLB/HLB/TLB
injuries resulting in long-     documented. Supported by   Regulations CO/HoD, line          SHEFH&S FPs.
term illness or disability.     other relevant             manager and GH&SE/A, (police         DS&C.
     Total loss of system or   documentation from AINC    or Senior Officer                    Findings to
facility.                       Team.                      appointed by Establishment/       Service Principal FPs.
                                                           Department/Unit. Police/LAIT      AINC Team by fax or
                                                           will be involved.                 phone for action &
                                                                                             records.




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                                                                                                                  Leaflet 2

                                                          Annex B - Investigation Levels - Civilian Personnel (DEL)

INVESTIGATION LEVELS - CIVILIAN PERSONNEL (DEL)

        Nature of
                                  Kind of Investigation                 Carried out by:                    Report to:
    Accident / Incident
 Trivial                          Local                      Line Manager and injured party.              Line Manager by
     Injuries resulting in       Supported by Accident                                               MoD Form 510.
 unfitness for work for less      Book entry (MoD Form                                                    Local HSWA (If
 than 3 days lost time & not      510).                                                               local procedures have
 involving doctor's bills or                                                                          been instigated).
 other expenses or requiring
 notification action to AINC
Slight                            Local                      Line Manager, Safety Monitor,                GLSU/RALSU
     Injuries resulting in       Supported by copy of       member of the UWC and the USA /          Unfallanzeige to UK
unfitness for work for less       relevant docs              GHSWE if required.                       Bund & WBV.
than 3 days lost time             submitted to AINC.                                                      AINC Team by
(involving doctor's bills or      Unfallanzeige (injury                                               fax or phone for action
other expenses).                  only).                                                              & records (Injury
     Incidents causing                                                                               only).
minor damage to equipment
/ materials. (Not requiring
AINC notification action).
Serious                           Informal                   Line Manager, Safety Monitor, USA /          GLSU/RALSU
     Generally resulting in      With written record        GHSWE and a member of the UWC.           Unfallanzeige to UK
over 3 days off work              supported relevant         (Special manager in conjunction with     Bund &WBV.
requiring medical treatment.      docs submitted to          USA / GHSWE, (special investigation          AINC Team by
     Failure or corruption of    AINC Unfallanzeige         teams may also be involved in some       fax or phone for
safety measure or                 (injury only).             cases).                                  action & records.
procedure (egg broken or
damaged device).
Major                             Formal                     CO/HoD, line manager and GHSWE,              GLSU/RALSU
     Generally involves          Fully documented.          (police or special investigation teams   Unfallanzeige to UK
hospital treatment.               Supported by copy of       may be involved in some cases).          Bund & WBV.
     Damage to system,           relevant docs from                                                      AINC Team by
facility, and failure of safety   AINC.                                                               fax or phone for action
measure or procedure.             Unfallanzeige (injury                                               & records.
                                  only).

Critical                          Inquiry                    Appointed Officers in accordance with        UK Bund urgently
     Fatality or severe          Formal Board of            Queens Regulations                           GLSU/RALSU
injuries resulting in long-       Inquiry. Fully             or Senior Officer                        Unfallanzeige to
term illness or disability.       documented.                appointed by                             UK Bund & WBV.
     Total loss of system or     Supported by copy of       Establishment/                           (WBV where there is
facility.                         relevant docs from         Department/Unit. Police/LAIT will be     a fatality).
                                  AINC.                      involved.                                    AINC Team by
                                  Unfallanzeige (injury                                               fax or phone for
                                  only).                                                              action & records.




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                                                                Annex C – Structure of a Learning Account

STRUCTURE OF A LEARNING ACCOUNT

The structural parts of the report are as follows:

Background

Background leading up to the incident including;

        a.   Location.

        b.   Task organisation.

        c.   Any training or environmental issues.

What happened?

Who was involved in the incident, including details of casualties?

Why did it happen?

Salient and factual reasons only are required.

Lessons learned – recommendations

        a.   Internal – by unit.

        b.   External – by chain of command (if appropriate).

Immediate action taken to prevent a recurrence

        a.   Internal – by unit.

        b.   External – by chain of command (if appropriate).

Summary

See Family Information at LFSO 3207, Para 23 for possible inclusion here.

Disclaimer

There will be some circumstances when the complete report passes into the public domain, for instance to
Coroners or requests under the Freedom of Information Act. It must therefore contain the following
warning at the beginning of the report.

   THE INFORMATION IN THIS LEARNING ACCOUNT MAY BE INACCURATE AND IS ONLY BASED
   ON INFORMATION KNOWN AT THIS TIME. IT MUST BE VIEWED AS A PROVISIONAL REPORT
   AND NOT A DEFINITIVE VERSION OF EVENTS




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Leaflet 3 - Competent Persons

                                                 COMPETENT PERSONS

Reference:

A.    JSP 815, para 41 et seq.
B.    Betriebssicherheitsverordnung.

Introduction

1.     Some H&S regulations require the employer to appoint a competent person to assist the meeting of
statutory obligations. Different persons will need to be appointed for different tasks – for example the person
competent to administer first aid will be different from the person competent to examine a pressure vessel. A
competent person can be an employee or an individual from an external source. Competency requires a
combination of several factors such skill, knowledge, experience, training or other relevant qualities.

2.     The provision of a qualification does not, in itself, make a person competent. Generally, in Germany,
the understanding of the term “competent” is more specific than in UK legislation, and can be clearly
demonstrated in the electricity regulations or the appointment of H&S advisors. A competent person is
legally responsible for ensuring, insofar as he can; that the particular aspects of H&S entrusted to his
competency are properly dealt with by him.

Duties

3.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the appointment and use of competent persons. The arrangements are to be monitored
and reviewed as necessary.

4.    Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that where the use of competent persons is specified,
only competent persons are to be employed.

Guidance for line managers

5.    Some typical tasks that will require the use of a competent person are as follows (although the list is
not exhaustive);

      a.      First aid.
      b.      Devising of emergency procedures.
      c.      Supervision of fire evacuations.
      d.      Statutory inspections of:
              (1)      Lifts.
              (2)      Boilers.
              (3)      Compressed air receivers.
              (4)      Scaffolding.
      e.      Maintenance of:

              (1)      Air conditioning plant.
              (2)      Local exhaust ventilation.
              (3)      Water services.
              (4)      Electrical work.
              (5)      Fork lift trucks.

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        f.   Risk assessments for:
             (1)     COSHH
             (2)     Manual handling.
             (3)     Noise.
             (4)     Site assessment.
             (5)     General risks.
             (6)     Health surveillance.
        g.   H&S assistance is available from:

             (1)     Garrison SHEF FP
             (2)     GHSWE
             (3)     Unit Safety Advisor
             (4)     Safety Monitors
Training

6.     An employee‟s competency will decline if skills are not used regularly. Thus, training should be
carried out in a planned and systematic manner to ensure continued competency. Line managers should
identify the most cost-effective means of providing competency training. In certain cases the frequency of
training is laid down, for example Safety Monitor training and first aid training. H&S specialists are to
complete continual profession development as part or their competency requirements. Line managers
should ensure that the competent person has the sufficient authority to ensure his task is fulfilled. Sufficient
resources should be allocated for the task and an effective two-way communication between line managers
and the competent person established. The competent persons proposed role must be clearly defined and
fully explained

Records

7.    Records of specialist training or specific competency training are to be retained in the employees work
record.




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Leaflet 4 - Management of visiting workers, contractors and visitors to Barracks and Establishments
controlled by British Forces Germany

References:
A.    Occupiers Liability Act 1957.
B.    Health and Safety at Work etc Act (HSAWA 1974).
C.    The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (MHSWR 1999).
D.    Arbeitsschutzgesetz (German Employment Safety Act - ArbSchG) Article 8.
E.    LANDSO 4600.
F.    JSP 375 Vol.2, Leaflet 34.

Introduction

1.      MOD has a moral and legal responsibility for the health and safety of visiting workers, contractors and
visitors while they are on MOD premises. LAND has published a Standing Order (LANDSO 4600) on this
subject which overseas commands are expected to follow in so far as is reasonably practicable, accounting
for differences in local procedures.

2.     This Leaflet of the BFG SHEF Manual meets the local procedure requirement of the LANDSO,
Reference E, complies with the relevant national laws, References A to D and with the overarching MOD
Instruction in JSP 375 at Reference F. The arrangements in this Leaflet are known as the „4Cs Management
System‟.

3.      The 4Cs Management System is designed to ensure that the health, safety and well-being of all
visiting workers, contractors and visitors is not affected adversely by the activities of others. The four system
principles require that all employers must co-ordinate with each other to ensure that preventive and
protective control measures are in place to protect visiting workers and contractors. The system requires
that different parties at shared Establishments who commission work or invite visiting workers or contractors
must co-operate with each other. The system must communicate health and safety information, keep it up
to date and share all relevant information with visiting workers and contractors and other visitors who are
potentially at risk.

4.    This Leaflet applies to all Barracks or Establishments in BFG, including their tenants, lodgers,
contractors and other visitors. A glossary of terms used in this leaflet is at Annex H.
                                                                      2
5.      The Leaflet is for the use of Commanding Officers (COs) and the staff they appoint to fulfil the 4Cs
management system roles. These staff, whose primary role may not be that of a full-time Health and Safety
practitioner, must have a working knowledge of basic Health and Safety responsibilities and the ability to
                                          3
conduct and act upon risk assessments . There is no requirement for knowledge or experience of technical
matters; these are the responsibility of the „host‟ as defined later in Paragraph 13 e below and at Annex D of
this leaflet.

6.      This Leaflet is to be complied with by those who have been appointed by their CO to conduct the role
of either 4Cs Duty Holder (4CDH) or Area Custodian (AC). The roles of the 4CDH and AC are explained
later in this Leaflet. Not all COs will be required to appoint a 4CDH.

7.     This Leaflet is also for those who act in an advisory or audit capacity within the BFG such as Garrison
or HQ UKSC Safety, Health & Environmental Protection Staff. It will inform the audit process in assessing the
effectiveness of a 4Cs Management System at or within any BFG Establishment.
                                              4
8.     COs of all BFG Establishments must ensure that they comply with the statutory and mandatory
requirements set out in this Leaflet by establishing a 4Cs Management System. The 4Cs System described

2
 . For the purposes of this Leaflet, a Commanding Officer is the person in command of, or the Head of Establishment of, any
independent unit or organisation.
3
 See BFG SHEF Manual, Leaflet 26 General Risk Assessment - and Leaflet 30 Site Risk Assessment.
4
 An Establishment for the purposes of this Leaflet is defined as a geographical area, including buildings, open spaces and roads, over
which a single CO has been given operational or administrative control.

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in this leaflet is a modified version of the LANDSO. Further modifications required should be appropriate to
the nature and scale of the Establishment and its associated hazards. Further advice and assistance is to
be sought from Garrison SHEF Focal Points.

Aim

9.     The aim of this Leaflet is to provide COs with a safety management system to enable them to comply
with their moral and legal responsibilities for the health and safety of visiting workers, contractors and
visitors, appropriate to the level of risk on their site.

The 4Cs underlying principles

10. Effective application of the 4Cs Management System, will reduce the likelihood of harm or damage
arising from the actions of MOD staff, visiting workers and contractors working on MOD sites.

11.   Every Establishment in BFG must have a safety management system that:

      a.   Identifies all significant hazards, evaluates the risks and implements mitigating control
      measures.

      b.     Ensures Establishment entry control procedures are conveyed by provision of instructions
      during pre-start meetings and briefings including guidance, where appropriate, on the subsequent
      internal movement of visitors and contractors to their point of contact.

      c.     Communicates awareness of all relevant hazards and risks.

      d.     Co-ordinates and co-operates with all visiting workers, contractors and other visitors.

      e.     Ensures that the health, safety and well-being of all visiting workers, contractors and other
      visitors are not adversely affected by the activities of others.

Roles & Responsibilities

12. Key roles and responsibilities are:

      a.     Garrison HQ. Garrison HQs are to ensure that:

             (1)  Each Barracks within their ADMINCON area has a unit appointed to lead for the 4Cs
             Management System and to appoint a 4CDH. Garrisons must ensure that no area is left without
             4CDH coverage.

             (2)   They maintain a register of all 4CDH appointments and have an effective management
             system to assure that competent post holders are in place.

             (3)     That details of their 4Cs arrangements are shared with DE(E) and kept up to date.

        b.   CO. The 4Cs site safety responsibilities of COs are at Annex A.

        c. 4C Duty Holder (4CDH). The 4CDH is a competent manager, formally appointed in writing by
        the CO who manages the overarching procedures for visiting workers, contractors and other visitors.
        The responsibilities of the 4CDH are at Annex B.

        d. Area Custodian (AC). The AC is a competent person formally appointed by a CO, in
        association with the 4CDH, to compile Area Hazard Registers for a specific area, function or asset
        type, and who liaises with hosts, visiting workers and contractors. The AC is considered to be the
        key person in the 4Cs system and is responsible for ensuring the 4CDH is notified of all activities
        taking place within their area of responsibility. The 4Cs responsibilities of ACs are at Annex C.




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        e. Host. A host is any person who through financial authority or as part of their job requests or
        arranges for a visiting worker, contractor, or other visitor to attend or carry out activities for them at
        an Establishment. A host is also anyone who sponsors or invites a visitor to the Establishment. The
        4Cs responsibilities of Hosts are at Annex D.

        f.   Visiting Workers. A visiting worker is any person not normally working in the area where they
        are to undertake a task; this includes people not normally employed at the location concerned.
        Examples include military or civilian personnel from a different site as well as consultants and
        contractors of all types i.e. telecoms or construction.

        g. Transient/Occasional Worker. A transient worker is any person or worker who may be visitor
        and who may also arrive unannounced or out of normal working hours. Examples include: delivery
        drivers, office equipment service engineers, catering or cleaning contract staff.

        h. Contractor. A contractor is any organisation engaged through a contract to undertake or
        provide services on behalf of the MOD, regardless of financial recompense.

13. A list of generic H&S Instructions which units should find helpful to give to contractors and visitors is at
Annex F in both English and German. An alternative trifold handout for visitors is in English at Annex G and
in German at Annex H. Unless producing their own equivalent or better information, units may opt to use
either or both of these formats, which must be extracted from the manual and adapted for local use. The
essential point is to make sure that visitors know what to do and a handout is a good way of ensuring that
they do not forget.

14. A list of General Guidance Notes is at Annex I.

15. The 4Cs communication process is illustrated in the chart at Annex J.

16. Information on the Hazard Register is at Annex K.

17. A glossary of terms is at Annex L.

The 4Cs Management System

18. The 4Cs Management System consists of four steps and these are clearly detailed at Annex E.

Training

19. The Unit Safety Advisors courses held at Deepcut, Arborfield and Sennelager include instruction on
4CDH responsibilities. As each unit is mandated to have a USA, there should always be an officer with
4CDH process training in a unit.

20. Further training may be provided as a result of the current CESO(A) Training Study.

21. HQ UKSC J4 SHEF will work with CESO(A), Garrisons, Hosts and others to define further 4Cs training
needs in Germany.

Accident / Incident Reporting & Investigation

22. Units are to report all accidents and incidents to the AINC whether occurring to MOD personnel (military
or civilian) or to visiting workings, contractors or other visitors.

23. The AINC reporting and investigation procedures are detailed in this Manual at Part 2, Leaflets 1 & 2.
The AC and 4CDH must ensure that all accidents and incidents are also reported to their USA and GHSWA
for local action where necessary.




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Further advice

24. The General Guidance Notes at Annex I set out the essential principles which are particularly
commended to anyone with a managerial role in this field. In addition, professional H&S staff at Garrison HQ
and at HQ UKSC can provide further advice.




Annexes:

Annex A     CO‟s Safety Management Responsibilities.
Annex B     4CDH Responsibilities.
Annex C     AC Responsibilities.
Annex D     Host Responsibilities.
Annex E     4Cs Management System.
Annex F     H&S Instructions for Visitors & Contractors (English & German Versions)
Annex G     4 Cs Visitors handout in trifold format (English Version)
Annex H     4 Cs Visitors handout in trifold format (German Version)
Annex I     General Guidance Notes.
Annex J     Communication Process Chart.
Annex K     Hazard Registers.
Annex L     Glossary of Terms.




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                                                                                                            Leaflet 4

                                                      Annex A - CO‟S Site Safety Management Responsibilities

CO‟s Site Safety Management Responsibilities

1.       The CO‟s site safety management responsibilities include, as a minimum:

         a.     As directed by Garrison HQ to appoint by name personally, in writing - a 4Cs Duty Holder(s)
         (4CDH). A draft letter is at Appendix 1. This letter must be copied to the head of the local DE(FM)
         Office and to Garrison HQ for the SHEF FP.

         b.     Ensuring that Area Custodians (AC) are appointed as required.

         c.     Ensuring that safety management arrangements are in place through a relevant, efficient and
         effective application of the 4Cs Management System modified to suit BFG and based on this Leaflet,
         that delivers suitable and sufficient control through co-operation, co-ordination and communication
         with all hosts, visiting workers, contractors and other visitors.

         d.     Ensuring that integrated general and site risk assessments are conducted and an Establishment
         Hazard Register is maintained. These must be made available to all visiting workers, contractors and
         other visitors as well as site personnel routinely occupying the area.

2.       The safety management arrangements should:

           a. Highlight to a particular host where applicable, any hazard or activity creating a risk that is not
           within the CO‟s control.

           b. Notify known general and site hazards and risks to hosts where applicable and visiting workers,
           contractors and other visitors, prior to the commencement of their activity.

           c. Establish and maintain suitable arrangements to deal with emergencies on the site and ensure
           that they are routinely practiced.

3. Ensure that arrangements are in place for all visiting workers, contractors and other visitors to receive
an up to date health & safety briefing providing information on all local hazards and risks within the area
where any work is proposed including emergency and disaster arrangements, prior to any work
commencing.

4.     When appointing the 4CDH the CO must take into account the size and complexity of his
Establishment, and the relationship with other site occupants, such as schools, NAAFI, DLO, ISS(G),
DTE(G) and other Agencies etc. Where a Garrison has a remote Station or Unit under command, a
separate 4CDH may be appointed for that part. The overall aim is to ensure a sensible and simple alignment
of safety responsibilities, ensuring full coverage.
                               5
5.    The CO is required to publish a written statement with respect to the health and safety of the unit‟s
employees, and the organisation and arrangements in place for executing the requirements of that
statement. A copy of this statement must be displayed and made available on demand to all hosts, visiting
workers, contractors and other visitors.

6.     The CO must establish, and chair, a Site Safety Committee which includes appropriate representation
from such roles as DE - FM, GWA, PM, USAs, J4 Estates Requirements Manager, 4CDHs, ACs, Unit Fire
Officers, and others where deemed appropriate with safety responsibilities on the Establishment. This
committee must meet at least twice a year but may need to meet more frequently depending on the
complexity of the works taking place on an Establishment at any particular time. Alternatively, the 4Cs


5
    BFG SHEF Manual Part 1 Chapter 3.

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management system may form part of the unit/Gar SHEF committee as a standing item on the agenda.

    7. The CO must review annually the safety management arrangements, or earlier when significant
    change occurs.
                                                   6
    8. It is not a COs responsibility to host any visiting workers, contractors and other visitors on behalf of
    other hosts. This could expose all parties to unnecessary risk. Where such arrangements are requested,
    unit personnel must report the issue and seek further advice from USAs or the Garrison SHEF Staff.


    Appendix:

    1.    Draft COs letter of Appointment of Site 4Cs Duty Holder




6
    Host responsibilities are shown at Annex D

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                                                                                                                            Leaflet 4

                                Annex A – Appendix 1 Draft COs letter of Appointment of Site 4Cs Duty Holder

                       DRAFT COs LETTER OF APPOINTMENT OF SITE 4Cs DUTY HOLDER

To: Rank, Name and Appointment
Copy to: DE(FM) head of local office
         Garrison HQ for SHEF FP

LETTER OF APPOINTMENT AS A 4Cs DUTY HOLDER

References:

A.        BFG SHEF Manual Leaflet 4.

1.    I attach great importance to ensuring that everyone who works in or visits ………..Barracks can be
assured it is a safe environment. In accordance with Ref A, I appoint you as the 4Cs Duty Holder of
….Barracks with immediate effect/effect from …………

2.     You are to support me in my Health and Safety duties towards all personnel including contractors and
other transient workers and visitors in accordance with the extant edition of the BFG SHEF Manual and in
addition any further direction I may give you. You are to plan and implement all necessary procedures to
ensure that the 4C arrangements, in relation to proper co-operation, co-ordination, communication and
control, are in place, and that site hazards and associated risks that such hazards present are mitigated in
an effective and efficient manner.

3.    I shall fully support you in your duties and wish you to report to me through regular SHEF meetings,
and immediately when significant safety events occur or when you judge that my guidance is required.

4.      I shall provide the necessary training that you and your assistants may require, so that you can fulfil
this role effectively and competently.
                                                                    7
5.    I shall include this role in your Job Specification (and acknowledge this work in your annual
         8
appraisal ])




Signed

Name, Rank and Appointment

                                                                                                              Date………………….

Note; this letter must be signed in person by the Commanding Officer. This duty is not to be
delegated




7
    Changes to DEL Job Specifications require advice from GLSUs.
8
    Only include the words in square brackets where the appointee is subject to a performance report from the CO.

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Leaflet 4

                                                                             Annex B – 4CDH Responsibilities

4C DUTY HOLDER (4CDH) RESPONSIBILITIES

1.    Each Barracks must have a 4CDH who is appointed to that role, in writing, by the CO as directed by
Garrison HQ. The 4CDH must carry out all safety duties allocated to the CO.

2.    All Establishments must use the title of „4Cs Duty Holder‟ as this is the duty holder nomenclature
agreed throughout MOD and by its contractors. The name and contact details of the 4CDH must be made
available to all hosts, visiting workers, contractors and other visitors by the hosts and included in all pre-start
meetings and Establishment briefings by ACs. A typical sign indicating details of the 4CDH and AC is shown
at Annex K – Appendix 1 of this leaflet and should be displayed in the Guardroom and on notice boards as
widely as possible within each 4Cs area and throughout the Establishment generally.

3.     Each 4CDH must have a deputy so that there is 4Cs management representation during all working
hours.

4.   The 4CDH should work with managers throughout their area of responsibility to identify suitable AC
nominees to ensure all site assets are covered collectively by the appointed ACs when in post.

5.   Where a Barracks is small or has few safety hazard and risk implications as determined by risk
assessment, the 4CDH may also fulfil the role of sole AC.

6.    The 4CDH does not need to be a subject matter expert nor have technical skills, because the role is
primarily one of managing the 4Cs system. However, the post holder must have access to competent H&S
support and advice.

7.    The duties of a 4CDH can be summarised into five key areas:

      a.    Emergency preparedness. The 4CDH must ensure that arrangements are in place to deal
      with emergencies and that all relevant parties including visiting workers, contractors and other visitors
      are aware of such arrangements through local Establishment safety and emergency briefings via
      hosts or at the place of work by the ACs.

      b.     Identification of hazards. The 4CDH must combine all Area Hazard Registers into an
      Establishment Hazard Register, which must be available to all visiting workers, contractors and other
      visitors as well as personnel routinely occupying the area. This will assist in ensuring that all fully
      understand the potential hazards and risks that they may be exposed and which may have an effect
      on any work they propose to carry out within the site.

      c.      Communication of hazards and risks. The 4CDH must ensure that systems are in place for
      visiting workers, contractors and other visitors to receive a relevant site safety briefing (usually via the
      AC) to understand the nature of the hazards and risks in their work or visit area. Such briefings must:

               (1) Take place prior to any commencement of work;

               (2) Ensure that all hazards in specific work areas are identified and explained;

               (3) Include daily changing hazards, Emergency and Disaster Plans, and evacuation
               procedures.

        d. Interfacing duties with DE- FM, GWA, GCA and other Contractors. The 4CDH is
        responsible (usually via the AC) for ensuring information is provided on hazards and risks relating to
        the area where the proposed work will be carried out. The 4CDH is not responsible for any technical
        hazards or aspects of the work, unless already responsible for a technical facility. A host, typically
        the DE - FM, GWA, PM or the GCA is responsible for communicating technical information involving
        hazards and risks and for ensuring visiting workers, contractors and other visitors are competent and

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comply with laid down procedures including work quality, via appropriate „Safe Systems of Work‟ as
described in the BFG SHEF Manual at Leaflet 27. This will include personnel that routinely
occupying the work area.

e. Feedback and co-ordination. The 4CDH must ensure that regular feedback from MOD
customers personnel, especially the ACs, on the safety performance of hosts, visiting workers,
contractors and other visitors is gathered and assessed, and failings reported to the main players
such as DE(E) or other lodger organisations as appropriate so that refinement and improvement can
continually be achieved.




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                                                                                                       Leaflet 4

                                                                 Annex C – Area Custodian Responsibilities

AREA CUSTODIAN RESPONSIBILITIES

1.     The Area Custodian (AC) must be a competent person, formally appointed by the Chain of Command
in association with the 4CDH, who is responsible for compiling the Area Hazard Register (see Annex K) for a
specific area, function or asset type, and who liaises with visiting workers, contractors and other visitors.
Each AC must have a deputy so that there is 4Cs management representation during all working hours.

2.     The AC does not need to have technical skills, although the AC must have sufficient knowledge about
their specific area to compile the Area Hazard Register and the ability to liaise with visiting workers,
contractors and other visitors. The AC must have access to competent H&S support and advice.

3.     The title of „Area Custodian‟ may be altered to account for local custom or existing responsibilities, eg
Building Custodian / Manager. However, the responsibilities set out in this Leaflet may not, be altered.
Visiting workers, contractors and other visitors must be informed by their host or the 4CDH as appropriate of
the AC for the area where work is planned, proposed or visited, prior to the work commencing.

4.    In order to assist the management of a large or complex site it is helpful to divide the site into
manageable geographical / physical assets, known as 4C Areas, „owned‟ by an AC. Where a Unit is small or
has few safety hazards implications, the 4CDH may also be the sole AC.

5.     Normally a 4C area would correspond to a functional boundary, eg sub-unit lines, Workshop,
Department or Mess, where all activities and/or assets within the area fall within the responsibility of one AC.
The aim is to establish realistic boundaries where Building Custodian / Manager cover is already in place or
requires minimal reorganisation to achieve. Other divisions could be:

      a.     Building, or part thereof (e.g. a boiler room), pump house or a group of buildings.

      b.     A structure or asset, such as masts, chimneys, towers, bridges, tunnels, external areas
      (including road networks), ranges, airfields, jetties, storage yards etc, including over ground and
      underground services.

      c      Specific area of functional competence such as Fire Safety, Fuels, Radiation or Munitions.

6.    Whether an AC “is responsible for one or more 4C Areas depends on such factors as:

      a.     Existing management demarcations and arrangements.

      b.     The ability of the AC to control the Areas or Functions.

      c.     The physical proximity of the Areas or Functions.

7.    When the 4C Areas have been defined, Establishment Site Plans must be produced that identify the
areas and their boundaries. A list of the AC(s), must be held centrally by the 4CDH, DE (FM) and the
Guardrooms. The ACs must also be aware of adjoining boundaries and ACs therein.

8.    The AC duties include these key areas:

      a.     Identification and registration of hazards. The AC must identify, compile and maintain an
      Area Hazard Register, and ensure that the general and site-specific risk assessments that underpin
      the register‟s information are current and included. This should be done in conjunction with personnel
      who are competent to identify the hazards and evaluate the risks within the area eg. technical
      personnel from DE, the USA or GHSWA. The 4CDH will combine all Area Hazard Registers into one
      Establishment Hazard Register.




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b.     Communication of hazards and risks. The AC must be aware of all safe systems in place
within their area of responsibility so that they can provide a relevant site safety briefing to visiting
workers, contractors and other visitors explaining the nature of the hazards and risks therein and
contribute to such briefings as required. The hazards and risks will be mainly contained within the
Area Hazard Register but may also include any short-term daily changing hazards. The must also
include information on the Site Emergency and Disaster Plans, and evacuation procedures. The
briefings must take place prior to the commencement of any work in the area.

c.     Interfacing duties with DE- FM, GWA, GCA and other Contractors. The AC is responsible
for providing hazard and risk information within his competence and as recorded on the Area Hazard
Register as stated above. The AC is not responsible for any technical hazards or aspects of the work,
even where they are responsible for a technical facility within their area (eg. an on-site water or
sewage works). The host, typically DE-FM, GWA, PM, the GCA and other contractors is responsible
for communicating technical hazards and risks and for providing information (eg „Safe Systems of
Work‟) that will assist the visiting workers, contractors and other visitors and contribute to their general
health and safety as a whole.

d.    Feedback and co-ordination. The AC must contribute to the feedback on the safety
performance of hosts, visiting workers, contractors and other visitors and assist the 4CDH to ensure
information is gathered and assessed, and failings reported to DE-FM, GWA, PM, the GCA or other
lodger organisations as appropriate.




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                                                                                                       Leaflet 4

                                                                            Annex D – Hosts Responsibilities

HOSTS RESPONSIBILITIES

1.    The host is the person or organisation responsible for arranging and inviting visiting workers,
contractors and other visitors onto the Establishment. The host must work within the structure of this leaflet
and within the requirements of host nation standards at Reference D and MOD Safe Systems of Work at
Reference C.

2.   The term also applies to those inviting in, or sponsoring, office visitors and such others as sports
teams, mess guests and families. Examples of typical hosts include:

      a.     Defence Estates (Europe) (eg. DE-FM, GWA and PM).

      b.     Defence Training Estate (Germany).

      c.     German Construction Administration.

      d.     Principle Contractor.

      e.     Other MOD organisations eg ISS(G), SCE, DLO, NAAFI etc.

      f.     Lodger Units.

      g.    Any manager either directly requesting visiting workers, contractors and other visitors to attend,
      or sponsoring a visitor.

3.    The host must clearly identify all aspects of the proposed work, to the visiting workers, contractors or
others that they are about to appoint in order to allow evaluation and assurance that they are competent to
undertake the task(s) required.

4.      They must ensure arrangements are in place to protect the health, safety and well-being of their
visiting workers, contractors and other visitors as well as personnel routinely occupying the area where they
intend to carry out a work task or visit, as far as is reasonably practicable.

5.    Hosts must ensure that arrangements are in place to decide what level of safety briefing would be
appropriate for their visiting workers, contractors and other visitors and arrange with the AC in the first
instance or the 4CDH where appropriate before any work commences on site.

6.     The host must ensure that arrangements are in place to notify the AC in the first instance or the 4CDH
where appropriate, of the arrival details and briefing requirements of any visiting workers, contractors and
other visitors. Where, in the case of new contractors or short-term visitors, the host must ensure they are
permitted/authorised to enter the barracks and are advised to contact the AC on arrival at the proposed
place of work immediately, before starting any work activity.

7.     The host must advise any of their visiting workers, contractors or others that they must consider, prior
to any work commencing, whether an additional Risk Assessment is required over and above those
prepared for their proposed work activities, where there are other specific site activities taking place that may
have an effect on their work task. In order to make that decision, the host must ensure that the visiting
workers or contractors have advised their personnel to consult with the relevant AC in the first instance (or
4CDH where appropriate) so that the relevant Area or Establishment Hazard Registers is checked. Any
additional control measures required as a result of this consultation must be considered and implemented
where reasonably practicable. The AC must also advise the 4CDH of any such additions or changes in
requirements before the work commences.




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8.    Hosts must consider, or ensure their visiting workers, contractors and other visitors consider, whether
the scope of work requires the use of specific „Safe Systems of Work‟ such as MOD Safety Rules &
Procedures which may include liaison with Authorised Persons and the need to obtain formal Permits to
Work.

9.      Hosts must ensure that their visiting workers, contractors and other visitors pay particular attention to
the mandatory procedural requirements to ensuring that any „digging‟ or „excavation work‟ or „hot work‟
activities such as welding, grinding, or use of flame or heat are only carried out with the approval of the MOD
responsible person and with the knowledge of the AC or 4CDH where appropriate.

10. Hosts must ensure that the visiting workers, contractors and other visitors are aware of their
responsibilities in accordance with German and UK legislation as shown at the References and that they
comply with all agreed standards and procedures i.e. the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and
adherence to safe systems of work etc.

11. Hosts must ensure that visiting workers, contractors and other visitors advise their EMPLOYEES of
their responsibilities in accordance with German and UK legislation and that they comply with all agreed
standards and procedures whilst on site including their duty of care to others.

12. Hosts must always consider the safety performance of their visiting workers, contractors and others
and report any shortcomings and/or failings in their work practices or compliance with laid down standards or
procedures to the AC or 4CDH.

13. Hosting is not the responsibility of any CO unless for their own invited visitors under their direct
control.

14. In the case of work conducted through DE, the GCA fulfils the role of Agent and host to the working
visitors, contractors or other visitors they employ. As such, they have administrative contractual control but
limited functional control of site activities.




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                                                                                                    Leaflet 4


                                                                  Annex E – The 4Cs Management System

THE 4Cs MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

The 4Cs Management System consists of four steps. The guidance below should be used to arrange a
pragmatic, compliant, system that suits local conditions. It will be used to audit those arrangements.


                           STEP 1 – Co-ordinate and Define

                           STEP 2 – Assess and Communicate

                           STEP 3 – Co-operate and Inform

                           STEP 4 – Control and Verify



                                  STEP 1 - Co-ordinate and Define
 1. There must be local co-ordinated procedures to ensure visiting workers, contractors and visitors know
 which 4CDH is responsible for which Establishment, and which AC is responsible for which area. The name
 and contact details of the CO and the 4CDH must be communicated to DE(E) FM, the GCA and to others
 organisations that may need to know.

 2. Where a Barracks has more than one main occupying unit then a lead unit is to be nominated for 4Cs
 management purposes by the Garrison HQ. The unit commander must formally appoint, in writing, a 4CDH
 from the lead unit. The 4CDH must co-ordinate arrangements between all units and ensure the
 appointment of the ACs for each area. Where, in the judgement of the unit commander, more than one
 4CDH was required and appointed, it is essential that formal arrangements be made so that they work
 together when necessary. In all cases, it will be a matter for local commanders to decide the most
 appropriate arrangements and who are the most suitable appointees.

 3. Each Barracks must be divided into sensible and manageable 4C Areas to enable the efficient and
 effective management of the 4Cs system. See Annex E for details.

 4. The AC manages a 4C Area and is responsible for co-ordinating with hosts, acting as a focal point and
 for sharing H&S information with visiting workers, contractors and other visitors where necessary.


                                 STEP 2 – Assess and Communicate

 1. The AC, who may also be the 4CDH in the case of simple Establishments, is responsible for the
 collation of their Area Hazard Register and retains it as the master version. Any health and safety
 information relating to any hazards and risks within an area where work is proposed or actually being
 carried out must always be exchanged between the ACs and visiting workers, contractors or other visitors.
 Duties of the 4CDH and AC are at Annexes B and C respectively, and details of Hazard Registers are at
 Annex I.

 2. The AC (or 4CDH) ensures that the Area Hazard Register is updated whenever there are changes. The
 revised Register must be communicated to those who require this information, and the 4CDH or AC must
 endeavour to publicise any significant changes via contractor and visiting worker briefings and/or pre-start
 meetings or briefings. Site risk assessments should also be available to all from ACs and 4CDH. Seek
 further advice from the USA or Gar SHEF FP.


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3. Areas determined by the 4CDH and AC to be high risk and requiring special controls must be clearly
identified and communicated to hosts, visiting workers and contractors usually at pre-start meetings before
visiting the Establishment. Special consideration must be given to these high-risk management controls (eg
in the case of construction work – Safety Rules and Procedures (SR&Ps)). Further advice can be sought
from the host, USAs, or Garrison SHEF FPs.

4. The 4CDH must ensure that ACs have arrangements in place for visiting workers, contractors and other
visitors to receive a relevant site safety briefing, normally at the area where the work is to be carried out.
This briefing should also be made in the HN language if necessary. The briefer (usually the AC) must ask
the visitor to confirm that they understand the nature of any significant hazards and risks in their work or
visit area. The briefings do not have to cover detailed safety procedures for the whole site, but must
highlight relevant hazardous areas where the visitor is likely to go (ie MT or tank parks, HLSs, POL and
refuelling areas). The briefings must occur prior to the commencement of any work, and include Emergency
and Disaster Plan information and evacuation procedures.

5. All visitors (whether or not in MOD vehicles and/or with an MOD pass) or regular transient workers,
must have prior knowledge of where they will be working before entering the Establishment and this must
be provided by the FM, GWA, PM or other host during pre-start meetings etc. This information may be very
short or may even advise visitors that there are no currently known significant hazards or risks on-route to
their place of work. The information should be supplemented with a leaflet covering standard hazards and
risks and Emergency and Disaster Plan procedures.



                                    STEP 3 - Co-operate and Inform


1. The AC in the first instance, or 4CDH, where appropriate is responsible for interfacing with hosts,
visiting workers, contractors and other visitors and must provide hazard information to all. The AC or 4CDH
is not responsible for supervising the technical aspects of the work; this is the responsibility of the host
and/or their contractors. The host (usually DE(E) or the GCA in respect of construction works) is
responsible for ensuring the contractor‟s competence, safety procedures and work quality.

2. The visiting worker or contractor, together with their host where appropriate, must engage directly with
the 4Cs system by noting the hazards and risks recorded in the Area or Establishment Hazard Register,
and by responding to the specific briefings.


3. The visiting worker or contractor must advise the AC or 4CDH where appropriate, on how they propose
to undertake their work in accordance with host nation standards or UK standards and the means (in simple
terms) on how they intend to achieve the required outcome. They must work within the controls that have
been identified and agreed. A reminder here that the AC or 4CDH is not responsible for any technical
matters.

4. It is the responsibility of the host, not the AC or 4CDH to ensure that contractors and visiting workers are
competent to do the work and must ensure that agreed methods of work are applied and monitored
correctly. The host must ensure that visiting workers, contractors or other visitors are aware of their
responsibility (usually at pre-start meetings) to produce task-specific risk assessments in accordance with
host nation standards (ie ArbSchG and BetrSichV) or UK standards where appropriate before work
commences. The host must also ensure that the visiting worker, contractor or other visitors when on site,
gives due consideration to any additional hazards and risks that may be highlighted by the AC in the Hazard
Registers presented to them. This ensures that the risk assessment has taken adequate account of the
actual work-site conditions.




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5. Transient/Occasional Workers will not generally require a briefing each time they visit. However, each
individual must be fully briefed before entering for the first time by their host (usually at pre-start meetings
etc), at intervals thereafter whilst on site (usually by the AC), and whenever there is a change of
circumstances, which they need to be aware. It is important that all people affected by the unannounced
arrival of a transient worker are aware of such a possibility in their workplace.




                                        Step 4 - Control and Verify

1. The CO, together with the 4CDH, must review the following arrangements on a regular basis, at least
annually:

     a.     The co-ordination and definition of 4C Areas or Functions. This process should also check for
     overlaps or gaps in coverage between units and establishments.

     b.     The risk assessments (general or site) that underpin Area and Establishment Hazard
     Registers.

     c.      The information that is communicated in briefings.


2. The 4CDH and AC must carry out formal reviews of the respective Establishment and Area Hazard
Registers every 12 months together with those who have a working knowledge of the hazards present (e.g.
DE(E) FM, J4 Estates Requirements Manager).




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                             Annex F – H&S Instructions for Visitors and Contractors (English Version)

H&S INSTRUCTIONS FOR VISITORS AND CONTRACTORS (ENGLISH VERSION)

As a visitor to or contractor working in ………..…….. (insert premises/barracks), you are required to comply
with current German Legislation, and where applicable its UK counterpart, especially Health & Safety at
Work and Road Traffic regulations. In particular, visitors have a responsibility for their own safety and must
ensure that other personnel are not harmed as a result of their actions or omissions.

As a minimum the following instructions must be followed:

     The German Traffic Regulations (StVO) apply throughout the barracks to all forms of transport,
        including pedestrians and cyclists.
     The Barracks speed limit of (…….. insert kmh) must not be exceeded.
     Contractors are to report to (the Area Custodian) who is located in (……….insert address) to receive
        local brief on hazards and risks within the area of the intended work or visit.
     Contractors and other visitors are to declare any processes they intend to carry out that may possibly
        endanger people or property. In particular contractors must comply with procedures for hot work or
        other dangerous processes requiring a permit to work.
     All safety signs and notices are to be complied with.
     Areas marked out of bounds or prohibited for access are not to be entered without specific prior
        permission from an authorised official.
     Access is not allowed in areas that require protective equipment to be worn or used without the
        permission of the area controller and the relevant protective equipment being worn or used at all
        times.
     Visitors are to report any hazards that may arise, or have arisen either from their actions or omissions
        or by others, to the (Area Custodian or 4CDH)
     Report any injuries you have incurred to the (Area Custodian or 4CDH). For serious injuries, which
        require urgent treatment, telephone the relevant emergency number shown at the bottom of this
        page.
     In the event of a security alert follow instructions (given over the public announcement system and
        direction).
     Report any suspect packages, vehicles or activity to (the Guardroom).
     When entering buildings make a note of the location of any emergency exits and alarms.
     On the outbreak of fire proceed immediately to the assembly point or follow instructions given by local
        management or staff.
     Smoking is prohibited in all buildings.

Emergency Telephone Numbers from Military Network (From civilian line prefix with (……)

Fire:                                                                                Ext……..
Guardroom:                                                                           Ext……..
Area Custodian                                                                       Ext……..
4CDH                                                                                 Ext……..
Injury (Civilian) German ambulance;                                                  (0) 112……….
Injury (Military, UKBC or Dependant Personnel):     Medical Centre:                  Ext……
Health & Safety Advice:                             Safety Adviser                   Ext…....




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                                                                                                Leaflet 4


                           Annex F – H&S Instructions for Visitors and Contractors (German Version)

GESUNDHEITS- UND SICHERHEITSANWEISUNGEN FÜR BESUCHER UND VERTRAGSPARTNER

Als Besucher oder Vertragsdienstleister in …………….. (bitte Gelände/Kaserne einfügen) sind Sie
verpflichtet, der aktuellen deutschen Gesetzgebung Folge zu leisten, und falls zutreffend, auch deren
britischer Entsprechung, speziell hinsichtlich Gesundheit und Sicherheit am Arbeitsplatz und der
Straßenverkehrsordnung. Insbesondere tragen Besucher die Verantwortung für ihre eigene Sicherheit und
sind verpflichtet sicherzustellen, dass andere Mitarbeiter auf Grund ihrer Handlungen und Unterlassungen
nicht geschädigt werden.

Mindestens folgenden Anweisungen muß Folge geleistet werden:

    Die deutsche Straßenverkehrsordnung (StVO) findet überall in den Kasernen bei allen
       Transportmöglichkeiten, einschließlich Fußgänger und Radfahrer, Anwendung.
    Die Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung auf dem Kasernengelände (bitte ……Stundenkilometer einfügen)
       darf nicht überschritten werden.
    Vertragsdienstleister sind verpflichtet, sich beim (AC) zu melden, der sein Büro in (bitte Adresse
       einfügen……..) hat, damit sie über örtliche Gefahren und Risiken innerhalb des Bereichs der
       vorgesehenen Arbeiten oder des geplanten Besuchs unterrichtet werden können.
    Vertragsdienstleister und andere Besucher sind verpflichtet, alle Arbeitsabläufe, die möglicherweise
       Menschen oder Sachen beeinträchtigen könnten, zu melden. Insbesondere sind
       Vertragsdienstleister verpflichtet, Verfahrensweisen für das Arbeiten mit heißen Gegenständen oder
       für andere gefährliche Vorgänge, die eine Arbeitserlaubnis benötigen, Folge zu leisten.
    Allen Sicherheitsschildern und –hinweisen ist Folge zu leisten.
    Bereiche, die gesperrt sind oder deren Zugang für Unbefugte verboten ist, dürfen ohne vorherige
       Sondergenehmigung eines Befugten nicht betreten werden.
    Zugang zu Bereichen, in denen das Tragen oder die Benutzung von Schutzausrüstung erforderlich ist,
       dürfen nur mit Einverständnis der Bereichsaufsicht betreten werden, wobei die entsprechende
       Schutzausrüstung ständig zu tragen oder zu verwenden ist.
    Besucher sind verpflichtet, alle möglichen Gefahren, die aus ihren eigenen Handlungen oder
       Unterlassungen oder durch die anderer entstehen könnten oder entstanden sind, dem (AC oder
       4CDH) zu melden.
    Melden Sie alle Verletzungen, die Ihnen zugefügt wurden, dem (AC oder 4CDH). Bei ernsthaften
       Verletzungen, die dringend medizinisch versorgt werden müssen, rufen Sie die entsprechende,
       unten aufgeführte Notrufnummer, an.
    Im Falle eines Sicherheitsalarms folgen Sie bitte den Anweisungen (Ankündigungen und
       Anweisungen über die Lautsprecheranlage).
    Melden Sie alle verdächtigen Pakete, Fahrzeuge oder Vorgänge der (Wache).
    Wenn Sie Gebäude betreten, merken Sie sich den Standort der Notausgänge und Notrufstellen.
    Bei Ausbruch eines Feuers begeben Sie sich sofort zum Sammelpunkt oder folgen Sie den
       Anweisungen des Managements oder der Mitarbeiter vor Ort.
    Das Rauchen ist in allen Gebäuden verboten.

Notrufnummern aus dem Militärtelefonnetz
(Vom Zivilnetz, Vorwahl mit (…..).

Feuer:                                                                          Apparat…..
Wache:                                                                          Apparat…..
Wachleiter                                                                      Apparat…..
4CDH                                                                            Apparat…..
Bei Verletzung (Zivilbeschäftigte) den deutschen Rettungsdienst;                112
Bei Verletzung (Militärangehörige, UKBC, Dependants); Medical Centre:           Apparat …..
Fachkraft für Arbeitssicherheit:                                                Apparat …..



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                                                                                                                           Annex G – 4 Cs Visitors trifold handout English Text
The 4C‟s Process                                                            A demarcation agreement has been set up for my
                                                                            work area. Do these arrangements still apply?
                                                                            On some Establishments, where a formal demarcation
                                                                            agreement has been set up, some variation to these
Step 1:
                                                                            arrangements may be applicable. You should refer to
                                                                            the 4C‟s Duty Holder for clarification.
    - Receive general site induction brief                                                                                               THE MOD 4C‟S SYSTEM - A GUIDE FOR VISITING
                                                                            How will I know who the Area Custodian is?
                                                                                                                                                   WORKERS AND CONTRACTORS
                                                                            Your Host should be able to tell you who the relevant
Step 2:                                                                                                                             Your safety, health and wellbeing whilst working on this
                                                                            Area Custodian for your activity is. Some
                                                                                                                                    Establishment is of key importance. This leaflet describes the
                                                                            Establishments display “Area Custodian” signs outside
                                                                                                                                    arrangements to ensure your protection and the protection of
                                                                            the office of the post-holder. If there is doubt, you
                                                                            should refer to the 4C‟s Duty Holder, whose contact     those working around you. It applies equally to MOD staff and
    - Discuss detail of job and method of working
                                                                                                                                    service personnel, as well as to all other visitors. Please take
    - Exchange of known hazard information                                  details are given below.
                                                                                                                                    a few minutes of your time to read this through. If there are
    (Communication)
                                                                            Site Contacts:                                          any questions it doesn’t answer, a list of contacts is given on
    - Review of Risk Assessment
                                                                                                                                    the reverse, to whom you may refer for further guidance.
    - Requirement for Permits to Work (Control)                             The following contact numbers may be obtained from
                                                                                                                                    So what are the 4C‟s, exactly?
                                                                            any military phone:
                                                                                                                                    MoD Establishments, due to the nature of activities
Step 3:
                                                                                                                                    undertaken, often present visitors with an unusual range of
                                                                            FIRE or OTHER EMERGENCY: 112 or xxxx                    hazards. Many of these change on a daily basis. Equally,
                                                                                                                                    maintenance work and repair work can all introduce hazards
    - Discuss detail of job and method of working (Co-operation)            4C‟s Duty Holder: xxxx                                  of their own. Sometimes the two sets of activities can conflict.
    - Exchange information on particular site hazards                                                                               Effective safety management, therefore relies on the
    - Exchange information on other activity in the area (Co-ordination)                                                            following principles:
    - Sign visitor‟s log                                                    [Name of FMO] Office: xxxx                                    - That the work of different organisations is
                                                                            (Host for most maintenance activity)                           Co-ordinated
                                                                                                                                          - That different organisations Co-operate to ensure that
                                                                            Guard Room: xxxx                                              work is carried out safely
                                                                            Establishment Safety Adviser: xxxx                            - That different organisations Communicate on safety
On Completion:                                                                                                                            matters
Note: On some sites, where the Host is not resident, Steps 1 & 2 may                                                                      - That, where there is a conflict of interest, that work is
need to be reversed                                                                                                                       Controlled, to ensure respective tasks are carried out in
                                                                                                                                          a safe manner.




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So how does it work?                                                   Other frequently asked questions:                                   ESTABLISHMENT RULES:
The person who invited you to this site is known as your Host.                                                                             General Rules:
This may be an MOD member of staff, or a representative of             I‟ve been called in to do an urgent repair. Hasn‟t the Host         No alcohol or drugs may be brought onto this site.
one of the other organisations resident on this site. They are         done all this co-ordination and communication before I get          Smoking is NOT permitted anywhere except designated outside
responsible for notifying the Guardroom / Security Post of your        here?                                                               areas.
arrival. The Host is also responsible for ensuring that your work      Your Host should have pre-notified all relevant people of your      All persons employed on this site must display a valid
is managed in a safe manner.                                           arrival. However, he or she will not know how you intend to         establishment pass.
                                                                       work, nor all the other activities happening on site at the same    Photography is not allowed.
Step 1 – Arrival:                                                      time. No job is so important that time cannot be taken to get       Bags, holdalls and boxes etc may not be left unattended at any
When you arrive at the site, you will need to report to the            these first steps right.                                            time, except inside designated areas.
Guardroom / Security Post, in order to gain entry to the site.                                                                             Escorts are required for entry into any of the following:
Here, you will be given a general site briefing on the collective      I‟m just a delivery driver / I just came here to attend a
safety and security arrangements for the site (Fire evacuation         meeting. Do I need to go through all this?
procedure; Speed limits; use of cameras; mobile phones etc.)           Where your work is unlikely to have an impact on anybody else,
                                                                       the general site induction given at Step 1 may be sufficient.
Step 2 – Report to Host:                                               Your Host will determine this.                                      Permits to Work:
Once you have been admitted to the Establishment, you should                                                                               A Permit to Work MUST be obtained prior to carrying out any of
report to your Host. They will discuss the detail of the job you       I‟ve been in and out of this Establishment for years. Surely        the following activities:
have come to do, and your intended method of working. They             I don‟t have to do this every time I come in?                       Excavation; Hot Work; work on electrical systems; work on fuel
may also need to see your Risk Assessment. The Host will also          Where workers carry out routine or regular and repetitive tasks,    installations; work on boilers or other pressure systems; work at
tell you if a „Permit to Work‟ is needed for your activity.            some Establishments may allow for Steps 1 & 2 to be covered         height; work in any manhole or confined space. (Contact your
                                                                       by a periodic briefing given by the Host. However, you will still   Host for details).
Step 3 – Report to Area Custodian:                                     need to report to the Area Custodian to exchange information
Each building or area on this Establishment is under the control       on the day-to-day activity in the area in which you intend to       Rules for vehicles and road safety:
of an Area Custodian. This may, or may not, be the same                work.                                                               The speed limit around the establishment is XX kmh
person as your Host. He or she is responsible for co-ordinating
the day-to-day activity in any one area of the Establishment.          I‟ve been called in out-of-hours, and neither the Host nor          Columns of marching service personnel ALWAYS have priority
They will advise you of any particular hazards in their area and       Area Custodian is available. What am I supposed to do?
let you know of any other activity taking place at the same time.      This situation arises when responding to task that requires an      Parking is only permitted in designated areas. Grassed areas
They will also need to know what work you intend to carry out,         urgent repair. You should only attempt to “make safe” or carry      are out of bounds.
to ensure that this does not conflict with any other local activity.   out such restoration work as is within your competence, and as
You will also be asked to sign the visitor‟s log. Once this            has been agreed with your Host. If they are not physically          Reversing delivery vehicles must always have a guide.
discussion has taken place, you will be able to commence               present on site, further advice from your Host, should be
work.                                                                  sought by telephone.

A flowchart, describing this process is given opposite




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                                                                                                                            Annex H - 4Cs visitors trifold handout German Text
Das 4-C-System                                             Eine Abgenzungsvereinbarung wurde für meinen
                                                           Arbeitsbereich erstellt. Sind diese Vorkehrungen noch
             Host bestellt den Arbeiter zu sich            gültig?
                                                           Bei einigen Organisationen, wo es eine formelle
Schritt 1:                                                 Abgrenzungsvereinbarung gibt, kann es sein, dass
                                                           Änderungen daran vorgenommen werden müssen. Wenden
        Meldung bei Wache/Sicherheitsdienst                Sie sich an den 4C‟s –Duty Holder zur weiteren Abklärung.
                                                                                                                           DAS 4C-SYSTEM DES MOD – HINWEISE FÜR BESUCHER UND
                                                                                                                                                  VERTRAGSPARTNER
     - Allgemeinen Einweisung in die Örtlichkeit           Wie kann ich in Erfahrung bringen, wer der Area
                                                                                                                         Ihre Sicherheit, Gesundheit und Ihr Wohlergehen am Arbeitsplatz ist
                                                           Custodian ist?
                                                                                                                         für unsere Organisation von allergrößter Bedeutung. Hier werden die
Schritt 2:                                                 Ihr Gastgeber (Host) sollte in der Lage sein, den für Ihre
                                                                                                                         Vorkehrungen erläutert, die Ihren Schutz und den von anderen, die
                    Meldung beim Host                      Tätigkeit zuständigen Area Custodian zu benennen. Bei
                                                                                                                         um Sie herum arbeiten, sicherstellen sollen. Der Anwendungsbereich
                                                           einigen Organisationen hängt das Schild "Area Custodian"
                                                                                                                         erstreckt sich gleichermaßen auf alle MOD-Mitarbeiter sowie auf
     - Genaue Informationen über Arbeit und                außen an seiner Bürotür. Wenn Sie sich nicht sicher sind,
                                                                                                                         Militärangehörige aber auch auf alle anderen Besucher. Bitte nehmen
        Arbeitsmethoden                                    wenden Sie sich an den 4C‟s Duty Holder, dessen
                                                                                                                         Sie sich einen Augenblick Zeit, um dies durchzulesen. Falls Sie
     - Bekannte Gefahrenpotentiale austauschen             Kontaktdaten unten aufgeführt sind.
                                                                                                                         weitere Fragen haben, befindet sich eine Liste der Kontaktpersonen
     (Communication)
                                                                                                                         auf der Rückseite, an die Sie sich für weitere Informationen wenden
     - Überprüfung der Gefährdungsbeurteilung              Ansprechpartner vor Ort:
                                                                                                                         können.
     - Arbeitsauftrag erforderlich (Control)               Folgende Telefonnummern sind von jedem Militärapparat aus
                                                                                                                         Um was handelt es sich bei dem 4 C System?
                                                           zu erreichen:
                                                                                                                         Wegen der Art der ihnen übertagenen Arbeiten stellen MoD-
Schritt 3:
                                                                                                                         Organisationen Besucher vor ungeahnte Gefahrenpotentiale. Viele
               Meldung beim Area Custodian                 FEUER oder SONSTIGER NOTRUF: 112 oder xxxx                    davon erfahren täglich eine Veränderung. Gleichwohl kann es sein,
                                                                                                                         dass Reparatur- und Instandhaltungsarbeiten neue, eigene Gefahren
     - Genaue Informationen über Arbeit und
                                                                                                                         birgen. Manchmal stehen sich diese beiden auch im Weg. Daher
        Arbeitsmethoden (Co-operation)                     4C‟s Duty Holder: xxxx
                                                                                                                         stützt sich ein effektives Sicherheitsmanagement auf folgende
     - Bekannte Gefahrenpotentiale vor Ort
                                                                                                                         Prinzipien:
        austauschen
                                                           [Name des FMO] Büro: xxxx                                           - Dass die Arbeit verschiedener Organisationen     koordiniert
     - Austausch von Informationen über andere
                                                           (Host für die Mehrzahl der Instandhaltungsarbeiten)                 wird (Co-ordinated)
        Aktivitäten vor Ort (Co-ordination)
                                                                                                                               - Dass verschiedene Organisationen         miteinander
     - Unterschrift im Gästebuch vornehmen
                                                           Wache: xxxx                                                         kooperieren, um zu gewährleisten,          dass die Arbeiten
                                                                                                                               sicher durchgeührt werden          (Co-operated)
                   Beginn der Arbeiten
                                                                                                                               - Dass die verschiedenen Organisationen miteinander in
                                                           Sicherheitsbeauftragter: xxxx                                       Sicherheitsangelegenheiten in      Verbindung stehen
Nach Beendigung der Arbeiten:
                                                                                                                               (Communicate)
Anmerkung: An manchen Orten, wo der Host nicht
                                                                                                                               - Dass in den Fällen, wo es einen Interessen-      konflikt gibt,
anwesend ist, müssen vielleicht Schritte 1 & 2
                                                                                                                               die Arbeit überwacht wird (Controlled), um zu gewährleisten,
umgekehrt werden
                                                                                                                               dass die jeweiligen Arbeiten auf sichere Art und Weise
                                                                                                                                  durchgeführt werden.




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Wie funktioniert das überhapt?                                  Eine    Abgenzungsvereinbarung        wurde    für  meinen         ORGANISATIONSREGELN:
Die Person, die Sie zum Gelände bestellt hat, wird als          Arbeitsbereich erstellt. Sind diese Vorkehrungen noch              Allgemeine Regeln.
Gastgeber (Host) bezeichnet. Dabei kann es sich um einen        gültig?                                                            Es darf kein Alkohol bzw, keine Drogen auf das Gelände
MOD-Mitarbeiter handeln oder um einen Vertreter einer           Bei   einigen  Organisationen,    wo    es    eine  formelle       gebracht werden.
anderen Organisation, die sich auf dem Gelände befindet.        Abgrenzungsvereinbarung gibt, kann es sein, dass Änderungen        Das Rauchen ist NICHT gestattet, außer in den dafür speziell
Diese ist verantwortlich für die Benachrichtigung der Wache     daran vorgenommen werden müssen. Wenden Sie sich an den            ausgewiesenen Bereichen.
bzw. des Sicherheitsdienstes über Ihr Kommen. Der Host ist      4C‟s –Duty Holder zur weiteren Abklärung.                          Alle Personen, die auf diesem Gelände beschäftigt sind,
außerdem verantwortlich sicher zu stellen, dass Sie Ihre                                                                           müssen einen gültigen Betriebsausweis tragen.
Arbeiten sicher verrichten können.                              Wie kann ich in Erfahrung bringen, wer der Area Custodian          Fotografieren ist nicht gestattet..
                                                                ist?                                                               Taschen, Beutel und Kisten usw. dürfen niemals
Schritt 1 - Eintreffen:                                         Ihr Gastgeber (Host) sollte in der Lage sein, den für Ihre         unbeaufsichtigt gelassen werden, ausgenommen in den dafür
Wenn Sie vor Ort angekommen sind, müssen Sie sich bei der       Tätigkeit zuständigen Area Custodian zu benennen. Bei einigen      speziell ausgewiesenen Bereichen.
Wache/dem Sciherheitsdienst anmelden, um Zugang zum             Organisationen hängt das Schild "Area Custodian" außen an          Das Betreten folgender Stätten ist nur in Begleitung gestattet:
Gelände zu erlangen. Hier erhalten Sie eine allgemeine          seiner Bürotür. Wenn Sie sich nicht sicher sind, wenden Sie sich
Einweisung       über   die gesamten  Sicherheits-   und        an den 4C‟s Duty Holder, dessen Kontaktdaten unten
Schutzvorkehrungen vor Ort (Evakuierungsmaßnahmen bei           aufgeführt sind.                                                   Arbeitsaufträge:
Feuer, Geschwindig-keitsbegrenzungen, Gebrauch von                                                                                 Ein Arbeitsauftrag MUSS erteilt werden, ehe folgende
Kameras, Mobil-telefonen usw.).                                 Ansprechpartner vor Ort:                                           Aktivitäten durchgeführt werden dürfen:
                                                                Folgende Telefonnummern sind von jedem Militärapparat aus zu       Ausgrabungsarbeiten, Hitzearbeiten, Elektroarbeiten, Arbeiten
Schritt 2 – Anmeldung beim Host:                                erreichen:                                                         an Tank- oder Heizungsanlagen bzw. anderen Drucksystemen;
Sobald Sie Zugang zur Einrichtung erlangt haben, sollten Sie                                                                       Arbeiten in großer Höhe, Arbeiten im Schacht oder beengten
sich bei Ihrem Host anmelden. Dieser wird mit Ihnen die         FEUER oder SONSTIGER NOTRUF: 112 oder xxxx                         Räumen (weitere Einzelheiten bei Ihrem Host erhältlich).
Einzelheiten    die von Ihnen zu verrichtenden Arbeiten
besprechen sowie die von Ihnen angewandte Arbeitsmethode.                                                                          Fahrzeug- und Straßenverkehrsregeln:
Es kann sein, dass er dafür einen Einblick in Ihre              4C‟s Duty Holder: xxxx                                             Die Geschwindigkeitsbeschränkung in        dieser   Einrichtung
Gefährdungsbeurteilung erlangen muss. Der Host wird Ihnen                                                                          beträgt XX Stundenkilometer
auch sagen, ob Sie für Ihre Tätigkeit einen Arbeitsauftrag
(Permit to Work) benötigen.                                     [Name des FMO] Büro: xxxx                                          Militärkolonnen haben IIMMER Vorrang
                                                                (Host für die Mehrzahl der Instandhaltungsarbeiten)
Schritt 3 – Melden beim Area Custodian:                                                                                            Das Parken ist nur in den ausgewiesenen Bereichen gestattet.
Jedes Gebäude oder jeder Bereich dieser Einrichtung steht       Wache: xxxx                                                        Auf den Rasenflächen ist es nicht gestattet.
unter der Obhut eines Area Custodian. Dabei kann es sich
auch gleichzeitig um Ihren Host handeln oder auch nicht.. Er    Sicherheitsbeauftragter: xxxx                                      Rückwärts fahrende Lieferfahrzeuge müssen eingewiesen
ist verantwortlich für die Koordinierung der täglichen                                                                             werden.
Aktivitäten in allen Organisationsbereichen. Er wird Sie über
ganz besondere Gefahren in seinem Bereich informieren und
über alle anderen, in der Organisation gleichzeitig
stattfindenden Aktivitäten. Er muss auch wissen, welche
Arbeiten Sie durchführen werden, um sicher zu stellen, dass
sie nicht mit anderen Arbeiten in Konflikt stehen. Sie müssen
sich auch in das Gästebuch eintragen. Erst nachdem dies
geklärt ist, dürfen Sie mit Ihren Arbeiten beginnen.
Ein Ablaufplan, auf dem der Vorgang beschrieben ist, befindet
sich auf der Rückseite.




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                                                                                                      Leaflet 4

                                                                          Annex I – General Guidance Notes

GENERAL GUIDANCE NOTES

ACs, 4CDHs and other unit key personnel dealing with visiting workers, contractors and other visitors are to:

1.    Work within the requirements of this Leaflet.

2.    Seek specialist advice, from their USA, GHSWA, Garrison SHEF FP or DE-FM as appropriate, where
they are uncertain or do not possess the competence to make valid judgements relating to a particular
aspect of a work task or situation.

3.     Ensure that any visiting workers, contractors or other visitors accessing BFG sites have been pre-
notified by the host or visiting worker/contractor directly and that in every case they contact the AC or 4CDH
where appropriate on arrival at the place of work within the site. Guardrooms to be informed where
necessary.

4.    Not operate outside of their area of competence/expertise in relation to the safety of visiting workers,
contractors or other visitors.

5.     Not be pressurised into allowing work to take place where there are any doubts over safe working
practices and the competency of the visiting workers, contractors or other visitors.

6.     Not sign any documents, invoices, delivery notes, permits to work or any other documentation, unless
fully authorized and competent to do so. If in doubt always, seek advice.

7.     Continually review the arrangements for the management and control of visiting workers, contractors
or other visitors to ensure, to the best of your knowledge, that they are effective.

8.   Never assume that contractors will follow „Safe Systems of Work‟ and/or safe working practices i.e.
Method Statements and Permits to Work. If something looks unsafe, it may well be the case.

9.    In cases of serious concern, do not be afraid to stop a job immediately if it appears that people or
property may be in imminent serious danger because of unsafe work practices. In all other cases where it is
suspected or appears that unsafe working practices are being carried out, seek advice immediately.




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                                                                                                                        Leaflet 4


                                                                            Annex J – 4Cs Communications Process


4CS COMMUNICATION PROCESS


                Suppliers (Hosts)                           Customers
                                                    G4 Estate Requirements
                                                    Manager
                                                                                                           Customers (Bks A)

                                                                                                           AC1 AC       AC
                                                    AC1            AC2        AC etc                           2        etc

           PM        FM/       DEL                                                                               4CDH
                     GWA       GCA
                               & other
                               Contr.                                                                         Lodger ACs
                                                                4CDH
                                                                                                           Customers (Bks B)

                                                                                                           AC1    AC     AC
                                                                                                                  2      etc

                   Lodgers (HQ)                               Lodger ACs
                                                                                                                 4CDH
          NAAFI         DLO     DTE(G)             NAAFI             DLO        DTE(G)
                                                                                                              Lodger ACs
          SCE         ISS(G)      Others           SCE            ISS(G)         Others




 LEGEND:

 FM = Facility Manager.                    ------------------------ = Passage / Exchange of Information.
 PM = Project Manager
 AC = Area Custodian                                         = Chain of Command or Direction.
 4CDH = 4 C‟s Duty Holder




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                                                                                                       Leaflet 4


                                                                                 Annex K – Hazard Registers
HAZARD REGISTERS

1.    Hazard Registers, which are pivotal in enabling the communication of hazards and control measures,
are registers, which summarise known hazards that might present a significant risk to visiting workers or
contractors. They assist the host, AC and 4CDH by highlighting identified hazards and risks within an area or
the Establishment as a whole for any visiting workers or contractors.

2.     Each defined 4C Area must have its own Area Hazard Register, which must be collated,
communicated, reviewed, kept up to date and held by the AC. The general and site risk assessments that
underpin the Register‟s information should be completed in conjunction with competent personnel able to
identify and assess the risks of the site hazards presented. This may include technical staff from DE(E), their
main contractors or others.

3.     The Establishment Hazard Register is the compilation of all Area Hazard Registers. The 4CDH uses
this central record of all hazards to determine and record the Establishment‟s significant risks. All visiting
workers, contractors and other visitors must be briefed on the hazards, risks and controls, have access to the
Registers, and be provided with copies as necessary.

4.    Hazard Registers must be reviewed regularly (at least annually) and amended if any details change.
The amended Register must be passed to the 4CDH, and used to update the current records. Hazard
Registers are required for all buildings including empty ones.

5.     The Hazard Register is a controlled document. It must be marked with date and version number and
only the latest version should be in circulation. Where the Registers are held in electronic format, the 4CDH
must ensure suitable access and revision arrangements.

6.     Examples of Best Practice elsewhere in MOD have proven the advantages of prominently displaying a
simple record of the hazards beside the entrance door to each Area, for the information of all workers and
visitors. In multi-storey buildings, the record should be on each floor if the hazards or owners are different.

7.     The information displayed should include existing risk assessments, AC contact details and any
specific health and safety notice, eg potential access problems, electrical isolations, permits to dig or working
in confined spaces.

8.    A sample of the alerting notice on blue card is at Appendix 1 and an example of information to be
displayed is at Appendix 2

9.     Copies of the Register must be made available to potential visiting workers, contractors and other
visitors by the AC at the place where the work is to take place.

Appendices:

1.    Safety Notice to all Visiting Workers, Contractors and Others.
2.    4Cs Area Hazard Register.
3.    Hazard Classification List.




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                                                                                                   Leaflet 4
                                                                                                     aflet 4

                                                     Annex K – Appendix 1 - Notice to Contractors & Visitors



          SAFETY NOTICE /SICHERHEITSINFORMATION
     TO ALL VISITING WORKERS, CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS
         FÜR ALLE BESUCHER, VERTRAGSFIRMEN USW.
                       All contractors and visiting workers must receive a safety briefing before
                     undertaking work in this area/building which is named/numbered/located at:
      Alle Besucher und Mitarbeiter von Vertragsfirmen müssen eine Sicherheitsunterweisung erhalten bevor
     sie Arbeiten in diesem Gebäude/der Bereich ausführen. Das Gebäude/der Bereich hat die Bezeichnung:




          Name of Area Custodian/                                 Name of 4C Duty Holder/
           Name der zuständigen                                  Name der Verantwortlichen
            für den Bereich (AC):                                 für den Bereich (4CDH):




           Location and Tel No/                                   Location and Tel No/
             Ort und Tel.- Nr.                                      Ort und Tel.- Nr.




                The nearest Telephone to this notice is located/
                       Das nächste Tel befindet sich:



                A copy of the Hazard Register is posted next to this sign/
            Eine Kopie der Gefahrenliste ist neben diesem Schild ausgehängt

           Further copies are available from the 4Cs Area Custodian or 4CDH/
                   Weitere Kopien sind bei der AC oder DH erhältlich.


Issue Version ______________ dated.

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                                                                                                     Leaflet 4


                                       Annex K – Appendix 2 - Typical Example of 4Cs Area Hazard Register

4Cs – AREA HAZARD REGISTER FOR AREA: ……………………AT: …….……….BARRACKS

  Authority          Asset No.           Area Custodian (AC)          Deputy AC             4C Duty Holder
 Commander        9/007                 Name : Richard Reade    Name: Jane Smith         Name : John Brown
 …..Garrison      Main HQ               Tel : 12345             Tel: 54321               Tel : 22955
                                                                                         Deputy : Danny Dan
                                                                                         Tel : 12568
Date prepared        Last revised            Last reviewed      Date received by the     Issue No. Page No.
  24. 10.07                                                     4CDH – 24.10.07               1       1 of 3


Ref   Location    Activity or Fixed     Hazard       Risk       Precautions required     Remarks (e.g. access
                  Asset – brief         Class        assess     by visiting workers      requirement/equipme
                  description                        held by    (e.g. permits to work)   nt, risk to other
                                                                                         areas)
                  Fixed                                                                  Access to roof 4m
      Through     Electrical            ELECT        AC         Refer to drawings        above loading area,
01    out         Infrastructure &      WSD                     and RA held by AC        needs access
                  Water Supply          ASB                                              equipment not
                                                                                         supplied by MOD
                  Fixed                 ACCESS       AC         Refer to RA              No fixed access
02    In Store    High level static     ASSIST                                           equipment provided
      Roof        water tank            HEIGHT
      Space                             CONF
                                        WATER
                  Fixed                 PRESS        AC         Refer to RA. Permit      Seek DE(E) FM
03    Boiler      Boiler                ELECT                   to work required from    Authorised Person
      Room                              FIRE                    AP in compliance         who holds & issues
                                        NOISE                   with DE SSW              PTW.
                                        HEAT                    procedures (SR&P)
      Ceiling     Fixed                 ASB          AC         No work on tiles         Asbestos Register
04    tiles       Asbestos Tiles        CANCER                  without strict           held by DE(E) FM.
      Room                              DUST                    compliance with          Seek advice from
      2B                                                        DE(E) SSW                DE(E) regarding
                                                                procedures.              compliance with
                                                                Refer to Asbestos        SSW.
                                                                Register
                  Activity              HAZCHE       Store A    Comply with access       DSEAR assessment
05    Store A     Handling/contac       M            Manager    controls. Refer to       to be completed by a
                  t with various        EXPL         & AC       COSHH Assessment         competent person.
                  chemicals-            FIRE                    and DSEAR                Consult with Gar, Pet
                  nature &                                      assessment.              Insp and DE experts.
                  quantity varies
                  Activity              VEH          MT         Refer to RA
06    MT Park     Forklift trucks in    IMPACT       Manager
                  operation                          & AC

                 UNLESS PROVEN OTHERWISE ASSUME THE PRESENCE OF ASBESTOS




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TRANSIENT/OCCASIONAL VISITING WORKERS

Items 1& 2. Below cover known miscellaneous visiting workers in an area (NOT works contractors) who may
arrive unannounced/out of working hours, and who do not need to receive an Induction from the AC on each
visit:

1.    The following people require only a standard establishment briefing by the host prior to arrival or by
the AC on arrival at the place of work within the site: i) Delivery personnel ii) Personnel attending
meetings etc.

2.      The following people require additional briefing/induction (generally once only, except where
changes occur):

Visitor Type              When visits possible           Induction/briefing required
Cleaners                  Daily except Sunday            Initially by Host or by AC. But by AC where change
                                                         occurs
Refuse Collectors         Daily                          Stadt contractors to be given local update by the
                                                         relevant AC where necessary at the place of work.




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                                                                                                Leaflet 4


                                                             Annex K – Appendix 3 - Hazard Classification

HAZARD CLASSIFICATION

Abbreviation                                     ACTIVITY BASED
CONF            Confined spaces
EXCAV           Excavation work
VOIDS           Unguarded voids and openings in floors and structures
HEIGHT          Working at heights (over 2m)
FRAG            Access to or work on Fragile roofs
ACCESS          Hazards associated with accessing work area
VEH             Moving vehicles, pedestrian interface
WATER           Working in or over water or other liquids (not including diving)
DIVE            Under-water diving
LIFT            Lifting operations
MAN             Manual handling
ULD             Upper limb disorders
IMPACT          Collision with moving objects
SLIP            Slippery surfaces
FALL            Falling objects
TRIP            Tripping
HEAT            High air temperatures, hot surfaces
COLD            Low air temperatures, wind chill, cold surfaces
VIB             Vibration
VISB            Restricted visibility
OTHER
TRESP           Trespassers
OTHER           Please describe
ASSIST          All visitors to be accompanied
PLANT & EQUIPMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE
M/C             Machinery with exposed moving parts
PRESS           Med. to high pressure containers and/or systems. Compressed air and gasses
TOOLS           Hand tools, power tools
SCAF/LAD        Scaffolding and Ladders
ELECT           Electrical
FIRE            Including risk of spontaneous combustion
GAS             Gas installations
WS&D            Water supply and drainage
COMM            Communications equipment




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ENVIRONMENT
NOISE          Noise
LIGHT          Inadequate lighting
VENT           Ventilation
WEATH          Adverse weather (including flooding)
(See Activity Based Hazard Class for heat/cold, trips/slips/falls & atmospheric pollution)
ARTICLES & SUBSTANCES
HAZCHEM        Chemical
BIO            Biological agents
ASB            Asbestos
DUST           Respirable and inhalable dusts - May require DSEAR assessment
CANCER         Carcinogens
ION            Ionising radiation
NONION         Non-ionising radiation
COM            Combustible/flammable materials
POL            Petroleum Oil and Lubricants – May require DSEAR assessment
EXPL           Explosive materials - May require DSEAR assessment




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                                                                                                        Leaflet 4


                                                                                          Annex L – Glossary

GLOSSARY

Title                 Definition                                                                   Abbreviation

4 Cs                  A MOD safety management system designed to ensure Co-operation,
                      Communication, Co-ordination, and Control between all parties
                      involved at a shared workplace, for the management of the health and
                      safety of visiting workers, contractors and visitors.

4 Cs Duty Holder      The competent person appointed by a CO/HoE to manage the site                4 CDH
                      Safety Management System. This title must be used and may not be
                      renamed locally.
4 Cs Area             A sub-division of an Establishment conveniently designated for 4 Cs
                      management purposes. Can be based on geographic boundaries or by
                      asset type. Managed by AC.
Area Custodian        The person, conversant with hazards in his area, who is appointed to         AC
                      compile and manage the hazard register for a defined area of
                      responsibility, and to liaise with visiting workers and contractors. See
                      4Cs Area above. This title may be renamed locally, eg Building
                      Manager, whilst retaining this meaning.
Area Hazard           A concise summary of the significant hazards in a 4Cs Area, together
Register              with control measures and precautions required.
Authorised Person     The Authorised Person is a suitably trained and experienced individual       AP
                      formally appointed to act as the subject matter expert in high-risk
                      activities when specific authorisation is required in accordance with
                      MOD Safety Rules & Procedures.
Commanding            Person appointed by the Chain of Command to be responsible for               CO
Officer               Garrison / Station / Barracks / Establishment / Unit. See also HoE.

Contractor            Any organisation engaged through a contract to undertake services on
                      behalf of the MOD.
Defence Estates       Defence Estates (Europe)                                                     DE(E)
(Germany)
Defence Training
Estate (Germany)      Defence Training Estate (Germany)                                            DTE(G)

Defence Estates       The local representative of Defence Estates (Europe) with                    DE(E) FM
(Europe) Facility     responsibility for the defined site.
Manager
DSEAR                 Dangerous substances and explosive atmosphere regulations. Risk              DSEAR
                      assessment required under these regs will be completed by competent
                      person; normally by a contractor on behalf of Defence Estates. Units
                      will be given specific guidance by subject matter experts.
Duty Holder           A competent person formally appointed with specific 4Cs                      DH
                      responsibilities.
Establishment         The collation of all Area Hazard Registers into one document by the
Hazard Register       4CDH. Copies held in the Guardroom and at the briefing point.
Facilities Manager    A DE(E) Head of Facilities Management for a given site or area with          FM
                      responsibility for works, either carried out by DE(E) Staff or contractors
                      arranged through the GCA
Focal Point           SHEF FP: Person responsible for advising and monitoring on subject           FP
                      matter at HQ level.

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                        Other FPs: Persons responsible within an area or facility under the
                        control of the AC (ie building occupant LM or supervisor).
Hazard                  Something with potential to cause harm. This can include articles,
                        substances, plant and machinery, methods of work etc.
Risk
                        Risk is the combination of the likelihood of potential harm from the
                        hazard being realised and the potential severity of the harm should it
                        do so. The population, which might be affected, should also be
                        considered.
Head of                 Person appointed by the Chain of Command to be responsible for                  HoE
Establishment           Garrison / Station / Barracks / Establishment / Unit. See also CO.

Health and Safety       Generic title, encompassing the health, safety and welfare of                   H&S
                        employees and others.
Host                    Any authorised MOD manager, or their representative, who requests a
                        visiting workers, contractors or other visitors to carry out activities at an
                        Establishment. The Host is the sponsor of a work or visit activity: all
                        visiting workers, contractors and visitors will have an identifiable Host.
German                  The Host Nation government agency responsible for the management                GCA
Construction            of contracted out construction works in response to orders placed by
Administration          DE(E). In North Rhine Wetstfalia this is the Bau und Liegenschafts              BLB
                        Betrieb (BLB). In Lower Saxony it is the Städtisches Bau Amt (SBA).             SBA

Safety, Health,         A generic title encompassing the management of those areas.                     SHEF
Environment and
Fire
Site Specific Risk      Risk Assessments produced by the Visiting Workers, Contractors or
Assessment              other visitors that take into account the hazards and risks of the local
                        4C Area, in addition to the intended activity / operation hazards and
                        risks.

Transient/              Workers whose activities present a trivial risk, and who do not need an
Occasional              induction briefing from the AC each time they visit a 4Cs area but they
Visiting Worker         must advise the AC on their arrival eg. delivery drivers, cleaners.
Unit Safety             Each unit is mandated to have one officer with the additional role of           USA
Advisor                 advising the CO on H&S; this is normally the QM. The post holder must
                        attend the USA course at Deepcut, or the similar courses at Arborfield
                        and Sennelager before assuming the appointment or as soon as
                        possible thereafter.
SHEF Warden             A locally employed civilian with competencies to assist Unit SHEF staff
                        such as the USA, UFO, Environmental Officer and others in the
                        discharge of their duties.
Visiting Worker         Any person who works outside their normal place of work: this includes
                        other MOD personnel eg troops under training.
Visitor                 Any person who visits a military establishment. This can include: staff
                        officers; inspectors and auditors; sports teams; mess guests; and
                        families.
Works Order             The order raised by the Host for works to be completed.
Site Risk               Usually complied by the USA in conjunction with the DE(E) technical             USA
Assessments             representative. The assessment covers the significant hazards and               DE(E)
                        risks relating to the general areas throughout the Unit/Establishment.
                        This assessment is valuable to inform Area and Establishment Hazard
                        Registers. See the BFG SHEF Manual Part 2, Chapter 2, Leaflet 30.
Army Incident           This is the Army accident and incident reporting procedure, which is            AINC
Notification Cell       clearly explained in the BFG SHEF Manual Part 2, Chapter 2, Leaflets
(AINC)                  1 & 2.




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Leaflet 5 – H&S Management of Events Held on Estate Controlled or Used by BFG

             H&S MANAGEMENT OF EVENTS HELD ON ESTATE CONTROLLED OR USED BY BFG

References:

A.     Allgemeine Arbeitssicherheits-Vorschriften.
B.     Betriebssicherheitsverordnung.
C.     JSP 375 Volume 2 Leaflet 57.
D.     2009DIN06-010
E.     SOBAG 2112.

Introduction

1.       Many units or organisations will wish to run events in the form of fun days, fetes, open days or shows
where staff can be involved in activities outside their normal work discipline and which they may be
unfamiliar. Such activities, whilst inevitably intended to be fun and enjoyable will also require sound
management of all H&S related issues. Failure to provide adequate H&S protection could result in the
personnel responsible being criminally liable in the event of a breach of legislation, H&S or otherwise. Civil
litigation may also be instigated by any person involved should a loss or injury occur and it is proven that the
unit has failed in its duty of care. The unit needs therefore to manage the H&S risks associated with these
types of events in exactly the same way H&S is managed in the workplace.

2.     This Leaflet is concerned with the principles of H&S Management for events held at any premises
provided by the German Authorities for use by the British Forces Germany. This includes barracks, SFA
areas, schools as well as training areas. Reference C has been introduced to assist Commanding Officers
and Heads of Establishment in planning such activities. That document, together with other reference
documents and any others as may be issued by HQ UKSC or Garrisons are to be read in conjunction with
this Leaflet to ensure that all engaged in such activities are fully aware of, and discharge their various
responsibilities.

Duties of Commanding Officers and Heads of Establishment.

3.     Commanding Officers and Heads of Establishment are responsible for the day-to-day administration of
the organisation and arrangements for the safety of the event. They are required to ensure that their unit or
organisation has adequate and timely arrangements in place for the management of H&S at any event held
on premises under their control or authority.

4.    Commanding Officers and Heads of Establishment are to give their personal attention and direction to
the management of such events. They shall make sure that any arrangements established are carefully
monitored and reviewed as necessary.

5.   The Commanding Officer/Head of Establishment is always to appoint, officially and in writing, a
         9
competent person to be the event organiser.
                                      10
Duties for Event Organiser

6. The duties for health and safety management are to be clearly articulated in the written Terms of
Reference for the Event Organiser who is appointed officially in writing by the CO/HoE.

7. The Event Organiser must have full executive authority to impose conditions on the operators of
attractions, activities and services or to close them as necessary if there is a health and safety issue. It is
MOD policy that this authority may be delegated, in writing, to the appointed competent official with the lead
for health and safety for the event. This may involve appointing specialists to provide advice to the health
and safety lead for activities which have a technical requirement beyond their expertise.

9
    See Para 35 for definition of competence.
10
     Extracted from Ref D and modified for application in BFG.

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8. Key to event safety is the production of suitable and sufficient risk assessments. Whilst the Event
organiser may not have the competence to produce these, he or she is to ensure that they are produced by
competent persons. Where there are a number of high risk activities, the Event Organiser may consider
appointing more than one competent person with health and safety duties e.g. one dealing with routine
issues (food safety, trip hazards etc) and one or more to deal with higher risk activities.

9. The Event Organiser shall ensure that, as part of the initial event planning, a health and safety plan is
produced. This plan shall contain all documentation relevant to the attractions, activities and services
involved, including: risk assessments, including those for the purchase or hiring of equipment and its design
(fit for purpose); adequate insurance cover of third parties; proof of serviceability; competence of operators;
weather condition limitations etc. If insurance cover is ambiguous or unclear, the event organiser shall
confirm the suitability of the cover by contacting, in the first instance, the Area Claims Officer NEW located at
HQ UKSC.

10. The Event Organiser must ensure the allocation of real estate is sufficient to cover the erection of
tentage, complete with storm straps, regardless of predicted weather forecast. The potential of trip hazards
must also be taken into consideration at this stage. The layout must ensure that all areas can be accessed
by the emergency services.

11. The Event Organiser must ensure that equipment that is subject to a statutory inspection regime is
proven compliant (with UK or host nation, whichever is the most stringent) e.g. fairground equipment. Such
equipment must be set up in accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions, and must not be used until written
proof of serviceability and conformity has been provided by the owner/ supplier.

12. All officials actively involved in the running of the event must have clearly defined terms of reference
and be competent to undertake those duties. No official is to leave on the day or be diverted from their duties
during the event without the written authorisation of the Event Organiser, so that those duties can be re-
allocated and recorded.

13. The relevant Senior Liaison Officer shall be consulted to ensure that attractions, activities and services
conform to relevant host country regulations, e.g. where an inspection requirement may be more rigorous
than that which applies in the UK (e.g. TÜV/DEKRA inspections on spectator stands and fairground
equipment in Germany).

14. The Event Organiser must ensure that emergency procedures are in place and, where appropriate,
tested in advance of the event. The Event Organiser must also ensure that all officials are proficient in these
procedures and, where appropriate, the formation of an Incident Control Point shall be considered in order to
manage any emergency situation.

15. Safety planning and arrangements, including risk assessments, must be formally reviewed by the Event
Organiser and, where practicable, verified independently by the CO/HoE prior to the event taking place.

16. The Event Organiser must ensure that all attractions, activities and services are set up in accordance
with the manufacturer‟s guidelines and operated in a safe manner. Where appropriate a full demonstration of
set up and operation of the attractions, activities or services may be required before final authority is given to
operate.

17. The Event Organiser must ensure that prior to and during the event adequate information is provided to
event officials, operators of attractions, activities or services and the public, on any change of circumstance
or environmental conditions (e.g. adverse weather), that may adversely affect health or safety, together with
advice on appropriate actions.

18. A post event report must be completed by the Event Organiser for every event and forwarded to the
CO/HoE and any interested parties.

19. The Event Organiser shall ensure that contractors prepare and produce suitable and sufficient risk
assessments relating to their activities within the event including ensuring that it meets the requirements of



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the organisers risk assessments and/or other relevant assessments to prevent any conflicts that may result
in the risk of injury or damage to any party involved. See also Part 2, Leaflet 4 of this Manual.

20. Where a planned or intended activity cannot prove compliance with current H&S legislation or
procedures, or the risks involved in that event can not be eliminated or adequately controlled, then it is not to
take place. In accordance with Reference C, organisers are to consult with the appropriate specialists or
competent persons in respect of legislation, policy and procedures including the carrying out of risk
assessments.

FURTHER GUIDANCE FOR EVENT ORGANISERS/THOSE INVOLVED WITH EVENTS

Risk assessment

21. Risk assessment is a fundamental requirement to ensure the event is adequately controlled. The
objective of a proper risk assessment is not to spoil or stop an activity but to ensure that the hazards have
been properly identified and suitable and sufficient risk management measures put in place. In some
circumstances where risk cannot be contained of managed then this might require stopping or not permitting
an event. Normally most activities can be adequately controlled in order to provide safe enjoyment.

22. When identifying the hazards in the event and evaluation of the risks, a consultative approach with
those involved is essential. Preliminary surveys and/or inspections are an essential means of identifying
potential hazards and risks and any safety concerns should be identified at this stage. Specialists such as
the Unit Safety Adviser, Environmental Protection Officer, Fire Officer and Security Officer must be involved
in the arrangements at an early stage to ensure that the proposed event is viable and safe. Additional
advice from safety professionals, such as the Garrison HSWE should be sought as necessary.

23. The risk assessment is to identify those who may most vulnerable such as staff and their families,
performers, spectators, those with special needs, disabled (including those with hearing or sight impairment)
etc. and those who assemble or clear away the events. In Germany, those who have a limited command of
the English language and are thus less able to understand instructions may also be considered to be
vulnerable. Arrangements must therefore be made to provide adequate provision for such persons to
remove or minimise the risk so far as is reasonably practicable.

24. Leaflets 26 and 30 of this chapter provide guidance on appropriate risk assessment. The hazards
involved with an event can often be significant and as stated above organisers should always seek the
assistance of unit or garrison specialists, competent in identifying hazards, evaluating risks and making
adequate recommendations for necessary control measures. The findings of the risk assessments are to be
documented in accordance with Leaflets 26 and 30. During the preparations for the event, those responsible
for managing it must be involved in, and informed of the findings of all risk assessments, to allow them to
make informed decisions on ways to help minimise the risks. As the event approaches, or even when it is in
progress, circumstances may change and organisers must be made aware that it may be necessary for them
to revisit and review risk assessments that have already been completed. In any case, no activities should
take place unless they have been adequately risk assessed and appropriate control measures implemented
as required. It is thus essential to keep the risk assessment in mind until the activity to which is relates has
been finally concluded.

25. Some event activities may need an element of risk to prove attractive, in which case the issue relates
more to reducing the risk to the lowest possible level. The general application and objective of H&S
measures is not to stop events but to adequately control the risk of harm. The management and control of
events will vary from occasion to occasion. By having core principles and policies in place the organisers can
then adapt them as and when required for each particular event to ensure that the H&S of those involved is
secure at all times.

Competent contractors

26. For any event, if a facility or service provider is to be contracted, the unit is to establish the
competence of the provider and appropriateness of the facility to ensure, in so far as is reasonably
practicable, the H&S of those involved including members of the public.



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 27. German law makes it obligatory for fairground type equipment and equipment such as spectator
 stands to be inspected by a competent authority (i.e.TÜV or DEKRA etc). Details are to be annotated within
 the equipment logbook (Baubuch) with any faults and condition of the equipment, before the use of such
 equipment may be offered to the public. The organiser‟s Unit Safety Adviser must insist on being shown the
 inspection certificates before allowing the operator to do business; no certificate equals no permission. If
 clarification or advice is required on documentation, then the GHSWE is to be consulted. This also applies to
 insurance certificates.

 28. In order to be suitably assured of a contractor‟s competence during the vetting process, see the
 References and, as a minimum, ask the following questions and seek positive evidence:

           a.    Is the operator or facility part of an acknowledged trade association?

           b. Is there employers and public liability insurance at the appropriate level and inclusive of the type
           of activity offered? (See paragraph 30 below).

           c.    Is there experience in dealing with this type of activities and in a military environment?

           d.    Is there documented evidence of training inspection procedures?

           e.    What is the operator‟s accident and insurance claim history?

29.    Unless satisfactory answers are received then very careful consideration should be given as to the
suitability of selecting that particular contractor, noting that the provision of insurance is mandatory. Where
there is any doubt, then the operator is to be excluded.

Insurance and indemnity

30.        MOD does not carry any liability insurance at all and costs of claims against their core Defence
business are met from the MOD budget. It is therefore mandatory for event organisers to take out public
liability insurance against possible claims for negligence and also to ensure that indemnity arrangements have
been made as appropriate. It is also mandatory for organisers to ensure that stall holders and attraction
organisers are properly insured and have signed a written form of indemnity agreeing to reimburse BFG for
any compensation which BFG might have to make in connection with the stall holders or attraction organisers
use of the estates.

31.     Any contractor‟s, stall holders or others vehicles, machines or item of plant are to have an appropriate
insurance covering their use from preparation through to site clearance where applicable. In the case of motor
vehicles/prime movers, third party insurance must be held.

32.     Suitable indemnity clauses should be included in the insurance documentation of stallholders and
event organisers. A suggested format is shown at Annex A to this Leaflet, in English and at Annex B in
German. More detailed guidance can be found at Reference E and further advice should be sought from the
Area Claims Officer NWE, BFPO 140.

Planning Meetings and Specialist Advice

33.      Planned committee meetings must take place prior to the event and formal written records produced
and retained. Responsibility and accountability for all tasks from each meeting must be clearly defined and any
actions assigned must be carefully monitored at all stages. Unit qualified personnel such as the USA, fire
officer, environmental officer, security officer, medical officer and others should form part of the event standing
committee. In addition specialist advice from Garrison HQ, such as that from the DF&RS Assistant Divisional
Officer and the GHSWE is always to be sought at the earliest stage of planning. In order to ensure that
                 11
considerations for DEL employees are also taken into account, the OC GLSU is to be engaged in the
planning process. These specialists, along with the event management committee, should inspect the
activities for any safety or other concerns immediately prior to it being opened to the public. All significant
safety concerns are to be formally registered and acted upon where appropriate.


 11
      See advice at Part 1 Chapter 4 of this Manual

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Notification of Event to German Emergency Authorities

34.     It is a requirement of German law and hence BFG policy that all events, including those to which the
general public is not invited, must be notified to the Emergency Authorities if they involve more than 200
people. Events attracting more than 5,000 people will be attended throughout by on site German Emergency
Authorities. Full details of the procedures are to be obtained from Service Liaison Officers who are always to
be consulted where the public is involved or numbers in any case exceed 200 at any event. It follows that
garrison HQ is always to be notified of such events.

Competency

35.      All personnel that organise events should be competent to do so. They should have knowledge of the
site area and an ability to make sound judgement, reach informed decisions and have the authority to
implement appropriate control measures. This competency may best be defined as a combination of practical
knowledge, skills, training, experience and personal qualities including the ability to recognise the extent and
limitation of one's own competency by seeking further advice/guidance as necessary. Other specialists should
be used as and when required. In some activities more detailed competency will be required, reinforced by an
attendance on an appropriate training course.

Records

36.     Records of all event meetings and associated documents are to be kept for 3 years. This includes any
findings and recommendations identified as a result of a pre-opening inspection and the findings of any post
event reports or investigations. Event risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be
destroyed on review but held in case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident.




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                                                                                                       Leaflet 5

                                                                      Annex A - Waiver and Indemnity Form


         ………………………………..….[ Insert Event details here]…………..……………………..…..

                                        WAIVER AND INDEMNITY FORM

TO BE RETURNED TO THE [ORGANISER] PRIOR TO COMMENCEMENT OF EVENT

To:    The Secretary of State for Defence

1.     In consideration of being permitted to trade or exhibit at [EVENT]


I, (full name)


on behalf of (Company or Business)

hereby declare that the Company/Business will make no claim on behalf of itself or any of its employees or
agents against (EVENT) or the Ministry of Defence of the United Kingdom (“the MOD”) arising from, or in any
way connected with , the presence of the Company/Business at the (EVENT); and that the
Company/Business will indemnify and keep indemnified (EVENT) and the MOD from and against all claims,
to the extent permissible by law, including but not limited to claims for personal injury or death caused by any
person, arising out of the presence of the Company/Business at the (EVENT) and the sale of goods and/or
the supply of services by the Company/Business at the (EVENT).

2.    Further, I understand that it is a condition of my permission to trade or exhibit at the (EVENT) that I
take out insurance to cover the indemnities detailed above, and confirm that such insurance is in place.




Signature                        Date

(Authorised to sign on behalf of the Company)




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                                                                                              Leaflet 5

                                                  Annex B - Verszichts-Und Haftungsfreistellungserkl



                     VERSZICHTS- UND HAFTUNGSFREISTELLUNGSERKLÄRUNG

BITTE IM SEKRETARIAT ABGEBEN

An das Verteidigungsministerium des Vereinigten Königreichs

1.     Zur Erteilung der Genehmigung, am (VERANSTALTUNG), als Händler oder Aussteller teilzunehmen,
erkläre

Ich, (voller Name) …………………………………………………………………………………

handelnd als Vertreter von (Firma oder Geschäftsbetrieb) ……………………………………

dass die Firma/der Geschäftsbetrieb weder im eigenen Namen noch im Namen eines ihrer/seiner
Beschäftigten oder Vertreter Ansprüche gegen den/die (VERANSTALTER(IN)) oder das
Verteidigungsministerium des Vereinigten Königreichs (kurz: “MOD”) aus oder in Zusammenhang mit der
Teilnahme der Firma/des Geschäftsbetriebes bei dem (VERANSTALTUNG) geltend machen wird; dass die
Firma/der Geschäftsbetrieb den/die (VERANSTALTER(IN)) und das MOD von sämtlichen Ansprüchen aus
und in Zusammenhang mit der Teilnahme der Firma/des Geschäftsbetriebes bei dem (VERANSTALTUNG)
sowie bei dem Verkauf von Waren und/oder die Bereitstellung von Dienstleistungen durch die Firma/den
Geschäftsbetrieb auf dem (VERANSTALTUNG) umfassend freistellen und freihalten wird, und zwar – soweit
gesetzlich zulässig – unter Einschluss sämtlicher Ansprüche wegen Körperverletzung oder Tod irgendeiner
Person.

2.    Ich habe außerdem zur Kenntnis genommen, dass die Genehmigung meiner/unserer Betätigung als
Händler oder Aussteller auf dem (VERANSTALTUNG) unter der Beteiligung steht, dass ich/wir die
vorbezeichneten Haftungsrisiken in ausreichendem Umfang versichern, und bestätige, dass solche
Versicherungsdeckung besteht.



Unterschrift: ………………………………………….……………….

Datum …………………………………………………………………




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Leaflet 6 - Electricity and Electrical Equipment

                              ELECTRICITY AND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

References:

A. JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 12.
B. Unfallverhütungsvorschrift BGV A3 für Elektrische Anlagen und
   Betriebsmittel.
C. New Norm (Standard) VDE 0702.

Introduction

1. Electricity, when properly controlled and used, is a safe and efficient form of energy. However if
electricity is misused it can be dangerous causing serious harm to people and equipment. Consequently,
those who work with or manage electrical installations and/or equipment shall comply with the stringent
requirements of References A and B.

2. Excluded from this Chapter is fixed electrical equipment already maintained in accordance with an
approved formal scheduled procedure (i.e. DE Safety Rules and Procedures 01). Employees working with
this equipment will comply with formal safe systems of work.

Duties

3. Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate arrangements
for the effective management of the risk associated with electricity in the workplace. These arrangements
are to be monitored and reviewed accordingly.

4. Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that all persons are protected from the hazards
associated with the use of electrical equipment within their workplace. The main hazards are electrocution,
burns, fire, explosion and indirect injuries such as falls from height when in contact with electricity.

5. Employees. Employees are to check that prior to use the electrical equipment appears to be in a
serviceable condition, and report any faults with the equipment or system to the line manager. They are to
comply with the appropriate risk assessment and formal safe systems of work.

Guidance for Line Managers

6. Line managers must ensure that where a risk of injury is foreseeable then employees receive adequate
training and information that allows them to use or work safely on electrical equipment or systems.

7. Advice must be sought from the USA where DEL and military employees interface and electrical
equipment is subject to inspection and maintenance by a competent person.

Working on Electrical Installations and Electrical Equipment

8. No work is to be carried out to any electrical installation or fixed equipment regardless whether live or
completely isolated and/or disconnected without the express consent of the appropriate authority (ie. DE(E)).
Only authorised, trained, experienced and competent personnel are allowed to work on electrical
installations and fixed equipment. This must also be in accordance with the safe system of work, which may
include a permit to work system. Reference A provides further guidance.

9. In accordance with References B & C it is not permitted to carry out any unauthorised alterations or
modifications to any portable electrical equipment (eg. cutting off a sealed plug and replacing with a non-
sealed one or removing plug and cable complete from the body of the equipment and replacing) unless done
by a fully qualified and competent electrician. It should be noted however, that carrying out such work may
invalidate any manufacturer‟s guarantees and the competent electrician may be liable should any related
malfunction occur.


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Maintenance of Office Equipment

10. Office staff with the minimum of training and supervision can generally carry out simple maintenance
(changing cartridges, dealing with paper jams etc) on general office equipment such as photocopiers,
computers and printers. Where guards or other safety devices have to be removed or disconnected then
only a competent person is to carry out the maintenance. Care should be taken however, when changing
light bulbs that may require the use of ladder/steps, where the additional hazard of working at height must
also be considered.

Private Electrical Equipment

11. The use of privately owned items of electrical equipment in the workplace should be discouraged, as
their suitability for use and standard of inspection, maintenance and repair cannot easily be guaranteed. If
this equipment is brought into the workplace then it must be declared to the line manager before being
allowed to be used by the authority of the HoE/CO. It must be included in the establishments‟ inspection and
maintenance regime for electrical equipment. Line managers have a duty to ensure this equipment does not
present a risk of harm to employees and others. All equipment must be CE marked in accordance with UK
and European standards. Control includes asking owners of private equipment permitted to be used in the
workplace to provide evidence of its serviceability in respect of safety or inclusion of the equipment in the
electrical register and maintain it accordingly.

Maintenance of Portable Electrical Appliances

12. All portable electrical appliances are to be maintained to prevent danger to employees and others. This
implies that best practice is that all equipment has to be identified, marked with a unique number and
entered into an electrical equipment register. It then has to be subject to a maintenance regime based on the
equipment held, the circumstances of its use and the potential related risk.

13. There is little difference between Host Nation legislation and its UK equivalent in defining who is
competent to carry out electrical maintenance. Each also provides a table of maintenance periodicity and
allows maintenance periods to be extended depending on satisfactory maintenance results.

14. Formal maintenance of electrical appliances is to be carried out by a competent person. However the
line manager can reduce risk by implementing a simple system of visual inspection by the user before and
after use to identify obvious physical damage to the appliance and associated electrical system. It is
generally accepted that 95% of the inspection requirement is visual and that almost all defects are identified
in this way. Reference A provides detailed guidance.

Extension leads

15. Extension leads are classed as portable electrical appliances and shall be inspected, tested and
maintained accordingly. These are used widely throughout BFG as a means to increase the number of
socket outlets and/or provide an electrical supply to an area away from the socket outlet. Care must be taken
to ensure that the current drawn by attached appliances never reaches the maximum permitted load for the
lead or the socket and that cables do not create a fall or trip hazard. Leads must never be used in a coiled
position as this increases the risk of overheating and fire. The use of extension leads is to be discouraged
and should only be considered as a temporary measure for short-term use. In the long term, in so far as is
reasonably practicable, arrangements should be made to have fixed socket outlets fitted within
buildings/facilities.

16. Under no circumstances shall extension leads be added together to extend distance between
equipment and the socket outlet.

Multi-plug Adaptors

17. These adaptors allow more than one cable to be plugged into a single outlet. Use of these adaptors in
the workplace is prohibited at all times.



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Continental (Travel) Plug Adaptors (Advice to be repeated periodically in Unit orders)

18. It is common practice for UK based personnel to use electrical plug adaptors to enable a 3 pin UK
appliance to be plugged into a German 2 pin socket, normally to avoid cutting off a perfectly useable plug
and perhaps invalidating the warranty. However, not all adaptors are actually fit for purpose or use with all
appliances.

19. Whether used within the workplace or within residential accommodation, all adaptors should be of a
type that displays the official CE logo. They should also display their rated loading, which is the amount of
amperage that the adaptor is constructed for use with, and have an earth contact (this is the metal strip in
the recessed sides of the plug). Adaptors connected to appliances that have a high amperage rating; for
example, kettles, washing machines and tumble dryers must also be marked „13/16 Amp‟. Such adaptors
can normally be appropriately used for most types of household appliance unless otherwise stated in the
manufacturers instructions.

20. Appliances that require high amperage, or which must be earthed, whether using an adaptor or not,
must be plugged into their own wall socket and never into a multi-socket extension lead. They must not be
connected to adaptors that can take two UK 3 pins plugs as this can overload the socket.

21. Travel adaptors, such as those for multi-country use, are not suitable for appliances that require an
earth connection and, as the name implies, are really for travel use. They may only be used with double

insulated appliances; these will be marked with a symbol . Therefore appliances that require an earth
connection or high amperage should be connected to the mains by use of an appropriately marked and
earthed adaptor.

22. The use of an adaptor that is of sub standard or inferior quality may overheat causing injury or damage
to the appliance, the wall sockets and electrical circuits and possibly in worse case a fire.

23. The use of inappropriate adaptors in barracks or in single living accommodation is not permitted. Any
such adapters must be permanently taken out of use and the socket used visually checked for damage,
which must be reported. Damaged sockets must not be used until professionally repaired and declared safe
to use.

24. If there are any concerns about electrical safety at your place of work or in your accommodation then
this is to be reported immediately in accordance with local instructions.

25. Legal advice is that occupants of MoD accommodation (be it in the workplace or at home) will be liable
to the MoD for the cost of repairing any damage caused by improper or inappropriate use, including use
contrary to the guidance set out in this leaflet of electrical adaptors used by the occupants within the
accommodation. The MoD will also seek to recover from such occupants all costs, claims, expenses and
damages incurred as a result of claims by third parties alleging injury or damage caused by the improper or
inappropriate use of adaptors.

Single Living Accommodation (SLA)

26. In SLA, it is not always practical to have an inspection and maintenance regime for privately owned
electrical appliances. Commanding Officers should consider their duty of care owed to the occupiers and
implement a policy that reduces the potential risk from electrical appliances. The attention of those
responsible for SLA is drawn to Reference A for further guidance.

Electrical Testing

27. Electrical testing using portable appliance testers (PAT) where the interpretation of the read out
requires electrical knowledge is only to be carried out by a competent person. Host Nation legislation and
standards shown at References B & C, differ from the UK equivalent in that it states “inspections/testing must
be carried out by qualified electricians or, where the correct test equipment is used, with, for instance, a
“good-bad” signal, they may be carried out by persons instructed in electro-techniques under the guidance
and supervision of qualified electricians”.

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28. However, the Unfallkasse des Bundes (UK Bund) have made the following interpretation: “so long as
the „competent person‟ has been trained by a fully qualified electrician on the operation procedure of the
PAT, there is no restriction in allowing that person to work independently”. The term “under the guidance and
supervision” basically means that the qualified electrician needs to be fully satisfied that the individual is
competent to carry out the testing required and to check that they are carrying out the work to a satisfactory
standard. There is no intention to ensure the person is constantly monitored or shadowed during the
inspections/testing of the equipment.

29. The qualified electrician conducting the training can be Military, UKBC DEL or DEP but consideration
needs to be given to ensure there are no language difficulties that may affect understanding of the
instructions.

30. This interpretation effectively differs from the UK requirement in that the operator receives training on
the use of the equipment by a person deemed “competent” to provide it but that person does not need to be
a qualified electrician. They must however, supervise the operator until they are satisfied that they are fully
competent. The definition of competence is described clearly at Part 2, Leaflet 3 of this Manual. For Military,
UKBC or DEP pers, PAT testing instruction may in exceptional circumstances be provided under the
authority of J4 SHEF, HQ UKSC by a MoD civilian contractor

31. Based on the above guidance, the following procedure should be followed:

      a.    Only qualified electricians must be allowed to train DEL personnel on how to carry out PAT in
      the workplace.

      b.     Qualified electricians are also permitted to train Military personnel, UKBCs and DEPs on how to
      carry out PAT in the workplace.

        Note: qualified electricians can be DEL, Military, DEP or UKBC. See paragraph 20 above.

      c.     UK “competent” persons (not qualified electricians) are NOT permitted to train DEL on how to
      carry out PAT in the workplace.

      d.  UK “competent” personnel (not qualified electricians) ARE permitted to train Military personnel,
      UKBCs and DEPs on how to carry out PAT in the workplace.

32. The standard MOD service supplied PAT has a multi-functional capability in that it can provide the basic
yes/no reading (common to the most basic monitors) but also a full analysis function (for use by the fully
qualified electrician) including the provision of computer interface and print-out capability. This equipment
comes complete with user manual and help menus built into the equipment. The supplier (Test Equipment
Management Organisation (TEMO) from RAF Brampton) states that no specific formal training package is
available or required for the operation of this equipment as it is considered simple to operate. They also
stated that current operators of similar PAT equipment at Gars/Units should be more than capable of
meeting the required operating competencies.

33. The PAT details are as follows:

      a.     PAT (“Seaward,” Model: “Super Nova Plus”): NSN is 6625-99-284-3037.
      b.     Printer: NSN is 6625-99-724-3377.
      c.     Accessory Bag: NSN is 6625-99-724-9080.
      d.     Continental Adaptor: NSN is Z4 6625-99-567-7936, Part No. 283A975.
    Note: Requests should be directed through the USA. The PAT comes complete with German 2-pin
    plug and lead. The adaptor is required for the printer only and is not to be used for other equipment.




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34. Portable appliance testers must be maintained and calibrated according to the manufacturer‟s
instructions. Arrangements for maintenance and calibration should be arranged through the holding unit
and/or USA. Annex A refers to the non-exhaustive types of appliances that will require testing and includes
typical guidance on the inspection frequency.

DII(F) computer equipment
35. Atlas (the providers of DII F) equipment) have no contractual duty to carry out PAT Checks. The
equipment (PC, Monitor and any printers) are thus considered to be unit held electrical equipment for which
the unit has certain managerial and safety responsibilities. These are shown in JSP 375, Vol 2 Leaflet 12
Annex A Appendix 1 thereto, with which units are expected to comply.

High Voltage Cables

36. High voltage power cables can be found above or below ground. The risk of serious injury or even
death from contact with these cables is high and line managers must ensure employees are not exposed to
this potential risk. Generally, work should not be carried out in the vicinity of overhead power cables. Should
work have to be carried out in the vicinity of power cables, advice should be sought from the appropriate
USA or GHSWE and from DE(E).

Railway Flats Hazard

37. Host nation railway systems employ high voltage power cables. No person required to work on a rail
loading area, rail flats or other processes near such hazards is to be permitted to do so until they have
received information, instruction and supervision from competent persons on the risks. Once the vehicle is
loaded, access to the vehicle must be restricted until appropriate railway staff confirms it is safe to do so. At
no time are personnel allowed access to vehicles whilst the train is moving.

38. Attention is also drawn to the Workplace Transport Safety direction contained in Leaflet 42 of this part
of the BFG SHEF Manual.

Records

38. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and should not be destroyed on reviewed but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Training should be carried out and
recorded in accordance with Reference A. All portable electrical appliances are to be identified and marked
with a unique identification number. They are to be recorded in a local electrical register and maintained by
the line manage, as outlined at Reference A.




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                                                                                                Leaflet 6

                                                Annex A - Inspection Intervals for Portable Equipment

TYPICAL INSPECTION INTERVALS FOR PORTABLE EQUIPMENT

       Portable Electrical Equipment                                       Test Deadline
       Baths:
        Liquid jets/Water suction (suction scrubbing devices).
        Extension/Appliance connection cables.
        Underwater suction devices/centrifuges.                           6 Months
       Building Cleaning:
        Vacuum/Polishing and brushing/Carpet cleaning appliances.
        Extension/Appliance connection cables.                            12 Months
       Laboratories:
        Rotation evaporators/Mobile analysers/Heaters.
        Measuring devices/Mains operated lab equipment.
        Table lamps/Mixers.
        Extension/Appliance connection cables.                            12 Months
       Mass Catering Kitchens
        Cutting machines/Coffee makers/Toasters/Hot trolleys.
        Hot plates/Rings/Mixers/Electrical hand appliances etc.
        Extension and appliance connection cables.                        6 Months
         Exceptions: Other kitchens.                                       12 Months
       Classrooms in schools
        Electrical machinery in the media area.
        Slide/film/daylight projectors/Video appliances etc.
        Extension/Appliance connection cables.
        Electrical machinery in the sphere of textiles.
        Irons/Sewing machines.                                            12 Months
       Fire Brigades / Technical Disaster Help                             12 Months
        (for machinery used on exercise and in operations):
        Electrical hand appliances/Hand lamps/Floodlights.
        Decanting pumps/Extension and appliance connection cables.
       Workshops / Building Sites                                          12 Months
        Hand and building site lights/Hand drills/Angle grinders.
        Belt and orbital sanders/Hand-held circular saws/Jig saws.
        Soldering irons/Ventilation appliances/Liquid spray appliances.
        Mobile table-top circular saws/Mobile surface planers.
        Extraction of (wood) chips/Mixers.
        Hedge shears/Chopping machines.
        Lawn mowers/Extension and appliance connection cables.
       Offices
        See JSP 375 Vol 2 Leaflet 12 - Reference A
       Laundries
        Irons/Mobile ironing machines/Sewing machines.                    12 Months
        Extension and appliance connection cables.




NB: Adapted from Unfallverhütungsvorschrift BGV A3 für Elektrische Anlagen und Betriebsmittel




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Leaflet 7 - Serious and Imminent Danger

             SERIOUS AND IMMINENT DANGER (DISASTER AND EMERGENCY PLANNING)

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 1.
B.    The Management of Health and Safety Regulations 1999.
C.    The Control of Major Accident Hazard Regulations 1999

Introduction

1.     All units are to have appropriate arrangements in place to be followed in the event of a serious and
imminent danger to persons at work. These arrangements may well interface with other specific major
accident control regulations where more stringent arrangements will be required. Reference A provides
detailed guidance on managing the risk and is to be used to develop and maintain an effective system.

Duties

2.      Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for emergency and disaster planning in accordance with Reference A. These arrangements
apply to a unit even if it has a part role in a wider barracks or garrison plan for which it not the lead or author.
It follows that unit plans may form part of a wider plan. The arrangements are to be tested, monitored and
reviewed as necessary, at least annually.

3.     Line managers‟. Line managers‟ duties will be dependent on their role as defined in the overall
emergency and disaster plan. They are however to ensure that any risk assessment undertaken identifies all
areas that require measures to be taken to control the degree of risk. The risk assessment process is a
fundamental part of the emergency and disaster strategy. Line managers are to be fully conversant with the
emergency and disaster plan and ensure that their employees are provided with appropriate information,
instruction, training and supervision for their role.

4.    Employees. Employees are to read and understand the emergency and disaster plan and to co-
operate with the line manager in its practice and execution.

Guidance for line managers

5.     The employer must have suitable procedures to be followed in the case of an emergency or disaster.
These are required to prevent the risk of harm to the health safety and welfare of employees and others that
might be affected by the event. The following guidance is to be read in conjunction with Reference A and is
not intended for major accident control management.

Competency

6.     There must be a sufficient number of competent people nominated to implement the emergency
procedures. The term competency means that the person has the skills, knowledge, ability, training and
expertise and other qualities that will enable them to implement the evacuation and control procedures
effectively.

Information to Employees

7.      Employees and others, for example, visitors or contractors, who may be affected by the emergency or
disaster, must be provided with comprehensive and relevant information on the nature of the hazards and
risks involved and the procedures in place to protect them.

8.      Procedures must allow for those exposed to actual or imminent danger to stop work and reach a place
of safety and prevent them from returning until it is safe to do so. Employees should also be informed on the
identification of competent persons who will assist during the emergency/disaster. The entitlement to


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information extends to all that work or visit the area, including those who share premises. Where there may
be language problems the use of translated information or pictorial signs should be considered.

Contact with External Services

9.    Where appropriate, employers are to arrange any necessary contacts with external services,
especially in respect to first aid, emergency medical care, fire and rescue work. These services should be
requested to take part in realistic training procedures.

Training

10. It is a fundamental requirement that staffs undertaking specific roles within the emergency response
are adequately trained to discharge those duties. This includes those involved in the production of the
suitable and sufficient risk assessment. Reference A provides guidance on training requirements and
frequency of training.

Lessons learnt

11. As a result of the training and exercises undertaken and real life incidents that occur, lessons learnt
should be recorded and any issues found to be relevant to the planning and execution of the procedures
should be incorporated and specific risk assessments reviewed and amended accordingly.

Records

12. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Records of emergency and disaster
training and practices are to be retained under local arrangements. Records of pre or post exercise decisions
should be included.




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Leaflet 8 - Exposure to Vibration at Work

                                  EXPOSURE TO VIBRATION AT WORK

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 38. (Currently Suspended as at Aug 07)
B.    2006DIN07-008: MoD Policy for the Control of Noise and Vibration at Work Regulations 2005.
C.    Mechanische Schwingungen-Vibrationen - BG1 523.

Introduction

1.     Occupational exposure to vibration arises in a number of ways. If left uncontrolled it can cause
discomfort, a reduction in productivity and adverse health effects. There are two routes of transmission,
namely whole body vibration and hand-arm vibration. Examples of this hazard may be found in the driving of
vehicles and the use of some hand held tools, for example, chain saws, hammer drills etc. The Vibration at
Work Regulations 2006, as outlined at Reference B, place a specific duty on the employer to control the risk
of exposure to hazardous vibration.

2.    Reference A has yet to be updated by MOD to incorporate the UK legislation changes outlined at
Reference B. These changes have already been written into this leaflet.

Duties

Commanding Officers

3.     Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate arrangements for the management of
the risk from occupational vibration. The arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

4.     Line Managers. Line Managers are to ensure that the potential exposure of employees to hazardous
vibration is identified, measured and assessed and where necessary managed to control the risk. Adequate
information is to be provided to employees on the potential risks and also the controls measures in place to
minimise it. The main emphasis should be placed on management control procedures over vibration
measurements.

5.   Employers. Employers are to co-operate with the employer to reduce the risk of harm and report any
symptoms that may be related to vibration to the line manager.

Guidance for Line Managers

6.     References A-C provide adequate guidance to line managers on assessing and controlling the risk
from hazardous vibration. Vibration is frequently caused by poor or incorrect maintenance of machines and
tools and in the case of whole body vibration, normally vehicles.

7.     A key factor in ensuring hazardous vibration is minimised is by carrying out regular servicing and
maintenance of all equipment for which the line manager is responsible (i.e. machines, tools or vehicles).
Equipment selection is also an important factor and line managers are to ensure equipment is procured
through service supply chains where checks have been carried out to ensure current protection levels meet
the requirements of References A and B.

8.    If vibration cannot be reduced below the exposure limit value and the use of the particular equipment
and associated activity is considered essential, then consideration needs to be given to taking steps to seek
an exemption from the regulations (See Annex C of Reference B).

Competence

9.    The measurement of vibration, whole-body and hand-arm, is a complex procedure and requires
specialist knowledge and equipment. Only qualified persons deemed competent to conduct such


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measurements should be used. The main emphasis should always be towards implementing control action
to minimise hazardous vibration before seeking reliance on vibration measurements to instigate action.
Requests for measurements to be taken should be directed through the USA, GHSWE and/or the Gar SHEF
FP who will, in turn, pass to J4 SHEF Branch HQ UKSC (G) for further action. Other points of contact for
advice on vibration procedures and assessment can be found in Annex D to Reference B.

Risk Assessment

10. Where hazardous vibration is identified or suspected within workplaces as part of the routine risk
assessment process, line managers should take simple measures to ensure it is reduced. These measures
can be found at Reference B. Where all attempts have been made but there still remains a significant
residual risk then the USA or GHSWE should be contacted for assistance.

11. Where specialist measurement has been arranged and carried out as stated above, the results should
be carefully analysed in conjunction with specialists and the risk assessment developed to indicate exposure
levels and adequate controls implemented and monitored.

Health Surveillance

12. References A&B state that if the risk assessment indicates that there is a risk to the health of any
employees from hazardous vibration, they must be placed under suitable health surveillance. Where there is
evidence of health problems and they are suspected to be as a result of exposure to hazardous vibration,
then medical advice is to be sought through normal medical channels or in the case of DEL employees
through the occupational medical practitioner (OMP). Health surveillance may then be instigated.

Training

13. Line managers must provide adequate information, instruction and training on the potential hazard,
risk and control measures in use to reduce exposure from vibration. Training is available for all nominated
personnel through a number of MOD providers and they can be found at Annex E of Reference B. The
Institute of Naval Medicine courses are run twice yearly, usually during April and Oct. Requests for such
training, where deemed necessary, should be submitted to the GHSWE in the first instance.

Records

14. Records of all vibration risk assessments and monitoring are to be kept under local arrangements for
40 years. The medical authorities are to retain all health surveillance records in accordance with medical
procedures.




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Leaflet 9 - First Aid at Work

                                            FIRST AID AT WORK

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 27.
B.    Erste Hilfe BGV A1, Art 24 & 26.

Introduction

1.     In the event of injury or sudden illness, failure to provide first aid could result in minor injuries
becoming major ones or may even result in death. It is important that immediate attention is received and
that, where necessary, the emergency services are called in serious cases. First aid at work covers the
arrangements that must be in place to ensure this immediate action is carried out. References A and B lay
down the guidance for the provision of adequate first aid cover, equipment and facilities required in the
workplace.

2.     Current MOD policy and procedures for first aid are well established in the UK but due to our overseas
location and the SA to SOFA agreement, these procedures do not fully apply. The HN first aid requirements
shown at Reference B are the standard to be followed. This is the case in regard to cover and equipment
required, training and treatment facilities and these requirements must be determined through the risk
assessment process. With regard to first aid boxes, the contents for standard small and large kits should
meet HN requirements. To meet this standard, UK first aid boxes are procured through MOD service supply
sources and “topped up” as required (See also paragraphs 4-9 below). However, the first aid box content
requirements may vary depending on needs as identified by the risk assessment.

Duties

3.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the effective management of first aid in the workplace. The arrangements are to be
regularly monitored and revised as necessary, but at least annually.

4.     Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that risk assessments are completed to determine the
potential risks relating to the workplace concerned and that appropriate provision is made for first aid cover.
They should ensure that adequate numbers of trained personnel are available to render first aid at
appropriate locations with minimum delay should the occasion arise. The risk assessment must be reviewed
as circumstances change or at least annually and records made.

5.    This cover includes the requirements at References A & B, for the appointment of trained First Aiders
and in addition, in the case of Reference A, “Appointed Persons” (See paragraph 8 below). Also, first aid
boxes containing sufficient provisions and other equipment must be provided in the most suitable areas, and
all employees should be aware of their location. They should also know the identity of their nominated First
Aiders (and Appointed Persons where applicable). The unit SHEF notice boards should display these names
and locations.

Guidance for Line Managers

6.     Personnel. Sufficient competent first aid personnel and facilities must be provided to give immediate
assistance, summon an ambulance or other professional help when required. The minimum number of First
Aiders must be maintained in accordance with Reference B unless the risk assessment justifies an additional
requirement.

7.     First Aider. A person who has undergone an approved training course by a recognised Training
Provider, (e.g. German Red Cross, Malteser Hilfs-Dienst or DF&RS, or HSE for UK personnel, etc) and holds
a valid certificate as competent to administer first aid. References A & B offers suggestions on how many
First Aiders that might be needed in relation to categories of risk and number of employees. There is also a



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requirement at Reference A to appoint an “Appointed Person” if deemed necessary (See also paragraphs
17-20 below).

8.     Appointed person. A person appointed by their line management to take charge if someone is
injured or falls ill, with duties to call in the emergency services and if necessary ensure that first aid boxes
are kept stocked. Although there is no requirement for this under Reference B, it may be necessary in
situations where limited civilian employees are available as First Aiders and where cover may be stretched.
This should be determined by the risk assessment.

First aid boxes contents

9.    UK requirement. There is no legal requirement regarding the content of a UK type First Aid (FA) Kit
and no standard list of items that should be included. The requirement depends on what managers assess
as being required. There is however, HSE guidance on the recommended minimum content of the FA kits for
use where there is no special risk in the workplace. There are two standard FA kits commercially available –
10 person or 50 person FA kits/boxes. These are available through service supply from the DSDA and
include the same items.

10. Additional items can be provided separately for the standard service supply kits but any additional
requirement should be determined by the risk assessment based on the activities / environment in which it is
needed.

11. German requirement. The contents of all German first aid boxes comply with the DIN standard (i.e.
DIN 13157C for small size and DIN 13169E for large size). A recommended minimum contents list is at
annex a. As with the UK, if the risk assessment identifies a requirement for additional items due to the
nature of the risk in the workplace, then this must be considered.

12. The contents of first aid kits for travelling employees are to comply with the German DIN standard
(DIN 13164) and therefore, the standard UK service supply kits should be topped-up with the necessary
additional items.

BFG Policy

13. First aid boxes supplied for use throughout BFG should contain the contents to meet the German DIN
standards. German first aid boxes contain some additional items in comparison with UK boxes. Information
on the variation should be sought from the USA or GHSWE. Because first aid boxes are normally procured
for DEL workplaces through the MOD supply chain and not locally purchased, the contents therein need to
be topped-up to meet the contents required by the German DIN standards. This effectively means that
orders must include a demand for the additional items required to meet the DIN standard (these additional
items are usually sent under separate cover). On receipt, the items are to be added to the standard UK box.

14. Renewal or replenishment of first aid boxes is down to local management arrangements and should
be ordered through the MOD service supply chain from:

             DSDA,
             Bldg C16,
             Lower Arncott,
             Bicester.
             Oxon. 0X25 1LP

             Tel. No. Civ: 0044 (0)1869 256052 or Mil 94240 2052.
             Fax No. Civ: 0044 (0)1869 256269 or Mil 94240 2269.

15.   Demand form: AFG8620 or on UNICOM.

16. There are some variations in the types and sizes of items within UK/German boxes but these are
insignificant and it has been agreed with the UK Bund that they are considered acceptable. The contents list
for each type of box and the basic first aid instruction sheet should be produced in English and German.



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First Aid Treatment Room

17. Reference B requires employees to provide a treatment room when there are 1,000 or more
employees. The GLSU and garrison SHEF FP must be consulted where a treatment room is required and
ensure that Reference B standards are met.

Training

18. In BFG Defence Fire & Rescue Service (DF&RS) Stations and the DF&RS Fire Training School at
JHQ Rheindahlen provide courses each year to train DEL employees as “First Aiders at Work Place” in order
for BFG to meet its SA to SOFA obligations. Once the qualification is attained, it is valid for 2 years before
refresher training is required..

19. Units requiring DEL personnel to be trained as a „First Aider at Work Place‟ are to submit their
requirements to their USA or GHSWE in the first instance. Vacancies on these courses may also be
allocated to UKBC and DEP personnel on a fill up basis where garrisons deem this to be appropriate and
relative to the workplace requirements.

Note: Vacancies on these courses cannot be allocated to military personnel. See also paragraph 20 below.

20. Military persons who have the MATT 3 qualification (Battlefield Casualty Drills training – formerly
ITD(A)(3)) are not, under present legislation, considered competent to provide first aid in the workplace.
However if an emergency does occur, then this qualification is adequate for rendering emergency first aid.

21. In areas where a dedicated Medical Centre provides first aid within a reasonable timescale then this
may be reflected in the risk assessment and considered as part of the line managers‟ first aid cover.
However, this must be carefully co-ordinated with the Medical Centre personnel.

Records

22. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. All first aid boxes are to be regularly
checked for content and serviceability and the details recorded in a locally produced record book. All
accidents are to be recorded in the appropriate accident book. See Part 2, Leaflet 1 of this Manual.




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                                                                                                                   Leaflet 14

                                                                           Annex A – First Aid Box Contents and Check List

                                           112
FIRST AID BOX - CONTENTS
Ser        NSN                                                 Description                          10 man         50 man
                                                                                                    (Small)        (large)
(a)              (b)                                             (c)                                  (d)             (e)
1         6545-99-463-5585             First Aid Kit Workplace, 10 persons                              -              -
2         6545-99-660-6508             First Aid Kit Workplace, 50 persons                              -              -
3         6510-99-210-2563             Bandage, Triangular,                                             4              8
4         6510-99-210-2612             Dressing Assortment, Adhesive Waterproof.                       20             60
5         6510-99-210-2627             Dressing Standard, BPC, No 7, (finger dressing)                  2              4
6         6510-99-210-2626             Dressing Standard, BPC, No 8 (medium)                            4             12
7         6510-99-210-2625             Dressing Standard, BPC, No 9 (large).                            2              4
8         6510-99-210-2664             Dressing Standard, BPC, No 16 (eye pad).                         2              6
9         6510-99-211-3005             Pad, Gauze.                                                      6             20
10        6510-99-983-9529             Dressing, Wound, First Aid, Ex Large, No 3.                      2              4
11        6515-99-213-0842             Scissors, First Aid.                                             1              1
12        6515-99-213-7028             Gloves, Surgical latex, Large,                                 1 pr           3 pr
13        6515-L0-213-6011             Forceps, Tweezers style.                                         1              2
14        6510-99-215-8183             Resuscitation Aid.                                               2              4
15        8315-99-721-6822             Pin, Safety, Straight, lin -3in, Assortment.                     6             12
16        Guidance Card                Guidance Card for First Aid Kit, Workplace                       1              1

FIRST AID BOX - CONTENTS CHECKLIST
                               CONTENTS                                                                      INSPECTIONS
 Ser        NSN                         Description                                           10    50    1/4 2/4 3/4 4/4
  (a)        (b)                            (c)                                               (d)   (e)   (f) (g) (h) (i)
    1 6510-99-210-2563 Bandage, Triangular.                                                    4     8
    2 6510-99-210-2612 Dressing Assortment, Adhesive.                                         20    60
    3 6510-99-210-2627 Dressing Standard, No 7, (finger dressing)                              2     4
    4 6510-99-210-2626 Dressing Standard, medium, (No 8)                                       6    12
    5 6510-99-210-2625 Dressing Standard, large (No 9).                                        2     4
    6 6510-99-210-2664 Dressing Standard, eye pad, (No 16)                                     2     6
    7 6510-99-211-3005 Pad, gauze, cleaning wipe.                                              6    20
    8 6510-99-983-9529 Dressing, Ex Large, (No 3).                                             2     4
    9 6515-99-211-0842 Scissors, First Aid.                                                    1     1
  10 6515-99-253-6224  Gloves, Surgical latex.                                                1p    3p
  11 6515-99-213-6011  Forceps, Tweezers style.                                                1     2
  12 6510-99-215-3152  Resuscitation Aid.                                                      2     4
  13 8315-99-721-6822  Pin, Safety, Assortment.                                                6    12
  14 Guidance Card     Guidance Card for First Aid Kit, Workplace                              1     1

FIRST AID BOX SUPPLEMENTARY ITEMS
 Ser        NSN                    Description                                                       Remarks
  (a)        (b)                        (c)                                                             (d)
   1  6505-99-001-9776 Sodium chloride 0.9%, sterile                                  For areas where clean running water is
                       eyewash, 500cc.                                                not available.
   2  6530-99-702-6613 Holder, eyewash bottle                                         For use with above
   3  6510-99-211-5577 Dressing, burn, hand
   4  6510-99-211-7549 Plaster, adhesive, blue, (pk 120)                              For use in catering areas.

12
     All items are to be in date. No ointments, tablets etc., to be held in FA box.

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Leaflet 10 - Health & Safety Inspections

                                     HEALTH & SAFETY INSPECTIONS

References:

A.    JSP 375, Vol 2, Leaflets 21, 23, 34, 39 and 43.
B.    The Unfallversicherungseinordnungsgesetz (UVEG).
C.    Arbeitsschutzgesetz.
D.    Arbeitssicherheitsgesetz.

Introduction

1.     Workplace H&S inspections are a key element of hazard identification and an effective means of
confirming that control measures instigated as a result of risk assessment are being met. As a performance
indicator tool, inspections can be used to determine whether the organisation is meeting its legal obligations
and provide audit trail evidence when required. This leaflet provides guidance on general workplace
inspections. It does not cover areas where clearly defined legal inspections are required; for example, the
examination of lifting equipment or Local Exhaust Ventilation (LEV), which is carried out by specialist
inspectors.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the conducting of H&S inspections and that the results of such inspections are acted upon
accordingly. The arrangements are to be reviewed and monitored as necessary.

3.    Line Managers. Line Managers are to ensure that regular and routine formal surveys/tours of their
areas of responsibility are carried out in order to identify obvious or potential hazards. This is a personal
duty of the line manager; it is not to be delegated to or carried out by a SHEF Adviser or SHEF
Warden although their advice may be sought. These inspections should be related to the activities of
people, the use of materials, the environment, work processes, or a combination of them all and include as a
matter of course a check that risk assessments are up-to-date and in use. The findings should then be
documented in order that they may be assessed to determine the significant risks and prioritised for action.
The frequency of the inspections will be determined by the nature of the activities/processes taking place
and the evaluation of risk from the risk assessments. A report is then to be produced for each inspection and
should include an action plan to address the significant risks found. The action plan is to be monitored and
the chain of command alerted to any actions required having not been fulfilled within the given timescales or
deferred due to financial or resource constraints. DEL Safety Monitors are to be invited to participate in
workplace inspections and are to be kept informed of the findings of the inspection.

4.     In addition to the requirement to identify all significant workplace hazards, the 4C‟s system requires
that an area hazard register be collated, maintained, reviewed and held by the nominated Area Custodian.
Full details are given at Leaflet 4 of this part of the BFG SHEF Manual.

Guidance for Line Managers

5.     Frequency of inspections. The frequency of inspections will be mainly determined through the risk
assessment. However, as a minimum, it is recommended that safety inspections be conducted at six-month
intervals. In high-risk activities the frequency of general workplace inspections may need to be increased and
reinforced by other specific performance monitoring regimes. Detailed guidance on inspection techniques is
given at Reference A.

6.      Inspection reports. In all cases a formal inspection report is to be produced detailing the
observations found and the recommended actions to be taken. The action plan should be Specific,
Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time Bound (SMART) and actions placed on activities/processes where
significant risks exist, must be monitored through to completion.


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7.    Other monitoring. Line managers may wish to carry out other forms of performance monitoring and
Reference A provides guidance on the methods available.

8.      Competence. Line Managers do not require any formal qualifications in order to carry out this type of
performance monitoring. However they should be experienced and familiar with the workplace and its
activities/processes. Safety Monitors are trained in accordance with Host Nation requirements and usually
assist the line manager so that their legal obligations can be fulfilled.

9.    Reporting to the chain of command. Line Managers must ensure that any significant safety issues
found during their inspections are reported up and down the unit chain of command as necessary, with the
Commanding Officer being briefed as required. Significant issues are to be tabled at the COs O Gps or
equivalent and at the unit SHEF Committee Meetings

External Inspections by German Authorities

10. In accordance with the Protocol of Signature concerning SA to SOFA, Article 56 (1), the Bundeswehr
is the German Authority responsible for monitoring workplace activities of DEL within BFG establishments.
This includes environmental protection, emission control and fire safety.

11. The Authority has, through the WBV, right of access to the DEL in all BFG workplaces and
installations. It should be noted however, that their authority only relates to DEL employees. An annual
programme of WBV visits is issued to Garrisons by J4 SHEF Branch, UKSC (G). Garrisons are to ensure
that, where appropriate, an action plan is prepared and aimed at addressing any significant observations
arising from the WBV inspections. The action plan is to be copied to J4 SHEF Branch, UKSC for
transmission to the WBV.

12. The Gewerbeaufsichtsamt (trade supervisory office) is also liable to enter barracks to check on works
being carried out by contractors. Such visitors, which may be unannounced, are to be reported to Garrison
HQ and to the local head of DE(FM)

13. SA to SOFA Art 53 provides for consultation, cooperating to reconcile any differences that may arise.
Such differences are to be referred to HQ UKSC J4 SHEF through the Garrison SHEF FP in the first
instance.

Records

14. Records should be maintained of all workplace H&S inspections. The inspection report should include
any inspection notes and work requests submitted. The records are to be retained for a period of 5 years.




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Leaflet 11 - H&S Training
                                                      H&S TRAINING

References:

A.        JSP 375 Vol 1, Chapter 13.
B.        JSP 375, Vol 2, Leaflet 11.
C.        H&S Act at Work etc 1974.
D.        Arbeitschutzgesetz §12.
E.        BGV A1 – Art.4.
F.        BFG SHEF Manual Part 1 Chapter 5.

Introduction
                                           13
1.     Employers are legally required to give such information, instruction, supervision and training as is
necessary to enable safe working. This duty is comprehensive and includes training in all aspects of safety
and health at the workplace. The extent of training will vary according to the existing knowledge of the
individual carrying out the task and the potential risks associated with the activities/processes in which they
will be involved.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure their unit has adequate arrangements
and resources for the provision of H&S training for their employees. The arrangements are to be regularly
monitored and reviewed as necessary.

3.     Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that appropriate H&S training is provided to their staff
taking into consideration the level of risk and the extent of knowledge required by each individual.

Guidance for Line Managers

4.   Garrison SHEF FPs are to identify H&S training needs through a training need analysis. Training,
where reasonably practicable, is to be provided by the line manager, USA or GHSWE.

5.        In accordance with References C and D employees are to be provided with adequate H&S training:

          a.       Upon recruitment.
          b.       Before being exposed to new or increased risks.
          c.       Upon transference or change in responsibilities.
          d.       Upon the introduction of new work equipment and practices or changes to them.
6.    The type and extent of training given must take into account the trainee's individual learning capability,
but should be repeated periodically where appropriate and be given during working hours.

7.    Some regulations require specific information, instruction and training to be given prior to carrying out
the activity or process. For example, the Health & Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 and
the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 2004.

8.    There are several forms of training, which can be given to employees. These range from short,
informal in-house training sessions to formal external tuition at an educational establishment that can lead to
a recognised qualification.

9.     In-house training is most suitable and cost effective where several employees require training in a
particular subject. These courses can be tailored to meet the specific needs of the garrison/unit. External
courses are more suitable where only one or two persons require training.

13
     Reference C

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Induction Training

10. Induction training, which must happen as soon as possible upon commencement of employment,
should include:

     a.        Mandatory military training (e.g. DI Trg(A): Workplace Induction Programme).
     b.        Arrangements for first aid and accident reporting.
     c.        Fire safety drills and any other emergency procedures.
     d.        Location(s) of evacuation route(s) and assembly point(s).
     e.        Names and identities of persons appointed to assist with H&S.
     f.        A briefing on the Commanders SHEF Statement and the units SHEF Management System.
     g.        An outline of employer and employee responsibilities.
     h.        Arrangements for undertaking risk assessments.
     i.        How to report perceived shortcomings in safety arrangements.
     j.        Arrangements for general and safety communities.
     k.        Details of relevant systems of work or local procedures for provision and use of equipment.
     l.        Occupational health facilities (where relevant).
     m. The COs discipline and recognition and reward policy for good or poor H&S performance.
12. It must be recognised that a trainee (especially a young person) is more likely to be at risk due to
inexperience/immaturity/unfamiliarity with the hazards and risks in a workplace. In these circumstances,
special consideration must be given to protect their H&S at all times.

13. As it is possible that the amount of information which a new arrival, especially a young person, may
have to assimilate, it is best practice to issue them with a personal pamphlet or aide memoir, which may
need to be updated from time to time.

Training programmes and courses held in Germany

14. Specialist training, identified by legislation or risk assessment, may be provided by external sources. To
ensure that training programmes meet organisational objectives bids for MOD and private sector courses are
to be directed in the first instance through the garrison SHEF FP to J4 SHEF Branch, UKSC.

15. HQ UKSC will provide a range of courses to meet the H&S training needs of BFG. Details will be
published throughout the training year. Further information is given in this manual at Part 1 chapter 5

DEL Training

16. The Garrison HSWE are responsible for ensuring that the following mandatory H&S training is provided
for the garrison‟s DEL employees:

          a.      Safety Monitor Training.
          b.      Manual Handling Training.
          c.      Refresher Safety Monitor Training.
16. Further details for DEL training is given in Part 1 Chapter 4 of this Manual.

H&S Training for Military, DEP and UKBC Staff

17. Attention is drawn to Part 1 Chapter 5 of this Manual.




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Training records

18. All H&S training is to be recorded using the prescribed methodology as at Reference A. All training
records must be retained for a period of 5 years. As a minimum, the following should be recorded:

      a.    Name(s) of employee(s).
      b.    Time, date and venue of training.
      c.    Course details and results.
      d.    Name of trainer (qualifications, etc if from an external source).
      e.    Validation of training.
      f.    Review date.




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Leaflet 12 - Health & Safety of Young Persons and Children

                        HEALTH & SAFETY OF YOUNG PERSONS & CHILDREN

A.    JSP 375 Vol 1, Chapter 13.
B.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 35.
C.    Jugendarbeitsschutzgesetz.

Introduction

1.     A young person is defined as a person who has not reached the age of 18. Employers are legally
obliged to ensure that young persons are protected from any risks to their H&S, which are the consequence
of their lack of experience, absence of awareness of risk or the fact that the young person may not yet have
fully matured. Young persons may include those who are long-term employees, school pupils on work
experience, students on sandwich courses and military cadets. It does not apply to young persons who visit
for reasons other than to work for the MOD.

2.    There are also situations where children are employed to carry out activities in the workplace (i.e.
school placements) and a “child” is defined as “one who is not over compulsory school age”. Regardless of
the social implications, the risk of harm to children when brought into the workplace is high. Children are
generally not allowed into any working area however; this does not apply to organised formal visits, work
experience or when permission has been given to collect mail in the spouse‟s absence. Special
consideration must be given to all children in the workplace and should include careful supervision,
guidance, patience and re-assurance.

Duties

3.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of the risk to young persons and children. The arrangements are to be
monitored and reviewed as necessary.

4.     Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that a young person or child is not given work activities
or tasks beyond their physical or psychological capability and that all risk assessments take this into
consideration. Additionally, assessments must be prepared to take account of a young person or child‟s lack
of experience, limited safety awareness and immaturity.

Guidelines for line managers

5.     Similar to the normal adult workforce, young persons and children should not be exposed to work
involving significant risks such as toxic or carcinogenic substances, working at height, extreme variations in
temperature or exposure to high levels of noise or vibration. The risk of harm to young persons is not always
evident because they may be unwilling to express their feeling or opinions. References A & C provide
guidance on the areas considered to be relevant and applicable when preparing the risk assessment for
young persons and children.

6.     Comprehensive and relevant H&S information should be provided to the young person or child.
Employers are also to provide the parents of a child with comprehensive information on the H&S risks that
their child may be exposed and details on how they will be protected by explaining the control measures that
are in place and the training, instruction and supervision they will be given.

7.    Young persons and children may not be assigned work during restricted periods i.e. between 2200
and 0600 hours.

Records

8.     Risk assessments, training records and information supplied to young persons and children should be
retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in case of future potential claims as a
result of an accident or incident.


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Leaflet 13 - Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment

                            LIFTING OPERATIONS AND LIFTING EQUIPMENT

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 9.
B.    Anschlagmittel BGR 150 - BGR 151 - BGR 152 - BGI 622.

Introduction

1.     The term lifting equipment relates to any equipment used to lift, ranging from tower cranes to fork lift
trucks to canvas lifting strops. The use of this equipment can significantly reduce the need for carrying out
manual handling activities in the workplace and therefore assist in potentially reducing the risks to the
workforce. It also has the added potential benefit of improving business efficiency and productivity. However,
the introduction of such devices may also create new hazards and risks into the workplace, which may affect
operators and those nearby.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the safe use and management of lifting operations and lifting equipment. These
arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

3.    Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that all lifting operations are identified and a suitable
and sufficient risk assessment is carried out before any lifting takes place. Lifting work must be carefully
planned, supervised and carried out by a competent person in a safe manner.

4.      Employees. Employees are to use lifting equipment in accordance with the manufacturer instructions
and to bring to the line managers‟ attention any defect or concern with the equipment. Employees involved in
lifting work must follow the safe systems of work/procedures in place.

Guidance for Line Managers

5.    Line managers must ensure that any lifting equipment, attachments or components used for MOD
purposes is of adequate strength and stability for each individual load raised and lowered. All lifting
equipment, including that for lifting people, is to be maintained through a planned and systematic thorough
examination and inspection regime in accordance with the manufacturers maintenance schedules.
Reference A provides detailed information on the maintenance requirements.

6.    There is a statutory obligation to thoroughly examine/inspect lifting equipment within specified
timescales and that a competent person conducts it. This would also be carried out in the event of an
accident or incident. These examinations/inspections are usually carried out by an independent specialist
authority on behalf of the equipment insurers or by the TÜV.

7.     Any lifting operation must be planned by a competent person and appropriately supervised to ensure
the process is carried out in a safe manner. The plan must:

      a.    Address the hazards and risks associated with the lift by risk assessment and identify the
      resources needed to carry it out safely.
      b.    Be produced by a person with adequate knowledge, experience and understanding of the lifting
      operation and equipment involved.
      c.       Ensure that the equipment remains stable, secure and intrinsically safe prior to, during and after
      the lifting operation.
      d.    Ensuring that the lifting equipment is not overloaded and that it displays its safe working load
      and that it is in-date with regards to safety inspections


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      e.     Be part of a formal safe system of work where necessary.

8.    Those planning lifting operations should consider the following:

      a.     The load to be lifted, its weight, shape, stability, integrity and lifting points
      b.     The movement of the load from its original position to its intermediate/final position.
      c.     How the lifting equipment will be positioned and operated during the task.
      d.    The working environment, taking account of visibility, weather conditions, access, egress,
      obstructions and proximity of other hazards, e.g. other equipment, overhead electrical power cables;
      underground services etc.
      e.    The training knowledge and experience of those employees involved in any way with the lifting
      operation.

Inspection policy

9. The Army has a large quantity of equipment deployed abroad, which is often maintained by a locally
employed workforce. In this situation it has been decreed (see Reference A) by the Secretary of State for
Defence that when UK legislation is more rigorous than local regulations, UK criteria will apply. Where a host
nation‟s legislation is more stringent than UK requirements; the Army must abide by those regulations
implemented by that Nation.

10. DE(FM) will provide copies of inspection records and, where possible, ensure that suitable stickers or
other means of recording the due inspections date have been affixed to the lifting machinery to which it
relates.

11. Where such evidence is not apparent then the line manager responsible for the day to day supervision
of the equipment is to contact DE(FM) or other appropriate and either arrange for the current certificate to be
displayed or otherwise notified to operators. If certification cannot be found and displayed then the line
manager is to ensure that the equipment is not used until certified safe.

Competent Person

12. The competent person will have the appropriate knowledge, ability, training and experience to ensure
the lifting operation is properly assessed, planned and executed safely. This will be reinforced by successful
attendance on a relevant course.

13. Persons who carry out thorough examinations and inspections of lifting equipment must be competent
to do so. References A & B provides further guidance.

Records

14. Risk assessments, plans, thorough examinations and inspection records for lifting equipment should be
retained for 5 years. Training records should be retained in the employees‟ records. References A & B
contains details on the inspection and maintenance of lifting equipment. These will be examined during
audits.

15. Where records of inspections are not attached and clearly visible on each item of lifting equipment, then
DE(FM) is to be approached for a copy of the inspection records; see above for further action in such cases
where certification cannot be displayed.




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Leaflet 14 - Management of Asbestos

                                       MANAGEMENT OF ASBESTOS
References:

A.    The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006.
B.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflets 5, 40 and 54.
C.    BFG Technical Bulletin 04/03.
D.    DE Functional Standard – The Management of ACMs on the Defence Estate.
E.    Gefahrstoffverordnung.

Introduction

1.      Asbestos has always been recognised as an extremely versatile natural material and was traditionally
used in a large number of manufacturing processes, producing many useful products. These products can
still be found today in, for example, old buildings, insulation, friction linings, gaskets and many other places.
It is generally accepted that undamaged asbestos, when properly managed, presents little or no risk to the
workforce. However, the risk is significantly increased if the asbestos is disturbed and fibres are released into
the atmosphere. The dangers associated with asbestos work are well known and documented. Safety is
maintained through strict compliance with current legislation.

2.     Reference B, which outlines the procedures relating to the Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations
(CAWR) 2002; the Asbestos (Licensing) Regulations (as amended) 1983; and the Asbestos (Prohibitions)
Regulations 1992 (as amended) have now been superseded by Reference A, which outlines the procedures
relating to the new Control of Asbestos Regulations (CAR) 2006 brought about by the EU Asbestos Worker
Protection Directive 83/477/EEC and Directive 91/382/EEC. Reference B is presently being updated by
DS&C to reflect the changes and in due course an amendment will be issued.

Duties

3.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for controlling the risks associated with Asbestos Containing Materials (ACMs) on MOD
premises. The arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

4.   Line managers. Line managers are to manage the potential risks associated with ACMs, using the
methodology and guidance at References A - E and as described below.

Guidance for Line Managers

5.    Line managers have a duty to protect their employees and others from exposure to ACMs. Where it is
suspected that ACMs may be present within their building, facility, machinery, work materials or equipment
they should contact the USA or the GHSWE by the quickest means possible so that further action can be
taken where deemed necessary. The flow diagram at Annex A shows the typical procedure to be followed.

Role and Responsibilities of Defence Estates

6.     In accordance with References C & D, Defence Estates (DE) are mandated to ensure that all MOD
buildings, facilities and most fixed machinery or fixed equipment are formally surveyed to determine the
presence, condition and control measures required when ACM is found. Additionally, where DE control or
operate their own workshops or facilities, they are responsible for all machinery and equipment in use (fixed
or non-fixed).

7.     Initially, as part of the formal survey, any existing information relating to the presence/ location of
possible, or known ACM will be gathered from documentation such as registers, drawings, specifications,
method statements etc. and will be carefully examined. The USA and GHSWE will liaise with DE to assist in
providing any relevant documentation as required. DE will then carry out a visual and/or analytical material
assessment to determine whether asbestos exists, or is suspected on the premises. DE must inform Units,



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USA, and 4Cs DHs of the location and condition of ACM. The AHR must be regularly updated to reflect
changes in the condiction or removal of the ACM.

8.     Where ACM is suspected or identified then DE must determine the extent of the risk and prepare a
written Asbestos Management Plan (APM) including an Asbestos Register in accordance with References C
& D. This will identify the areas concerned and the control measures necessary to either repair or remove
depending on its condition or alternatively, manage it where no current risk exists. DE is to implement the
control measures contained within the AMP and monitor the condition of the asbestos as necessary.

9.    Any work carried out on ACMs where DE is deemed responsible shall only be arranged and
completed under strict control in accordance with References A – E. Under no circumstances shall this work
be carried out by any other organisation without DE authority.

ACM identified but not DE Responsibility

10. Line managers should make every effort to avoid using non-fixed equipment, materials or machinery
where ACM is known or suspected (see also Paragraph 13 below). Where this is unavoidable and the work
is of short duration it must be strictly controlled. This effectively allows work of a “sporadic and low intensity
exposure” to be carried out by personnel not directly under the control or responsibility of DE but they must
be competent to do so. A risk assessment must be carried out to identify the type, condition and potential
risks from the ACM before any work commences. The assessment should also indicate the control measures
required including the possible need for a formal safe system of work/method statement. Only personnel
with the appropriate competence are to carry out such assessments and devise the safe system of work
required. Consideration must also be given to protecting other personnel in the vicinity of the work.

Warning Signs

11. Where ACM is identified within a building or facility and its condition is found to be sound, warning
signs must be displayed in such a position that they will be readily visible to anyone that may, potentially be
required to disturb the ACM at any time in the future. The standard warning sign for non-domestic premises
is shown at Reference B, in Leaflet 54. Within BFG a dual language version has been created for use by DE.

Information, Instruction and Training

12. Those employees who carry out work on older machinery or equipment (i.e. boilers, vehicles, trailers,
machinery etc) where there is a likelihood that they may be liable to exposure to ACMs, must be provided
with adequate and regular information, instruction and training to ensure their safety and that of others at all
times. The information should contain the significant findings of the risk assessment including the associated
health risks and precautions in place. Reference may also be made to the survey information, risk
assessment and AMP produced by DE.

Service Provided Machinery, Equipment and Materials

13. Every effort should be made by line managers to ensure that any machinery, equipment or materials
provided through the supply chain for use within the workplace, are asbestos free (for example: vehicle and
trailer parts, gaskets etc). In almost every instance this will be the case but there are certain items that still
contain ACMs (ie. AS90 - Obturator Pads). Special care should also be taken for old stock items or items
transferred from other units or procured locally where suppliers / providers may be less stringent.

Repair, Removal and Disposal

14. It should be stressed that ACM repair or removal work must only be arranged through DE and will be
carried out by a registered specialist-licensed contractor. Any ACM removed is classified as hazardous
waste and must be disposed of strictly in accordance with HN legislation. See Reference E for further
guidance.




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Health Records and Medical Surveillance

15. Where employees are exposed to ACMs, employers must maintain health records containing
approved particulars for 40 years from the date of the last entry. Employees are to
be provided with adequate medical surveillance by a doctor. Reference A & B provide further information on
health surveillance and record maintenance. Where further advice is required, line managers should contact
their USA or GHSWE.

16. Any personnel that suspect or know that they have been exposed to ACMs recently or in the past as a
result of their normal activities, are advised to complete MOD Form 960 in accordance with the instructions
given in JSP 375, Vol 2, Leaflet 5, Annex A, Paragraphs 45 – 48; also see distribution requirements for
UKBCs at paras 17 & 18 below

Reporting for UKBC Staff

17. Copies of MOD Form 960 for UKBCs are to be sent to: PPPA; People Services; J Block; Foxhill;
Bath. BA1 5AB.

18. One copy will be placed on the individual‟s personal file; the other 2 copies will be returned to them
and they may, if they wish, pass one on to their general medical practitioner.




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                                                                                                                                                    Leaflet 14

                                                                             Annex A – Typical Procedure Where ACM is Suspected


                                                        ACM SUSPECTED
                                                       IN THE WORKPLACE


                                          CONTACT USA AND/OR GHSWE BY QUICKEST
                                         MEANS POSSIBLE (USA/GHSWE to liaise with DE
                                             to determine responsibility for action)




                DE NOT RESPONSIBLE 1                                                               DE RESPONSIBLE 2



      USA OR GHSWE TO LIAISE WITH PERSON                                      USA OR GHSWE TO CHECK WITH DE IF RECORDS HELD
   RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SUSPECTED SOURCE                                               INDICATE THE PRESENCE OF ACM
(Check with service supplier, manufacturer or others if                                (i.e. Check DE Asbestos Register)
   item contains ACM and check availability of an
            alternative, suitable material)
                                                                                  USA OR GHSWE TO ADVISE G4 SHEF-UKSC(G) ON
                                                                                         FINDINGS FOR FURTHER ACTION


   SOURCE KNOWN                      SOURCE UNKNOWN
(USA / GHSWE to advise             (USA / GHSWE to advise               NO RECORD OF ACM FOUND                        ACM RECORDED IN DE
  G4 SHEF – UKSC(G))                 G4 SHEF – UKSC(G))                      IN DE REGISTER                                REGISTER


                                                                       DETERMINE SOURCE OF ACM                       DETERMINE SOURCE OF
     ACTION BY PERSON                                                    IN LIAISON WITH PERSON                       ACM IN LIAISON WITH
       RESPONSIBLE                                                      RESPONSIBLE AND GHSWE                             DE/GHSWE
                                                                             (Where necessary)                         (Where necessary)
                                     G4 SHEF-HQ UKSC(G)
                                           ACTION
                                                                        NOTIFY EHT OF SUSPECTED
                                                                        EXPOSURE AND DECIDE ON
                                                                        SAMPLING/TESTING ROUTE

     CONDUCT RISK
ASSESSMENT FOR WORK                                                                 EHT
   OF A SPORADIC AND                                                              ACTION
     LOW INTENSITY                                                               REQUIRED?
EXPOSURE & IMPLEMENT                                   No                                                     Yes
  CONTROL MEASURES
 IAW MANUFACTURER‟S                             G4 SHEF-HQ UKSC(G)
  INSTRUCTIONS & MOD                                  ACTION
       GUIDANCE

                                                  ARRANGE FOR                                 ARRANGE FOR IN-HOUSE
                                              SAMPLING/TESTING OF                             SAMPLING/ TESTING OR
                                                 ACM THROUGH                                       THROUGH
                                              WIWEB/WIS/TÜV/OTHERS                                AMD-EMT UK



                                            NOTIFY GARRISON/UNIT/ DE
                                                 OF RESULTS IN
                                                GERMAN/ENGLISH



                   DE TO ARRANGE FOR CLEANING/REPAIR/REPLACEMENT IN LIAISON WITH
                                G4 SHEF-HQ UKSC(G) / GHSWE / SHEF FP
                            AND UPDATE ASBESTOS REGISTER ACCORDINGLY

Footnotes:

1.       Miscellaneous items of machinery/equipment/components or other suspected or known ACM‟s where DE is not deemed responsible.
         For example, these items may include service supplied components, vehicle and trailer parts, gaskets or spare parts. Although it is rare
         that ACMs will be present in any of these items it cannot be ignored and action must be taken in accordance with the flow diagram if
         suspected.

2.       Any suspected or known ACM‟s within buildings/facilities/equipment or machinery where DE are responsible. This includes fixed or non
         fixed equipment or machinery where used in workshops or facilities under DE control or contract.




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Leaflet 15 - Manual Handling

                                             MANUAL HANDLING

References:

A.    JSP 375, Vol 2, Leaflet 4.
B.    Lastenhandhabungsverordnung 1996.

Introduction

1.     A manual handling operation is defined as “any transporting or supporting of a load by hand or other
bodily force”. This includes lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling, carrying, and moving or static supports of
loads where bodily force is involved. Lifting or moving heavy objects is common in the military environment
and often results in injury. Detailed guidance including risk assessment procedure can be found at
References A and B. It should be noted that at the time of publication of this version 2.2 of the BFG SHEF
Manual (Aug 08) MOD has revised the risk assessment forms of Reference A, but has not yet revised the
JSP itself. For ease of use and reference the new risk assessment forms are attached at Annex A

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of risk associated with manual handling operations and that the
arrangements are monitored and reviewed as necessary.

3.    Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that where the manual handling operations/activities
cannot be avoided a suitable and sufficient risk assessment is carried out by a competent person, and
controls implemented to minimise the risk of harm.

4.     Employees. In accordance with References A and B every employee is to comply with any safe
systems of work provided by their line manager. Employees selected or tasked to carry out manual handling
operations/activities must firstly inform their line manager of any physical or medical pre-condition that could
affect their ability or condition when undertaking the task.

Guidance for Line Managers

5.     In order to reduce the risk of harm to employees, the line manager must try to avoid manual handling
in the first instance or if that is not possible automate or mechanise the operation. If some residual risk still
remains then a manual handling assessment should be undertaken and appropriate control measures put in
place. A typical hierarchy of measures to be taken is shown at Annex A to Reference A.

Application of best working practice

6.      Where possible, line managers should, in the first instance, consider changing the working practices
where reasonably practicable with a view to avoiding the need to undertake manual handling operations. If
this is not considered feasible then consideration needs to be given to automating the process or providing
appropriate mechanical handling devices such as lift trucks, sack trolleys, conveyor rollers etc. If careful
consideration is given to these measures and the risk has been reduced to the lowest level reasonably
practicable, they may prevent the need to conduct a full manual handling risk assessment. Line managers
are advised to contact their USA or GHSWE for assistance in identifying the correct methodology or
equipment to reduce the potential risk.

Assessment

7.     Where the risk cannot be avoided then employers are to carry out a suitable and sufficient risk
assessment of the manual handling operation/activity. The forms at Annex A should be used. This should
take into account the task, the individual, the load, the working environment and any other related issues.
The risk assessment and control measures should be reviewed to ensure they remain current and effective.


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Monitoring and Review

8.     The LM is responsible for ensuring that all control measures identified in the assessment are
continually monitored for effectiveness and are being adhered to. An initial review of the risk assessment
and control measures should take place shortly after implementation, in order to check the effectiveness of
control measures. This review would also look at medium and long-term measures that may have resource
implications, which may have been raised upwards through the chain of command. Further guidance can be
found at References A & B.

Competency

9.     In the majority of cases no specific competency is required to carry out a basic manual handling
assessment. However a meaningful assessment can only be based on practical knowledge, ability, training
and experience of the manual handling operations/activities that take place in the workplace concerned.
Where the assessment is complex then advice and guidance should be sought from the USA, GHSWE or
other competent specialists.

Training

10. Training requirements will be identified through training needs analysis based assessment of the
frequency of the task and the risk to employees. All employees must receive manual handling operations
training, as detailed at Reference A. Bids for the Manual Handling Operations Instructor Course (i.e. Train-
the-trainer) provided by RAF Halton and other service providers, are to be directed through the garrison
SHEF FP to J4 SHEF Branch, UKSC for consideration and further action.

Records

11. Manual handling operations risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be
destroyed on review but held in case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Training
records should also be retained for a period of 5 years.




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                                            Annex A – Manual handling risk assessment form/checklist


                     MANUAL HANDLING RISK ASSESSMENT FORM / CHECKLIST

                                               SECTION A
Establishment & Location:

Name of Assessor:             Service/Staff No:       Rank/Grade:                   Ext:


Line Manager:                 Service/Staff No:       Rank/Grade:                   Ext:


Type of Assessment:           Single / Generic:       Date of Assessment:


Description of Operation:                             The Load:          (Diagram where appropriate)




Hierarchy of Controls: Can the operation be,
   Eliminated               Automated                  Use of Mechanical Aids                Indicate Y or N
If any of the above measures cannot be implemented immediately, then a detailed manual handling
assessment is required at section B on the following page, and sections C to E must also be completed.
If these measures can be implemented straight away, but there may be a possibility of some risk of injury
remaining, then a manual handling assessment is also required.




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                                                    SECTION B
                                                                                         Control Measures /
                   Question to consider                              Level of Risk
                                                                                         Remedial Action /
(If the answer is yes place a tick against it, then consider                                 Remarks
the level of risk)
The Tasks Do they involve:                                Y/N   Mi      L    M       H
   Holding loads at a distance from the body.
   Twisting of the trunk?
   Stooping?
   Lifting above waist height or lowering below mid
    thigh?
   Moving a load over excessive distances over 10
    metres?
   Excessive pushing or pulling of the load?
   Repetitive handling?
   Insufficient rest or recovery periods?
   Frequent or prolonged physical effort?
   Positioning load precisely?
The Loads Are they:
   Heavy?
   Bulky/ unwieldy?
   Difficult to grasp?
   Unstable or contents likely to shift
   Intrinsically harmful (sharp/hot)?
The Working Environment            Are there:
   Space constraints preventing good posture?
   Uneven slippery or unstable floors?
   Variations in level of floors or work surfaces?
   Hot/cold conditions?
   Strong air movements?
   Poor lighting conditions?
Individual Capability        Does the job:
  Stretch the employee‟s physical capabilities to
   the point of risk injury?
 Pose a risk due to the employee‟s present state
   of health?
 Pose a hazard for those who are pregnant?
 Require additional knowledge or training for the
   task to be carried out safely?
Other Factors
   Is movement or posture hindered by clothing,
    footwear or Personal Protective Equipment
    (PPE)?
   Other (Suppliers/Scheduled deliveries etc)
Initial Risk Rating                Mi / L / M / H


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 Mi = Minimal, L=Low, M=Medium, H=High – If HIGH RISK is identified in any of the above then LM must
                                          reduce risk.
                                               SECTION C

Recommended Action and additional controls required to reduce to a risk rating of low or below:
Short term/Immediate controls; Medium Term Controls and Longer Term Measures, must be stated.
Where actions entail resource implications, which may entail raising through the chain of command then this
must also be stated
1. Short Term/Immediate:


2. Medium Term:


3. Longer Term:


Signed: (Assessor)                                   Date:

                                               SECTION D

Line Managers/Commanders Actions/Comments:
To Include whether additional controls are agreed, Measures taken and Target Dates

                         Measures                                 Target Date            Comments
1. Short Term/Immediate:


2. Medium Term:


3. Longer Term:



Risk Rating after the implementation of the above Control Measures:         Mi     L       M         H

Signed:                                              Date:
Senior Manager for Activity/Process
Date for First Review:

                                               SECTION E

Line Managers/Commanders First Review and Revised Risk Rating:              Mi     L       M         H

Controls Effective:                                  Yes / No:
Comments:




Signed:                                              Date:
Senior Manager for Activity/Process
Date for Second Review:



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Leaflet 16 - MOD Premises (Clubs; Societies; Encroachments)

                        MOD PREMISES (CLUBS, SOCIETIES, ENCROACHMENTS)

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol. 2, Leaflet 3.

Introduction

1.     Clubs, societies and encroachments are always to be included in the organisation and arrangements
made when devising a risk management strategy. Certain clubs and societies carry out activities that have
many significant hazards and risks, for example, car, woodworking, climbing and gliding club. MOD has a
legal obligation to protect club members and others who may be affected by these activities. All employees
who organise or run clubs, societies, or social events and activities are to read and understand Reference A.

Duties

2.     Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure their unit has adequate arrangements
for controlling the risks associated with clubs and societies on MOD land and premises. A responsible officer
or other person accountable to the Commanding Officer is always given formal responsibility to be in charge
of such activities.

Guidance for Line Managers

3.     In this context the Line Manager is defined as the officially appointed officer or the person responsible
for the club or activity appointed under paragraph 2 above. The Line Manager is to write a short Safety
Statement which is to comply with Leaflet 3 Annex B Appendix 1 of Reference A .

4.   Where a club or encroachment has Non UK Based members, further advice is to be sought from the
USA or the GHSWE.

5.     There must also be an effective procedure to ensure all guests, contractors and visitors are provided
with information on the potential risks to which they may be exposed. These arrangements are to be
regularly monitored and reviewed as necessary.

6.     The purpose of risk assessment is to identify known or potential hazards, evaluate the risks and where
they cannot be eliminated, be minimised and controlled by suitable control measures, thus safeguarding the
health, safety and welfare of persons using MOD premises. Suitable and sufficient risk assessments are to
be carried out on all club or encroachment activities. This includes internal and external activities. A guide to
risk assessment for clubs and societies is outlined in Reference A, Annex A.

7.     Facilities provided for leisure and social activity must be free from the risk to the H&S of those using
them and from any environmentally damaging effects. The fabric of the building should be maintained and
kept free from defects. Safe access and egress must be assured at all times and fire regulations complied
with.

8.    All equipment provided for club use is to be fit for its intended purpose and maintained so it can be
used safely. Information, training, instruction and supervision are to be provided on all hazardous equipment
and activities.

9.    Club, society and encroachments are to be included in the SHEF Audit/Inspection regime of the
responsible commander. SHEF Standards are to meet those prescribed for places of work.




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Insurance Cover

10. Activities outside the normal MOD work environment are not normally indemnified for insurance
purposes. The organisers of social events and activities must seek advice through the appropriate channels
as to the level and extent of insurance cover required.

Fire Safety

11. All Clubs, societies and encroachments are to receive a Fire Safety Management Plan (FSMP) and
are to comply with fire safety direction contained therein. Alterations to the FSMP are not permitted without
the express written authority of the responsible DFR&S Officer.

Training

12. All persons who use the club or society must be given appropriate information; training and
supervision to ensure safety standards are understood and met. The level of training will be dependent on
the risk from the equipment or activity. All members should receive induction and familiarisation training on
joining the club, and specific training on any hazardous activity or equipment.




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Leaflet 17 - New/Expectant Mothers at Work

                                         NEW/EXPECTANT MOTHERS AT WORK
References:

A.        JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 36.
                              14
B.        Mutterschutzgesetz.
C.        Mutterschutz-Richtlinienverordunung (EU/92/85).
D.        SIBA(G) 6200

Introduction

1.     Pregnant women or women who have recently given birth or are breast-feeding are at risk from certain
work activities. Legislation imposes provision on employers to ensure that these workers are not exposed to
any process, working condition or physical, chemical or biological agent that may adversely affect their H&S
or that of their baby. Pregnancy should not be equated with ill health but be regarded as part of everyday life
and its H&S addressed by good H&S management procedures.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers, Heads of Establishment and Department Heads are
to ensure that that their unit has adequate arrangements for the management of risk to pregnant women and
new mothers and that the arrangements are monitored and reviewed as necessary.

3.    Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that any significant risks faced by new and expectant
mothers are formally assessed and appropriately controlled. Assessments are to be regularly monitored and
reviewed.

4.    Employees. New and expectant mothers should inform their line manager in writing as soon as they
are aware of their condition, and provide a medical certificate confirming their condition if requested to do so.
LEC should also inform the GLSU.

Guidance for line managers

5.     If a risk to a pregnant woman cannot be avoided or adequately reduced to a safe level, line managers
must make changes to the working conditions/hours or offer alternative work. If this is not possible then the
employee is to be given paid leave for as long as necessary to protect her H&S, or that of the child. These
actions are necessary where there is genuine concern for safety as a result of risk assessment. Prior to this
action, advice should be sought from the garrison SHEF FP and GLSU.

6.     References A to D, provide guidance on other aspects of pregnancy and breastfeeding. This includes
night working, provision of rest rooms, and medical facilities. Further guidance can be sought from the GLSU
and garrison HSW Expert..

Hazards

7.     Reference A outlines the physical, biological and chemical agents and working conditions which may
affect the H&S of new or expectant mothers. Many of the hazards are covered by specific H&S legislation. If
any of the hazards are present in the workplace, the line manager should seek the advice of the USA or
GHSWE. Some of the more common hazards are:

                    Lifting/carrying of loads (manual handling)
                    Standing or sitting for long periods
                    Stress
                    DSE workstations/posture


14
     A copy of Reference B must be made accessible to female employees.

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                Shiftwork
                Violence
                Exposure to:

                o    Hazardous substances
                o    Infectious diseases
                o    Extreme heat or cold
                o    Radioactive sources
                o    Cigarette smoke
                o    Noise

Risk assessment

8.    Hazards in a workplace are likely to remain constant; however the possibility of damage to the foetus
from a hazard will vary at different stages of a pregnancy. Therefore risk assessments are to be reviewed
frequently to manage the risk effectively.

9.      When carrying out a risk assessment, line managers are to pay particular attention to workers who are
new or expectant mothers, and to take actions to ensure they are not exposed to any significant risk. This
will include risks to the unborn child or child of a woman who is still breast feeding – not just the risks to the
mother herself. The results of the risk assessment must be discussed with the employee.

Control measures

10. Line Managers must consider implementing suitable measures to eliminate or reduce the risk to the
health of expectant mothers and there unborn child. Consideration must be given to providing a separate
rest area and an area for nursing mothers. Toilettes are not suitable for this purpose.

Records

11. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Where the assessment identifies the
potential for employees to be exposed to a prescribed disease, impulse noise or radiation which requires
health screening or surveillance then a copy of the assessment should form part of the employee's records
and kept for 40 years.




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Leaflet 18 - Noise at Work

                                                      NOISE AT WORK
References:

A.     JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 6. (Currently suspended)
B.     2006DIN07-008: MoD Policy for the Control of Noise and Vibration at Work Regulations 2005.
C.     Unfallverhütungsvorshriften (UVV) - Lärm BGV B3.
D.     NAWR 2005

Introduction

1.     Employers have a legal duty to prevent damage to the hearing of their employees not only when they
are at their main place of work but also when they are working elsewhere. In addition, contractors,
maintenance personnel, visitors and others who share the workplace must also be considered. The preferred
method in reducing noise should be firstly through engineering solutions, secondly by organisational
measures and finally the issue and use of hearing protection should only be considered as a last resort.

2.    Reference A, which outlines the procedures relating to the Noise at Work Regulations (NAWR) 1989;
have now been superseded by Reference B, which outlines the procedures relating to the new Control of
Noise at Work Regulations (CNAWR) 2005 brought about by the EU Physical Agents (Noise) Directive
(2003/10/EC).

Changes in Legislation

3.      References B & D include the revised Noise Assessment form to reflect the new workplace exposure
limits. The changes also include an amended Noise Assessment form which is at Annex A to this leaflet.
Gars/units are permitted to reproduce it until such time that Reference A is amended by DS&C. The standard
Nomogram previously used for calculating noise levels has now been withdrawn and replaced with a
                             15
numerical Ready Reckoner and this is also shown at Annex A.

4.     The new CNAWR introduce a number of changes to the NAWR including a reduction in the levels of
exposure and new legal limits on exposure but the main emphasis of the new Regulations is to control noise,
not just measure it. Employers are now required to concentrate on practical measures by reducing the
exposure to as low as is reasonably practicable.

5.    It is anticipated that the impact of the legislative changes to our noise policy and procedures in BFG
should be minimal and there should be little change to the methodology in the assessing techniques carried
out by our noise assessors.

Duties

6.     Commanding officers. Commanding officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate arrangements
in place for the protection of employees or others from any known or potential noise sources within their
areas of responsibility. The arrangements must be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

7.     Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that all employees or others are protected from any
known or potential noise source within their areas of responsibility. Where noise sources exist a noise
assessment should be conducted to ascertain persons at risk, extent of risk and control measures
required/in place to minimise exposure. All effort is to be made to eliminate or control noise within the
workplace and only then, where appropriate, hearing protection should be provided and hearing protection
zones suitably and clearly marked. Appropriate information, instruction and training should be provided to
employees and a programme of health surveillance including audiometric testing should be instigated and
maintained where appropriate.



12
  The Institute of Naval Medicine has withdrawn the use of the Nomogram and now use only the numerical Ready Reckoner. It is
anticipated that DS&C will replace the Nomogram with the Ready Reckoner in the near future

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8.     Employees. Employees are to ensure that they inform their line manager of any suspected levels of
noise in the workplace that may be considered hazardous. Employees are to use hearing protection correctly
and ensure it is worn when instructed i.e. when in hearing protection zones or when warning signs are
displayed. Any hearing protection defects should be reported to the line manager. See also paragraph 26.

Guidance for line managers

9.     Noise Exposure Values. The Regulations set three exposure values.

       a.    Lower Exposure Action Values: This is set as a daily* (or weekly) personal noise exposure
       Lep,d of 80 dB(A); and a peak sound pressure level of 135 dB(C).

                    Note: In calculating this level no account is taken of any hearing protection worn.

       b.    Upper Exposure Action Values: This is set as a daily or weekly personal noise exposure of 85
       dB(A); and a peak sound pressure level of 137 dB(C).

                    Note: In calculating this level no account is taken of any hearing protection worn.

       c.    Exposure Limit Values: This is set as a daily or weekly personal noise exposure level of 87
       dB(A); and a peak sound pressure level of 140 dB(C).

                    Note: These limits DO take account of the reduction afforded by hearing protection. See
                    also paragraphs 13 to 17 below.

          * Where daily noise exposure varies markedly from one working day to another the regulations allow
          employers to average values over a working week. “Working day” means a daily working period,
          irrespective of the time of day when it begins or ends, and of whether it begins or ends on the same
          day. “Weekly noise exposure level” means the logarithmic average of daily noise exposure levels
          over a week, normalised to five working days.

10. Irrespective of the action values as stated above, there is still some risk of hearing damage from
exposure below these levels and it is therefore the line managers‟ responsibility to ensure, where reasonably
practicable, all measures are taken to reduce the employee exposure.

11. The Exposure Limit Values are most likely to be experienced in areas where employees are subject to
weapon firing or using cartridge operated tools. In these situations the Basic Noise Assessor must refer their
findings to the USA/GHSWE/Gar SHEF FPs for further action. Additionally, where the daily personal noise
                                                  13
exposure (Lep,d) reaches or exceeds 100 dB(A) this level must also be referred to the USA/GHSWE/Gar
SHEF FPs. See also paragraphs 13 & 15 below. Examples of sound levels from typical noise sources are
shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Examples of Sound Levels:

                 Sound Level dB(A)                                           Noise Source
                       120                                                Jet take off at 100m
                       110                                                 Pneumatic chisel
                       100                                                      Road drill
                        90                                                 Wood turning lathe
                        70                                                     Road traffic
                        30                                                  Quiet bedroom
                        20                                                  Leaves rustling
                         0                                                Threshold of hearing




13
   The Institute of Naval Medicine recommend that (regardless of the attenuation properties of any hearing protection provided) if an
Lep,d of 100 dB(A) is measured then the Basic Noise Assessor should refer the matter to the USA/GHSWE / SHEF FP for further
specialist measurement through J4 SHEF Branch, HQ UKSC.

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Noise assessments

13. Line managers are to make adequate arrangements to ensure that a risk assessment is carried out
where the noise level is likely to be at, or above, the Lower Exposure Action Values. Only personnel that
have attended the Basic Noise Assessors‟ Course are deemed to be competent to conduct such
assessments. There are a number of competent persons within BFG who are authorised to carry out basic
noise assessments for Lower and Upper Exposure Action Values but they are required to refer any situation
where the noise level is at, or above, the Exposure Limit Values after hearing protection attenuation has
been included to reduce the Lep,d. See also paragraphs 16 & 17 below. Further advice can be obtained from
USA or GHSWE.

       n. A basic rule of thumb guide on whether the Exposure Action Values have been reached is
       indicated as follows:

         a.    Lower Exposure Action Value: Where the noise is intrusive but normal conversation is possible
                                                                       2 142
         and personnel are exposed to this noise for more than 6 hours

         b.    Upper Exposure Action Value: Where the voice needs to be raised to hold a conversation with
         a person about 2 metres away for at least part of the day.

Reduction of Noise Exposure

15. Where the noise exposure is likely to be at, or above, the Exposure Action Values then measures
must be taken to reduce exposure, before considering the use of hearing protection, to as low as is
reasonably practicable.

16. Where the noise exposure is, or likely to be, above the Exposure Limit Values then steps must be
taken to reduce it. Hearing protection can be used (in conjunction with noise reduction techniques) as a
means of reducing the exposure to below the Exposure Limit Values. For example, if the Lep,d is measured
at 96 dB(A) and the attenuation value of the selected hearing protection is 20 dB(A), then the exposure level
will be reduced to 76 dB(A) which is below the Exposure Limit Values (87 dB(A)) and indeed, in this case,
the Lower Exposure Action Value (80 dB(A)). The selection of the hearing protection attenuation properties
will obviously have a direct bearing on whether the Exposure Limit Value is likely to be exceeded or not.
Border line cases should always be referred.

17. Where the Lep,d cannot be reduced below the Exposure Limit Values where hearing protection has
been provided, then this situation must be referred to the USA/GHSWE/SHEF FP for further action. Gar staff
will then pass all requests to J4 SHEF Branch, HQ UKSC for further specialist action by G1 UKSC
Environmental Health Team (EHT). This action will include specialist assessment outside the scope of the
training received by students during the Basic Noise Assessors‟ Course run by the INM.

18. If noise cannot be reduced below the Exposure Limit Value and the use of the particular equipment
and associated activity is essential then the matter should be referred to the USA/GHSWE/SHEF FP for
further consultation with J4 SHEF Branch.

19.      The hierarchy of control measures to reduce noise requires line managers to consider:

         a.     Elimination or isolation from source of noise.
         b.     Enclosure, silencers, lagging, damping, screens.
         c.     Training, information, supervision.
         d.     Reduce exposure time, or increase distance from source.
         e.     Use of ear protection (as a last resort).




14
     This timescale is recommended in accordance with HSE Guidance L108 and has been adopted by the Institute of Naval Medicine.

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Hearing Protection

20. The Regulations require that when employees are exposed to the Lower Exposure Action Values
suitable hearing protection should be offered to employees who request it. For exposure at or above the
Upper Exposure Action Values protective equipment is to be issued and worn.

21. Line managers must monitor hearing protection use. It is not acceptable to issue protection and allow
the employee to make the decision on its use. Hearing protection is readily available, simple to use and a
major means of protection against noise induced hearing loss. However, it should be the last line of defence
in noise control.

22. Arrangements for issue, inspection, maintenance and records relating to hearing protection are
described at References A & B.

Hearing Protection Zones

23. Line Managers are to designate any area where employees are exposed to the Upper Exposure
Action Value or above as a Hearing Protection Zone. These zones should be clearly marked and identified
by signs that comply with current legislation. Employee must wear hearing protection prior to entering the
zone and at all times when within.

Maintenance and Use of Equipment

24. Line managers are required to ensure that any work related equipment is regularly inspected,
maintained, used and controlled to prevent excessive noise. Equipment that produces high levels of noise
should be marked with appropriate warning signs.

Hearing Test (Audiometric Screening)
                                                                           15
25. Units are to nominate a Hearing Conservation Officer (HCO). The HCO is responsible for ensuring
that any personnel exposed to noise levels above the Upper Exposure Action Value, and for those who may
be especially vulnerable if exposed to noise above the Lower Exposure Action Value, are placed under
suitable health surveillance, which shall include a hearing test. Line managers must identify such members
of staff and ensure that they are provided with the appropriate information and instruction on noise hazards
and the control measures in place to effectively reduce the risk of harm. An effective hearing conservation
programme is to be implemented with audiometric screening conducted at regular intervals. The advice of
the appropriate medical services should be sought as to what constitutes an effective hearing conservation
programme including frequency of testing. Hearing conservation programmes for DEL employees will be
provided by the appropriate OMP.
26. Where appropriate, pre/post audiometric screening should be considered to reduce the possibility of
opportunist civil claim action.

Training

27. Line managers, in conjunction with the competent person, are to ensure that employees who are, or
are likely, to be exposed to hazardous noise are given appropriate information, instruction and training on the
risks of hearing damage that exposure may cause, and any actions taken to reduce that risk. Employees
must be correctly instructed in the use of equipment provided to protect their hearing. (See Annex B to
Reference B).

Records
28. MOD policy requires units to retain copies of all noise assessments for a period of 40 years. Health
surveillance records classified as “Restricted – Medical” documents will be required to be stored in the
individuals‟ Medical file for a minimum of 40 years.
15
  The HCO within Units is usually an integral role fulfilled by the USA (normally the QM) and the title commonly given is the Noise at
Work Officer (NAWO).Annex A – Noise Assessment Record




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                                                                       Annex A – Noise Assessment Record
                                     Noise Assessment Record

(The following should be conducted in conjunction with JSP 375 and the Guidance at ANNEX A of this form)
                            Modified by Institute of Naval Medicine: May 2007
1. Assessment details:
    Title of Assessment

    Reference No.                                 Date of assessment



    If this is a re-assessment enter previous details:
    Reference No. of previous
                                               Date of previous assessment
    assessment


2. Assessment carried out by:
    Name                      Initials                     Establishment

    Rank/grade                Post                         Signature




3. Location of Assessment & type of noise environment:




4. Summary of Results (Complete after sections 5 – 14)

                                                              Lower            Upper
                                         Number of                                            LEP,d
                                                             Exposure         Exposure
              Post(name)                 employees                                          100dB(A)
                                                           Action Value     Action Value
                                          exposed                                          exceeded?
                                                            exceeded?        exceeded?




 Is a specialist noise assessment required?                               Yes
                                                                                              No



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5. Measurement Equipment Details

 Sound Level
                                     Serial No.                     Date of Calibration
 Meter

 Microphone                          Serial No.                     Date of Calibration

 Calibrator
                                     Serial No.                     Date of Calibration
 Model

6. Sketch of Workplace
(Show locations of noise sources, normal working positions etc.)




7. Details of Operations/Remarks
(Include details of existing hearing conservation measures, e.g. enclosures, silencers, personal
hearing protection)




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                                                                                Annex A – Noise Assessment Record


                                           Noise Assessment Record

(The following should be conducted in conjunction with JSP 375 and the Guidance at ANNEX A of this form)
                            Modified by Institute of Naval Medicine: May 2007
1. Assessment details:
     Title of Assessment


     Reference No.                                         Date of assessment




     If this is a re-assessment enter previous details:

     Reference No. of previous assessment                  Date of previous assessment




2. Assessment carried out by:
     Name                           Initials                        Establishment


     Rank/grade                     Post                            Signature




3. Location of Assessment & type of noise environment:




4. Summary of Results (Complete after sections 5 – 14)

                                                                                          Upper
                                                    Number of       Lower Exposure                          LEP,d
                                                                                         Exposure
                  Post(name)                        employees        Action Value                         100dB(A)
                                                                                       Action Value
                                                     exposed          exceeded?                          exceeded?
                                                                                        exceeded?




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Is a specialist noise assessment required?                         Yes
                                                                               No




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                                  Measurement Results


Start Calibration Level: (dB)                    End Calibration Level (dB)

 Name &       Activity &    Measurement   Measurement   Exposure   Exposure    LEP,d
  Post        location        Duration     Leq dB(A)    Duration   Points     dB(A)    Remarks




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Recommendations
Actions necessary to comply with Control of Noise at Work Regulations:

   8. Reduction of noise exposure by means other than the provision of hearing
   protection
   (Essential if employees are exposed above the Upper Exposure Action Value)




    9. Instruction, Information and Training of employees
    (All employees exposed at or above the Lower Exposure Action Value)




   10. Hearing Protection Zones
   (Essential in areas where employees are exposed above the Upper Exposure Action Value)




   11. Provision of Personal Hearing Protection
   (Include Type and Stock Number if applicable)




   12. Additional Recommendations
   (list any further actions which have not been previously discussed)




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13. Record of reviews:
       Date of initial assessment                     Reference No. of initial assessment




                                                                                                  Re-
     Date of
                  Name of reviewer             Post held                Signature               assess?
     review




                                                            If yes enter new Reference No. and
       Is a new assessment required?          Yes
                                                            Date:-
       Reference No. of new assessment                      Date of new assessment



Note :–
A review should be undertaken every 2 years or sooner if there is a change in work practices.
A reassessment should be undertaken every 4 years

14. Further comments

         Reference No. of initial assessment




15. Action taken by Line Manager




         Name:                    Signature:                           Date:




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                                   READY RECKONER

                            Duration of exposure (hours)                       Total     Noise
  LAeq
                                                                             exposure   exposure
  (dB)        ¼     ½      1         2        4            8   10     12      points    LEP,d (dB)
  104         250   500   1000      2000    4000      8000                    8000        104
  103         200   400   800       1600    3200      6500     8000           6500        103
  102         160   320   650       1250    2500      5000     6500   7500    5000        102
  101         125   250   500       1000    2000      4000     5000   6000    4000        101
  100         100   200   400       800     1600      3200     4000   4700    3200        100
  99          80    160   320       650     1250      2500     3200   3800    2500         99
  98          65    125   250       500     1000      2000     2500   3000    2000         98
  97          50    100   200       400      800      1600     2000   2400    1600         97
  96          40    80    160       320      650      1300     1600   1900    1300         96
  95          32    65    125       250      500      1000     1300   1500    1000         95
  94          25    50    100       200      400      800      1000   1200     800         94
  93          20    40    80        160      320      650      800    950      650         93
  92          16    32    65        125      250      500      650    750      500         92
  91          13    25    50        100      200      400      500    600      400         91
  90          10    20    40        80       160      320      400    470      320         90
  89          8     16    32        65       130      250      320    380      250         89
  88          6     12    25        50       100      200      250    300      200         88
  87          5     10    20        40       80       160      200    240      160         87
  86          4     8     16        32       65       125      160    190      125         86
  85          3     6     13        25       50       100      125    150      100         85
  84                5     10        20       40        80      100    120      80          84
  83                4      8        16       32        65      80     95       65          83
  82                       6        13       25        50      65     75       50          82
  81                       5        10       20        40      50     60       40          81
  80                       4         8       16        32      40     48       32          80
  79                                 6       13        25      32     38       25          79
  78                                 5       10        20      25     30       20          78
  77                                 4        8        16      20     24       16          77




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Leaflet 19 - Occupational Health

                                          OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

References:

A.    Queens Regulations Paragraph 5.321.
B.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 43.
C.    Arbeitssicherheitsgesetz.
D.    20080901-Occupational Health Advice and Support- PRG


Introduction

1.     Occupational Health comprises those aspects of human health and disease that are determined by
physical, chemical and biological factors in the working environment. It aims to protect, maintain and
enhance capability by the theory and practice of assessing, communicating, correcting, controlling and
preventing those factors in the environment that potentially can adversely affect the health or survival of
personnel. Occupational hygiene is an applied science concerned with the identification, measurement,
appraisal of risk, and control to acceptable standards, of physical, chemical and biological factors arising in
or from the workplace which may affect the health or well-being of those at work or in the community.

Duties

2.     Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are ultimately responsible for the health and hygiene
of their units as set out in the References. They are to ensure that their unit has adequate arrangements for
the management of occupational health. The arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

3.     Line managers. Line managers are responsible for ensuring that effective risk assessments are
carried out of all tasks undertaken by their subordinates. These must be recorded where necessary and
reviewed when the task, equipment or individual changes. They must also ensure that subordinates have the
correct supervision, training and equipment to carry out their duties. They must report any Occupational
Health concerns to the Unit Safety Advisor who, in turn, should seek advice from Garrison HQ in the first
instance.

4.    Employees. Employees must comply with rules and guidance put in place for the purpose of
sustaining safety in the workplace. They must report any occupational health concerns to their line manager
and must report for any medical examinations related to occupational health.

GUIDANCE FOR LINE MANAGERS

Military Occupational Health

5.   The Environmental Health Team (EHT) HQ UKSC is responsible for provision of environmental health
support to British Forces in Operational and Infrastructure Support capabilities. The EHT provides an in-
house EH advisory service for operational formations and headquarters, and other administratively
dependent elements of the European Continent. The EHT contributes to relevant aspects of Health
Defence.

6.     The EHT HQ 1 (UK) Armd Div provides operational support for all units under command of their
Division. Within Operational constraints the EHT HQ 1 (UK) Armd Div and the Env Health Tech 1 CSMR, can
be requested to assist EHT HQ UKSCin carrying out its infrastructure support tasks within the Div area. Army
EH personnel located at the School of Health at the LWCTG(G) in Sennelager provide an Occupational
Safety and Health, and Environmental Health training resource.

7.    The EHT UKSC provides a wide variety of Environmental Health and Occupational Hygiene services.
For example, catering premise inspections, Specialist Staff Inspections (SSI‟s), workplace inspections,



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general EH advice, noise monitoring, lighting surveys, thermal comfort surveys and monitoring for hazardous
substances.

8.     In order to prevent confusion amongst units, all EH and Occupational Hygiene infrastructure support
tasks (i.e. Non Operational) must be passed through the GHSWE in the first instance who will liaise with HQ
UKSC.

Civilian Occupational Health

9.     Occupational Health for DEL employees is covered under arrangements made through the
Occupational Medical Practitioner appointed for the Garrison as set out under Reference C. Arrangements
are also audited by the Host Nation Health and Safety Regulators during their routine audit visits to all units
employing DEL. Further guidance is given in this SHEF Manual at Part 1 Chapter 4.

10. Occupational health for all UKBC employees is made under UK arrangements set out in Reference D.
This places duties on line managers and employees alike and should be studied and complied with as
necessary

Records

11. In accordance with the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 2004,
health surveillance records must be kept for specific periods. Guidance is given at Reference B.




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Leaflet 20 - Office Safety

                                              OFFICE SAFETY

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 17.
B.    Arbeitsstättenverordnung.
C.    BGI – 774.

Introduction

1.    Offices, although normally considered benign, do have their own particular hazards which can range
from the psychological such as stress to the physical such as simple slips, trips and falls or work related
upper limb disorder (WRULD). Research shows that office workers tend to be exposed more to health rather
than safety risks but nevertheless both have the same priority when considering the methods of elimination
and/or the controls required.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of hazards and risks in their office environments. The arrangements are
to be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

3.   Line managers. Line managers are to ensure that all office hazards are identified and the risk of
harm assessed and appropriate control measures implemented to reduce the risk of harm to employees.

4.     Employees. Employees are to use any office equipment in accordance with the manufacturer
instructions and the training provided by the employer.

Guidance for Line Managers

5.      Detailed guidance on managing the risks associated with office environments is provided by
Reference A. There are a number of typical hazards in an office environment that may be considered as
significant risks to the staff, for example: WRULDs, use of electrical and mechanical appliances such as
electrical staplers or guillotines, manual handling and slip, trips and falls. Risk assessments are to be
completed for all office environments and where risks are evaluated as significant, but cannot be eliminated,
then appropriate control measures are to be implemented to minimise them to as low as reasonably
practicable. Some further guidance on risk associated with office machinery in particular are at Annex A.

6.     There are a number of minor differences between References A and B such as temperature and room
space. These are unlikely to impinge on the employees' H&S, however, where DEL and military work
together in an office environment then References B and C are to apply in order to conform to the SofS
direction to comply with overseas standards

7.     All new employees are to receive appropriate H&S induction training so that they are fully familiar with
the hazards and risks associated with their office environment. Instruction should also be given on specific
issues such as how to use the office equipment safely, where to get first aid assistance, and what actions to
take in the event of an emergency. The level of the induction training can vary considerably and is
dependant on local circumstances based on the risk assessment. Refresher and further training is to be
provided as appropriate.

Training

8.    Line managers are required to be competent to carry out risk assessments. In the majority of cases,
based on risk, no special training is required, but the assessor should have an understanding of the office
environment and an ability to make sound judgements. Competency therefore can be seen as a



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combination of knowledge, skills, experience and personal qualities, which includes the ability to recognise
the extent and limitations of one's own competence and the need for further assistance where necessary.

9.    Where a line manager does not possess the necessary competence to, for example, carry out a DSE
assessment then advice and help should be sought from the local USA or other specialist. It is stressed
though that the responsibility for completing a risk assessment lies entirely with the line manger.

Records

10. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Where the assessment identifies the
potential for employees to be exposed to a prescribed disease, impulse noise or radiation which requires
health screening or surveillance then a copy of the assessment should form part of the employee's records
and kept for 40 years.




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                                                 Annex A - Office Machinery – potential hazards and risks

OFFICE MACHINERY – POTENTIAL HAZARDS AND RISKS

1. Large machines which are capable of collating or are used regularly for long copy runs should be sited
in dedicated copy rooms with adequate natural or mechanical ventilation. If this is not possible, they should
be placed well away from staff workstations and long runs of printing or copying carried out at times when
the minimum of stress will be caused to staff, e.g. break times.

2. Photocopiers and laser printers are used world-wide by many people without any problems. Office
machinery like any machinery that is installed, maintained or operated improperly can cause problems of an
unpredictable nature. In addition, certain individuals are more susceptible to the possible problems caused
by office machinery than others are.

3. According to the International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health and specialists in atmospheric
particles, the average printer releases toner particles which can get deep into the lungs and cause
respiratory and cardiovascular problems. Appropriate installation and operation can reduce the hazards and
risks.

Potential Hazards
4. The sources of possible health concerns relates to Toner, Carbon Black, Polymer Resin, Ozone, Light
and Ultraviolet Light, Noise and Heat and Laser Beam.

Toners
5. Toners are usually a combination of synthetic resin and carbon black frequently with other supplements.
Toner is a fine powder, which in itself is not classed as a substance hazardous to health, but any dust in
substantial concentration may cause respiratory tract irritation resulting in coughing and sneezing.

6. Toner dust may become airborne for a variety of reasons; toner dust spilled inside the machine
becomes airborne by passing through the ventilation fans into the room, the waste toner compartment fills up
and causes toner to back up inside the machine or the careless renewal of the toner cartridge causes a spill
of toner into the room.

7. Toners should be handled with caution, protective gloves should be used, dust release minimised and
instructions observed. Exposure to skin can cause itchiness and other health effects can include headaches
and irritated eyes. Maintenance staff are at risk from repeated contact which can result in skin and eye
irritation.

8. If toner is spilt, it is best to vacuum it up, rather than brush it off to avoid raising dust. The remainder
should be removed using a damp cloth rinsed in cold water. Hot water should be avoided as it may cause
the toner to partially melt and become sticky. Toner may be disposed of as normal waste, though it should
be placed in a sealed bag to contain the fine powder.

Carbon Black
9. Carbon black is categorised as a ‟nuisance dust‟, it is only mildly toxic in itself, but will contain impurities
that are potentially carcinogenic. Numerous studies have been carried out to determine the effects of
exposure to carbon black. In all instances, there was no evidence of cancer production or fatalities. The
small content of carbon black is not a cause for concern.

Polymer Resin
10. The image fixing of the final copy uses a low melt polymer resin; this varies in its composition
dependant on the manufacturer. The heat required for this process is just sufficient to melt the resin and
vapour produced is minimal and insignificant.




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Selenium and Cadmium Sulphide
11. Some copiers use a drum impregnated with these chemicals. The gas they emit, especially when hot,
can cause throat irritation to exposed workers. This is mostly a risk to maintenance staff when cleaning or
grinding the surface of the drum.

Ozone
12. Exposure to concentrations of ozone is the most common concern amongst users of photocopiers and
laser printers. Ozone (O3) a form of oxygen, is a normal constituent of the earth‟s atmosphere. It is a highly
reactive, unstable, colourless gas with a distinctive, sweet smelling odour, which can be detected when its
presence is too high.

13. Ozone is also produced during many industrial activities where UV radiation is emitted, e.g. arc welding,
during curing of printing inks, varnishes, lacquers and use of projection lamps. It is also produced around
high voltage electrical discharges such as electrostatic precipitators and x-ray machines.

14. Uses include improving air quality in offices, odour suppresser in hotel bedrooms, commercial kitchens,
cafeterias and food processing plants, as a disinfectant in drinking water production and in swimming pools.

15. Ozone is produced during the high voltage electrical discharge in photocopiers and laser printers.
Though ozone can degrade quite rapidly in the atmosphere, this process can be inhibited by high humidity,
temperature and by some effects of office furnishings.

16. As ozone is such a highly reactive substance, any adverse health effects will be found essentially at the
sites of initial contact; the respiratory tract (nose, throat and airways), the lungs and at higher concentrations,
the eyes. The principle health affects are produced by irritation of and damage to the small airways of the
lung.

Nitrogen oxide
17. This gas may be produced when there is a spark in electrostatic photocopiers. Its effects on people are
similar to those produced by carbon monoxide.

Carbon monoxide
18. This gas is produced when toner (containing carbon black) is heated in an inadequate air supply. In an
insufficient ventilated environment this can induce headaches, drowsiness, faintness and increased pulse
rate and carbon monoxide can cross the placenta and affect the unborn child.

Ultra Violet Light
19. UV light can cause eye irritation and burns. The photocopier lid should be kept fully depressed when
the machine is being operated.

Noise levels
20. Noise levels can reach up to 65dB(A) for standard photocopiers. Copiers with noisy collaters should be
positioned as far from staff as possible.

Fire potential
21. Excessive dust in electrical equipment will cause sparking. The availability of carbon dioxide fire
extinguishers near machines is essential.

Heat
22. Even though the majority of machines cut out when opened, they should be switched off before
attempting to extract jammed paper. Contact with surfaces that can be very hot should be avoided hands
washed immediately after paper removal to remove traces of toner dust.

Laser Printers
23. Unlike photocopiers, laser printers are usually placed on desktops beside workers. They produce ozone
like conventional copiers. Tests on the effectiveness of filters under factory conditions do not reflect the
deterioration in performance under heavy use in the workplace. The regular inspections of filters which may
need replacing will reduce any hazard.


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Risk Assessment
24. With some work activities, there may be exposure to small amounts of ozone that is without any
significant risk to health. These low risk work activities are mainly encountered in office environments. They
include working with most types of photocopiers, printers, projectors, x-ray machines (all types): medical,
dental, industrial and some types of room deodorisers.

25. Manufacturers and suppliers should provide recommendations on the siting and use of such equipment.
The preferred option is to put the equipment in a dedicated room. Where this is not practicable, it may be
necessary to site the equipment in a well ventilated area.

26. Slow output ozone generators are often used to improve air quality in offices, or to act as a commercial
odour suppresser. These generators emit small quantities of ozone. Assessment of the most appropriate
siting and ventilation should be carried out in the same way as for printers and copiers.

Safety Data
27. Most companies will supply Product Safety Data Sheets (PSDS) relating to their machines and by law
they have to provide on request, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) relating to the products used with the
machine, e.g. toner.

28. The PSDS will give details of siting requirements for the particular machine such as the minimum
volume of the room required for natural ventilation, noise emission levels and ozone emission levels.

29. The MSDS will give information on the health risks of the product, if any, such as exposure routes of
entry to the body, symptoms, first aid measures and waste disposal measures.

Recommendations
30. The responsibility for ensuring that a photocopier or laser printer does not present a health hazard is
shared between the manufacturer, the installer and the operator. Whilst the risks to health from photocopier
or printer use are slight, the following points should be borne in mind when they are purchased, installed and
used. Smaller machines which are not capable of collating and are not used regularly for long runs may be
housed within the room occupied by staff.

31. The following recommendations are made:

     a. Air vented from the machine into the room should be filtered (most modern machines incorporate
     filters to reduce ozone emission).

     b.     Machines should be sited so that exhaust emissions do not travel over workstations or personnel.

     c.     Machines should be serviced regularly.

     d. Consideration should be given to the adequacy of the ventilation in the room, i.e. size of room,
     natural or mechanical ventilation.

     e. Refilling techniques for toner in dry (xerographic) machines should be given special attention
     avoiding spillage wherever possible.

     f. Toner spillages should be cleaned up with care and ideally if persons are known to have
     compromised respiratory systems they should not be asked to carry out this task.

     g.     Spent toner from a machine should be placed in sealed bags for disposal.




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Sources
31. This advice has been drawn together from a range of internet sources to provide guidance and some
basic details of health and safety issues. It is not intended to be comprehensive and should not be taken as
an authoritative statement of applicable legislation. The following hyperlinks may be useful for further
reference:

http://www.tssa.org.uk/article-47.php3?id_article=982
“Photocopiers and printers in the office”

http://www.hse.gov.uk/printing/coshhessentials/index.htm
“COSHH Essentials for Printers”

http://www.lhc.org.uk/members/pubs/factsht/58fact.htm
“Indoor workplace air pollution”

http://www.safety.ed.ac.uk/resources/General/printers.shtm
University of Edinburgh Health and Safety Health and Safety Department “Photocopiers and Laser Printers
Health Hazards”

http://schools.becta.org.uk/index.php?section=tl&catcode=as_chr_02&rid=152&pagenum=1&NextStart=1&pr
int=1
“How to plan the safe installation of ICT in schools”




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Leaflet 21 - Permit to Work

                                               PERMIT TO WORK

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 18.
B.    JSP 375 Vol 3 – DE Safety Rules & Procedures and 2006DIN07-09.
C.    BGVA1/GUV-V A1.

Introduction

1.     A permit to work system consists of a formally written procedure devised by the line manager (with
input from other specialists) to control operations that the manager judges to be particularly hazardous.
Permits should be used as an instrument to implement the unit‟s safe system of work for those routine and
non-routine processes with a high degree of foreseeable risk that requires clear and precise instructions for
safe operation.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of a permit to work system in accordance with Reference A. These
arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

3.    Line managers. Line managers who issue or control permits are to do so in accordance with
Reference A. For ease of use the Permit to Work Form at Reference A is available at Annex A to this leaflet
in word format.

Guidance for Line Managers

4.     The main purpose of a permit to work system is to ensure that proper and specific considerations are
given to all risks of any particularly hazardous work, and that all risks are assessed and controlled before
work commences. The permit authorises the work to be carried out and aims to ensure all-necessary
personnel are informed and instructed in the safe operation.

5.     The employer should formally appoint a competent person to issue permits to work authorisation. This
person then assumes the duty of an Authorised Person (AP) and must have a high enough authority to
enforce the system. The AP must have the appropriate knowledge, ability, training and experience to
identify, know or foresee the hazards and potential risks involved with the permit work.

6.    The AP then issues the permit to a Responsible Person, (RP) who should be either a supervisor or
person actually doing the work. The permit must be issued to a named person and not a position or section.
The permit should define:

      a.      The location of the work.
      b.      The day, date and duration of the permit‟s authority.
      c.      The process to be carried out.
      d.      Who is to supervise and who is to carry out the work.
      e.      The type of tools and PPE required.
      f.     Specific or special precautions, e.g. types of fire extinguishers for hot work permit, and lifeline
      for confined space entry etc.

 7. All those involved in high-risk process should be informed of the hazards involved. It is essential that
 responsible persons have technical knowledge of the processes covered by the permit.



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8. The person who requests the permit must be in charge, both of the area and the whole operation and
ensure that appropriate signage is displayed around the area. The responsible person must be competent
and must sign the permit to allow persons into the area.

9. The location where the permitted work is to be identified, isolated and made safe. Hazards are to be
highlighted and the work carried out properly with clear instructions that are understood by everybody
involved in the task.

10. All employees involved in the work must sign the appropriate section of the permit to indicate they
have read and understood all the instructions and information regarding the process.

11. Any monitoring or sampling required before, during or after the operation must be specified and the
results recorded on the permit. After the work is completed, the responsible person must sign off
accordingly; ensuring the area is left in a safe condition for normal work activities. The permit must be
correctly signed off and returned for record keeping.

12. Contractors entering MOD premises for the purpose of hazardous work are not to be allowed to
commence work until a permit to work has been issued by a responsible person. This person is to monitor
the permit for compliance.

13. The use of a permit system, shown in flow diagram form on the next page, underlines the potentially
hazardous nature of the proposed activity; therefore permits are only to be issued in circumstances that
warrant their use.

14. Fig. 1 reflects an overview of a permit to work system, which should be written by a competent person.
Leaflet 3 of Chapter 2 gives guidance on competent persons.




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                          Fig. 1 Permit to Work System

                        Has a risk assessment
                          been carried out?



    No
                                  Yes



 Carry out a       Does a risk still exist after control                   No
     risk         measures have been implemented?
 assessment


                                  Yes



                    Is there a current documented?
                   safe operating system statement?



         No                      Yes



                      Do significant risks still exist
  Competent       following the formulation of a safe
person to write   system statement or does the safe         No
 safe system       system statement require further
 statement to             control measures?
manage residual
 risk/hazard.
                                 Yes




                        Permit to work action                Permit to work
                              required                     action not required




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                                                                          Annex A – Permit to Work Form

                                           PERMIT TO WORK

    Permit Serial No:………………………………                               Date………………….

PART 1 - GENERAL
 Ship/Unit/Establishment
 Work Area of personnel Responsible for the
 task
 Location of the task
 Activity
 Validity of PTW
                                                   From:____:____hrs on the_____________(date)

 (to be completed by the authorised person)        To:     ____:____hrs on the_____________(date)



PART 2 -TASK TO BE CARRIED OUT

 Description of the activity or process to be carried out: _______________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________



PART 3 - CROSS-REFERENCED DOCUMENTATION
 The following Risk assessments, PTWs, Safe Systems of work, Method statements, SOPs, or
 Maintenance procedures are applicable to this task.
 ___________________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________
 ___________________________________________________________________________________



PART 4 – HAZARD IDENTIFICATION AND CONTROL MEASURES
 The following residual hazards exist or have been introduced to this task and the listed control measures
 are to be implemented (include PPE requirements).
  Hazard                                             Control measure
  a.____________________________________ a._________________________________________



PART 5 – AUTHORITY TO PROCEED BY AUTHORISED PERSON
 I have reviewed all aspects of the task/activity and am satisfied with the arrangements as detailed in the
 “Safe System / Method Statement” have been put in place and certify that the activity/process detailed at
 Part 2 is authorised to proceed.

 Signed _____________________________                          Name ____________________________

 Rank/Grade ____________        Appointment    __________      Date ___________       Time ___________




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PART 6 – TASK ACCEPTANCE BY THE PERSON IN CHARGE
 I certify that I have read and fully understand the documentation associated with the task and listed at
 Part 3. I am satisfied that those personnel who will be employed on the task are properly equipped and
 understand the safety and emergency procedures to be followed and are competent to carry out the
 task.

 Signed _____________________________                               Name ____________________________

 Rank/Grade ____________           Appointment      __________      Date ___________        Time __________



PART 7 - TASK COMPLETION/TASK STOPPED BY THE PERSON IN CHARGE
 I certified that the task/activity detailed at part 2 has been:-     (* delete as applicable)

 *a.     Completed
 *b.     stopped/suspended. The task was stopped/suspended at___:___hrs on the ______(date).
 Details of the reasons for stoppage/suspension are detailed at part 9 complete with details of what
 arrangements have been put in place to isolate and prevent all unauthorised access to the
 activity/process.

 Signed _____________________________                               Name ____________________________

 Rank/Grade ____________          Appointment      __________       Date ___________        Time ___________



PART 8 – AUTHORISED PERSONS DECLARATION
 I certified that this permit to work is cancelled and that the task/activity detailed at part 2 has been:- (*
 delete as applicable)

 *a.   Completed at___:___hrs on the______(date).

 *b.    Stopped/Suspended. I concur that the task was stopped/suspended for the reasons detailed at
 part 10 and agree with the arrangements that have been put in place to prevent unauthorised access.
 This permit to work is now cancelled and all further work will be authorised on Permit to Work serial No
 ___________________

 Signed _____________________________                               Name ____________________________

 Rank/Grade ____________          Appointment      __________       Date ___________        Time ___________



PART 9 – WORK STOPPED/SUSPENDED CERTIFICATE

 a. The task detailed at Part 2 has been stopped/suspended for the reasons listed :




 b. The following arrangements have been put in place to prevent unauthorised access to the work area:



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Certified by the person in charge.

Signed _____________________________                      Name ____________________________

Rank/Grade ____________      Appointment     __________   Date ___________   Time ___________




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Leaflet 22 - Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

                                           PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

References:

A.        JSP 375, Vol 2, Leaflet 13.
B.        Persönlicher Schutzausrüstungs (PSA) Benutzungssverordnung 1996.
C.        JSP 437, PPE Catalogue.

Introduction

1.     The above regulations require employers to provide, free of charge, suitable and sufficient personal
protective equipment (PPE) in situations where it has been shown, through the risk assessment process, as
being deemed necessary for the continued H&S protection of employees. The PPE provided must be
suitable for the hazard it is intended to protect against, be maintained in an effective and proper working
order, be regularly inspected for serviceability, be replaced if lost or found to be defective and have
designated storage accommodation. Employees must be trained in its use and given specific information
and instruction on its use.

2.     PPE only protects individuals and does not address the hazard. If the PPE is ineffective then the
employee is not protected; hence the use of PPE should only be considered as the last resort, when all other
control measures have been addressed. It may be possible to do the task in hand by another method which
will not require the use of PPE or, if that is not possible, to adopt other more effective safeguards.

Duties

3.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers have overall responsibility for the H&S of their staff. As
such they are to ensure that their unit has adequate arrangements in place for the provision, use,
maintenance, control and storage of PPE in the workplace. The arrangements are to be monitored and
reviewed as necessary.

4.     Line Manager (LM). The Line Manager assumes the day-to-day control and responsibility for all
his/her staff, with regards to PPE. The LM has the following duties:

         a. To ensure that where the requirement for PPE is specified as part of the risk assessment, that a
         further assessment is made to determine the most suitable PPE for the particular task/activity involved
         and ensure that it meets the requirements of the individual in respect of comfort, fit, and compatibility
         with other PPE. Fit testing must be carried out for most PPE and in particular RPE (See Leaflet 25).
                                                              16
         b. Ensure that PPE is provided free of charge             where deemed necessary and worn by the individual
         when required.

         c. Ensure that maintenance records, testing, cleaning, storage and disposable procedures are
         implemented in accordance with the above References and are followed.

         d.     Ensure that adequate information, training and supervision are provided.


              Note: Further advice is also available from the USA or GHSWE.

Employees

5.        All employees must:




16
     Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, Section 9

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     a. Use any PPE supplied to them (where deemed necessary by the risk assessment) in accordance
     with the training and/or instruction they receive.

     b. Where applicable, ensure that it is stored safely when not in use and that any loss or defect is
     reported to the line manager immediately.

     c.     Check the serviceability of PPE immediately prior to and after use.

Guidance for Line Managers

6.    Types of PPE available for use in the workplace includes head protection, eye protection, safety
footwear, hand and arm protection, protective body clothing and respiratory protection. Details of PPE are
provided at Reference C.

7.      The use of PPE is determined by means of a risk assessment, and worn only when other control
measures fail to address the residual risk. The use of personal protective equipment is limited to the extent
that it does nothing to attenuate the hazard at source and therefore the primary aim should always be to
eliminate or minimise the hazard before considering the use of PPE. Where more than one item of PPE is
issued and worn, line managers are to ensure that they are compatible with each other and do not introduce
secondary hazards.

8.    Line managers are to provide adequate storage facility to enable PPE to be stored when not in use.
Storage facilities are not to be placed in areas where eating or drinking is permitted or where the potential for
cross-contamination may occur.

Inspection & Testing

9. The frequency and depth of inspection/testing required will vary depending on the type of equipment
and may be mandated by legislation or manufacturer‟s instructions. All PPE must be subject to a pre-use
operative‟s inspection to confirm it is in sound condition and serviceable.

10. Responsibility for the care, maintenance, inspection, repair, testing etc should be laid down in local
operating procedures, together with the actual procedures to be followed and their frequency. The
manufacturer‟s instructions will form the basis for these local operating procedures.

11. The form at Annex A, extracted from Reference A for ease of use, should be utilised to record
inspection and testing of PPE.

CE Marking

12. All PPE must display a 'CE' mark to confirm that it has been tested and certified as meeting harmonised
European safety standards (ENs). Line managers should be aware that uniforms are exempt from the
legislation and generally have no inherent protective properties. DEL personnel are not to use uniforms as
PPE but must be issued with the appropriate protective clothing or equipment that is relevant to the task or
activity involved.

Training

13. Line managers are to ensure that their employees are provided with all the necessary information,
instruction and training appropriate to the use and maintenance of PPE. This will vary according to the risk
and complexity and performance of the PPE. Reference A sets out in detail the information, instruction and
training requirements.

Records

14. Records of PPE risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed upon on
review but held in case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Maintenance and
training records should be retained in accordance with the requirements at Reference A.



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                                                                        Annex A – PPE Inspection Record

                                       PPE INSPECTION RECORD



1. PPE User
(Where issued to an individual)

  Surname                                          Initials                  Staff/Service No.




2. Location of PPE being checked
(Specify the normal storage position for the equipment at the Unit/Branch/Establishment where it is
used)

  Unit/Branch/Establishment


  Building                                         Room/Lab/Workshop




3. Equipment to be checked
(Specify the details of the equipment to be checked. The identification number should be unique to a
specific item.)

  Manufacturer                               Model                        Local Identification No.




4. Checks required
(Based on the manufacturer‟s guidance, list the equipment checks required)




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5. Monthly Inspection results for PPE specified
(Specify date of inspection, name and signature of persons examining equipment and any comments.
The comments may simply be „All Checks OK‟ or may recommend remedial action.)


        DATE                     NAME                     SIGNATURE              COMMENTS




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Leaflet 23 – Provision & Use Work Equipment

                                PROVISION & USE OF WORK EQUIPMENT

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 8.
B.    Betriebssicherheitsverordnung.

Introduction

1.     The above regulations support and make more explicit the general duties required by the main H&S
legislation of the UK and Germany. They include generic requirements that relate to all types of work
equipment. The term work equipment is extremely wide and covers almost any equipment used at work, for
example, simple tool box tools to fork lift trucks.

2.     References A and B are wide ranging and this leaflet provides line managers with a general overview
on the main aspects of the regulations that may have an effect on their every day risk management.
Reference A provides detailed guidance that generally is in line with Reference B but where there are any
variations further guidance should be sought from the USA or GHSWE.

Duties

3.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the safe provision and use of work equipment. The arrangements are to be monitored and
reviewed as necessary.

4.   Line Managers. Line Managers are to ensure that suitable and sufficient risk assessments are
completed for all work equipment in use that may pose significant risk to personnel. The assessments are to
be monitored and reviewed where there is a change in; the equipment, its use or the user.

5.    Employees. Employees are to ensure that they use work equipment for its intended purpose and in
such a way not to endanger others, and report any faults or defects to their line manager as a matter of
urgency. Known, defective equipment must not be used and should be isolated to prevent use until repaired
and passed as serviceable. They are to undertake any training necessary to enable them to use work
equipment in a competent and safe manner.

Guidance for Line Managers

6.    All work equipment currently in use in BFG is to meet the standards of References A and B. Line
managers are to ensure that all new work equipment is supplied with a “Declaration of Conformity” and has a
“CE” mark affixed that indicates that the equipment meets current harmonised European safety standards.
Reference A provides further guidance. Work equipment should only be used for the purpose in which it was
intended.

7.     Work equipment has to be maintained in an efficient state, in efficient working order and good repair,
and where a maintenance log is provided, recorded and kept up to date. The unit equipment maintenance
strategy should consider the need for planned preventative maintenance and condition and breakdown
maintenance.

8.     Work equipment that is exposed to conditions that may cause deterioration and consequent danger as
a result, must be inspected at suitable intervals. The inspections are to ensure that work equipment is fit for
purpose, serviceable, maintained to a high standard and used correctly by competent personnel. Where the
equipment is found to be deficient, then it must be rectified without delay or withdrawn from service for
repair. Where the operator is found to be deficient, additional training or supervision may be required.

9.    Any work equipment that poses a specific risk to H&S must only be operated and maintained by
authorised and competent personnel who have received adequate information, instruction and training in


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their safe use. For example when operating FLTs, chain saws or abrasive wheels etc. Where necessary,
additional supervision may be required

10. Employers must take measures to prevent access to dangerous parts of machinery, or stop the
movement of any dangerous machinery before the person can enter a danger zone. The danger zone is an
area on or around the machine in which there is a risk of contact between a person and a dangerous part of
the machine. Reference A provides guidance on the hierarchy of control measures that should be employed.

Lifting Equipment

11. Reference A also includes reference to PUWER 1998 in regard to lifting equipment. More specific
regulations dealing with the full operation of lifting equipment can be found in the Lifting Operations and
Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998 (LOLER 98), which applies in conjunction with the PUWER
requirements. Further information can be found in Leaflet 13 of this Manual.

Training

12. All employees who operate or maintain work equipment must receive adequate and specific
information, supervision and training as deemed necessary. Written instructions should also be provided
where applicable. Supervisors and managers responsible for ensuring the competence of their workforce
must also receive adequate and specific information, supervision and training as deemed necessary.

Records

13. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Training records are to be retained on
the employee‟s personal file. Risk assessments are to be retained in accordance with Reference A.
Maintenance and inspection records are to be retained for the work equipment for a period of 5 years.




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Leaflet 24 - Radiation Protection

                                           RADIATION PROTECTION
References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 37.
B.    JSP 390.
C.    JSP 392.
D.    Strahlenschutzverordnung.

Introduction

1.      The term radiation protection covers the safeguarding of the health of personnel from the exposure to
all sources of ionising and non-ionising radiation. Ionising radiation is a generic term, which includes
radiation emitted by the decay of radioactive substances, cosmic rays and x-rays. These emissions are
usually beta particles, alpha rays, gamma or x-rays. Whilst hazardous they do have their uses in the medical
field in the form of x-rays and radiotherapy. In the non-medical field ionising radiation can be found in
nuclear power stations, industrial non-destructive testing, baggage inspection and research.

2.     Non-ionising radiation includes lasers, ultraviolet, infra-red, microwaves and radio frequency radiation.
Both ionising and non-ionising radiation hazards are found in the military environment.

Duties

3.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit have completed suitable
and sufficient risk assessments and made adequate arrangements for the radiation safety of all employees
and others. Where appropriate Commanding Officers are to appoint a competent Radiation Safety Officer
(RSO) and or a Radiation Protection Supervisor (RPS). The arrangements are to be monitored and
reviewed as necessary.

Guidance for line managers

4.    The basic aims of ionising radiation protection are to:

      a.      Prevent the occurrence of deterministic effects by keeping doses below the threshold level.
      b.      Limit the probability of stochastic effects to an acceptable level.
5.    The risk assessment will identify the hazards and evaluate the risks to the exposure to radiation and
the controls required to reduce the exposure to as low as level as possible. This can be achieved in a
number of ways, including distance, shielding and containment. Protection of the individual is achieved by
appropriate working practices and the use of protective clothing and equipment.

6.     Where appropriate, units holding these types of material or equipment are to appoint a RSO or RPS
who provide advice and guidance on the safe use and storage of ionising and non-ionising sources.
Reference C, Chapter 10, details the duties of the RSO and RPS. Reference A provides line managers with
detailed guidance on radiation protection.

7.    Those appointed as an RPO or RPS are to attend the appropriate radiation course, prior to or as soon
as possible after their appointment. Bids for these courses should be directed through the garrison SHEF
FP to J4 SHEF HQ UKSC.

8.    Radiation Advisor visits to those units holding radioactive material and equipment are carried out
periodically by the Defence Radiation Protection Services (DRPS). These visits are to be arranged initially
through J4 SHEF UKSC who will issue a generic programme for the visits. Garrisons are to produce an
appropriate programme for their units. DRPS are to be met and escorted during the visit. Garrisons are to
monitor any adverse observations raised and ensure, where appropriate, that units comply with the
recommendations of the DRPS team.



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Annual Radiation Returns

9.    Garrison SHEF FPs are to collate and co-ordinate the annual radiation returns from units and
despatch them directly to DRPS, or as instructed by HQ UKSC J4 SHEF. A list of common army equipment
containing radioactive material is at Annex A.

Records

10. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Where health screening or surveillance
is required then a copy of the assessment should form part of their medical records and kept for 40 years.




Annex A - Common army equipment containing radioactive material




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                                                                                                          Leaflet 24

                                       Annex A – Common army equipment containing radioactive material

ITEM                                                        NATO STOCK NUMBER      NUCLIDE      ACTIVITY (GBq)
Small Arms Collimator                                       1240-99-125-7832          H-3             25.9
BEACON Dial Sight                                           1290-99-964-3799          H-3            111.0
SUSAT Sight                                                 1240-99-967-0947          H-3             4.07
                                                            1240-99-667-1947          H-3             10.8
Blade Assembly                                              1005-99-967-0508          H-3             0.33
C2 Sight                                                    1240-99-963-0107          H-3             77.3
MAY BE BOXED WITH A LIGHT AIMING POST (TRILUX)                                  TOTAL FOR BOXED SET = 254.9
Dial Sight                                                  1240-99-964-4080          H-3             37.7
Trilux Sights                                               1005-99-966-6470          H-3             0.33
LAW 80 (inc. trainers)                                      1055-99-967-6649          H-3             3.44
51mm mortar sight                                           1240-99-978-3464          H-3            54.76
Rocket, Drill                                               1340-99-978-3078          H-3             3.48
Wrist Compass                                               6605-99-119-9903      Pm-147 or H-3    0.37 or 20
Prismatic Compass                                           6605-99-527-9034          H-3             5.0
    "         "   (unmounted)                               6605-99-967-1919                          4.6
Bearing Compass                                             6605-99-460-6382          H-3             0.33
Silva Compass                                               6605-99-529-3731          H-3             18.5
(SUNUTO compass)
Luminised Watch                                             6645-99-541-5317           H-3              0.000008
Clansman Radio PRC320 Transmitter/receiver                  5820-99-114-3188           H-3                11.84
Clansman Radio PRC321 Transmitter/receiver                  5820-99-114-3385           H-3                19.24
Sight Rifle Grenade Launcher                                1240-99-321-5473           H-3                 3.5
Adaptor Tel Radio                                           5820-99-114-3389           H-3                11.84
TURF 25W tuner                                              5820-99-114-3386           H-3                14.43
SURF 4W                                                     5820-99-630-6142           H-3                 7.4
SURF 25W                                                    5820-99-620-8079           H-3                 74.0
Chemical Agent Monitor (CAM)                                6665-99-225-3836          Ni-63                0.37
Man Portable Chemical Agent Detector (MCAD)                 6665-99-809-0326          Ni-63           0.37 & 0.185
Collective Protective Chemical Agent Monitor (ColPro CAM)   6665-99-609-8640          Ni-63               0.555
Portable Doserate Meter (PDRM) (Now Obsolete)
PDRM 82M                                                    6665-99-119-8766      Sr-90 and H-3      0.013 and 40.7
PDRM 82C                                                                              Cl-36            0.0000004
                                                            6665-99-110-8766          Cl-36            0.0000004
                                                            6665-99-225-4087
Smoke Detectors                                             4210-99-519-3461        Am-241               0.002
                                                            4210-99-519-3462
                                                            4210-99-519-3489
Route Marker (Green)                                        9905-99-744-6125          H-3                 79.9
Route Marker (Orange)                                       9905-99-744-6126          H-3                172.0
Defile Marker                                               6210-99-209-4968          H-3                 53.0
Trilux Marker (Green)                                       1290-99-960-8895          H-3                 23.1
Trilux Marker (Orange)                                      1290-99-960-8896          H-3                 23.1
Level Fire Control                                          1240-99-964-2704          H-3                 18.9
PADS                                                        1290-99-966-2611          H-3                 88.8
Dial Sight Carrier                                          1240-99-964-2698          H-3                68.45
Quadrant Fire Control                                       1290-99-964-9187          H-3                32.93
Telescope Elbow                                             1240-99-964-4211          H-3                 40.7
Neck Light                                                  6260-99-965-3582          H-3                 72.2
Illuminator (Soldier Personal)                              6260-99-781-4147          H-3                 74.0
Light Aiming Post Trilux (Green)                            1290-99-960-8742          H-3                177.6
Light Aiming Post Trilux (Orange)                           1290-99-960-8743          H-3                177.6
Angulation Head                                             5855-99-967-2463          H-3                 65.9
Gas Mantles                                                 6290-99-129-6561         Th-232           0.00000156
                                                            6260-21-107-4859         Th-232           0.00000068
                                                            6260-99-910-6822         Th-232           0.00000157
                                                            6260-99-107-4860         Th-232           0.00000189
'MILAN' System (Mira sight)                                 1427-12-157-0800         Th-232              4 kBq
„MILAN‟‟ Night Flare                                                                 Th-232              4 kBq



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Leaflet 25 - Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE)

                                RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 49.
B.    Atemschutz GUV20.14.

Introduction

1. The health of employees may be damaged if they breathe in hazardous dusts or fumes. Current
regulations require employers to eliminate hazardous substances from the workplace and where this can not
be achieved, control exposure to hazardous substances through a hierarchy of control measures. As a last
resort, and if with control measures in place, a residual risk still remains then Respiratory Protective
Equipment (RPE) may be used to reduce the risk.

Duties

2. Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the provision, use and maintenance of RPE. The arrangements are to be monitored and
reviewed as necessary.

3. Line Managers. Line Managers are to ensure that RPE is only provided when all other control
measures, identified by a COSHH assessment, have been considered and a residual risk to the employee is
still present. Suitable information, instruction and training are to be provided to employees in the safe use of
RPE. Fit testing of all RPE must be conducted. All RPE is to be maintained in accordance with current
standards.

4. Employees. Employees are to use any RPE provided for their use, in accordance with the
manufacturers‟ instructions and training they have received. Any defects in the use of the RPE are to be
reported to the line manager.

Guidance for Line Managers

5. Reference A provides adequate information for line managers to safely manage RPE. With the
exception of breathing apparatus, no form of RPE will provide 100% protection against exposure to a
hazardous substance. Hence selection of RPE is only to be made after a COSHH assessment has been
undertaken.

6. Where the hazardous substance has a Workplace Exposure Limit (WEL), the Environmental Health
Team (EHT), WIS or WIWEB will, on request, carry out monitoring of hazardous substances to ascertain
whether the exposure limits are not being exceeded or to determine the effectiveness of control measures.
Monitoring will also enable these bodies to provide advice to line managers on most effective PPE/ RPE for
the circumstances.

7. The PPE catalogue, JSP 437 is designed to aid line managers in the selection of appropriate RPE.
Recent publicity has highlighted the limited use of the disposable facemasks. Line managers should, except
in the simplest operations, consider the use of a respirator half mask as a more effective means to protect
the employee. The choice of filter will be determined by hazardous substance being used. All RPE has to be
maintained so its performance does not deteriorate. Where a filter is 'lifed', and then filter use must be
monitored and recorded, as at Reference A.

Fit Testing

8. Fit testing is a legal requirement and a means of measuring the fit of a facepiece onto the wearers face.
Its aim is to match the facepiece to the wearer, to provide a comfortable respirator that fits each person well
and to minimise the worker‟s risk of respiratory damage or disease when exposed to potentially hazardous



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substances. Respirators that need to be fit tested include disposable respirators, half mask and full masks,
including tight fitting facepieces that form part of a powered or air fed respirator.

9. DEL employees who are required to wear RPE are to be registered for medical surveillance (G26), with
the appropriate Occupational Medical Practitioner (OMP). This is to be actioned through the GHSWE and
GLSU. A medical record of the surveillance must be kept.

Training

10. Line managers and employees must receive adequate training in the safe use, filter use and storage of
RPE. Specialised training will be required for some RPE equipment. Where this type of equipment is
required then advice from specialists must be obtained.

Records

11. All COSHH assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held
in case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Records of RPE training are to be
retained in the employee‟s training records. Records of filter use are to be kept for 5 years.




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Leaflet 26 – Risk Assessment

                                             RISK ASSESSMENT

References
A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 39.
B.    Arbeitsschutzgesetz (1996).

Introduction

1. This leaflet includes, for ease of reference the complete latest MOD Risk Assessment document
published in August 2008 as Reference A. In particular the Risk Assessment forms, which are published in
the referenced JSP as a Picture Document File have been included in this leaflet as a word document, thus
allowing them to be copied and more easily used electronically.

Duties of Commanding Officers.

2. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate arrangements for the management of
risk through the risk assessment process and that all those who are affected by of required to comply with
such risk assessment are aware of their responsibilities for themselves and others. The arrangements are to
be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

Duties of Line Managers.

3. This leaflet is intended for use by Line Managers, both Service and civilian, who are responsible for the
assessment of significant work related hazards. The aim of this leaflet is to provide a system for assessing
risks across all work activities involving MOD personnel, equipment, buildings and or land.

4.   Within this Leaflet Hazard and Risk have the following meaning:

      • Hazard - Potential to cause harm.

      • Risk - Likelihood that harm will occur and its consequences.

5. The term “Line Manager” is used throughout this Leaflet to mean the person with direct responsibility for
the safe conduct of the work activity. For military activities this will usually lie within the chain of command.

6. It is not just sufficient for a line manager to have ensured that a risk assessment has been carried out
where appropriate. They also are responsible for ensuring that all those who are, or might be, affected know
about the risk assessments and of the actions and control measures that are in place. A cupboard full of risk
assessments has no value if those to whom it applies simply do not know of their existence or of what they
are supposed to do to comply with the risk assessment

Definition of a Risk Assessment

7. A Risk Assessment is simply a careful examination of what, in your work, could harm people, so that
you can weigh up whether you have taken enough precautions or should do more to prevent harm to
yourself, your colleagues, contractors, visitors or anyone else who may be affected by your work.

8. Risk assessment helps employers to focus on the risks that really matter in the workplace, the
significant ones with real potential to cause harm. The Management of Health and Safety at Work
Regulations require employers to undertake suitable and sufficient risk assessments. However they do not
necessarily require the elimination of all risk, but employers are required to protect people so far as
reasonably practicable. Part of this protection involves an informed, rational and structured evaluation of the
risks presented by working practices and or the working environment. The MoD through its Line Managers is
legally required to assess the risks in the workplace so that an effective plan to control the risks can be put in
place.



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9. Risk assessment is not a substitute for making things safe e.g. spilled liquids should be cleaned up
rather than a risk assessment produced warning of the slip hazard.

Further risk assessment related terms and definitions

10. Further risk assessment terms and definitions are given at Annex A.

Types of Risk Assessment

11. All significant risks shall be assessed, however, although the principles of assessment remain the same
their application can differ. There are 3 recognised methods of assessment;

      • Dynamic - A mental assessment of risk for use when any delay would increase the risk of harm.
        Dynamic assessment can also be used as the initial step in formal risk assessment.

      • Formal - A written method of evaluating the risk of harm e.g. in accordance with MOD Form 5010a.

      • Generic - An evaluation of risk that can be applied to common tasks.

12. Dynamic risk assessment allows for immediate mental safety assessments to be made without
implementing the formal risk assessment process e.g. the decision to tackle a small fire, a task with obvious
safety risks which would increase if delayed by formal assessment. Therefore dynamic risk assessment can
be effectively used in emergencies where any delay increases the risk of harm, it is not to be used purely to
save time or avoid additional work.

13. Dynamic risk assessment can also be used as an initial step in establishing which risks are significant
and require further assessment. It can also be used prior to the use of generic assessments to identify if the
assessment is suitable and sufficient for the task in hand.

14. Generic risk assessments may be appropriate for some common tasks, such as those that share the
same hazards and controls e.g. routine maintenance or cleaning activities. These assessments can only be
used when the influencing factors are the same and the Line Manager considers that the control measures
identified and implemented should reduce the risk of harm adequately.

15. Formal risk assessment is a documented process of assessing risks and involves a process of
measuring the likelihood of an event occurring with its likely consequences.

16. Guidance on which method of assessment is appropriate is provided in the flow diagram at Annex B.

17. The risk assessment methods described shall only be deviated from where alternative legislation
applies.

Responsibility for conducting risk assessment

18. Line Managers (both Service and Civilian) are responsible for ensuring all hazards in their areas of
responsibility have been identified and all significant risks are assessed.

19. Hazard identification and risk assessment, although a Line Management responsibility, can be
conducted by a third person providing they are competent to do so. The establishment of competency is
particularly important when conducting risk assessments that require specialist knowledge, such as those
covering the use of hazardous substances etc.

20. Other legislation e.g. the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health, The Dangerous Substances and
explosives Atmosphere Regulations 2002 and the Work at Height Regulations require specific risk
assessments to be conducted. Where a task involves activities already assessed under such legislation it is
not necessary to repeat the assessment, providing it is referenced in the overall assessment.




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21. Line Managers are responsible for ensuring that all those who might be exposed to a hazard are made
aware of the risk assessment and the identified control measures. They are also responsible for ensuring
that the control measures identified by the risk assessment are effectively implemented and complied with.

22. It may be necessary for more than one person to be involved to ensure competency, in these instances
one person should be appointed as the responsible assessor and it is this person that signs the risk
assessment form as the „Assessor‟.

23. Line Managers are responsible for maintaining the suitability and effectiveness of risk assessments and
their control measures. Therefore risk assessments should be treated as „live documents‟ which should be
reviewed and updated if necessary on a regular basis. If there are changes to be made it is not necessary or
desirable to wait until the review date to change the assessment, it is to be done at the earliest opportunity.

24. Employees are responsible for complying with the findings of the risk assessment and for informing Line
Managers when a process or task changes or it is felt the risk assessment fails to identify appropriate control
measures.

How to carry out a Risk Assessment (The 5 Steps)

25. Risk assessment is a subjective but logical process which can be broken down into 5 Steps:

      • Step 1 Identify the hazard

      • Step 2 Decide who might be harmed and how

      • Step 3 Evaluate the risks and decide on precautions

      • Step 4 Record your findings and implement them

      • Step 5 Review your assessment and update if necessary

26. When conducting a risk assessment involvement of staff or their representatives will provide useful
information about how the work is done, this will make assessment of the risk more thorough and effective.
In conducting the risk assessment at all stages the assessor needs to consider the persons involved or
affected, the equipment used or needed, the materials used and any subsets of hazards these may produce
and any environmental issues or impact (such as the weather or spillage issues). Advice and guidance may
also be available from the unit safety advisor or safety committee representatives.

Step 1 - Identify the hazards

27. Review the task and or work area, talk with the persons involved and identify any hazards. Look at the
persons, equipment, materiel and the environment associated with the activity and the hazards that these
face. Assessment is not limited to normal work activities, open days, displays etc if organised by a MoD
department or taking place on MoD property or using MoD owned equipment, shall be subject to risk
assessment. Remember to include hazards arising from normal activities and potential hazards if things go
wrong. Focus on the reasonably foreseeable (that is an event that can logically be predicted to occur and
which could result in harm) not remote possibilities. Tasks/activities that pose trivial safety consequences
should not be subject to risk assessment. It is helpful to record the hazards, the Hazard Survey Form (MOD
Form 5010b) at Annex C is an acceptable template for recording, this will help ensure hazards are not
missed during the risk assessment process.

28. It is important to remember that an effective risk assessment looks at the whole activity not individual
hazards. For instance, if the work activity is to load a vehicle onto a transporter, consider each element of
the operation and include these in one single risk assessment covering the whole process. This avoids the
need for unnecessary paperwork and subsequent additional review and will in the end show a complete
picture of how the hazards and associated risk are to be managed. There is a tendency to break risk
assessments down into bite sized chunks for simplicity, but it is sometimes more effective to manage the
hazards collectively thereby making the risk easier to manage overall.



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Step 2 - Decide who might be harmed and how

29. For each hazard establish who might be harmed, it will help to identify the best way to manage the risk.
This does not mean listing everyone by name, but rather identifying groups of people, e.g. store room staff,
visitors, members of the public etc.

30. In each case decide how they might be harmed, i.e. what type of injury or ill health might occur. For
example, stores personnel may suffer back injury from repeated lifting of boxes.

31. Some workers have particular requirements, e.g. new and young workers, women of child-bearing age,
new or expectant mothers and people with disabilities may be at particular risk.

32. Shared workplaces present particular problems. Risk assessments should consider the effect of the
activity on other workers. Line Managers should also ensure that they are familiar with the risk assessments
produced by other groups within the workplace that may affect their staff.

Step 3 - Evaluate the risks and decide on precautions

33. Evaluating the risk is a subjective process which becomes easier with experience. To help assessors a
„Risk Rating‟ calculation matrix is provided on the MOD Form 5010a and is shown at Table 1. Tables 2 and
3 provide guidance on definitions of „likelihood‟ and „consequence‟.

                                         Table 1- MOD Risk Matrix
    Hazard                      3                  3 MED             6 HIGH                      9 HIGH
  Consequence                   2                 2 LOW              4 MED                       6 HIGH
                                1                 1 LOW              2 LOW                       3 MED
             Risk Rating                             1                  2                           3
       Consequence X likelihood                             Likelihood of occurrence

                                        Table 2 – Likelihood Criteria

           Likelihood                                        Criteria
         High         3                  Common, regular or frequent occurrence
       Medium         2                            Occasional occurrence
         Low          1                       Rare or improbable occurrence


                                      Table 3 – Consequence Criteria

       Consequence                                        Criteria
          High       3                       Fatalities, major injury or illness
        Medium       2                           Serious injury or illness
          Low        1                            Minor injury or illness


34. If the product of the hazard severity and likelihood of occurrence is 1 or 2, then the item being assessed
is categorised as Low risk. Similarly if the score is 3 or 4 then the risk category is Medium while scores of 6
or 9 signify a High risk category. When recording the Risk Rating include the individual “Likelihood” and
“Consequence” scores, this allows resources to be targeted at the right areas.




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35. Table 4 identifies the actions to be taken depending on the severity of the Risk Rating.

                                               Table 4 – Action to be taken

         Risk                                                   Action to be taken
        Rating
         High         Improve control measures; consider stopping work. Conducting work at this level of risk is
                      to be reported up the Line Management / Command chain.


       Medium         Review control measures and improve if reasonably practicable to do so, consider
                      alternative ways of working.


         Low          Maintain control measures and review if there are any changes.



36. The legal requirement for most health and safety regulations is to reduce the risk of harm „in so far as is
                                                                                         17
reasonably practicable‟. A risk assessment itself shall also be „suitable and sufficient‟ The level of
acceptable risk is dependent on circumstances. For example, the perceived risks of working in an office
environment are different to those of working in a military front line hostile environment. It is the Line
Managers responsibility to decide when the level of risk is acceptable; a well constructed risk assessment
will aid in this decision. Some Regulations, such as the Electricity at Work Regulations, require a higher
degree of compliance and therefore do not allow the use of „so far as is reasonably practicable‟. These
Regulations are limited to high risk activities and guidance should be sought if there is any doubt regarding
compliance.

37. The first step in evaluating the risk is to establish what controls are currently in place, it is important that
this is based on what is actually being done not what is thought to be done. The second step is to decide
whether anything else can and needs to be done, this could involve the introduction of additional control
measures or better implementation of existing control measures.

38. If the need for additional control measures is identified their implementation needs to be managed, this
will require identification of ownership and the setting of implementation dates. Large numbers of additional
control measures should be addressed in priority order, the most affective being implemented first. Once
additional controls have been identified the risk rating is to be recalculated and recorded in the “Residual
Risk” column. If existing controls are considered adequate the “Additional Controls” section of MOD
Form5010a should be marked “Controls Adequate”.

39. When assessing risks the following points should be considered:

       • Can the hazards be eliminated altogether?
       • Can the risks be controlled so that harm is „most unlikely‟?
       • Is there a less risky option?
       • Can access to the hazard be eliminated or reduced e.g. barriers, guards etc?
       • Can the work be reorganised to eliminate or reduce the risks?
       • Are additional welfare facilities required e.g. first aid or washing facilities for removal of
          contaminates?
       • Is Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) required? The use of PPE is a last resort and should not be
          preferred to other forms of risk elimination or reduction.




17
  Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 Reg 3(1). Risk assessments carried out carefully and correctly in
accordance with this Leaflet are likely to suitable and sufficient.

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Step 4 - Record and implement findings

40. On completion of the risk assessment the details shall be recorded and the assessment brought to the
attention of all those who are at risk or are responsible for implementing the control measures.

41. The recording of the risk assessment shall be clear and concise, it is to be easily read with the minimum
use of acronyms. Control measures should be clearly identified without excessive reference to large
documents with embedded information which is difficult to extract. MOD Form 5010a at Annex D provides
an acceptable format for recording the assessment.

42. It is vital that where a risk assessment is update or changed that the previous version is not over
written but filed without change as claims may arise from the period during which the assessment was valid
and it may thus be required in evidence.

43. It is best practice to record dynamic risk assessments retrospectively and at the earliest opportunity. By
recording these assessments it may be possible to use the findings as a starting point for future similar tasks,
thus improving the control of risks and reducing workloads. It also provides an auditable record of decisions
allowing for more effective accident investigation and helps provide assurance during the audit of safety
management systems. MOD Form 5010a can be used for the recording of dynamic risk assessments.

44. The most important part of any risk assessment is effective implementation of the control measures.
Once implemented Line Management is to ensure that the control measures remain effective and that staff
are compliant with the risk assessment requirements.

Step 5 - Review and update

45. Risk assessments are to be regularly reviewed to ensure they remain suitable and sufficient.

46. A review is to be conducted:

        • Annually as well as:
        • If there is reason to doubt the effectiveness of the assessment.
        • Following an accident or near miss.
        • Following significant changes to the task, process, procedure or Line Management.
        • Following the introduction of more vulnerable personnel, e.g. persons who are not familiar with the
           process, task or environment, persons who may have special needs.

47. If following review there are no changes to be made to the assessment, the Line Manager is to sign and
date the original assessment confirming that it is suitable and sufficient.

Retention of Risk Assessments

48. Retention of risk assessments is to comply with the requirements of JSP 375 Vol 2 Leaflet 55 Retention
of Records.

Related Documents

The following documents should be consulted in conjunction with this leaflet:

        BFG SHEF Manual

         a. Part 1 Chapter 5 - Safety in Military Training and Exercises
         b. Leaflet 30 - Site Risk Assessment
         c. Leaflet 43 - Lone Working
         d. Leaflet 4 - The Management of visiting workers and contractors to BFG controlled sites
         e. Leaflet 12 - The Health and Safety of Young Persons
          f. Leaflet 17 - New and Expectant Mothers at Work




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   JSP 375 Vol 3

    Safety Rules and Procedures for working on the Defence Estate

   Other documentation -Legislation and guidance

    a. Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999
    b. HSE 5 Steps to Risk Assessment INDG163




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                                                           Annex A - Risk assessment terms and definitions

Risk assessment terms and definitions

       Term                                                   Definition
Common Tasks              Common repeatable tasks that share the same hazards.
Competence                Competence requires sufficient practical experience and technical knowledge and
                          understanding to carry work in a safe and efficient manner to a recognized
                          standard on a regular basis. It requires the ability to communicate understanding
                          to all people in a clear and comprehensible manner, and the awareness of
                          personal limitations.
Consequence               Effect or outcome.

Control Measure           An item, procedure or system introduced to eliminate or reduce risk
Dynamic Risk              A mental assessment of risk for use when any delay would increase the risk of
Assessment                harm or as an initial step in identifying significant risks.


Formal Risk               A written method of evaluating the risk of harm.
Assessment
Generic Risk              An evaluation of risk that can be applied to common tasks.
Assessment
Harm                      Injury to persons or damage or loss to equipment or the environment.

Hazard                    Something with the Potential to cause harm or loss.
Line Manager              A person, military or civilian, with direct responsibility for the safe conduct of the
                          work activity.
Reasonably                Something that should be apparent to a reasonable person who has knowledge
Foreseeable               and experience of the work to be undertaken.

Risk                      Likelihood that harm or loss will occur and its consequences.

Risk Assessment           A process for evaluating risk.

Significant               Important, noteworthy not trivial
Significant Risk          Risks that if not properly controlled are likely to cause harm or loss.

So far as is reasonably   The degree of risk in a particular situation which must be balanced against the
practicable               time, trouble, cost and physical difficulty of taking measures to avoid the risk.


Suitable and sufficient   The expression „suitable and sufficient‟ although widely used in regulations, is not
                          specifically defined. It will often be a matter for the courts to decide if something is
                          „suitable and sufficient‟. Generally speaking, if the risk assessment advice given
                          in the appropriate leaflet, guidance or approved code of practise is followed, then
                          risk assessments are likely to be suitable and sufficient. They should normally
                          identify the risks arising from or in connection with work and be proportionate to
                          the level of risk. Once the risks are assessed and taken into account, insignificant
                          risk and those arising from routine activities associated with life in general, can
                          usually be ignored. The level of risk arsing from the work activity should determine
                          the degree of sophistication of the risk assessment.




.


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                                   Annex B - Risk assessment flow diagram




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                                          Annex C – MOD Hazard Survey Form –MOD Form 5010b
                                    MOD Hazard Survey Form
                                                                            MOD Form 5010b
Establishment/Unit:

Section/Department:

Activity/Process:

Hazard Survey Reference Number:


  Person conducting the survey                          Line Manager
Name:                             Name:

Date:                             Date:


                                                                                  3
                        Hazard                              RA             Priority
                                                            Req        1      2       3
  1                                                     Y         N

  2                                                     Y         N

  3                                                     Y         N

  4                                                     Y         N

  5                                                     Y         N

  6                                                     Y         N

  7                                                     Y         N

  8                                                     Y         N

  9                                                     Y         N

 10                                                     Y         N

 11                                                     Y         N

 12                                                     Y         N

 13                                                     Y         N

 14                                                     Y         N



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3
    The priority score should be used to identify which hazards need to be assessed first.

Annex C – continued

The following list includes potential hazards that may be encountered in the workplace, however it is not
exhaustive and assessors and Line Managers need to stay alert to other hazards that may be present or that
can develop.

         • Manual handling.
         • Exposure to hazardous substances.
         • Noise.
         • Vibration.
         • Working at height.
         • Lifting operations.
         • Confined spaces.
         • Exposure to electricity.
         • Transport.
         • Exposed machinery.
         • Construction activities.
         • Radiation.
         • Excessive stress.
         • Pressure systems.
         • Exposure to blood borne viruses.
         • Explosive atmospheres.
         • Fatigue.
         • Excessive heat or cold.
         • Storage systems, racking etc.
         • Fire.
         • Lighting levels.




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                                                                       Annex D- Risk assessment –MOD Form 5010a
                                                                                                               MOD Form 5010a

 Establishment/Unit                   Assessment                                        Assessment
                                      No                                                Date
 Section/Department                                         Assessment Type(delete as appropriate; see Note 1)
                                                    Specific                   Generic         Record of Dynamic Assessment

 Activity/Process:



                       Assessor                                             Line Manager Acceptance (se Note 2)
 Name:                                                  Name:
 Rank/Grade                                             Rank/Grade
 Signature:                                             Signature:


          Hazards            Who         Control         Risk Rating        Additional      Residual
  (Include Hazard Survey     is at      Measures        (Likelihood X        Controls      Risk Rating           Management Plan
       Number where          risk?      (Specific       consequence)          (Each           (see
        applicable)                      existing        (See Note 3)        Control         Note 4)
                                         Control                            Measure is                     Owner       Target      Comp
                                        Measures)                              to be                                    Date       Date
                                                                            specified
                                                                                and
                                                                            managed)




                                              Line Manager Assessment Review
                                                     (See Notes 2 and 5)
 Review Date:                     Review Date:               Review Date:                           Review Date:
 Name:                            Name:                      Name:                                  Name:
 Rank/Grade:                      Rank/Grade:                Rank/Grade:                            Rank/Grade:
 Signature:                       Signature:                 Signature:                             Signature:

Notes
    1 If using a „Generic‟ risk assessment, Assessors and Line Managers are to satisfy themselves that the assessment
    is valid for the task and that all significant hazards have been identified and assessed. If additional hazards are
    identified they are to be recorded and attached to the Generic assessment.

    2 Line Managers are to note that they are responsible for production of the risk assessment and that they are
         signing to indicate that the risk assessment is suitable and sufficient and they consider the risks to be
         acceptable.
   3
  High      Common, regular or frequent       3               3 Med                 6 High                        9 High
                   occurrence
Medium        Occasional occurrence           2              2 Low                   4 Med                         6 High
 Low           Rare or improbable             1              1 Low                   2 Low                         3 Med
                                                                 1                       2                             3
                    Risk Matrix                           Minor injury or       Serious injury or        Fatalities, major injury or
            Likelihood X consequence                         illness                 illness                       illness
                                                               Low                  Medium                           High

When recording the Risk Rating ensure that both the Likelihood and Consequence scores are included.




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      High         Improve control measures; consider stopping work. Conducting work at this level of risk is to be reported up the
                   Line Management / Command chain.
     Medium        Review control measures and improve if reasonably practicable to do so, consider alternative ways of working.
      Low          Maintain control measures and review if there are any changes.

 4. Record the residual Risk Rating to demonstrate that the risk has been reduced to an acceptable level; record
Likelihood and Consequence scores.

5. Risk Assessments are to be reviewed:
   • Annually.
   • If there is reason to doubt the effectiveness of the assessment.
   • Following an accident or near miss.
   • Following significant changes to the task, process, procedure or Line Management.
   • Following the introduction of more vulnerable personnel.
   • If “Generic” prior to use.




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Leaflet 27 - Safe Systems of Work

                                          SAFE SYSTEMS OF WORK

Reference:

A.    The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, Section 2 (2)
B.    Arbeitsschutzgesetz.


Introduction

1.      A "safe system of work" is defined as a formal procedure which will allow a specific task to be carried
out safely, after systematic examination of that task has identified and eliminated all the associated hazards
or at least minimised the risks. Thus "safe systems" are required to be put into place when the hazards
identified cannot be eliminated and some residual risk remains.

Duties

2.     In accordance with Reference A, part of the employer's general duty is to provide systems of work that
are, so far as is reasonably practicable, safe and without risks to health. Components of such a system
include: the organisation and co-ordination of the work of those involved; training, instruction and
supervision, layout of plant and appliances, methods to be used and general conditions of work.

3.       Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of risk through a safe system of work where normal risk control methods
still leave a residual risk. The arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

4.     Line Managers. Line managers are to ensure appropriate risk assessment are carried out on all
hazardous activities and processes and where a significant residual risk remains then a safe system of work
is to be employed.

5.   Employees. Employees are to comply with a safe system of work issued as part of the risk
management strategy.

Guidance for Line Managers

6.   The detail in a safe system of work will depend on the degree of risk it is designed to protect against.
Where a user manual, an AESP, or Betriebsanweisung, etc is available, then this should be used as
necessary to inform the appropriate safe system of work.

7.     Components of Safe Systems of Work. No list of component parts in a safe system of work can be
considered absolutely complete, because there may be circumstances requiring employers to do more or
less, depending on the particular circumstances of the case in question. However, safe systems of work can
be considered as consisting of five steps, ie

     a.     Task assessment.
     b.     Hazard identification.
     c.     The definition of safe methods.
     d.     Implementation.
     e.     Monitoring.
8.    Note the similarity between the first three steps above and the three stages commonly involved in risk
assessments, ie hazard identification, risk evaluation and the definition of necessary control measures.
The task assessment should cover all aspects of the task and the associated hazards and risks. It should
define:


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     a. What is involved in the task in terms of machinery and substances, and foreseeable incidents, such
     as accidental operation, or failure, of machinery.

     b. Who is involved in the task, including their responsibilities, training, foreseeable human errors,
     reaction to emergencies, etc.

     c. Where the task is performed, including hazards associated with the immediate work environment,
     eg limited space, adverse weather, etc.

     d. How the task is performed, including current procedures, potential failures, non-routine and/or
     infrequent work.

9.     For all the hazards identified, a risk evaluation should be carried out to determine/prioritise the controls
necessary to reduce the risks where the hazards cannot be eliminated. Involvement of the persons actually
carrying out the task is very important.

10. Once safe systems are identified as necessary, they must be defined and brought to the attention of
all relevant employees. This may be anything from a simple verbal instruction to a detailed written "permit-to-
work". In any event, the following points should be considered:

     a.     The preparation, authorisation and definition of responsibilities necessary to start the task.

     b.     The provision of a clear, planned sequence of events.

     c.     Specification of the safe work methods, including access, egress and emergency escapes, etc.

     d.     Procedures for completing and leaving the task.

11. Implementing safe systems requires the staff involved, at all levels, to fully understand why the safe
system is necessary, what the necessary procedures are, and their precise roles in the safe system.
Relevant training is a very important consideration.

12. Monitoring should ensure the system continues to be workable, effective, safe and that it achieves its
intended aims. It should also identify any changes to the task which can then be addressed accordingly.

13. The requirement to establish and maintain safe systems of work applies not only to routine activities
which are repeated every day; it also applies to tasks occurring infrequently at certain times, such as during
annual maintenance work. It also applies to single, one-off jobs which happen only once in a lifetime. It will
be clear that there is a different emphasis in each of the three categories given. In the first there may be
problems of familiarity and the potentially hazardous complacency arising from it. In the last there needs to
be emphasis on meticulous planning and constant close supervision by qualified, skilled and experienced
staff.

14. Maintaining a safe system may involve consulting and liaising with other employers, eg visiting
contractors. In doing all that is reasonably practicable, employers need to consider the potentially hazardous
activities of those working alongside them which may not only affect them, but also affect their own
employees. This is covered in Leaflet 4.

15. In certain cases, ensuring that systems of work are safe may be achieved with the help of "permits-to-
work". Such written permits formalise the progression through a particular operation. Most often the
operations are those with a high risk eg explosion risks from items of plant containing highly flammable
materials, or where toxic emissions are an ever-present possibility. This is covered in Leaflet 21.

For DEL

16. In accordance with Host Nation (HN) regulations, Safe Working Instructions (Betriebsanweisung) must
be produced for the use of Hazardous substances, Machinery, PPE and where applicable Environmental
Protection.



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Training

17. Line managers with the responsibility for producing a safe system of work should have a firm
understanding of risk management techniques and be familiar with the activities and processes being carried
out that require a safe system of work.

Records

18. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Records of a safe system of work are to
be kept with the risk assessments for that particular activity.




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Leaflet 28 - Safety in Excavation

                                          SAFETY IN EXCAVATION

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 33.
B.    BGV C22/GUV-V-C22

Introduction

1.      In the majority of circumstances, a contractor will normally undertake excavation. However there will
be cases where military personnel or DEL will be required to dig deep trenches or maintain existing services.
There have been fatalities within the MOD where excavation has collapsed burying the operator.
Secondary hazards may also be encountered, the most common occurrence being contacting underground
live electrical power cables.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements to manage the risk associated with excavation. The arrangements are to be monitor and
reviewed as necessary.

3.    Line Managers. Line managers are to ensure that no excavation is undertaken before a competent
person carries out a suitable and sufficient risk assessment

Employees

4.     In accordance with Reference A, Annex B, employees are to carry out excavations in accordance with
the instruction of the “Permit to Dig” system.

Guidance for Line Managers

5.     Where a residual risk is still present after applying the control measures as a result of risk assessment,
then a safe system of work is to be implemented to further reduce the risk. Prior to any excavation work
taking place, the line manager is to issue and control a “Permit to Dig” system, as at Reference A, Annex B.

6.     Excavation activities should be properly managed using a safe system of work, which involves the use
of a permit process, by making use of all available information and undertaking a survey prior to
commencing the excavation.

7.    In any excavation, earth work, trench, well or underground working where there is a risk of material
collapsing or falling, proper support must be used as early as practicable in the course of the work to prevent
any danger from an earth fall or collapse. Suitable and sufficient material should be available for this
purpose, or other alternative methods employed.

8.     Care must be taken with regard to secondary hazards, for example, underground electrical cables or
other services and vehicles reversing in the vicinity of the trench causing the excavation to collapse.

Open Trenches

9.     When trenches are open then steps are required to be taken to prevent any person falling into the
excavation. Control measures usually consist of suitable fencing and signage. Full guidance on managing
the risk of excavation is given at Reference A.




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Training

10. Those who act as a responsible person for ensuring excavation work is properly planned and
executed and control the use of “Permits to Dig” are to be competent to do so through knowledge, ability,
training and experience.

Records

11. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Records of any training in excavation
are to be retained on the employee‟s file. Copies of the Permit to Dig are to be retained locally until the
activity is completed. If an incident occurs then the permits are to be retained for 5 years.




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Leaflet 29 - Safety Signs and Signals

                                      SAFETY SIGNS AND SIGNALS

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 44.
B.    BGV A8.

Introduction

1.    Safety signs and hand signals are to be used where there is a residual H&S risk that can not be
avoided or controlled by other means. All signs employed must conform to current legislation as defined in
Reference B.

Duties

2.     Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the provision and maintenance of safety signs in the workplace. Also, they are to ensure
that areas where hand signalling is carried out are clearly marked and personnel are trained adequately.
The arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as appropriate.

3.     Line Managers. Line managers are to ensure that all risks are assessed and adequate control
measures introduced to reduce the risk. Where safety signs are identified as an appropriate control measure
or where hand signalling is being carried out, then they are to comply with References A and B. Employees
are to be provided with appropriate information and instruction on the use of safety signs and training where
hand signals are being displayed.

Employees

4.    Employees are to comply with all safety signs and hand signals where necessary in accordance with
Reference A & B. Before entering any area displaying mandatory safety signs or where under the control of
marshals displaying hand signal instructions, employees are to ensure that they are wearing the appropriate
PPE where required.

Guidance For Line Managers

5.       All safety signs and hand signals are to comply with current regulations, as detailed at References A
and B. Safety signs are generally pictorial; however in the event that wording is required, then the risk
assessment will determine the most appropriate language to display. The cost of supplying safety signs will
fall to the user unit. Permanent signboards must be used to display prohibition, warning and mandatory and
emergency escape/first aid signage. Hand signals are also a requirement of the regulations and, where
applicable, should only be carried out by competent personnel.




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Safety Colours

6.    Safety signs must be maintained and legible. Colours and their meaning are common throughout the
EU, and are:


       a.   Red – prohibition sign. A typical example, showing no access for pedestrians, is:




       b.   Yellow - caution sign. A typical example warning of Fork Lift Trucks, is:




       c.   Blue – mandatory sign. A typical example, showing that hearing protection must be worn is:




       d.   Green – emergency escape, first aid sign such as for fire exits:




Training

7.    All employees are to be provided with induction and continuous training on safety signs and hand
signals where appropriate.

Records

8.    Risk assessments showing the need for safety signs and signals should be retained for 5 years and
are not to be destroyed on review but held in case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or
incident. No specific records on safety signs are required. However records of all employee safety sign and
hand signals training should be updated regularly and retained for audit purpose.




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Leaflet 30 - Site Risk Assessment

                                         SITE RISK ASSESSMENT

References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflets 23
B.    BFG SHEF Manual Part 2 Chapter 2 Leaflet 26.
B.    Arbeitsschutzgesetz (1996).

Introduction

1.     Assessing a risk does not end in the confines of a workplace, but has to be extended to take into
account the hazards found throughout the work site as a whole. Therefore all hazards that have the potential
to cause harm to the health, safety and welfare of employee and others must be identified and assessed.
The term “others” includes contractors, visitors, the general-public, and in particular children. Examples of
typical hazards that must be assessed include road/pathway conditions, derelict buildings, open garages,
emergency water supply tanks and other unguarded water features, confined spaces, bunkers, towers,
electrical installations, barbed wire and access/egress to any hazard that children might find attractive.

Duties

2.     Garrison HQs. Garrison HQs are to ensure that each barracks and station has clearly defined areas
set out showing exactly and without doubt the site areas for which each unit is responsible. This is most
important in barracks with mixed occupancy. This duty for allocating areas may be delegated to station HQs.
The essential point is that units must know the areas for which they are responsible and those of others on
the site.

3.     Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure their unit has adequate arrangements
for carrying out appropriate site risk assessments for the areas for which they have been allocated site
management responsibility. These arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as circumstances which
affect the original risk assessment change and in any case at an interval not exceeding 2 years. Their policy
for reviewing their site risk assessment must be defined in unit standing orders for SHEF.

4.     Line Managers. Line managers are to use the methodology in Reference A including the forms
provided therein to carry out site risk assessments. Units are not to deviate from this format. It is a line
management responsibility to lead on the site risk assessment but the line manager may be assisted by the
allocated SHEF Warden or Advisor. The responsibility though remains with the line manager and not the
advisor.

Guidance for Line Managers

5.     The detail in a site risk assessment will be proportional to the level of risk involved. Where children
can gain access to the hazard, control measures aimed at reducing the risk must be stringent. Children are
attracted to danger and are not mature enough to recognise the risk. Typical hazards to children include,
open water of any description, entry into unlocked buildings, bunkers and confined spaces or towers. These
areas should be protected by appropriate barriers or locking devices. Signs are not, in these cases,
appropriately suitable or sufficient control measures.

6.   A site risk assessment process follows the same principles of a general workplace assessment.
Adequate information and guidance on how to carry out such an assessment is given in Reference B.
When carrying out assessments, line managers should seek appropriate guidance from other specialists
who may have a better understanding on how to reduce risk from a site area. These might include the USA,
GHSWE, and Defence Estates (Europe).




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Competence

7.    Line managers carrying out site risk assessments should be competent to do so. The assessor should
have an understanding of the site area, an ability to make sound judgements, and the knowledge of the best
means to reduce those risks identified. This competence does not require a particular level of qualification,
but may be defined as a combination of knowledge, skills, experience and personal qualities. These qualities
include the ability to recognise the extent and limitation of one‟s own competence and to use other
specialists when required.

Records

8.    Site risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident.

9.     If the assessment identifies that employees have been exposed to a prescribed disease, excessive
noise levels or radiation exposure that resulted in health surveillance, then a copy of the assessment is
provided for inclusion in the employee‟s medical records. This document is to be kept for 40 years.




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Leaflet 31 – Smoking at Work

                                             SMOKING AT WORK

References:

A.    Defence Internal Brief 2006/35 dated 07 Dec 2006.
B.    UKSC/G1(Med) 1400 dated 8 Dec 06.
C.    Arbeitsstättenverordnung
D.    Nichtraucherschutzgesetz

Introduction

1.    MOD has implemented a non-smoking environment in all its enclosed working premises in the UK and
Overseas. This was notified to BFG in References A and B. Although this is not strictly a Health and Safety
at Work issue, as the lead lies with G1 Med as an Environmental Health matter, this leaflet is published for
ease of reference. References C & D are the German Workplace regulations and Legislation governing the
protection for non-smokers against cigarette, cigar or pipe smoke and apply to BFG.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit complies with MOD
smoking control policy at References A & B within MOD workplaces and that this policy is incorporated into
Standing Orders.

3.      Line Managers. Line managers are to ensure that non-smokers are adequately protected from the
risk of harm from inhaling tobacco smoke and that all personnel comply with departmental smoking control
policy in accordance with the references.

Employees

4.  All employees, irrespective of their rank or status as Military, UKBC or DEL are required to comply with
MOD smoking policy. There is no exemption for DEL employees.

Visitors and contractors

5.  All visitors and contractors to any area under the control of BFG are to comply with the local
commanders smoking control measures.

Guidance for Line Managers

6.    Line Managers are to ensure that smoking is prohibited within all enclosed MOD and Armed Forces
premises including all communal areas in Service Messes and Clubs with the only exemptions being for:

      a.      Service Family Quarters.

      b.      MOD Residential Housing.

      c.      Designated Service Single Living Accommodation.

7.    Smoking will remain permitted in the open air on the MOD estate or inside premises that do not meet
the definition of enclosed premises. Local commanders are to ensure that safety is not compromised by
persons smoking in the open on an MOD establishment.

8.    Where smoking in open areas takes place and local budget permits, Local commanders may provide
covered areas outside buildings for smokers to shelter from the elements. Any shelter must not be located
adjacent to any doorway or other opening into any enclosed premises, or to any thoroughfare between



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locations, where they would expose non-smokers to second hand smoke. Any shelter provided must not fall
within the definition of an “enclosed premises” in accordance with Reference B.

9.    If smokers are permitted to smoke outside and no specific shelters are provided, instructions should
be issued to ensure that the activity is conducted in a location that is away from entrances into premises, or
adjacent to any opening into occupied premises, so that non-smokers are not exposed to second-hand
smoke.

Non – Compliance Procedures

10. Local Commanders are to ensure that Reference B is implemented successfully and in cases where
the policy is abused or not followed, disciplinary procedures can be applied. However, such action should be
a last resort and line managers and colleagues are encouraged to implement the policy sensitively and to
provide sympathetic support for smokers to enable them to adjust to the policy to avoid recourse to
disciplinary action.

“No – Smoking” Signs (Locations)

11. Guard – manned entry points are required to display a “No – Smoking” sign at each entry point to the
Establishment, which makes it clear that it relates to the whole Establishment. There is no requirement to
place “No - Smoking” signs on each of the individual enclosed premises located within such an
Establishment.

12. Other MOD enclosed premises, whether on or off the Defence Estate, not located on entry controlled
Establishments, will be required to display a “No – Smoking” sign at each entry point into the enclosed
premises.

13. Where shelters are erected as protection from the elements for smokers, or where bedrooms in
Service single living accommodation have been so designated, a sign indicating 'Smoking Permitted' is to be
displayed.

14. MOD Mini Buses, Coaches, and other vehicles forming part of the white fleet will be required to display
No Smoking signs where these can be seen by the occupants. Local Commanders may, for operational
reasons, exempt this signing requirement for White Fleet Vehicles, though the vehicle must remain 'smoke
free'.

“No – Smoking” Signs (Design)

15. “No – Smoking” Signs at the entry points to MOD establishments or premises are to have minimum
dimensions of 230 mm by 160 mm and must be of sufficient size to display:

      a.    The international "no smoking" symbol consisting of a graphic representation of a burning
      cigarette enclosed within a red circle at least 85 mm in diameter with a red bar across: and

      b.     Any text shown on the sign should be written in both English and host nation languages.

      c.    Name(s) of the person (or position in the Establishment or Premises) to whom a complaint may
      be made by any person who observes another person smoke in the no smoking premises. The sign
      should state that a complaint may be made and include telephone contact details of where to make
      the complaint.

16. If additional "no smoking" signs are displayed to remind persons inside a Premises or inside a
controlled entry Establishment, such signs must as a minimum contain the international "no smoking" symbol
consisting of a graphic representation of a burning cigarette enclosed within a red circle at least 85 mm in
diameter with a red bar across it.

17. When a "No Smoking" sign is required to be placed in a vehicle it must as a minimum contain the
international "no smoking" symbol consisting of a graphic representation of a burning cigarette enclosed
within a red circle at least 85 mm in diameter with a red bar across it.


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18. All "No Smoking" signs will need to be displayed in such a manner that it is clear and unobstructed
from the view of persons entering the premises or seated in the vehicle, and are positioned, so far as is
reasonably practicable to protect them from tampering, damage or removal.

19. Signs should be procured through MOD Service Supply sources but consideration needs to be made
to accommodate host nation language translations.




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Leaflet 32 - Stress at Work

                                              STRESS AT WORK

References:

A.        JSP Vol 2, Leaflet 25.
B.        2006DIN07-010: Occupational Stress Management Policy.
C.        Arbeitsschutzgesetz (1996).
D.        MMP 201 – The Land Commanders Guide to Risk Management on Training and Exercises

Introduction

1.       Every person is subjected to varying degrees of pressure. Stressors are part of Army life and most
certainly part of operations. Stress occurs when pressures exceed an individual's ability to cope and anyone
who experiences too much pressure at work and/or at home will be stressed. Excessive stress can manifest
itself in physical, behavioural, mental or emotional effects. Consequently this has an impact on the individual,
the team and the task.

2.        The Army defines stress as

          “the reaction people have when the pressure or other demands on them is excessive and results in a
          deleterious effect on health and capability that may reduce performance"

3.        The management of stress must therefore be recognised as a core function of leadership.

Duties
                                                         18
4.     1* commanders. 1* commanders are mandated to issue a stress management policy. A framework
for such a policy is at Annex A, This policy is subject to audit.

5.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of stress at work in accordance with References A and B. These
arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed at regular intervals.

6.     Line Managers. Line managers should carry out risk assessments to identify excessively stressful
situations, and identify indicators of stress in themselves and others and to manage it effectively, as outlined
at Reference A & B. Adequate records are to be kept.

Employees

7.    Employees should seek support from their line manager following a traumatic event, and early
resolution of problems, which disrupt their own productivity, or that of their team.

Guidance for Line Managers

8.     Stress should be recognised as a potential psychological hazard and managed as any other H&S
issue.

9.     Stress should be considered, where appropriate, during all risk assessments and safety audits and
particularly during periods of restructuring, changing employment conditions or workplace conflict.

10. Individuals will usually recover from stress if it is of a short duration and the situation is managed
effectively through effective leadership and appropriate training where relevant. Prolonged stress will result
in dysfunctional performance and/or physical ill health. Sudden massive and overwhelming pressure can
result in acute reactions such as 'battle shock' and 'traumatic stress reactions' (TSR).

18
     JSP 375 Vol 2 Leaflet 25

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11. No one is immune to stress. Guidance on stress management and stress audit is given at Reference
A and further pragmatic advice more related to military operations is given at Part 7 of Reference D, which is
issued to troop level. Where problems have developed, advice should be sought from the garrison SHEF FP
or appropriate occupational health services.

Training

12. Training for non operational stress management is still being developed; Reference A is under review
as at Aug 09. Meanwhile, a lack of training should not prevent the principles of stress management being
applied as set out in this leaflet.

Records

13. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. References A and B, records of
meetings, counselling and stress related absence should be kept to demonstrate that every effort has been
made in respect of stress prevention.




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                                                                  Annex A – 1* Stress Management Policy Framework


XXXXX BRIGADE/GARRISON - POLICY FOR MANAGEMENT OF STRESS

General

1.     As Commander of XXXXXX Brigade/Garrison, I am personally responsible for, and fully committed to,
the Safety, Health, Environmental and Fire Protection (SHEF) protection of all employees under my
command. I recognise that workplace stress is a health and safety issue and acknowledge the importance
of identifying and reducing workplace stressors.

2.       This Policy for the Management of Stress applies to everyone employed within XXXXXX
Brigade/Garrison and all Commanding Officers, Heads of Departments and Line Managers are responsible
for its implementation.

Definition of Stress

3.    The Health and Safety Executive define stress as „the adverse reaction people have to excessive
pressure or other types of demand placed on them‟. This makes an important distinction between pressure,
which can be a positive state if managed correctly and, stress which can be detrimental to health.

Policy
                                                                              19
4.     In accordance with the MOD Stress Management Policy , all units and departments under my
command are to identify all workplace stressors and conduct risk assessments to eliminate stress or control
the risks from stress. These risk assessments are to be reviewed at least annually.
                                                                                                          20
5.     The HQ Land Forces Post Operational Stress Management Intervention policy provides further
direction of this particular area and is to be applied for all personnel within XXXXXX Brigade/Garrison.

6.     Commanding Officers and Heads of Departments are to arrange training for all managers and
supervisory staff within their respective units. The training should reflect good management practices
relating to stress in the workplace.

7.   Staff affected by stress, either by work or external factors, are to be provided with confidential
counselling,

8.      Suitable and sufficient resources to implement this stress management strategy are to be provided.

Responsibilities

9.      Commanding Officers and Heads of Departments are to:

        a.     Conduct and implement recommendations of risks assessments within their
        jurisdiction.

        b.    Ensure good communication between management and staff, particularly where there are
        organisational and procedural changes.
                                                   21
        c.      Ensure staff are fully trained          to discharge their duties.




19
   JSP 375 Vol 2 Leaflet 25.
20
   LFSO 3209.
21
   Training for non operational stress management is being developed and the lack of formal training is not a reason to comply with the
direction given in this policy.

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          d.   Arrange for all Operational Stress Management (OSM) Intervention to be recorded on
          JPA22 for all Army personnel deploying on operations for one month or more (whether as
          members of formed units or as Individual Augmentees).

          e.     Ensure staff are provided with meaningful developmental opportunities.

          f.     Establish procedures to monitor:

                 (1)     Workloads to ensure that people are not overloaded.

                 (2)     Working hours and overtime to ensure that staff are not overworking.

                 (3)     Leave records to ensure that staff are taking their full leave entitlement.

          g.     Attend training, as required in good management practice and health and safety.

          h.     Ensure that bullying and harassment is not tolerated within their jurisdiction.

          i.    Be vigilant and offer additional support to a member of staff who is experiencing stress
          outside work, e.g. bereavement or separation.

          j.     Consider Stress Management as part of the Unit Health & Safety Committee (UHSC).

Occupational Health

10.       Assistance is to be sought from Occupational Health professionals to:

          a.     Provide advice and awareness training on stress.

          b.     Train and support managers in implementing stress risk assessments.

          c.    Support individuals who have been off sick with stress and provide advice for them and
          their management on a planned return to work.

          d.     Refer to workplace counsellors or specialist agencies as required.

          e.     Monitor and review the effectiveness of measures to reduce stress.

          e. Inform the Commanding Officer and the UHSC of any changes and developments in the
          field of stress at work.


Review

11.       This policy will be reviewed not less frequently than annually

A Leader
Brig
Comd                                                                      Date:




22
     HQLF/PersOps/2905 dated 29 Oct 08.

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Leaflet 33 - Substances Hazardous to Health

                                  SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH

References:

A.    The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (Amendment) Regulations 2004.
B.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 5.
C.    Defence Instructions and Notices – 2006DIN07-007.
D.    Arbeitschutzgesetz 1996.
E.    Gefahrstoffverordnung CHV 5.
F.    Arbeitsmedizinische Vorsorge (BGV A4).
G.    JSP 515 (Hazard Stores Information System (HSIS))

Introduction

1.      A hazardous substance is defined as any material, mixture or compound used or arising from work
activities or processes, which is harmful to people's health in the form in which it occurs in the work activity.

2.    Substances can be harmful when present in various forms such as a solid, liquid, mist, dust, fumes
and vapours. The main routes of entry into the body are by inhalation, ingestion, absorption or injection.

3.     The effects of exposure to hazardous substances are wide ranging and can cause minor effects such
as skin irritation, serious health effects such as lung disease or even death. A risk assessment must be
carried out prior to any work involving the handling, storage or use of hazardous substances in the
workplace. A list of hazard properties is at Annex A to this leaflet.

4.     With the exception of Reference B, all other References outline the current regulations and guidance
in place relating to exposure to hazardous substances.

5.    It has been agreed with the Host Nation (HN) Authorities that the COSHH Assessment at Annex B is
considered to be suitable and sufficient for DEL employees. However, it must be in a language
understandable by the employees.

Changes in Legislation

6.    During consultation with DS&C and CESO(A) it was confirmed that the DIN at Reference C will be
incorporate into Reference B to comply with UK legislation changes at Reference A in the near future. It was
stated that the amendment shall also include the revised COSHH Assessment forms to reflect the new
exposure values/limits.

7.      It has also been agreed with DS&C and CESO(A) that the inclusion of the changes will be
incorporated into this Manual by this leaflet. An amended COSHH Assessment form is included at Annex B
to this leaflet to reflect the new changes in values/limits and Gars/units are permitted to reproduce it until
such time that Reference B is amended by DS&C. For DEL employees, the COSHH Assessment must be
amended at the top to indicate the level of PPE required (levels 1 to 3). If unsure contact the GHSWE.

Duties

8.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements in place for the control of substances hazardous to health in the workplace. The
arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as appropriate.

9.      Line Managers. Line managers must ensure that all activities or processes where employees are, or
likely to be exposed to hazardous substances are identified, risk assessed and where necessary, controlled
to reduce the risk of harm to as low as is reasonably practicable. Exposure is to be monitored and adequate
information, training, supervision and instruction provided to employees and others.



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10. Employees. Employees have a legal duty to ensure that their acts or omissions do not put others at
risk. They should follow safe systems of work developed for their health and safety, make proper use of
equipment provided and adhere to any instructions related to work activities involving exposure to hazardous
substances. Line managers should be informed immediately of any situations where the health or safety of
any personnel is, or is likely to be, affected when handling, storing or using hazardous substances.

Guidance for Line Managers

11. Workplace Exposure Limits (WEL) have replaced the previous system of Occupational Exposure
Standards and Maximum Exposure Limits. These were widely misunderstood and the WEL system is much
simpler to apply, thus improving health and safety.

12. WEL have been established for a number of substances hazardous to health and these are intended
to prevent excessive exposure to specified hazardous substances by containing exposure below a set limit.
WEL are the maximum concentration of an airborne substance, averaged over a reference period to which
employees may be exposed by inhalation under any circumstances.

13. A WEL gives employers a maximum limit for the amount of each substance allowed in the workplace
atmosphere. However, despite the standards, the main emphasis has changed from: merely trying to keep
exposure levels below the WELs to ensuring all efforts are focused on implementing “Adequate Control” as
redefined in the Regulations at Reference A and as shown below. This deliberate approach demands the
application of the principles of good practice to minimise exposure through effective control methods.

14. The emphasis is that employers, who currently comply with COSHH, will still be able to do so by
continuing to apply good practice. Good practice advice on controlling substances and occupational hygiene
principles listed in the Regulations themselves is available free at HSE‟s “COSHH Essentials” website in the
guidance booklet. If this guidance is followed employers should stay within each hazardous substance‟s
WEL. The WELs are listed in the HSE Publication: EH40/2005 Workplace Exposure Limits.

Meaning of „adequate control‟

15. In accordance with Reference A, adequate control of exposure to a substance hazardous to health
means:

      a.    Applying the eight principles of good practice set out in Schedule 2A to COSHH Regulations
      and repeated in para 16 below for ease of reference;
      b.    Not exceeding the WEL for the substance (if there is one): and;
      c.     If the substance causes cancer, heritable genetic damage or asthma, reducing exposure to as
      low a level as is reasonably practicable.
The Eight Principles of Control

16. Schedule 2 of Reference A details the principles of good practice for the control of exposure to
hazardous substances and are reproduced as follows for ease of reference:

      a.    Design and operate processes and activities to minimise emission, release and spread of
      substances hazardous to health.
      b.    Take into account all relevant routes of exposure such as inhalation, skin absorption, injection
      and ingestion when developing control measures.
      c.    Control exposure by means that are proportionate to the health risk.
      d.    Choose the most effective and reliable control options, which minimise the escape and spread
      of substances hazardous to health.
      e.   Where adequate control of exposure cannot be achieved by other means, provide in
      combination with other control measures, suitable personal protective equipment.
      f.     Check and review regularly all elements of control measures for their continuing
      effectiveness.


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      g.    Inform and train all employees on the hazards and risks from the substances with which they
      work and the use of control measures developed to minimise the risk.
      h.     Ensure that the introduction of control measures does not increase the overall risk to H&S.
16. Where substances are defined as carcinogens, mutagens or a cause of occupational asthma, then
Reference A requires compliance to reduce exposure so far as is reasonably practicable. This applies to
substances with an 8-hour long-term reference period and under these circumstances employers may have
to carry out a programme of air monitoring. This will generally be necessary unless the risk assessment
shows that the level of exposure is most unlikely ever to exceed the WEL. The extent to reduce exposure
below the WEL depends on the type of risk presented by the substance, weighed against the cost, time and
effort involved in taking measures to reduce it.

17. Other substances assigned a WEL but not classified as carcinogens, mutagens or a cause of
occupational asthma must be adequately controlled and this will be achieved by applying the principles of
good practice to the work concerned and keeping the exposure below any WEL.

18. In the case of inhaled substances not assigned a WEL, the absence from the lists of WELs in
EH40/2005, CHANs (see paragraph 19 below) or those listed in JSP 515 (Hazard Stores Information System
(HSIS)) does not mean that it is safe. Many substances in use do not have a WEL and for these substances
the principles of good practice for their control should be applied. The minimum requirement is to prevent
exposure to a level to which nearly all the working population could be exposed day after day at work without
adverse effects on their health.

Chemical Hazard Alert Notices (CHANs)

19. Where information cannot be found within JSP 515, a list of CHANs is given on the HSE website; cut
and paste this main link to your browser http://www.hse.gov.uk/. In addition, employers can obtain
information about the substance concerned from a number of other sources, including:

      a.     Manufacturers and suppliers of the substance.
      b.     Industry associations.
      c.     Occupational medicine & occupational hygiene journals.

20. If the principles of good practice are carefully applied as described above it is unlikely that a WEL will
be exceeded. If it is, then the line manager needs to check the continuing effectiveness of the control
measures and conduct a more detailed investigation where necessary. They should also seek further advice
from the USA or GHSWE.

21. Where exposure may be caused by substances by a route other then inhalation (i.e. absorption,
ingestion or contact) this may require short-term health surveillance to determine the level of exposure where
there are no ill effects. Where a substance has a designated WEL or the German equivalent AGW
(Arbeitsplatzgrenzwert), EHT should be requested to monitor exposure levels.

Assessment

22. The assessment and control process can be simple or complex, dependent on the situation. The
assessment process is based on who is being exposed, the substances used, how long people are being
exposed and the levels of hazardous substance(s) to which they are exposed.

23. The cornerstone of controlling hazardous substances in the workplace is the undertaking of a COSHH
assessment. Assessments should be specific to an individual process or work activity and should ideally, be
site-specific to ensure that all risks are adequately assessed. However, in some instances it may prove
useful to carry out a generic assessment that covers a group of similar activities or processes that occur over
several units. But it should be remembered that if the group of activities or processes change in any
significant way within a unit, then the line manager must make sure any differences are further assessed and
actioned.




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24. If employees are exposed to carcinogenic substances, the effort placed into assessing and controlling
the risks will need to be much greater. The assessment will have to be monitored to ensure that safe
working procedures are being followed and reviewed at regular intervals to ensure it remains valid.

25. When carrying out an assessment, information regarding the hazardous substances can be readily
obtained from the manufacturers or suppliers safety data sheet (SDS). Generally SDSs for most products
used throughout MOD can be obtained by accessing JSP 515. Where a safety data sheet is not available on
the system information can be obtained from the manufacturer or supplier.

26. Reference C outlines the essential need for line managers to ensure COSHH assessments are
reviewed when there is a change in the process, activity, environment or person and in particular ensure that
the information contained in the SDS extracted from JSP 515 - Hazard Stores Information System (HSIS) still
remains up-to-date and valid. This is also necessary to ensure the correct precautions are being
implemented including the correct personal protective equipment (PPE). Should the SDS information be
considered vague or non-specific, the line manager must consult with the HSIS Focal Node to determine if a
new data sheet is available, or contact the supplier or manufacturer to clarify the information.
                                         233
27. It has been accepted by the WBV that UK COSHH assessments defined in this Leaflet meet the
requirements of German legislation and that there is no requirement for German COSHH assessment forms
to be completed. However, Safety Data Sheets must be available in the German Language where
necessary.

Storage

28. All hazardous substances are to be accompanied by a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) containing
instructions as to its safe use. SDS are to be held as follows:

      a.    One copy in Master File.

      b.    Copies in actual storage location (whether in a Tech or QM store).

      c.    A copy at the workstation.

      d.    A copy in the Unit HSW Library.

29. Issue vouchers are to be endorsed with the SDS No and in BOLD letters „HAZARDOUS ITEM'. Large
quantities of hazardous stores should be partitioned with brick walls to prevent the accidental mixing of
incompatible substances. Where a fully partitioned store does not exist, the following considerations must be
applied:

       a.   The types of UN Hazard classes to be held.

       b.   Quantities of each type.

       c.   Length of time required to store.

       d.   Building construction.

30. Any building holding hazardous items must be well ventilated. Hazardous storage areas are to be
identified by the relevant signs and shown on the Dept location map on the HSW Notice Board. A simple
chart on how hazardous substances are permitted to be stored is at Annex C.

31. Figure 1 below identifies the assessment process including the hierarchy of control measures required
to reduce the risk of exposure to substances harmful to health.




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                                                   Figure 1

                                                                    Assess (Note) risks to
                                                                    health and decide on and
                                                                    implement the steps
                                                                    needed to control the
                                                                    risk.
     Prohibition of substance
     Substitution
     Enclosure of plant/process
     Good design                                                      Decide control measures
     Local and general ventilation                                    necessary to prevent or
     Engineering control measures                                     control exposure.
     Good management
     Personal protective equipment
     Hygiene facilities                                           Ensure control measures
                                                                  are correctly used and
                                                                  maintained.



                                  Make effective arrangements
                                  to deal with accidents,
                                  incidents and emergencies

     Inform, instruct and train                                   Monitor exposure of employees
     employees and others in                                      and others in units/garrisons as
     units/garrisons                                              necessary.




Provide health surveillance                                           Record and review
to employees as necessary.                                            the assessment.



Note: The COSHH Assessment Form at Annex A is to be used.

Health Surveillance

32. Risk assessments will identify the need for health surveillance. The advice of the garrison SHEF FP
should be sought. Occupational Medical Practitioners (OMP), or the military equivalent, carry out health
surveillance and medical examinations.

Records

33. COSHH assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Health surveillance records are to be
kept for 40 years from date of last entry.

Annex

A.    Hazard properties
B.    COSHH Assessment Form
C.    Storage compatibility



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                                                                                                            Leaflet 33

                                                                                      Annex A – Hazard Properties

Classification   Letter   Symbol              Description of risk                 Preventive measures
                                   Repeated contact causes inflammation of            Keep products in their original
   Irritant       Xi               the skin and mucous membranes, etc.                 packaging (properly closed
                                                                                       containers, childproof tops).
                                                                                      Keep products of the reach of
                                   Corrosive substances seriously damage               children.
  Corrosive        C               living tissue and also attack other                Always put them away safely,
                                   materials. The reaction may be due to               never on windows-sills, etc.,
                                   the presence of water or humidity.                  where they may fall.
                                                                                      Protect the eyes, skin etc, against
                                                                                       splashes. Be very careful when
                                                                                       pouring or sprinkling the product.
                                                                                       Always use gloves and eye
                                                                                       protection.
                                                                                      Hygiene is essential: after use,
                                                                                       wash the face and hands
                                                                                       thoroughly.
                                                                                      As first aid, rinse affected part
                                                                                       thoroughly for 10 mins.
                                                                                      Corrosive products in aerosols
                                                                                       are dangerous.
                                   Toxic & harmful substances &                       To avoid contact with the skin,
    Toxic          T               preparations posing a danger to health              use protection, e.g. gloves, mask,
                                   even in small quantities.                           overalls etc.
  Very toxic      T+                                                                  Work in well-ventilated premises
                                   If very small amounts have an effect on             or outside.
                                   health the product is identified by the
   Harmful        Xn                                                                  Good hygiene: wash hands, never
                                   toxic symbol
                                                                                       eat or smoke while using such
                                                                                       products.
                                   These products enter the organism
                                   through inhalation, ingestion, or the skin.        Aerosol products are more
                                                                                       dangerous (inhalation)
                                                                                      Keep out of reach of children.
     Highly                        Highly flammable products ignite if the            Store products in a well-ventilated
  flammable        F               presence of a flame, a source of heat               place.
                                   (e.g. a hot surface) or a spark.                   Never use them near a heat
  Extremely       F+                                                                   source, a hot surface, sparks, or a
  flammable                        Extremely flammable products can                    naked flame.
                                   readily be ignited by an energy source
                                                                         o            No smoking.
                                   (flame, spark, etc.) even at below 0 C.
                                   Combustion requires a combustible
                                                                                      Do not wear nylon clothing and
                   O                                                                   always have a fire extinguisher
  Oxidising                        material, oxygen and a source of ignition;
                                                                                       within easy reach when using
                                   it is greatly accelerated in the presence of
                                                                                       flammable products.
                                   oxidising product (substance rich in
                                   oxygen).                                           Keep flammable products well
                                                                                       separated from oxidising
                                                                                       products.
                                   An explosion is an extremely rapid                 Avoid overheating, shocks and
  Explosive        E               combustion. It depends on the                       keep away from the sun.
                                   characteristics of the product, the                Never place them near sources of
                                   temperature (source of heat), contact with          heat, lamps, radiators etc.
                                   other products (reaction), shocks or
                                                                                      Strictly no smoking.
                                   friction.
 Dangerous                         Substances highly toxic for aquatic                Dispose of the product or its
   for the       <<N               organism‟s fauna also dangerous for                 residues as hazardous waste.
environment                        the ozone layer.                                   Use appropriate containment
                                                                                       to avoid environmental
                                                                                       contamination.

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                                                                                                                           Leaflet 33

                                                                                    Annex B – COSHH Assessment Form

                                          COSHH ASSESSMENT FORM
Tick Yes/No as appropriate. All documents relevant to this assessment must be cross-linked. Assessment and all relevant forms
(e.g. LEV, RPE maintenance records) must be accessible in proximity of task/process

    A.      Administration
    Establishment:                                       Unit:
    Assessment Title:
    Ref:
    B.         Process
    Exact location of process
    Description of process (include reference to operating procedures / work instructions etc):




    List equipment used (exclude LEV/RPE/PPE):



    How often is process done (number of times per day/week/month)?
    How long does it take (minutes/hours/weeks etc.)?
    How many people are likely to be exposed?
    Operatives               [        ]                  Vulnerable persons:
    Neighbourhood workers             [         ]                 young persons             [     ]
    Managers                 [        ]                           pregnant workers          [     ]
    Visitors                 [        ]                           nursing mothers                 [            ]
    Others (state):


    C.         Substances
    Note: include all substances used or produced in the process. Biological agents should also be included where
    relevant
    Name:                                                              Quantity:
    NSN                                                                  CHIP Classification
    Manufacturer/Supplier:

    Has H&S data sheet (supplier's / JSP 515 HSIS) been obtained?              Yes [ ] No [ ] If No, obtain one
    Where can data sheets be found locally
    Classifications in EH 40: (specialist advice may be required if substances have WELs, are carcinogens or have
    "Sen" notation)
    WEL?                                               Carcinogen?          Sk?                       Sen?
    Yes[ ]      No[ ]                                  Yes[ ]    No[ ]      Yes[ ]     No[ ]          Yes[ ]       No[ ]
    Which routes of entry apply:                     List corresponding symptoms of over exposure
    Inhalation                   Yes[ ] No[ ]
    Skin contact                 Yes[ ] No[ ]
    Eye contact                  Yes[ ] No[ ]
    Ingestion                    Yes[ ] No[ ]
    Other (specify)              Yes[ ] No[ ]
    Have substances continuation sheets been raised? Yes[ ] No[ ] How many? [           ]



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 D.      Controls
Note: Give full details of items used (eg NSNo, manufacturers‟ details, British Standard No etc.
  Type of control          Required controls    Actual controls         Deficiency        Statutory or other test ref.
                                                                                                     no.
Ventilation




Respiratory
Protection




Personal
Protection




Other Control
Measures
(eg safe systems of
work, warning signs,
segregation,
training)


Has suitable and sufficient information, instruction and training (IIT) been provided? Yes [ ] No [ ]
Outline of IIT provision:




                                          Yes [ ] MOD Form 933E ref:
Is routine monitoring required?           No [ ]
                                          Don‟t Know [ ] Request specialist advice
                                          Yes [ ] MOD Form 933F ref:
Is health surveillance required?          No [ ]
                                          Don‟t Know [ ] Request specialist advice

E.    Emergency Procedures
Immediate actions (eg evacuate area, ventilate area, call fire brigade):




Emergency drench shower? Yes [ ] No [ ]                            Emergency eye wash? Yes [ ] No [ ]
Personal Protective equipment required for evacuation? (list):



To be worn by:
Spillage confinement and clean up actions (include PPE):



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By whom?
Is any special training required for emergencies?               Yes [ ] No [ ]
Is record of training held?                            Yes [ ] No [ ]
Has it been carried out?                               Yes [ ] No [ ]
Is medical advice required following exposure?         Yes [ ] No [ ]
Is a specialist to be informed?                        Yes [ ] No [ ] If yes, who?
Alert AINC and complete MOD Form 510 to report spillage, exposure, injury       Yes [ ] Mandatory
Enter all injuries, exposure into MOD Form 510 (accident report)                        Yes [ ] Mandatory
F.      Evaluation of risk
                                                Yes [ ]         Go to (b)
(a) Do you have all the information needed
to complete assessment?                                         Tick CONCLUSION [5] & seek help
                                                No [ ]

                                                Yes [ ]         Go to (d)
(b) Would process present significant
risks to health if no controls were in          No [ ]          Go to (c)
place?                                       Don't
                                                                Tick CONCLUSION [4] & seek specialist advice
                                             Know
                                                     Yes [ ]    Tick CONCLUSION [3] & review method
(c) Could the risks to health become
significant?                                         No [ ]     Tick CONCLUSION [1] & review at regular intervals

                                                     Yes [ ]    Tick CONCLUSION [3] & provide backup /alarm
                                                                Tick CONCLUSION [2] & stop process/ reduce
(d) Are the control measures adequate?               No [ ]
                                                                exposure
                                             Don't
                                                                Tick CONCLUSION [4] & seek specialist advice
                                             Know
G.    Conclusion
1 [ ]                    Risks insignificant now and not reasonably foreseeable that they could increase in future.
2 [ ]                    The risks are high now and not adequately controlled.
3 [ ]                    The risks are controlled now but could foreseeably become higher in the future.
                         Uncertain about the risks, nature of the hazard known but uncertain about the degree and
4 [ ]
                         extent of exposure. Seek specialist advice.
5 [ ]                    Cannot decide about the risks. Not enough information. Seek specialist advice
Assessor's Signature                 Name (Block Caps)            Rank/Grade/Appt       Date

Address:                                                        Tel:




H.       Line Manager's Actions
Can the process or any hazardous substance be eliminated?                 Yes [ ] No [ ]
If Yes, state which:
Can any substance be substituted by a less hazardous one?                 Yes [ ] No [ ]
If Yes, state which:
      List all actions required following assessment      Priority          By whom        Target date      Completi
                                                                                                            on date




Have the workforce and safety reps been informed of all the assessment findings? Yes [ ] No [ ]
I will carry out the actions required by this assessment
Line Manager's Signature                  Name (Block Capitals)  Rank/Grade/Appt         Date




Address:                                                           Tel:


I.      Review                  Changes that do not alter the previous assessment conclusion at Section G,
                                should be noted, signed, dated and attached to this form, in addition to signing off
                                the review below.


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                                      Any change altering the previous conclusion requires a new assessment record.


      Date due               Reviewed by           Signature            Date reviewed     New assessment required?
                                                                                          Yes [ ] No [ ]
                                                                                          Yes [ ] No [ ]
                                                                                          Yes [ ] No [ ]
                                                                                          Yes [ ] No [ ]
                                                                                          Yes [ ] No [ ]
      J.       Audit Trail
      If you send a copy of this assessment to your health and safety adviser
      Date sent:
      Date received:
      Date entered on database (where appropriate)



The following additional COSHH Forms may be also required. These can be obtained through
normal Stationery supply channels

911F (6/89)        COSHH Assessments Master Register
933A               Local Exhaust Ventilation (LEV) - Plant Maintenance & Examination Record
933B               Respiratory Protective Equipment (RPE) - Issues from a Central Point
933C               RPE - Maintenance by Users
933D               RPE - Small Stockholders
933E               Routine Exposure Monitoring
933F               Personal Exposure & Health Surveillance Record
936                COSHH Laboratory Assessment




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                                                                                   Leaflet 33

                                     Annex C – Storage compatibility of hazardous substances




                                  X                    X                      
                                  X                    X                      
              X          X                         X     X           X           X
                                  X                    X           X           X
              X          X          X               X                X           X
                                  X               X     X                      
                                  X               X     X                      
   Are permitted to be stored together.
   Are permitted to be stored together in separate packages at least 3m apart.
   Segregate in different building compartments
X   Are not permitted to be stored together.




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Leaflet 34 - Working in Confined Spaces

                                     WORKING IN CONFINED SPACES

References:

A.    JSP 375, Vol. 2 Leaflet 10.
B.    Arbeiten in engen Räumen BGR 117.

Introduction

1.    Activities carried out in confined spaces can be extremely hazardous. Risk assessment may identify
control measures to reduce the risk, but generally a residual risk remains. Confined spaces can be found in
many military environments and in particular in areas where military training and operations take place, for
example, the searching of tunnels, traversing along chambers or pipes or other inaccessible places.

2.    In regard to construction work related tasks involving employees or contractors requiring entry into
confined spaces, this is managed and strictly controlled by Defence Estates (DE) in accordance with their
safe system of work “DE Safety Rules and Procedures - SRP06 for Confined Spaces. This safe system
includes “permit to work” procedures and demands that only authorised and competent persons are
permitted to carry out work activities within any categorised confined spaces.

Duties

3.     Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure their unit has adequate arrangements
for the safe access, egress and working in any confined space. These arrangements are to be monitored
and reviewed as necessary.

4.     Line Managers. Line Managers are to ensure that prior to entry into any confined spaces; they must
fully understand and comply with Reference A (paragraphs 9 to 11) and as described below.

5.    Employees. Employees are to ensure that they do not to enter any confined space until they have
received the appropriate authority, training, information and instruction on the control measures in place to
reduce risk. They are to fully comply with the conditions of the permit to work system and instructions given
by the person in charge.

Guidance for Line Managers

6.    Reference A clearly outlines all control measures required for safe working in confined spaces.

7.     A confined space is any enclosed space where there is a reasonably foreseeable risk associated with
that enclosed space, and includes chambers, tanks, vats, silos, pits, trenches, pipes, sewers, wells, or similar
spaces.

8.      Work in confined spaces may only be undertaken if it is not reasonable to perform the necessary work
any other way. Where work is undertaken then the employer is to ensure that a safe system of work is in
place, effective and monitored for compliance. A safe system of work is defined as "a formal procedure that
will allow a task to be carried out safely".

9.     In addition to the above, no work in confined spaces is to be carried out unless the employer has
suitable and sufficient arrangements in place to rescue workers in an emergency. The arrangements must
be able to be put in operation immediately. Emergency arrangements must include, where necessary the
provision and maintenance of resuscitation equipment.




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Monitoring and Reviewing

10. All risk assessments and safe systems of work associated with working in confined are to be regularly
monitored for effectiveness and reviewed accordingly. Instruments used to measure air quality are only to
be used by competent persons, in calibration date and suitable for the intended purpose.

Competence

11. The risk of harm from the hazard of working in confined spaces is high; therefore control measures
have to be strict, including the use of competent persons. This means the employee is to have adequate
knowledge, training and experience in that particular field and is essential if incidents are to be avoided.
Training standards must be appropriate to the task and the individual‟s roles and responsibilities. Only those
that have received the appropriate training in confined spaces are to control the entry or to enter a confined
space.

Records

12. Records of training given to a confined space worker or emergency team member are to be kept on
the individual‟s personnel file, or in local training records. Permits to Work are to be retained for a period of 5
years under local arrangements.




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Leaflet 35 - Working with Display Screen Equipment (DSE)

                         WORKING WITH DISPLAY SCREEN EQUIPMENT (DSE)

References:

A. JSP Vol. 2, Leaflet 24.
B. Bildschirmarbeitsverordnung 1996.

Introduction

1.      Since its introduction into the office environment, display screen equipment (DSE) has attracted
concern regarding the possible health effects upon users. The need for employers to adequately manage the
risk of harm to users has been exemplified by increasing civil claims activities in the field of work related
upper limb disorders, (WRULD) commonly referred to as repetitive strain injuries (RSI) Employers must
recognise and act accordingly to manage DSE risk.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of DSE. The arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed
accordingly.

3.      Line Managers. Line managers are to ensure that suitable and sufficient risk assessments are
undertaken on all users‟ workstations. Assessments are to be reviewed biannually or when the system or
activity alters significantly.

4.    Employees. Employees should take reasonable care of their own H&S. DSE is to be used in
accordance with their training and safe systems of work.

Guidance for Line Managers

5.    The general requirement is for line managers to provide and maintain an environment in which DSE
can be operated without risks to health. This means they are obliged to carry out a risk assessment of the
workstation and user using the appropriate MOD methodology in reference A. The assessment will look at
the equipment, the furniture and immediate working environment. This must be done in consultation with the
workers or their representatives. All risks to health must be identified, evaluated and reduced to an
acceptable level.

6.    The legal minimum requirement is to assess work stations of ”users” (an employee who habitually
uses DSE as a significant part of his normal work).

DSE Assessors

7.    No specific competency is required to carry out DSE risk assessment other than being familiar with the
task and equipment and the requirements of the regulations. Reference A, Annex C gives guidance on a
simple assessment. If line managers require further guidance then they are to contact the USA for advice.

Eye and Eyesight Tests

8.     Any defined DSE 'user', who considers that they have difficulty focussing on the screen, or suffers
from eye defects attributable to DSE work, has a legal right to request an eye and eyesight test. The line
managers must satisfy themselves that the individual concerned is a dedicated user and hence entitled to
eyesight testing and possible corrective appliances. Once this is agreed the individual is entitled to repeat
tests and any necessary renewal of corrective appliances, as advised by the optometrist, for as long as they
remain a user.




                                              ...
                                        BFG SHEF MANUAL - PART 2

9.    The employer is required to provide such tests at no cost to the individual. If corrective appliances are
                                                                                                    24
needed they must be provided at no cost to the employee from local budgets, up to a limit of £60 . (Unless
exceptional circumstances can be demonstrated).

10. The employer can specify a particular company to carry out sight tests and provide corrective
appliances. The provision of test and subsequent correction for Service personnel is through normal service
medical channels.

11.   Full guidance on eyesight testing is given at Reference A, Annex A.

12.   Advice specific to DEL employees is at Part 1 Chapter 4 of this Manual.

WBV Inspections

13. The age and layout of the MOD real estate often makes it difficult to achieve total compliance with the
requirements of Reference B. Where a unit is being inspected by the WBV, the advice of the GHSwE should
be sought regarding DSE standards.

Training

14. All new users are to be provided with adequate H&S information on DSE, with appropriate training in
its safe use, in accordance with Reference A.

Records

15. Line managers are to retain risk assessments for 5 years and should not be destroyed on review but
held in case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. In the event of a DSE incident or
injury, then copy of the assessment should be lodged in the appropriate employee‟s personal file.




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Leaflet 36 - Working at Height

                                            WORKING AT HEIGHT
References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 7.
B.    The Working at Height Regulations 2005 (WAHR).
C.    DE Safety Rules & Procedures - SRP 07 and 2006DIN07-09.
E.    BGR 148 - BGI605 - BG1757 - BGI778.

Introduction

1.     Falls and falling from heights accounts for more fatalities and serious injuries than any other workplace
hazard. Line managers should therefore recognise the potential risk from falling from heights. The guidance
provided in this leaflet is general but where the activities are not so straight forward and may involve
additional specific risks, for example, working on masts and towers, then the risk assessment should identify
a need for the operation of a safe system of work which may include permit to work procedures. See
paragraph 10 below.

Changes in Legislation

2.     Reference A details the general procedure for working at height. With the introduction of the WAHR at
Reference B, there have been a number of changes to the procedural requirements. During consultation with
DS&C and CESO(A) it was confirmed that the amendment to Reference A to incorporate the legislation at
Reference B, is currently being prepared. Until such time that the revised leaflet is issued, it has been agreed
that the basic requirements of the legislation will be incorporated into this Manual by this leaflet. Further
reading is available from the sources shown at paragraph 16 below. Reference A also remains a useful
source of the basic requirements for working at height.

3.      Reference B does not apply to the provision of instruction or leadership in caving or climbing by way of
sport, recreation, team building or similar activities but a review of the Regulations to consider including such
activities is currently taking place.

Duties

4.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of the risk associated with working at height. These arrangements are to
be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

5.     Line Managers. Line managers are to ensure that all potential hazards associated with working at
heights are correctly identified, adequately risk assessed and appropriate control measures implemented to
reduce the risk of harm. They must also ensure that those persons delegated to work at height are provided
with suitable and sufficient information, instruction, training and supervision and that all equipment provided
to reduce risk is subject to an inspection regime and if necessary regular examination.

6.    If the line manager has any doubts or concerns on managing the risks associated with working at
height then advice should be sought from the USA or GHSWE.

Employees

7.      Employees must be competent and physically fit to work at height. They must comply with the
requirements of the risk assessment and any safe system of work in operation to ensure they do not put
themselves or others at risk. Where any system or equipment failures or defect that may affect their safety is
identified, they should consider ceasing work and report to their supervisor or line manager without delay.




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Guidance for Line Managers

8.      The main hazards associated with working at height are the potential for employees or objects falling
and causing serious injury or damage not only to the individual(s) involved, but also to any others in the
vicinity. In accordance with Reference B, a place is “at height” if a person could be injured falling from it,
even if it is at or below ground level. “Work” includes access and egress and moving around at a place of
work (except by a staircase in a permanent workplace) but not travel to or from a place of work.

9.    In accordance with Reference B, a simple hierarchy for managing and selecting equipment for work at
height has been established and states that Duty holders must:

     a.     Avoid work at height where possible.
     b.     Use work equipment or other measures to prevent falls where working at height cannot be avoided.
     c. Where they cannot eliminate the risk of a fall, use work equipment or other measures to minimise
     the distance and consequences of a fall should one occur.

10. Line managers are required to ensure that all work at height is carefully planned, organised,
supervised and monitored. Where the risk assessment shows that it is not reasonably practicable to carry out
the task other than by working at height, the following factors need to be considered:

     a. Work Activities: The work may be simple and straightforward and may require minimum
     precautions (egg. Retrieving light stationery items from high shelving). On the other hand, the climbing
     of masts or towers will require a formal safe system of work and permit procedure.

     b. Work Location: Consideration needs to be given to the access and egress restrictions,
     confinement of the site, physical hazards (i.e. river, roads, power lines etc) and activities taking place by
     others nearby.

     c. Environment: Weather, temperature, wind, lightning, noise, vibration etc. may all be factors that
     can significantly increase the risk to H&S during working at height.

     d. Equipment & Safety Features: This includes many types of access equipment such as fixed,
     tower and independent scaffolding, mobile elevated working platforms, bosons chairs, ladders, steps
     etc. Where fixed is not feasible, then consideration should be given to fall arrest systems such as safety
     netting, harnesses & lifelines. Safety features can assist working at height such as handholds on
     vehicles, eyebolts for window cleaning, rail-lock devices for climbing.

     e. Fragile Surfaces: The condition and stability of the surfaces where work at height is carried out is
     a vital consideration before starting work. Avoid work on fragile surfaces unless essential but if there is
     no alternative ensure, so far is as reasonably practicable that suitable platforms, coverings, guard rails,
     etc are provided and used to minimise the risk. If there is still a risk remaining, ensure that the distance
     and effect of any potential fall is minimised. Posting of warning signs should also be considered.

     f. Falling Objects: All effort must be made to prevent falling objects during working at height. If this
     is not reasonably practicable, line managers must ensure that no one is injured by anything falling. Line
     managers must ensure nothing is stored, thrown or tipped when at height that may cause injury.

     g. Personal Protective Equipment: The suitability and compatibility of the PPE in use must be
     carefully checked. All personnel involved need to be competent in its use and must conduct before and
     after user checks and report any faults or defects to their line manager or supervisor.

     h. Emergency Arrangements: Reference B states that during the planning of any work at height in
     should include arrangements for emergencies and rescue. Safe systems of work should include these
     arrangements and the personnel involved should be adequately trained in the procedures and in the
     use of the PPE in such circumstances.




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Masts, Towers and Fixed Access ways

11. All working at height activities in relation to shore based masts, towers and selected fixed access ways
are to be carried out in accordance with Reference C. Its application covers access, egress and work
activities whilst at height, including a place at or below ground level. All other working at height activities not
covered by SRP 07 is to be carried out in accordance with References A & B.

12. Host Nation legislation requires that personnel working on masts and towers be subject to medical
surveillance (J41). This is to be conducted in conjunction with the GHSWE and GLSU. A medical record is
to be maintained.

13. If the line manager has any doubts or concerns on managing the risk from working at height then
advice should be sought from the USA or GHSWE.

Use of Ladders

14. There has been extensive debate regarding the use of ladders since the introduction of the WAHR at
Reference B especially on when and where they are permitted to be used. The use of ladders has not been
banned under WAHR but their use must comply with the requirements therein which demand sensible risk
management. If the correct measures have been considered as shown at paragraph 8 above and the risk is
assessed as low and of short duration, then the use of ladders may be considered as an acceptable solution.
Further guidance is shown at Reference B.

Equipment Inspection

15. An inspection regime has to be implemented and maintained to ensure the continuing serviceability
and integrity of all equipment used for working at height including scaffolding, Mobile Elevated Work
Platforms, ladders, steps, fall arrest systems, netting etc. Employees must be provided with information,
instruction, training and supervision on its use.

Training/Exercises

16. It may not be practicable to use a fall arrester or other system whilst retaining realism on training or
exercise, for example, when camouflaging a vehicle. A balance needs to be struck so that training remains
as safe as is reasonably practicable consistent with achieving the aim without transferring the risk to
operations. In such cases the line manager should provide information, instruction and training and
supervision relating to the task and environment and ensure that basic controls are in place, for example, the
serviceability of footwear, weather conditions, vehicle access points, canopies and framework.

Records

17. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. Records of PPE inspections and
maintenance should be retained locally in the equipment logbook.

Further Reading

18.   There are a number of HSE publications available through their website and as listed as follows:

      a.     INDJ401 - The Work at Height Regulations 2005 – A Brief Guide.
      b.     INDJ402 - Safe Use of Ladders and Stepladders – An Employers‟ Guide.




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Leaflet 37 – Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare)


                               WORKPLACE (HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELFARE)
References:

A.    JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 28.
B.    Arbeitsstättenverordnung.

Introduction

1.       The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations and its German equivalent at Reference B
lay down minimum standards relating to the health, safety and welfare aspects of workplaces. Essentially
the regulations cover environmental factors such as temperature, space and ventilation: structural features
such as windows, doors, floors, traffic routes and welfare factors such as toilet, washing and changing
facilities, drinking water and rest facilities. A number of differences between the UK and German standards
are identifiable, mainly in the areas of room temperature, space and lighting levels. This leaflets sets out the
differences and explains how they are to be managed.

Duties

2.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for the management of health, safety and welfare in the workplace. The arrangements are to
be monitored and reviewed as necessary. Where a shortfall in resources prevents or restricts a
commanding officers ability to meet the requirements then this is always to be referred to higher authority.

Guidance for Line Managers

3.    Line managers have a duty to ensure workplaces under their control comply with the regulations,
Reference A refers. The general requirements of the regulations require:

      a.    Stability: Where workplaces are inside buildings, the building must be safe, i.e. have a stability
      and solidity that is appropriate.

      b.    Maintenance: The equipment and systems must be maintained in an efficient state. This
      includes cleaning.

      c.    Ventilation: Enclosed workplaces must be effectively ventilated with sufficient fresh air by
      natural or artificial means.

      d.    Temperature: There is an important difference between Host Nation and UK workplace
      regulations on the issue of temperature.

              (1)    UK Regulations, see Reference A, set out in general, a „reasonable‟ temperature, defined
              as a minimum temperature of 16 ºC (degrees) or 13 ºC where severe physical work is carried
              out. A maximum temperature is not specified. Managers are to refer to Reference A for more
              detailed guidance on measures to be taken where a „reasonable temperature‟ cannot be
              sustained and are to undertake risk assessments as appropriate.

              (2)      Reference B sets out the following provisions for room temperature for DEL employees:

                       (a)    In workrooms, rest rooms, on-call rooms/stand-by areas, sanitary rooms, canteens
                       and first aid rooms where no specific requirements concerning room temperature have to
                       be met for operational technical reasons, with regard to working procedures, the physical
                       stress to the workforce and the specific use being made of the room, during working
                       hours, the room temperature must be conducive to good health and well being.

                       (b)   Windows, transom-windows/skylights and glass walls must, depending on the type
                       of work and the working area, allow work places to be shaded from excessive sunlight.


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 Note: Risk Assessments are to be carried out and mitigating action taken where appropriate to
 ensure that room temperatures are conducive to good health and well being. GHSWE is to be
 consulted for further advice if necessary.

e.    Lighting: Suitable and sufficient lighting must be provided at every workplace and should
where reasonably practicable be natural light. Whilst guidance is provided in the regulations,
Reference B is more specific. Advice on appropriate lighting levels and surveys can be obtained from
the appropriate EHT.

f.     Cleanliness: Workplaces, furniture, fittings and furnishings must be kept sufficiently clean. The
floors, walls and ceiling surfaces must be capable of being cleaned. Cleaning should not introduce
secondary hazards in the form of dust hazardous substances.

g.     Room dimensions and space: Every workplace must have sufficient floor area and
                                                                                              3
unoccupied space for ensuring health, safety and welfare. The UK regulations recommend 11m
                               3
whilst a higher standard of 12m is required by Reference B. As BFG is required to comply with Host
Nation Standards, then Reference B is to apply where DEL employees work.

h.    Work stations: Workstations must be arranged as to be suitable for the persons using them.
HN standards require that workstations shall be positioned perpendicular to windows or horizontal light
sources.

i.     Floor conditions and traffic routes: Floors and traffic routes must be kept free from
obstructions and articles and substances likely to cause slips, trips and falls. Floors must have
adequate drainage. In particular the surfaces of traffic routes must be in good condition and free from
holes, or unnecessary slopes. The floors must not be uneven or slippery. The hazards from snow
and ice should be taken into account. This part also is concerned with segregation of traffic and
pedestrians and the use of stair handrails where there is a risk of falling.

j.      Falls and falling objects: Where persons may fall a distance or be struck by a falling object
likely to cause personal injury then effective measures must be taken to prevent such events. The
regulations expands on the term 'distance' to mean 2 metres or more, however this must be tempered
by other dangers in the event of a lesser distance, for example near a pit or traffic route. This
regulation also deals with stacking and racking.

k.    Windows or transparent doors: Windows and transparent doors must be made of a safety
material or protected against breakage and marked so as to make it apparent.

l.     Ability to clean windows: Workplace windows must be designed and constructed to enable
safe cleaning.

m.    Organisation of traffic routes: Workplaces must be organised to allow safe circulation of
pedestrians and vehicles, including access and egress to and from sites. This means traffic and
pedestrians should be separated, and suitable marked. Adequate lighting is to be provided. Where
appropriate, one-way systems should be employed in preference to a two-way system. When
reversing vehicles the services of a banksman may be needed. The needs of disabled people are to
be taken into account when deciding what is suitable.

n.     Doors and gates: These have to be suitably constructed and where necessary fitted with
safety devices. It is essential that Fire Doors are not misused or compromised through, for example,
being blocked open or locked.

o.     Sanitary conveniences: Readily accessible, suitable and sufficient sanitary conveniences
must be provided. They must be well ventilated and lit, kept clean and maintained. Separate
conveniences for male and female employees must be provided. Reference A provides a table on the
ratio of employees to convenience requirements.




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      p.    Washing facilities: Readily accessible, suitable and sufficient washing facilities must be
      provided, including showers where necessary for health or work reasons. They have to have hot and
      cold water, soap and a means of drying hands. Reference A provides a table of the ration between
      employees and washing units.

      q.      Drinking water: An adequate supply of drinking water must be provided. Suitable and
      sufficient cups or other drinking vessels must be provided unless the water is supplied in drinking jet
      form.

      r.    Accommodation for clothing: Accommodation for personal clothing and for work clothes
      worn at work but not taken home must be provided. This must be secure and where appropriate
      include drying facilities.

      s.       Facilities for changing clothing: Where special clothing is worn at work, or for reasons of
      health or propriety, a person cannot change in another room, then suitable and sufficient changing
      facilities must be provided.

      t.     Facilities to rest and eat meals: Readily accessible, suitable and sufficient rest facilities must
      be provided. Such facilities must be provided in one or more rest rooms. Where food eaten in the
      workplace is liable to become contaminated, suitable facilities for eating meals must be included in
      rest room facilities. Rest rooms must be completely smoke free and have an adequate number of
      tables and seats and places for disabled employees. Suitable rest facilities are to be also provided for
      pregnant and nursing mothers.

      u.    Disabled persons: Parts of the workplace used or occupied by disabled persons must be
      organised to taken into account their needs. Particular attention should be given to doors,
      passageways, stairs, showers, washbasins, toilets and workstations.

Training

4.    Line managers who carry out risk assessment must be competent to do so. The assessor should
have an understanding of the workplace environment and the ability to make sound judgements on control
measures best suited to reduce any risk. This competency does not require a particular level of qualification,
but may be defined as a combination of knowledge, skills, experience and personal qualities, which includes
the ability to recognise the extent and limitations of one's own competence.

Records

5.    Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and are not to be destroyed on review but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident. These records should include requests
for work services and any resulting records of follow-up actions.




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Leaflet 38 – Safety in Swimming Pools

                                       SAFETY IN SWIMMING POOLS

References:

A. AGAI Vol 1 Chapter 18 – Safety Precautions in Training: The Hazards of Water.

Introduction

1.    The following leaflet is offered as guidance on aspects of swimming pool safety, which should be
considered in pool management arrangements. It is only intended for guidance to supplement authoritative
procedures and guidance, which should always be used as the key reference material. In all cases risk
assessments are the cornerstone on which to evaluate requirements for both physical and procedural
controls.

Duties

2.     Commanding Officers. Where appropriate Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has
adequate arrangements for the safe use of military swimming pools. These arrangements are to meet the
requirements of Reference A.

Guidance for Line Managers and those with responsibility for the operation, maintenance or
supervision of swimming pools

3.    The guidance lists generic type issues that are relevant to swimming pool safety.

Pool Facilities

4.     Structure. Is the building sound and well maintained, adequately ventilated, heated and lit?
Consideration should be given to the fabric condition of the facility and where appropriate work orders must
be raised to correct unsafe conditions. Any area considered unsafe must be put out of bounds. Ventilation
and heating should provide suitable temperatures for those in and out of water and at the same time should
provide adequate levels of fresh air. Accordingly ventilation and heating systems should be regularly
maintained and records kept. Lighting needs to be adequate to provide clear vision into the pool without
causing glare and also along access routes. Emergency lighting should be provided. If lighting impairs safety
then consideration must be given to stopping the swimming activity.

5.    Access and Egress. Is access to and from the facility free of trip or impact hazards and are the
access, egress points clearly signed (including emergency exits)? All access routes should be clearly signed
and well maintained, well lit and free from obstructions. Warning signs should be displayed where there is a
danger of slipping. Where access leads to the pool edge, consideration should be given to pool edge
protection barriers. Access should also be planned for emergency services to ensure unimpeded access to
the pool facility.

6.    Security. The pool and any associated plant room must be physically secured when not in use to
prevent unauthorised access. Security of premises must be achieved by physical means. Locked access
doors or gates or a patrolled entry is the only way to achieve this. Fire exits must remain closed at all times
and may not be jammed open on hot days to aid ventilation. Access to plant rooms must be secured and
only authorised and suitable competent persons should be able to gain entry. Security arrangements for
those who undertake maintenance work on the facility should include booking in, provision of safety
information & arrangements to secure or hand back the facility when work has been completed.




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7.     Signs. Suitable signs are to be displayed to identify hazards, restrictions, emergency arrangements
and where appropriate to relay information. Signs should be in both written and pictorial format. Typical
applications may include pool depths, plant room warnings, locations of fire exits and appliances, location of.
emergency telephone/alarms, access routes, first aid points etc. Signs are to comply with current sign
legislation

8.     Observation and Rescue. Where installed, viewing chairs for lifeguards are to be positioned to
ensure there are no blind spots in the pool. Suitable, serviceable and sufficient rescue equipment is to be
readily available, with staff trained in its safe and proper use. Observation chairs, where fitted, should be
positioned so users have an unobstructed view of the entire pool. In most cases this will necessitate
ensuring the chair is positioned close to the pool edge (normally mid length) so that no blind spots are
present, especially at the deeper section of the pool. Where observation chairs are not used then observers
should patrol the poolside during swimming activity.

9.     Rescue equipment. Suitable rescue equipment should be readily available e.g. throw ropes, rescue
poles, spinal board, buoyancy aids etc. For those using other provider‟s facilities, checks should be made to
ensure suitable rescue equipment is provided. Where deficiencies exist they should be brought to the
attention of the pool provider. Alternatively, the appropriate rescue equipment can be acquired by the unit
and taken to the venue when swimming activity is undertaken.

Pool Operating Procedures

10. Normal Operating Procedures (NOPs) are to reflect accurately the the safe operating systems for all
pool activities. They should list responsibilities of nominated personnel and the routines that are to be
followed to ensure safe swimming and control of persons in the facility.

11. The procedures should also cover arrangements for maintenance of the pool and its serving plant,
contractor safety when undertaking maintenance or repairs and also any arrangements for inspection of pool
equipment. Importantly NOPs should be also interfaced with other pool providers‟ arrangements.

12. Emergency Action Procedures (EAPs) are to reflect accurately the actions to be taken in the event of
an emergency situation arising. EAPs should reflect arrangements for all emergency situations. These
procedures need to be fully understood and acknowledged by supervisory staff, who in turn should ensure
the vital elements of the procedures are made known to subordinate personnel and all are to be trained
accordingly. The arrangements should also be displayed in a prominent location within the facility.

13. It is also important to ensure the procedures are given to any external user of the facility e.g. local
swimming clubs and that the external organiser is competent in the application of the plan. The EAP should
also account for those participating in recreational swimming activity that may not be familiar with
emergency/evacuation procedures. Where appropriate, supervisory levels may need to be increased to
maintain adequate control.

14. Risk Assessments are to be completed for swimming activities. Formal risk assessments should be
undertaken for all pool activities. The assessments should be monitored and reviewed at least on an annual
basis. Additionally, risk assessments are to be reviewed following any accidents or when associated
procedures have been found to be ineffective. Assessments should also be conducted where swimming
activity is conducted in other providers‟ facilities. The assessment should interface with the providers‟
arrangements, and where appropriate the associated controls should be practised. Essential information
from the suitable and sufficient risk assessment should where appropriate, be made known to subordinate
personnel. Effective risk assessment is central to the management of risk and is to be completed by a
competent person using the methodology in JSP 375.

15. Risk assessments should be retained for 5 years and should not be destroyed on reviewed but held in
case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident.

16. Staffs are to receive suitable and sufficient training. The skills and competencies required are set out
clearly in Reference A.




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Supervision and Control

17. Properly trained and competent lifeguards, as defined in Reference A, are always to be present during
all Service controlled swimming activity. They should also be present during swimming that is being
conducted by other pool users on MOD property. Others users may provide their own lifeguards for these
swimming activities, however, it remains the case that the pool provider should ensure that the users have a
competent lifeguard present.

18.    The ratio of lifeguards to swimmers is:

      a.     Military swimming:

             (1)         1 additional lifeguard for every 12 non-swimmers.

             (2)         1 additional lifeguard for every additional 20 swimmers.

      b. For mixed ability swimming groups‟ life guard support is based on the weakest swimmer/non-
      swimmer in the group, and should not be compromised.

      c.     For recreational/competitive swimming one additional lifeguard for every additional 30 swimmers.

Privately Owned Swimming Pools or Paddling Pools

19. No privately owned swimming pool or paddling pool containing any water shall be left unattended or
unsupervised in a public area. Owners of such pools are to ensure that they have appropriate third party
insurance cover.




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Leaflet 39 – Climatic Injuries

CLIMATIC INJURIES

References:

A.     JSP 539
B.     LFSO 3214

Introduction

1.    The human body has evolved to function effectively within a narrow internal temperature range, using
a number of physiological mechanisms to assist in maintaining that temperature balance in the face of widely
varying climatic and thermal conditions. However anything other than transient changes of body
temperature outside that „safe‟ range will result in a significant risk of injury and even death.

2.     Both heat and cold illnesses are a preventable cause of morbidity, and occasionally death, that have
an impact on all three Services. All commanders need a sound understanding of the principles of working
under conditions that impose a thermal stress, either hot or cold, on their personnel in order to be able to
make an informed assessment of the associated risks to health. These could be localised to an individual,
as a result of the workload, or affecting groups of personnel under adverse climatic conditions.

3.    Each year there are injuries and deaths as a result of heat and cold injuries amongst Service
personnel, both in UK and overseas. These are nearly all preventable, if the risk factors are assessed
properly and appropriately managed.

Aim

4.     The aim of this leaflet is to educate all Service personnel in the prevention of heat and cold injury in
order to minimise the risks of morbidity or mortality associated with these preventable conditions. It also lays
out the procedures to minimise the risk of developing heat and cold casualties and describes the immediate
management of anyone who develops thermal injuries.

HEAT

5.     In the Army heat illness affects approximately 100 personnel each year. Despite previous attempts to
reduce the problem, heat illness continues to occur. Casualties ranged in severity from mild cases requiring
rest and fluid replacement to personnel requiring intensive care in hospital. It is possible that many of these
cases might have been prevented by greater awareness of the risk by commanders at all levels. In addition
the severity of some of these cases could have been reduced if appropriate first ad measures and
evacuation to medical care had been carried out effectively.

Physiology

6.   Heat illness is caused by a rise in core body temperature. Control of human body temperature is
dependant on the following balance:

Heat Balance Equation
                                    Heat storage = heat gained - heat lost

7.    Heat will be gained from that generated by exercise and from the surrounding environment, for
example, solar radiation. In warm/hot environments heat loss is mainly by evaporation of sweat, although a
small amount will be lost by conduction and convection. If the heat gain exceeds heat loss the body
temperature will rise and eventually may result in heat illness.




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8.    Service personnel are at risk from heat illness because of exposure to a combination of high intensity
physical training, high environmental heat loads and protective clothing (for example, NBC clothing, Combat
Body Armour).

9.     Personnel at risk of heat illness may also be at risk of sunburn. Minor sunburn causes reduced
performance while severe sunburn may cause hospitalisation. Sunburn can be prevented by either working
in a shaded area or by covering the skin with clothing. When this is not possible sunblock creams should be
used and re-applied frequently.

10. Heat illness has traditionally been divided into heat exhaustion and heat stroke. In practice it is difficult
to define the division between the two. For the purposes of this leaflet the term „heat illness‟ is all embracing
and applies to an individual who becomes incapacitated as a result of a rise in core body temperature.

Duty

11. Commanders. Commanders have a duty to assess the risks of heat illness arising from military
training or operations and to ensure that these risks are minimised as far as is reasonably practicable.
Failure to manage this risk may expose individuals and the Ministry of Defence to prosecution under the
Health and Safety at Work Act and criminal law.

12. Line Managers. Line Managers have a duty to manage and control the risk assessment and ensure
that the guidance in this leaflet and References A and B is observed.

Prevention

13. The key to the prevention of heat illness is an awareness of the risk by commanders. Any activity
involving physical activity, the wearing of protective clothing (particularly NBC or impermeable clothing) or
exposure to a raised environmental temperature should be considered to be a high risk activity. Ideally, if
there is any doubt as to the level of heat stress, commanders should ensure that they are exposed to the
same conditions as their subordinates. The commander‟s assessment of risk should consider the following
factors:

       a.    Individual risk factors.

       b.    Environmental conditions.

       c.    Work intensity.

       d.    Water intake.

       e.    Clothing and equipment.

       f.    Acclimatisation.

Individual risk factors

14. There is a wide variation in human tolerance to heat stress. In some cases of heat illness it is possible
to identify factors that have caused particular individuals to become heat casualties. The following are
recognised risk factors:

       a.    Obesity.

       b.    Lack of physical fitness and/or lack of sleep.

       c.    Recent alcohol intake.

       d.    Concurrent mild illness for example, diarrhoea, common cold, fever.

       e.    Dehydration.


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      f.     Medication or illegal drugs (for example, ecstasy).

      g.     Nutritional status.

15. Service personnel who are known to be overweight or unfit should not be pushed on during high risk
activities if it is clear that they are struggling. Very careful consideration should be given to the suitability of
such individuals for overseas deployments to hot environments particularly if they are not able to pass
single-Service fitness assessments. Research in the USA has showed that recruits whose 1½ mile run times
were greater than 12 minutes were at three times greater risk of becoming a heat casualty compared to
those whose 1½ mile run time was less than ten minutes. Social events should not be planned to precede
intense physical activity and personnel should be warned against alcohol excess prior to planned high risk
activities. Where there is doubt about an individual‟s fitness to undertake a high risk activity advice should
be sought from a medical officer. „Soldiering on‟ through a minor illness is potentially extremely dangerous.

Environmental conditions

16. Environmental factors influence the effectiveness of the body‟s cooling systems. The primary method
of heat loss is through the evaporation of sweat. The efficiency of this is determined by the temperature,
humidity and wind speed. These factors can be integrated into an index of environmental temperature. The
index most suitable for military use is the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Index (WBGT). The use of this index
to help in assessing the risk of heat illness is shown at Annex A. It must be remembered that the WBGT only
forms part of the overall risk assessment and it must not be used in isolation.

Work intensity

17. The rate of heat generation by the human body is determined by work intensity. The primary cause of
heat casualties is loaded marching, especially the Basic Combat Fitness Test (BCFT). Although running
generates a higher heat load than loaded marching it is generally undertaken for shorter periods and in light
clothing. The use of an estimate of work intensity to determine limits for longer exercise in hot environments
is also shown at Annex A.

Rest periods

18. If prolonged intense physical activity is being carried out, consideration must be given to allowing rest
periods for individuals to cool down. The experiences of the Israeli Defence Force show that the provision of
a 15 minute rest (in a single session) during every hour of exercise has dramatically reduced the incidence of
exertional heat illness (EHI).

Water intake

19. Water is the key component of sweat that enables heat loss to occur. Supervised drinking before,
during and after a high risk activity is the most important preventive measure that can be undertaken by a
commander. Thirst is an inadequate guide to fluid requirements during exercise and therefore it is the
commander‟s responsibility to ensure that his troops drink adequate water before, during and after a high
risk activity. All water should be cool, potable and from a guaranteed safe source. Troops continually
exposed to a hot environment (for example, on an overseas deployment or on an intense physical course
lasting several days) should be advised to drink enough water to ensure that their urine remains colourless.
A guide to water requirements is at Annex B.

Clothing and equipment

20. Dress and equipment increase the risk of heat illness by increasing the workload and by reducing the
evaporation of sweat from the skin surface. The wearing of NBC protective clothing is enshrined in a „risk-
taking policy‟. This same principle should apply to the wearing of Combat Body Armour, helmets and other
protective clothing. Particular care should be taken in the choice of clothing for loaded marches. The
wearing of helmets and combat jackets significantly increases the heat stress during these activities, even in
cold weather.



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Risk assessment

21. The risk of casualties from work in heat is dependent on work rate, the environmental conditions and
the clothing worn. Individual risk factors, such as the physical fitness levels of the personnel carrying out the
activity, must also be considered. If it is judged that there is a risk of heat casualties, it is the commander‟s
duty to ensure that the resources are available to undertake an appropriate risk assessment. All the factors
must be considered together in order to obtain a meaningful overall assessment. It is inappropriate just to
consider one factor, such as the environmental conditions, in isolation.

22. The majority of heat illness casualties occur in temperate climates where individuals are exercising
hard and the excess body heat generated cannot be lost from the body surface at a sufficient rate. Both high
intensity exercise, such as running, and lower intensity endurance activities, such as route marches carrying
a load, require significant physical exertion with an associated increase in production of body heat.

23. The effect of environmental conditions on the risk of heat illness is determined by the air temperature,
wind speed and humidity. These measurements can be integrated into the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature
(WBGT). This temperature is measured using a WBGT meter (NSN 6515-01-474-1181). The table at Annex
A gives guidance on the maximum work rates for varying WBGTs.

24.   Prior to any activity which may involve a risk of causing heat illness commanders at all levels are to:

      a.    Assess the degree of risk associated with the planned activity. Further advice may be sought
      from Medical Staff or Environmental Health Teams (EHTs).

      b.      Determine if the risk of heat casualties from the activity is justified by the objectives of that
      activity. It is important to assess whether the same objectives could be achieved more safely by
      rescheduling the activity to another day or time of day or modifying the activity.

      c.     Ensure that the personnel involved are suitably briefed.

      d.    Ensure that the activity is adequately supervised, and that there are sufficient water and rest
      periods.

      e.    Ensure that each individual is adequately trained in first aid and that a clear and efficient means
      of evacuation for medical treatment is available.

Recognition

25. Any individual who experiences the following symptoms or who demonstrates the following signs
during physical activity, in a hot environment or whilst wearing protective clothing, or any combination of
these activities should be presumed to have heat illness. (see Annex A):

      a.     Agitation.

      b.     Nausea or vomiting.

      c.     Staggering or loss of coordination.

      d.     Cramps.

      e.     Disturbed vision.

      f.     Confusion, collapse or loss of consciousness.

      g.     Dizziness.




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Risk Assessment Aide Memoire.

26. The Risk Assessment Aide Memoire at Annex C is designed to assist commanders in performing a
risk assessment by providing a check-list of major risk factors to be considered. The residual risks increase
as the number of unmodified risk factors rise. Clearly the aide memoire cannot account for all circumstances
and it remains the duty of commanders to apply it to the particular circumstances in place. Once the
assessment has been completed commanders should re-assess their training aims against the risks
identified in order to make a balanced decision as to whether or not the activity requires modification.

Education

27. All personnel are to be made aware of heat illness and methods of prevention and treatment. For
Army personnel, this is included in the Individual Training Directives (Army), ITD(A) 8 – Health Training. The
tri-Service video No. A3876 „Keep your cool‟ is also a useful training aid on this subject.

First Aid

28. It is imperative that anyone suffering from heat illness be given immediate First Aid. The following
action should be taken:

      a.      STOP the activity, commence first aid and re-assess the risk to other personnel involved in the
      activity. A single case may be a warning that a large number of personnel are at risk.

      b.     Lie the casualty down in shade and, if conscious, elevate the feet.

      c.     Immediately strip to underwear.

      d.     Continuously sponge or spray the casualty‟s whole body with cool water.

      e.     Fan the casualty‟s skin to improve evaporation.

      f.     Give water to drink if the casualty is fully conscious.

      g.    If unconscious place casualty in ¾ prone position („Recovery position‟) - as the casualty is likely
      to vomit.

      h.     Evacuate to medical care as quickly as possible.

            At Annex D there is an Immediate Action Algorithm.

Education

29. All personnel are to be made aware of heat illness and methods of prevention and treatment. For
Army personnel, this is included in the Individual Training Directives (Army), ITD(A) 8 – Health Training. The
tri-Service video No. A3876 „Keep your cool‟ is also a useful training aid on this subject.

Summary

30. Heat illness is a recognised hazard of military training. The prevention of heat casualties is a
command responsibility both during training and on operations. Retrospective analyses of heat casualty
incidents frequently identify an error of judgement by a commander to be a contributing factor.




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COLD

Introduction

31. Cold environments represent a significant hazard to the unprepared. There have been two deaths in
Service personnel from cold related illness and injuries since 1991. Cold related illness and injuries are
preventable and all commanders need a sound understanding of the principles of working in cold
environments.

32. Military personnel are at risk from cold related illness and injuries because of exposure to the
combination of operational and training requirements in adverse environmental conditions, both in hostile
isolated locations at home and abroad. Commanders have a duty to assess the risks of cold injury as a
result of military operations and training and must ensure that these risks are minimised as far as is
reasonably practicable.

33. Cold illness and injuries occur as a result of the effects of cold wet and cold dry conditions on the
body. This Chapter will cover the following cold related illness and injuries which fall in to four broad
categories:

       a.    Primary - Generalised.

             (1)      Hypothermia (low body core temperature).

                      (a)   Mild.

                      (b)   Moderate.

                      (c)   Severe.

       b.    Primary - Localised.

             (1)      Freezing Cold Injury - Frostnip

             (2)      Freezing Cold Injury (freezing of body tissues) - Frostbite.

             (3)      Non-Freezing Cold Injury (after prolonged cooling of the tissues without freezing).

       c.    Secondary.

             (1)      Cold Sensitisation.

       d.    Other illness and injuries related to cold environments.

             (1)      Snow blindness.

             (2)      Other miscellaneous conditions.

Physiology

34. The body normally maintains a stable core temperature of 37C. Control of human body temperature
is dependent on the following balance:

       Heat balance equation

                      Heat storage = heat gained - heat lost


35. This stability is achieved by balancing the rate of heat production (mainly from internal metabolic heat
generation) with the rate of heat loss and also by altering the temperature of the body‟s external tissue layers

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(skin and muscle). The rate of heat loss through convection and conduction depends on the temperature
difference between the skin and the environment. The rate of evaporative heat loss, through breathing and
sweating, depends on the external ambient humidity. Air movement (air over the body or the body through
the air) increases both types of heat loss. This is commonly referred to as „wind chill‟ or relative air
movement, and is further detailed in Annex E.

Prevention

36. The key to the prevention of cold related illness and injuries is an awareness of the risk by
commanders. Any outdoor activity undertaken in adverse cold environments constitutes a risk. The
commander‟s assessment of risk depends on the following factors:

      a.     Individual preparation.

      b.     Environmental temperature.

      c.     Wind chill.

      d.     Work intensity.

      e.     Clothing and equipment.

      f.     Individual risk factors.

37. Individual preparation. The following videos are available to provide individual education in advance
of deployment to a cold climate:

      a.     SSVC Video 3904 – „Deadly by Degrees‟.

      b.     SSVC Video 3102 – „Health in Cold Climates‟.

      c.     SSVC Video 3942 – „Ice Cold War - Local Cold Injury‟.

38.   Environmental temperature. The following general recommendations are made:

      a.   Extra care is needed during outdoor training when the still air temperature (SAT) is less than –
      5C.

      b.    When operating in extreme conditions a method needs to be established for accurately
      forecasting the weather. If an exercise is to include hill or mountain climbing, it is essential that the
      nearest MOD Met office is contacted.

Wind Chill Index.

39. A wind chill index chart is attached at Annex E. This shows how temperature is affected by even
moderate wind speeds and calculates the equivalent air temperature in terms of its cooling effect.

Work intensity.

40. Inactivity in open areas exposed to the wind and cold may predispose an individual to the effects of
the cold. Additionally, the sweating produced after periods of exertion and the diversion of blood to muscles
and skin, away from the body core, may lead to excessive cooling thus predisposing to cold related illness
and injuries.

Clothing and equipment.

41.   Inadequate dress and equipment will increase the risk of cold related illness and injuries.




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      a.     Headwear. Correct headwear must be worn when the SAT is lower than - 10C, as at this
      temperature ears will begin to suffer the early effects of frostbite. Helmets and berets offer minimal
      protection against frostbite and do not significantly reduce heat loss from the head. It is advised that
      headovers or specific cold weather hats should be worn to provide protection.


      b.       Layered Clothing. The use of layered clothing with an outer windproof layer and close, but not
      tight fitting cuffs, is the best way to dress in cold climates, as it follows the „layering‟ principle. Layers
      of clothing need to be removed immediately prior to, and during, physical exercise in order to limit
      sweating and the danger of a resultant loss of insulation.

      c.    Footwear. Boots should not be laced tightly in cold conditions. Socks should be changed when
      waterlogged. Socks that are old or over-compressed have reduced insulating properties. Feet should
      be inspected regularly.

      d.     Hand Protection. Gloves (with separate fingers) cannot provide sufficient insulation to the
      fingers to permit indefinite use in SATs below 0C and mittens (four fingers in a single compartment)
      are preferred. Hand protection should be worn when the SAT falls below +5C and should be
      mandatory below a SAT of -5C or when high winds are expected. A spare pair of mittens should
      always be carried as cold and wet handwear contribute to cold injuries.

      e.    Eye and Skin Protection. Snow-blindness and sunburn may occur in cold environments and
      can happen in cloudy as well as in bright sunlight conditions. High Factor (25+SPF) suncream is
      necessary, as are glacier goggles (with side shields), for snow and ice work.

      f.     Sleeping System. Sleeping bags must be kept dry and insulation matting used as standard.
      They must be adequate for the temperature range likely to be encountered. The use of Gore-Tex
      bivvy bags is recommended.

Individual risk factors

42. Service personnel who are unwell, unfit, hungry or who have a history of previous cold-related injury or
illness, however mild, will be at increased risk of developing cold related illness and injuries.

      a.    Nutrition. As an example, normal energy requirements for a resting adult male increase from
      2500 kcal to 5000+ kcal at -20C. It is therefore vital that daily rations are increased accordingly.
      Survival rations are specifically designed for cold weather and should always be carried in case of
      emergency.

      b.     Fluids. Operations in cold conditions can lead to severe dehydration just as rapidly as in
      tropical environments. Cold weather increases respiratory water loss and when static will increase
      urinary fluid loss. The carriage of extra fluid (and fuel to melt snow) is necessary to avoid dehydration.
      Alcohol is not to be used in the first aid treatment of cold casualties as it can worsen their condition. In
      addition, all troops need to be informed of the dangers of alcohol abuse during cold weather.

Risk assessment

43. Prior to any activity which may involve a risk of cold related illness and injuries, commanders at all
levels are to:

      a.    Assess the degree of risk associated with the planned activity. Further advice may be sought
      from Medical Staff or Environmental Health Teams (EHTs).

      b.      Determine if the risk of cold casualties from the activity is justified by the objectives of that
      activity. It is important to assess whether the same objectives could be achieved by rescheduling or
      changing the activity.

      c.     Ensure that the troops involved are adequately briefed and prepared.


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      d.     Ensure that the activity is adequately supervised, and that there is the provision for adequate
      intake of food and water, and that shelter is prepared for rest periods.

      e.    Ensure that each individual is adequately trained in first aid and that a clear and efficient means
      of evacuation for medical treatment is available.

      f.    Ensure that any standing orders or instructions regarding training limits are up to date,
      thoroughly understood and observed by all.

First aid

44. Once a cold casualty has been identified they must not be allowed to become colder. Arrangements
must be made for urgent casevac to medical facilities. Specific treatment will depend on the condition
involved therefore medical assistance and advice must be sought.

45. The cardinal principles of first aid apply, that is to remove the individual from immediate danger and
prevent any further casualties from occurring. Other more serious illnesses or injuries may require attention
before the cold related illness or injury. Therefore the following should always be assessed first and
associated problems treated as they present:

      a.     Airway

      b.     Breathing

      c.     Circulation

46. If the casualty is unconscious but breathing, place him/her in the recovery position. If the casualty‟s
clothing is wet, provided dry clothing and warm protected shelter is also available, remove wet garments and
replace them. If not, leave wet clothes on and cover with waterproof material and additional insulation if
available. Provide hot sweet drinks and food as soon as the casualty is conscious and can swallow.

47. Always consider the other members of the group or party. If one individual has been affected by a
cold illness or injury then there is a high likelihood that others may also be victims.

48.   Other illness and injuries related to cold environments:

      a.     Acute Altitude or Mountain Sickness. The biggest killers associated with high altitudes may
      well be a combination of extreme environmental conditions (causing hypothermia and exhaustion),
      falls and avalanches. Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is one of the most significant dangers faced by
      those taking part in high-altitude expeditions. These dangers are preventable if simple precautions, as
      advised by medical staff, are taken.

      b.     Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). In the high latitude (sub-polar) regions, long periods of
      darkness may have a debilitating effect. SAD is a recognised condition characterised by low mood and
      social withdrawal. Recreation may help but the condition improves as daylight lengthens.
      Consideration should be given to evacuating any individuals who are severely affected from theatre.

      c.     Carbon Monoxide (CO²) Poisoning. Care is required when cooking in confined spaces (such
      as under canvas and in snow holes) or when vehicle engines are running in a static location, due to
      the significant risks of CO²poisoning.

      d.     Accidents:

            (1)   Slips and falls are more common in icy conditions and personnel should make a
            conscious effort to take care when travelling in vehicles or outside on foot. Additional time
            should be allowed for outdoor activities in cold environments.




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              (2)    Muscle and tendon injuries are more common when a person is cold. Inactive muscles
              are even cold in warm weather. When muscles are cold their action is inefficient and it may be
              uncoordinated. Joints are also stiffer. An active warm up with stretching will reduce the risk of
              injury and enhance performance.

      e.    All personnel should additionally be aware of the risks of injury to unprotected skin by touching
      very cold metal and from the effects of fuel splashes.

Reporting of climatic injuries

49. The reporting of all Climatic injuries is crucial to the monitoring of the effectiveness of this instruction.
All cases of climatic injury requiring treatment (either first aid or formal medical intervention) are to be
reported to AINC as detailed in Leaflet 1 of this manual.

50.   More detailed information is contained in References A & B.


Annex:

A.    WBGT Threshold Values
B.    Water requirements for personnel during exercise in heat
C.    Risk assessment aide memoire
D.    First Aid Immediate Action Algorithm
E.    Wind chill – Its use as a planning guide




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                                                                                                                          Leaflet 39

                                                                                        Annex A - WBGT Threshold Values
WBGT Threshold Values

                          25
Ser      Acclimatised              Unacclimatised                  Maximum Work rate (not to be exceeded)
(a)            (b)                      (c)                                            (d)
  1      No max limit           32C                         Low. For example, lying, guard duty, driving.
     2   30C                   26C                         Medium. For example, marching 2.25 mph 30 kg load
     3   27C                   24C                         High. For example, marching 3.5 mph 20 kg load,
                                                             patrolling, digging, field assaults.
     4   25C                   20C                         Very High. For example, marching 5 mph no load,
                                                             marching 3.5 mph 30 kg load. This equates to the Army
                                                             Basic Combat Fitness Test.
     5   20C                   Max 30 mins at 20C          Extreme. For example, running in sports kit.

1.    These threshold values indicate the maximum permitted continuous work intensity for Service
personnel at a given environmental temperature (WBGT). They are expressed for one hour exposure with a
minimum of 30 minutes rest after the activity. They apply to personnel wearing a single layer uniform with
sleeves rolled up and without helmets. For personnel who can not pass their mandatory fitness tests the
WBGT threshold values should be lowered. There is little difference in heat tolerance between men and
women of equal physical fitness. Adherence to the guidance will minimise the risk of heat illness to 95% of
normal, healthy personnel. Approximately 5% will not be protected.

2.      If NBC protective clothing or Combat Body Armour is worn the WBGT values for unacclimatised
personnel at low and medium work intensity, reduced by 5C, should be used. It is not safe to perform
activities at a high or very high work rate or to run in NBC clothing, at any environmental temperature without
specific medical advice.

3.     Commanders should anticipate changes in environmental conditions during the course of training for
example, the WBGT may be below the threshold for a loaded march starting in the early morning but could
be exceeded at the end. If the conditions or the proposed activity falls outside these limits then the duration
of activity should be shortened and mandatory rest periods (5 mins/hr) introduced to allow fluid replacement
and cooling to occur. Advice can be sought from Environmental Health or Medical Staff regarding work/rest
cycles if particular activities fall outside these limits and it is mandatory that the activity occurs.

4.      Limitations to the measurement of the WBGT. An assessment of risk based on the WBGT is only
valid if the temperature measurement is taken in the same location as the proposed activity. If the activity
and the measurement of the WBGT are widely separated then the assessment of risk will be invalid.




25
   The table is divided into acclimatised and unacclimatised groups. An individual is considered to be acclimatised if they have
undertaken regular exercise for longer than ten days in the same environmental conditions as the proposed activity. Residence in air-
conditioned accommodation slows the development of acclimatisation. If exposure to the hot environment has included a substantial
period of travel or crossing time-zones the time taken to acclimatise should be assumed to be longer than ten days. Individuals
returning to a hot climate from courses or leave should be considered as unacclimatised.




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                                                                                                       Leaflet 39

                                         Annex B – Water requirements for personnel during exercise in heat

                WATER REQUIREMENTS FOR PERSONNEL DURING EXERCISE IN HEAT

1.     It is the duty of Commanders to ensure that adequate water is drunk before, during and after a bout of
exercise in the heat. If personnel are exposed to heat continually for example, on an overseas deployment
or during a hard physical course then they should be advised to replace water regularly during the day in
order that their urine always remains colourless. Assuring normal hydration (very pale or colourless urine
output), a minimum ½ litre (1/2 a standard water bottle) of water should be drunk two hours prior to a high
risk activity followed by a further 1/3 litre 15 minutes prior to the task. On completion of the task one litre of
water should be drunk over the next one/two hours.

2.     The following table shows the numbers of litres (water bottles) required per hour during continuous
work at various WBGTs using the exercise intensities from Annex A. The figures are valid for acclimatised
personnel. Unacclimatised personnel require at least the same quantity of water, but note that the table at
Annex A specifies reduced exercise intensities for a given WBGT. The water requirement should be spread
over the hour period as many individuals find large quantities of water difficult to tolerate unless taken in
multiple small quantities.

       Ser       WBGT                  Exercise Intensity /Work Rate (as detailed in Annex A)
                                    Low              Medium              High              V High
        (a)        (b)               (c)                 (d)              (e)                (f)
           1   32C           1.5 l/hr          1.5 l/hr           N/A                 N/A
          2    30C           1.0 l/hr            1.5 l/hr          N/A                  N/A
          3    27C           1.0 l/hr            1.5 l/hr          1.5 l/hr             N/A
          4    25C           0.5 l/hr            1.0 l/hr          1.0 l/hr             2.0 l/hr
          5    20C           0.25 l/hr           1.0 l/hr          1.0 l/hr             1.5 l/hr

3.      Salt intake from food is normally adequate to meet the body‟s requirement. In circumstances where
this is not the case salt supplementation should only be undertaken on the advice of a Medical Officer.
Avoid fizzy drinks as fluid consumption is limited due to the carbon dioxide gas. Avoid stimulant drinks such
as „Red Bull‟ which will lead to further dehydration. Isotonic drinks should not be used without specific
advice during exercise, but are a useful means of rehydrating and replenishing carbohydrate during
recovery.

4.    Good nutrition and hydration during exercise in heat will minimise the risk of personnel collapsing due
to dehydration, hypoglycaemia and fatigue. It will not necessarily prevent all cases of heat illness.




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                                                                                                    Leaflet 39

                                                                   Annex C – Risk assessment aide memoir

                                 RISK ASSESSMENT AIDE MEMOIRE

Ser      Risk Factor                      Reason                     Suggested Interventions       Practicable
                                                                                                    Yes No
(a)           (b)                          (c)                                   (d)                (e)    (f)
   1 Activity               Strenuous work increases the body        Can the activity be
                            core temperature.                        modified to reduce the
                                                                     work load?
  2 Supervision of          Trainers and DS provide a vital          Are DS and training staff
    activity                means of early detection of cases        adequately trained and
                            of heat illness.                         competent? Is there
                                                                     adequate medical
                                                                     support?
  3 Environmental           Heat illness occurs more frequently      Can the activity be carried
    conditions              at high environmental temperatures       out at a cooler time?
                            with high humidity and low wind
                            speeds.
  4 Predisposing            Lack of sleep, food and fluids may       Can the activity be
    factors:                predispose to collapse during            postponed until personnel
    Are the personnel       strenuous exercise. Illness may          have rested?
    well-rested?            predispose to heat illness.              Can personnel be
    Are they well-                                                   provided with food and
    hydrated? Have they                                              water prior to undertaking
    all eaten?                                                       the activity?
    Are any of the troops                                            Can the injured or ill
    suffering from an                                                personnel be identified
    injury or illness?                                               and excluded from the
                                                                     activity?
  5 Acclimatisation         Acclimatisation to high                  Is there time to allow
                            environmental temperatures takes         personnel to become fully
                            between 4 and 12 days, dependant         acclimatised?
                            on an individual‟s level of fitness.
  6 Dress for activity      Wearing helmets, NBC clothing            Can the dress state be
                            and so on, increases the body‟s          modified to improve the
                            core temperature. Clothing should        heat loss?
                            also prevent sun-burn.
  7 Load carried            Carrying heavy loads increases the       Can the load be modified
                            body‟s core temperature.                 or weight be reduced?
  8 Duration of activity    The longer the duration of activity      Can the duration be
                            without rest periods the greater the     shortened, or rest periods
                            increase in body temperature.            introduced?
                            Rest periods in the shade will allow
                            the body to cool.
  9 Water intake            Water is required prior, during and      Is there adequate safe
                            after strenuous work to maintain a       water available throughout
                            lower core temperature.                  the intended activity?




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                                                                                                     Leaflet 39


                                                            Annex D – First Aid Immediate Action Algorithm

                                 FIRST AID IMMEDIATE ACTION ALGORITHM


                            Symptoms -agitation nausea or vomiting, staggering or
                           loss of coordination, cramps, disturbed vision, confusion,
                                  collapse or loss of consciousness, dizziness



                                       STOP activity, start First Aid treatment,
                                      reassess risk for all remaining personnel




                                 Lie the casualty down in the shade. Elevate feet if
                                  conscious. Strip to underwear, sponge or spray
                                      casualty with cool water and fan the skin.




                     Give water to drink if the                  Place the unconscious casualty in the ¾
                      casualty is conscious                         prone position (Recovery position)




                                         Evacuate to medical care as
                                             quickly as possible


Key Points.

      a.      The majority of heat casualties are preventable.

     b.       Commanders have a duty to assess the risk of heat illness to their subordinates.

     c.    If there is a risk of heat illness commanders must ensure that appropriate personnel, water,
     transport and medical assistance are immediately available.

     d.       Early recognition and treatment will prevent mild cases becoming worse.

     e.     All cases of suspected heat illness should be managed as outlined in this Chapter and all cases
     are to be reported to the single Service Medical Directorates.




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                                                                                                  Leaflet 39
                                                         Annex E - Wind chill – Its use as a planning guide

                              WIND CHILL – ITS USE AS A PLANNING GUIDE

1.    Wind causes the warm air next to the body to be replaced with cool air and therefore increases both
convection and evaporative heat losses. The wind chill chart is a ready guide that gives a comparative
estimate of the cooling effect of moving air on a body, which is hotter than the environment it is in.

2.    Use of the wind chill chart:

      a.    Plot the Still Air Temperature (SAT) in C on the top axis (temperature measured by dry bulb
      thermometer at wind speed of 0 mph) and look down the column.

      b.    Plot the current or predicted wind speed (mph) on the left and move across to the right into the
      relevant SAT column. Altitude changes and the weather forecast must be taken into account.

      c.     The apparent temperature or equivalent chill temperature may be read directly from the chart.
      In order to aid commanders in their decisions the conditions causing most concern have been boxed.
      for example, +4C at 20 mph is equivalent to -7C at 0 mph.
      -7C at 10 mph is equivalent to -15C at 0 mph.

      d.   It will be seen that the greatest changes to apparent temperature occur at relatively mild wind
      speeds.

3.    The wind chill table below offers only an approximate guide to activities and nutrition requirements in
cold environments. It must be used with caution. Studies undertaken of the incidence of cold injuries have
demonstrated that most cases of military cold injury occur in low risk conditions, therefore personnel must
remain vigilant at all times.

4.    When estimating the severity of cold stress (the rate of heat loss) wind and wet are as important as
temperature. A body will lose more heat at + 10C in a 20 mph wind than at - 10C in still air. The time
between exposure and damage is affected by the rate of heat production, and the deleterious effect of cold is
reduced by insulation such as clothing.

5.    The temperature falls with increasing altitude by approximately 1C every 150 metres.

WIND CHILL CHART

Wind chill chart showing the effect in increasing the degree of cooling at any particular
temperature and wind speed
Wind
Speed        Equivalent chill temperature (C)
(mph)
0            4       -1        -7     -12       -18     -23     -29      -34      -40     -46
5            2       -4        -12    -15       -21     -26     -32      -37      -43     -48
10           -1      -9        -15    -23       -29     -37     -34      -51      -57     -62
15           -4      -12       -21    -29       -34     -43     -51      -57      -65     -73
20           -7      -15       -23    -32       -37     -46     -54      -62      -71     -79
25           -9      -18       -26    -34       -43     -51     -59      -68      -76     -84
30           -12     -18       -29    -34       -46     -54     -62      -71      -79     -87
35           -12     -21       -29    -37       -46     -54     -62      -73      -82     -90
40           -12     -21       -29    -37       -48     -57     -65      -73      -82     -90
                                      Increasing Danger.        Great Danger. Flesh may
Less Danger                           Flesh may freeze          freeze within 30 seconds
                                      within one minute




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Leaflet 40 - Open water sites

                                             OPEN WATER SITES

Reference:

      A.        JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 23.
      B.        JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 59.

Introduction

1.     Open water sites, both natural and artificial; present a particular hazard to members of the
Garrison/Unit community, both military and civilian including contractors and visitors. Incidents associated
with water hazards occur on a regular basis, mostly with tragic consequences, and therefore, it is important
that appropriate safety measures are taken. References A and B provide further guidance and information
relating to water safety.

Duties

2.     Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements in place for the identification, assessment and recording of open water sites within their areas
of responsibility as defined in their site risk assessment. These arrangements are to be monitored and
reviewed as necessary.

Definitions

3.    The following may be defined as Open Water Sites:

      a.      Ponds (natural and artificial), streams and rivers.

      b.      Water catchment sites (including rain/storm water catchment pits).

      c.      Emergency water tanks.

      d.      Diver training tanks.

      e.      Water obstacles on military training areas.

      f.      Any other area or volume of water, contained within surrounding land or an open tank or vessel.

      g.      Dry ditches or gaps that have the potential to fill with water during periods of inclement weather
      (i.e. assault course obstacles).

Guidance for Line Managers

4.    Responsibilities. Gars/units are responsible for the following:

      a.     The completion of a Site Risk Assessment in accordance with Reference A and Part 2, Leaflet
      30 of this Manual. The presence of any open water site must be identified, assessed and recorded.

      b.      The implementation of safety measures required as determined by the risk assessment process.

      c.      The regular inspection and maintenance of all identified open water sites.

      d.   Where there is a requirement for bacterial testing of water, it is the Gar/unit‟s responsibility to
      make the necessary arrangements with Garrison SHEF FPs.

      e.   Units are to register all open water sites with the Garrison SHEF FP, who is responsible for
      maintaining a Garrison master register.


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Safety Measures

5.    Whilst each individual location will be different, the following safety measures must be considered:

      a.    Remove/eliminate redundant facilities no longer required, such as old emergency water tanks,
      diving tanks, training areas etc.

      b.     Erect fencing/barriers or similar to prevent unauthorised access.

      c.     Post warning signs and notices in English/German/other as necessary.

      d.     Install life saving equipment in prominent locations.

Records

6.    Units are responsible for recording details on all open water sites within their areas of responsibility,.
Typically, the minimum registration information required is listed as follows:

      a.     Name of sponsor unit.

      b.     Location of open water site.

      c.     Type of facility.

      d.     Dimensions of facility.

      e.     Security arrangements for the facility i.e. adequate fencing/barriers of suitable strength/height.

      f.     Details of any warning signage that has been posted in/around the facility.

      g.     Confirmation of any local orders produced for the facility.

      h.     Details of suitable and sufficient safety equipment provided at the facility.

      i.     Date of last inspection.




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Leaflet 41 – Dogs in the Workplace


                                                  DOGS IN THE WORKPLACE

References:

A.      JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 28.
                                               26
B.      German Civil Code – Article 833 and 834 .

Introduction

1.       It is established custom and practice for British military personnel to bring their dogs into the
workplace. This has been extended to allow other staff to exercise their right to do the same. However, it is
the responsibility of individual dog owners to ensure that their pet is well behaved and under proper control
at all times so as to prevent or minimise risk to other personnel. By allowing dogs to be brought into the
workplace, MOD becomes vicariously liable for the consequences.

2.     The legal position is clear, in accordance with Reference B; the keeper of an animal is liable to
compensate for any injury or damage caused by the animal. MOD, as the employer, has a duty to take
reasonable care to ensure that its employees and visitors to the workplace are not exposed to danger. The
danger from dogs in the workplace could be from them attacking personnel, fighting with other dogs, causing
allergic reactions or biological problems from fur, fluids or excreta. There is also the distinct possibility that
some employees may be frightened of dogs and may consequently suffer stress in their presence.

3.     The Legal Adviser also suggests that a court is likely to express surprise at the British military practice
of allowing dogs in the workplace and would be unlikely to accept that they could be anything other than a
hazard that could easily be avoided by banning the practice outright.

4.     Over the years there have been few recorded incidents involving pet dogs in the workplace. However,
if a worker can show their health is affected by an animal being in the workplace, for example allergic
reaction or significant stress levels, then MOD must consider either banning animals or to provide a separate
workplace away from the animals. This may also include excluding animals from public places such as
corridors that other personnel may access. In some circumstances it may be necessary to enforce a local
ban.

Duties

5.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that Gars/units have adequate
arrangements for controlling the presence of dogs in the workplace. These arrangements are to be
monitored and reviewed as necessary.

6.     Line Managers. Line managers are responsible for ensuring that all dogs allowed into the workplace
are formally authorised and controlled at all times.




26
   Article 833
If a person is killed, or the body or health of a person is injured, or a thing is damaged, by an animal, the person who keeps the animal is
bound to compensate the injured party for any damage arising therefrom. The duty to make compensation does not arise if the damage
is caused by a domestic animal which aids the business, the earnings or the prosperity of the keeper of the animal, and if the keeper of
the animal has either exercised necessary care in supervising the animal or if the damage would have occurred notwithstanding the
exercise of such care.

Article 834
A person who undertakes to supervise an animal under a contract with the keeper of the animal is responsible for any damage which
the animal causes to a third party in the manner specified in §833. The responsibility does not arise if he has exercised necessary care
in the supervision, or if the damage would have occurred notwithstanding the exercise of such care.



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Guidance for Line Managers

7.   To facilitate the control of dogs the following procedures will apply:

     a.   Gars/units are to ensure that a person is formally nominated to establish and co-ordinate the
     upkeep of a central register of all dog owners authorised to allow their dog into the workplace.

     b.   All dog owners must ensure that their dogs are registered. Prior to granting approval, the
     nominated person shall consider the following:

           (1)    Risk posed to an individual by virtue of the dog‟s typical observable behaviour, including
           its capacity to cause distress or nuisance.

           (2)   Risk posed to other pets in the workplace by virtue of the dog‟s typical observable
           behaviour.

           (3)   Risk posed to an individual by virtue of the dog‟s potential to cause accidents in the
           workplace (slips, trips, falls, ill health etc).

           (4)   Risk posed to the health of an individual susceptible to allergic reaction or aggravated
           medical condition (i.e. exposure to dog dust/hair/skin), exposure to fleas or ticks, anxiety,
           phobia or stress, exposure to body fluids or excreta.

           (5)   Risk posed to an individual by virtue of passing body fluids and/or excreta in external
           workplace areas, particularly where this may affect children.

     c.    Owners bringing their dog into the workplace will be required to adhere to the following
     procedures:

           (1)   Produce documentary evidence of third party liability insurance and vaccination against
           rabies certificate when registering their dogs.

           (2)    Payment for any incidental cleaning requirements, damage, repairs to the building
           structure or furnishings. In addition, owners may be liable to pay for the cleaning and/or repair of
           carpets and any upholstered furniture when they finally vacate an office, which has been
           occupied regularly by their dog.

     d.     With the exception that owners may release dogs within the confines of their own office, the
     door is to be kept closed at all times and a sign posted on the door alerting other personnel that the
     office has a dog within its confines.

     e.    Dogs are not to be left alone in any building or facility or its surrounds at any time.

     f.   Dogs may not be brought into shared offices without the express agreement of the other
     occupant(s).

     g.     The owners of dogs, which pass body fluids or excreta in offices, corridors, entrance ways
     (inside or out), or compound areas, will be responsible for thoroughly cleaning up afterwards. Any
     repetition of these transgressions may result in the dog being banned from the workplace
     permanently.

     h.   Any dog which is considered to be dangerous or a nuisance to any personnel will be banned
     permanently.

     i.     Dogs are not to be carried in Gar/unit official vehicles at any time (i.e. white or green fleet
     vehicles).




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Records

8.    Registration forms should be retained for 5 years after the owner has been posted or has left the
workplace or from the date the dog ceased to be brought into the workplace. A Certificate of Dog
Registration is shown at Annex A of this Leaflet.

Other Animals

9.    Where Gars/Units have employees that wish to bring other types of animals into the workplace, social
or public rooms and SLA, they must ensure permission is given.

Exemptions

10. Certain dogs, such as Guide Dogs for the visibly impaired, are exempt from these requirements as are
Military Working Dogs




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                                                                                                        Leaflet 41

                                                                       Annex A – Dog Registration Certificate

                                     DOG REGISTRATION CERTIFICATE

         DOG OWNERS DETAILS

         Rank:                                   Name & Initials:
         HQ:                                     Branch:                          Tel No:
         Breed of Dog:                           Colour:                          Name of Dog:
         Room No. / Location:

         Dog Registration Tag Number:

         I have read and understood Local Standing Instructions and agree to keep Insurance and
         Vaccination Certificates valid.


         Signature:

         Date Issued:

         Valid Until: 3 Years from Issue Date
         OFFICE USE ONLY:


         Proof of insurance YES/NO*           Proof of Vaccination YES/NO*          (* delete as appropriate)

         Issued by:                                                               Unit Stamp:




                                              Signature:


Notes:

1.    This certificate is not transferable.

2.   Tag is to be returned to the registration officer on leaving the unit or on passing the animal,
permanently, to another person.

3.    A bill will be raised against any dog owner who fails to return their registration tag.




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Leaflet 42 – Workplace Safety - Vehicles

                                          WORKPLACE SAFETY - VEHICLES

References:

A.     JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 39.
B      JSP 375 Vol 2, Leaflet 15.
C.     JSP 800 Volume 5

Introduction
                                                                                                     27
1.     The Army has a poor safety record with regard to accidents caused by vehicles in the workplace.
Even stationary vehicles may present hazards which need to be managed, such as exhaust emissions,
moving parts or working at height. When mobile and especially when manoeuvring in restricted spaces, then
hazards from vehicles are increased and proportionally greater measures of risk management may be
required.

2.     It is therefore essential to ensure that all activities involving the operation of vehicles are carefully
assessed to identify the hazards and evaluate the risks involved. Only then can adequate controls be put in
place to minimise the potential of further accidents and injuries to personnel. All too often, insufficient
consideration is given to the working environment and hazards that may be presented through a combination
of people, machines and buildings.

3.     Reference A provides for risk assessments to be made where necessary in order to provide suitable
and sufficient controls over any hazardous activity. Reference B gives subject specific direction on driving of
vehicle and industrial equipment. Reference C, The Joint Services Road Transport Regulations, is the MOD
JSP for the safe operation of vehicles and equipment. These JSPs are to be complied with throughout BFG.

Duties

4.    Commanding Officers. Commanding Officers are to ensure that their unit has adequate
arrangements for controlling the movement of vehicles within barrack areas, giving particular attention to
areas of known potential high risk such as confined areas, garage areas, LAD workshops and unit servicing
bays. The arrangements are to be monitored and reviewed as necessary.

5.     Line Managers. Line managers are to be aware of the considerable hazard posed by the operation of
vehicles in the workplace. In order to ensure that a safe system of work is in place they are to examine the
need for and subsequently carry out suitable and sufficient risk assessments on all processes permitting the
movement or operation of workplace transport within barracks including confined areas, garage areas, LADs,
workshops and unit servicing bays.

6.    A Safe System of Work may be provided through the sensible use of Generic Risk Assessments and
advice published in Technical Handbooks, Operating Manuals and Drivers Instructions and other documents
associated with the use and operation of vehicles, such as those provided by Arms and Service Directors
and Training Establishments. In addition, direction given in Reference C is to be complied with.

7.    The balance of effort must always be made in favour of risk mitigation, with the prime intent of
preventing reasonably foreseeable accidents or injury.

Guidance for Line Managers

8.      Units are to ensure that detailed instructions for vehicle commanders and drivers are contained within
their respective Standing Orders or Instructions.


27
  Vehicles are defined as any wheeled or tracked equipment capable of being moved under their own power or of being towed. The
definition includes all ancillary equipment, such as attached cranes and mechanical devices.




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Generic safety measures

9.     Experience and lessons learnt from previous tragic accidents and deaths caused by vehicles require
that the following generic procedures must be considered as a minimum:

      a.     The unit risk assessment must identify a “free zone” in front of vehicle garages, into which no
      obstruction is to be placed. Where necessary the zone should be clearly marked with yellow lines and
      including the words “Keep Clear”. If appropriate this area is to be marked in German and DEL staffed
      briefed accordingly.

      b.    Units are not to park more columns of vehicles in garages than there are exit doors for each
      respective column.

      c.      Where a vehicle has to manoeuvre into a tight space, then an additional observer/marshal
      should be positioned to observe the rear of the vehicle. The observer/marshal must be in the line of
      sight of the dismounted vehicle commander at all times and never placed in a position where there is a
      risk of injury. Great care must therefore be taken to ensure that the rear observer never stands
      between the manoeuvring vehicle and a dangerous place.

      d.    An all-round check must be made before manoeuvring starts to ensure that no unauthorised
      person is present. This includes checking under the vehicle

      e.     No vehicle may be moved until a positive functionality check has been made on all brake and
      steering systems, in addition to complying with any other safe working instructions that may be in the
      operating handbook.

      f.     The use of high visibility vests is to be normal practice when working in the area of moving
      vehicles.

      g.     Personnel working with on or vehicles are not to wear any jewellery, such as rings, necklaces
      etc, that may snag and cause injury.

      h.     A system that separates pedestrians from vehicles is to be put in place in so far as is
      reasonably practicable. Particular attention must be given to separation at gateways, entrances and
      other areas of access and egress as well as loading bays and goods transfer areas.

      i.     Suitable and sufficient ventilation must be provided to remove the risk from toxic fumes caused
      by engine operation in confined areas such as garages and workshops. Where static running in
      buildings is permitted then appropriate, efficiently functioning, local exhaust ventilation must be used.

      j.     Ignition keys or other means of starting are to be controlled securely, with particular attention
      given to silent hours and off duty security.

      k.    Great care must be taken when manoeuvring trailers. These should be moved with the correct
      prime mover, with the proper guidance and marshals safely in place where necessary, especially
      when moving into confined spaces. If, as a last resort, trailers have to be moved by manual force,
      then exceptional care is to be taken to avoid injury to those involved.

Specific Safety Measures for „A‟ vehicles

10.   The following specific measures are to be applied where „A‟ vehicles are operated.

      a.     All „A‟ vehicle movement within barracks must be controlled by a dismounted vehicle
      commander. The speed of vehicle movement is to be governed by the walking speed of the
      dismounted vehicle commander. At no time shall the dismounted vehicle commander run in front of
      their vehicle.

      b.    All dismounted „A‟ vehicle commanders/observers/marshals are to wear high visibility vests.



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      c.    It is very strongly recommended that high visibility clothing be worn by all persons working in
      any areas where „A‟ vehicles are likely to be manoeuvred.

Training

11. Units are to ensure that vehicle crews and any other persons likely to be involved with the movement
or use of workplace transport receive suitable and sufficient training specific to their particular role. This is to
be monitored, updated and reviewed on a regular basis or in line with service publications.

Toolbox Top Talks and Tips

12. It is accepted best practice to give so called „Tool Box Top‟ talks at the lowest working level. With
regards to Workplace Transport Safety the following points, perhaps in the form of rhetorical questions to
staff, should be considered.

      a.     When were you trained to carry out the task you are expected to do?

      b.     Have you completed the relevant driver or operator training, with refresher training?

      c.     Are you carrying out the task in the way you have been instructed?

      d.   How do you know your vehicle or equipment safe for use, fit for purpose and that its servicing
      and maintenance is up to date.

      e.     Are you following AESPs and standing orders?

      f.    Are supervisors present when needed? Is PPE required and if so, is it fit for use and being
      used?

      g.     Do you sometimes cut corners to get things done?

      h.     Is your workplace area laid out safely for what you have to do?

      i.    Have any uncontrolled risks that you have spotted been reported and does everyone know
      about them?

      j.    Have you read and signed Risk Assessments that affect the task you are to do and do you
      understand that you must comply with these assessments?

Induction and Refresher Training

13. Commanders at all, levels, but especially those at the working level, should ensure that all personnel,
and this includes those who might not be directly involved with workplace transport such as clerks and
support staff, are given suitable and sufficient induction and refresher training about workplace transport
risks.

Accident, Incident, Injury, Near Miss Reporting and Investigation

14. It is especially important that, in view of the dangers presented by workplace transport and the need
for lessons learnt to be widely communicated, that all accidents, incidents, injuries and near misses
(including serious equipment failure) are reported in accordance with the AINC and LAIT Procedures
published in Leaflet 1 of the BFG SHEF Manual Part 2 Chapter 2.

15. Investigations into such occurrences are to be carried out in accordance with current service
instructions as guided in Leaflet 2 of the BFG SHEF Manual Part 2 Chapter 2.




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Records

16. Workplace Transport risk assessments are to be retained for 5 years and are not to be
destroyed on review but held in case of future potential claims as a result of an accident or incident.
Units are to ensure that these risk assessments are handed over to the incoming unit during an arms
plot move. Records relating to training are to be kept in an individual‟s personal file or with the unit
training records.




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Leaflet 43 – Lone Workers

                                        GUIDANCE ON LONE WORKING

References:

A.    The Health and Safety at Work (HSW) Act 1974
B.    The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (MHSWR) 1999
C.    COSHH Regulations 2002

Introduction

1. The aim of this leaflet is to give general guidance to Line Managers on how to comply with their duties
under the above Regulations for staff that may be working alone.

Definition of Lone Work

2. Lone working could be defined as any situation where a worker is engaged in a solo activity out of
others‟ sight and hearing range. Unfortunately, this definition covers so many scenarios that ultimately
almost everyone will be a lone worker at some point in their normal work activity. Therefore, for the
purposes of this instruction Lone Working is defined as: “A person working alone in an environment where
there are no other workers present or available to respond effectively to unusual circumstances or
emergencies.

Examples (which are not exhaustive) are as follows:

     a. People who are working outside normal hours. Staff working on shifts MGS, duty personnel,
     cleaners, COMCEN staff. Budget Staff during STP (formerly ITC) process.

     b. People called upon to work separately from others. These include: RMP, vehicle mechanics,
     wksp/stores personnel, servicing bays, staff on OP WIDEAWAKE in trg camps, who may be working on
     their own for long periods of time.

     c.     Staff in remote locations. This includes those working from home.

     d.     Mobile workers. Are such employees who work away from their fixed base.

     e.     Personnel on detached duty. This includes travelling to/from detached duty station (DDS).

     f.     Domestic assistants. Cleaners and groundsmen for entitled officers.

Legislation and MOD Policy

4. Although there is no general legal prohibition on working alone, the broad duties of the legislation and
regulations still apply. Employers have the responsibility to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the
health, safety and welfare at work of all their employees. This duty also extends towards persons, other than
employees e.g. visitors, contractors and general public, who might be affected by such work activities. Line
Managers are responsible for:

     a.     Identifying the hazards of the work.

     b.     Assessing the risks involved.

     c.     Putting measures in place to avoid or control the risks.

5. Units and Establishments are to provide working conditions, which will ensure, so far, as is reasonably
practicable, a healthy and safe working environment. Reference C, states that Line Managers are required



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to conduct Risk assessments where necessary and applicable to ensure the Health and Safety of their
employees and those affected by their work activities.

6. Units are to identify situations where lone working arises and ensure that steps are implemented to
reduce risks to the lowest practical level.

Assessing the Risks - Factors to consider

7. Lone workers should not be exposed to any extra risks compared to people in a multi-staffed
environment. When carrying out the risk assessment, the following areas should be addressed:

     a.     The Environment. The workplace must be assessed for hazards and risks to the lone worker.

               (1)      There should be safe access and egress.

               (2)      Possible emergency situations eg. fire, illness and accidents.

               (3)    There must be access to a FA kit. If a lone worker sustains a minor injury, he/she may be
               able to use a first aid box, or phone for help. However, a more serious injury may mean that the
               workers cannot help themselves or use the phone. Where more serious injuries are
               foreseeable the absence of a colleague to administer or at least organise help could be
               construed as insufficient first aid cover.

     b. The Task. The assessment must consider whether the equipment and substances required for the
     job in question can be handled by one person, and whether the task involves the following hazards:

               (1)      Electricity.

               (2)      Dangerous machinery.

               (3)      Manual handling.

               (4)      Working in confined spaces.

               (5)   COSHH risk assessments must be suitable sufficient and reviewed in accordance with
               Reference C.

     c.     The Individual. The employee must fulfil certain requirements:

               (1)      The employee must be medically fit to work alone e.g. not prone to blackouts.

               (2)    The employee must be competent to work alone, and have received the necessary
               information, instruction and training. They must also have been informed of and have copies of
               the relevant risk assessments.

               (3)   The level of supervision should be based on the findings of the risk assessment.
               Employees new to a job or undergoing trg will require greater supervision than their more
               experienced counterparts. The higher the risks, the greater level of supervision required.

               (4)   Staff working out of hours should ensure that they have safe transport to and from the
               workplace.

               (5)    The risks of attack or assault by third party. Women can face increased risks when
               working alone, such as sexual harassment and assault, although men can also be victims of
               this type of violence.

               (6)   Young persons may be more at risk if working alone; those under 18 should be
               supervised at all times.



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               (7)    Individuals should never work alone where a task has been identified for two people as
               detailed below.

Control measures, monitoring and supervision

8. In establishing a safe system of work the means of effective communication are of paramount
importance. In every situation there must be an appropriate means of ensuring that at some stage, a two
way contact can be made. It should also be possible for the lone worker to know how to make contact with
security staff/point of contact/Line Manager, when they meet unusual or unexpected situations and it should
not be left for the worker to decide on how to cope with such circumstances. Security staff/point of
contact/Line Managers should know the name, location and working hours of the lone worker and the
contact and action policy when applicable.

9. Policy and procedures will need to be devised and put in place for the lone worker(s) to ensure that they
remain safe; this must include regular and routine contacts by any or a combination of the following methods:

     a.     Periodic visits by security staff/supervisors/other workers.

     b.     Regular contact between lone worker and supervision by telephone or radio.

     c. Mobile phones or radio communications issued to staff in remote locations, where significant risks
     exist, e.g. those undertaking OP WIDEAWAKE duties on large camps.

     d. Automatic warning devices which operate if a specific signal is not received periodically from the
     lone worker.

     e. Other devices designed to raise the alarm in the event of an emergency and which are operated
     manually or automatically, e.g. personal alarm systems, whistles.

     f.     Checks that a lone worker has returned to their base on completion of a task.

     g. Staff on Detached Duty. Line managers should be aware of the method of travel to the Detached
     Duty Station (DDS) and accommodation. In cases of non-arrivals, the DDS/Course admin would notify
     the parent unit. Situations that result in an individual travelling alone late at night/early hours of the
     morning should be avoided, as the individual may inadvertently be placed in a dangerous situation.

     h. Staff on detached duty or working late should also be aware of the precautions to take when using
     public transport, when parking and returning to parked vehicles.

Lone drivers

10. Whether using self-drive service vehicles, Hire vehicles or private vehicles, the information provided in
Drivers Standing Orders, extracted from JSP 341, e.g. maximum unbroken period of 4.5 hours etc, and must
be observed. Other measures to reduce the risk include, sharing the driving and limiting the driving time
(arrive day before, leave the day after).

11. Emergency procedures should be established and employees must be trained in them. This
information must also be notified to contractors and visitors.

Prohibition of lone working

12. Specific legal requirements are laid down in the case of work where the hazards are considered too
great for people to work unaccompanied. The second person is often required to act as a supervisor.
However, the safe method of work identified by a routine risk assessment may indicate that similar standards
of supervision should be adopted when it enhances the safety of the workforce, even if there is no statutory
requirement. For example, under Regulation 4 of The Confined Spaces Regulations 1997, the risk
assessment may determine that if the task is routine, control measures are straightforward, and the
arrangements for safety can be controlled by one person carrying out the work, a periodic check that all is



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well would be required. Conversely, the risk assessment may demonstrate the level of risk requires the
appointment of a competent person to supervise and remain present whilst the work is being undertaken.

13. Other circumstances where the law requires at least two people to be involved in the work:

     a. Work at or near any live conductor (The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989, Regulation 14 and
     16).

     b.     Young people working at prescribed dangerous machinery (PUWER 98 Reg 99).

     c. Certain operations that fall within the scope of the Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare)
     Regulations 1996, such as erecting scaffolding and using unsupported access equipment (regulation 6)
     i.e. window cleaning and the demolition of certain structures (regulation 10), activities must be
     supervised.

     d. Except where an exemption has been issued, accompaniment is needed when unloading petrol at
     certain premises under the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road
     e. Regulations 1996, and for the supervision of vehicles carrying certain explosives (Carriage of
     Explosives by Road Regulations 1996).

     f. The Diving Operations at Work Regulations 1981 Regulation 5, states that there must be a
     supervisor appointed to take control of the exercise.
     g. Further information

14. Annex A comprises the six points that should be addressed by line managers and individuals to ensure
safe lone working. This should be displayed on notice boards.




Annex A - Six Steps for Safe Lone Working




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                                                                                                    Leaflet 43

                                                               Annex A – Six Steps for Safe Lone Working

Six Steps for Safe Lone Working


                    Line managers                                           Individuals

1   Has a suitable and sufficient Risk Assessment      Are you aware of the all hazards and risks present in
    by a competent person been carried out             the workplace and the risks associated with Lone
    appertaining to Lone Working.                      Working?
2   Have the results of the Risk Assessments           Have all known hazards been notified to your Line
    been brought to the attention of the staff         Manager?
    engaging in Lone Working?
3   Have safe systems of work, identified as a         Are you aware of and understand the safe systems of
    result of risk assessments, been written and       work, and when you should seek assistance when
    implemented.                                       Lone Working?
4   Are lone workers working in high risk areas        Have you been informed/briefed on how you will be
    regularly monitored?                               monitored and What to do/who to report to if this
                                                       action is not been carried out?

5   Has an effective system of two-way                 Do you understand and use the two-way system
    communication been established?                    communication
6   Have employees received all necessary              Have you received all necessary information
    information, instruction and training, including   instruction and training required for the tasks, and
    emergency drills/evacuation procedures?            aware of the actions to be taken in an emergency?


REMEMBER! – FORGET, ALWAYS LEADS TO REGRET!                      CHECK AND MONITOR




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Leaflet 45 – The control and management of risk from legionella (under construction)


Note; this leaflet is under construction. Notification of issue will be made in due course




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Leaflet 46 – Health & Safety in Germany - Main Legislation


                           HEALTH & SAFETY IN GERMANY - MAIN LEGISLATION

 Legislation (abbreviated)          Full German title              English title               Explanation
Gesetze
Grundgesetz                     Grundgesetz vom              Constitution dated          Defines state structure
(GG)                            23 Mai 1949.                 23 May 1949.                and distribution of
                                                                                         competencies. §2
                                                                                         imposes legal
                                                                                         responsibility to protect
                                                                                         the H & S of employees.
Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch         Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch      Civil code dated            § 618 invokes a duty of
(BGB)                           vom 18 Aug 1896.             18 Aug 1896.                care on employers.
Gewerbeordnung                  Gewerbeordnung in der        Industrial code, dated      Imposes a duty of care on
(GO)                            vom 22 Feb 1999, zuletzt     22 Feb 1999, last           industrial employers
                                geändert am 11 Okt 02.       amended on 11 Oct 02.       (manufacturers/suppliers),
                                                                                         to ensure that equipment
                                                                                         is to a safe standard.
Sozialgesetzbuch VII            Siebtes Buch                 Social code. >20            The SM must attend a 2-
(SGB VII)                       Sozialgesetzbuch vom         employees, Safety           day course and a day‟s
                                7 Aug 1996, zuletzt          Monitors (SM) must be       refresher at least every 3
                                geändert am 21 Aug 02.       appointed in writing,       years. The SM is
                                                             (Sicherheitsbeauftragte),   responsible for assisting
                                                             selected from the           the employer, OMP and
                                                             workforce.                  FASi in fulfilling H&S
                                                                                         responsibilities. The SM
                                                                                         must be given adequate
                                                                                         time to fulfil his duties.
                                                                                         The position is voluntary
                                                                                         with no additional
                                                                                         remuneration.
Arbeitsschutzgesetz             Arbeitsschutzgesetz vom      Occupational Safety Act     Primary H&S legislation
(ArbSchG)                       7 Aug 1996 zuletzt           dated 7 Aug 1996 last       which transposes EU
BG CHV 2                        geändert am 21 Jun 02.       amended on 21 Jun 02.       Directives 89/391/EEC
                                                                                         dated 12 Jun 1989 and
                                                                                         91/383/EEC dated 25 Jun
                                                                                         1991, on the introduction
                                                                                         of measures to encourage
                                                                                         improvements in the H&S
                                                                                         of workers into German
                                                                                         law in various areas (UK
                                                                                         Six Pack). It requires
                                                                                         conducting and
                                                                                         documentation of risk
                                                                                         assessment.
Arbeitssicherheitsgesetz        Gesetz über Betriebsärzte,   Act on Occ Medical          Requires employers to
(ASiG)                          Sicherheitsingenieure und    Practitioners (OMP),        contract the services of a
BG CHV 1                        andere Fachkräfte für        Safety Engineers and        HSWA - Fachkraft für
                                Arbeitssicherheit vom        other Persons Qualified     Arbeitssicherheit – (FASi)
                                12 Dez 1973, zuletzt         in Occ H & S dated          and an OMP -
                                geändert am 24 Aug 02.       12 Dec 1973, last           Betriebsarzt. The hours
                                                             amended on 24 Aug 02.       to be contracted for are
                                                                                         defined by the Accident
                                                                                         Insurance Carriers – (BG)
                                                                                         Berufsgenossenschaft


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 Legislation (abbreviated)          Full German title               English title               Explanation
Arbeitszeitgesetz              Gesetz zur Schutz der          Working hours Act dated   Legislation governing
         (ArbZG)               Sicherheit und Gesundheit      6 Jun 1994, last          working hours in to
                               bei der arbeitszeit-           amended 25 Nov 03.        protect the H & S of the
                               gestaltung vom                                           employees, improve
                               6 Juni 1994.                                             framework conditions for
                               (Arbeitszeitrechtsgesetz –                               flexible working hours and
                               ArbZRG). Zuletztgeandert                                 protect Sundays and
                               am 25 Nov 03.                                            public holidays as non-
                                                                                        working days.
Mutterschutzgesetz             Gesetz zum Schutz der          Mother protection act     Legislation governing the
(MuSchG)                       erwerbstätigen Mutter in der   dated 20 Jun 02. Last     conditions at the place of
                               Fassung von 20 Jun 02,         amended 14 Nov 03.        work for pregnant women
                               zuletzt geandert am                                      and nursing mothers.
                               14 Nov 03.                                               Includes conditions
                                                                                        concerning Maternity
                                                                                        leave.
Jugendarbeitsschutzgesetz      Gesetz zum Schutz der          Youth Work Protection     Legislation governing the
(JarbSchG)                     arbeitenden Jugend von         Act, dated 12 Apr 1996    conditions at the place of
                               12 Apr 1996 zuletzt            last amended 21 Jun 05.   work for young persons.
                               geändert am 21 Dez 05.
Schwerbehindertengesetz        Gesetz zur Sicherung der       Severely handicapped      Legislation governing the
(SchwbG)                       Eingliederung                  act dated 26 Aug 1986     integration and conditions
                               Schwerbehinderter in           last amended on           for of severely
                               Arbeit, Beruf und              29 Sep 2000.              handicapped persons at
                               Gesellschaft von                                         the place of work and
                               26 Aug 1986 zuletzt                                      society.
                               geändert am 29 Sep 2000.
Geräte – und Produktsicher-    Gesetz über Technische         Act on Machinery Safety   Last amended by the
heitsgesetz (GPSG).            Arbeitsmittel und              dated 11 May 01, as       Workplace Safety
BG CHV 3                       Verbraucherprodukte vom        amended on 27 Sep 02.     Ordinance on 27 Sep
                               11 Mai 01, zuletzt geändert    Last amended 7 Jul 05.    2002. Imposes duty of
                               durch die BetrSichV am                                   care on manufacturers
                               27 Sep 02. Zuletzgeändert                                and suppliers to ensure
                               am 7 Jul 05.                                             that equipment is to a
                                                                                        safe standard (CE, GS,
                                                                                        DIN etc).
Chemikaliengesetz              Gesetz zum Schutz vor          Chemicals Act dated       Legislation governing the
(ChemG)                        gefährlichen Stoffen vom       16 Sep 1980, reissued     manufacture and use of
                               16 Sep 1980, vom               on 20 Jun 02 last         chemical substances and
                               20 Jun 02 zuletzt geändert     amended on 01 Sep 05.     compounds.
                               am 1 Sep 05.
Gefahrgutbeförderungsgesetz    Gesetz über die                Transport of Dangerous    Governs the transport of
(GGBefG)                       Beförderung gefährlicher       Goods Act dated           hazardous substances
                               Güter in vom 21 Jun 05.        21 Jun 05.
Atomgesetz                     Gesetz über die friedliche     Act on the peaceful use   Governs Radioactive eqpt
(AtomG)                        Verwendung der                 of Ionising Radiation     and substances used in
                               Kernenergie und den            and the protection from   civilian environments and
                               Schutz gegen ihre              its risks as announced    processes. Not directly
                               Gefahren in vom                on 15 Jul 1985, last      applicable to the Mil.
                               15 Jul 1985, zuletzt           amended 12 Aug 05.
                               geändert am 12 Aug 05.
Infektionsschutzgesetz (ISG)   Gesetz zur Verhutung und       Infectious Diseases Act   The aim of the Act is to
                               Bekampfung von                 dated 20 Jul 2000. Last   ensure that the spread of
                               Infektionskrankheiten beim     amended on 5 Nov 01.      infectious diseases is
                               Menschen vom 20 Jul                                      prevented. SS42 prohibits
                               2000, zuletzt geandert am                                infected employees‟ from
                               5 Nov 01.                                                working in catering
                                                                                        establishments. SS43

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 Legislation (abbreviated)         Full German title              English title                Explanation
                                                                                        requires catering
                                                                                        employees to receive info
                                                                                        regarding their duty to
                                                                                        report any infectious
                                                                                        diseases/illness that they
                                                                                        may have. Employers
                                                                                        must give employees
                                                                                        regular training (at least
                                                                                        annually).
Verordnungen
Arbeitsstättenverordnung      Verordnung über                Ordinance on               Governs workplace
(ArbStättV)                   Arbeitsstätten vom 20. Mär     Workplaces dated 20        conditions and welfare
BG CHV 4                      1975, zuletzt geändert am      Mar 1975 last amended      facilities (Workplace
                              12 Aug 04.                     on 12 Aug 04.              Health, Safety and
                                                                                        Welfare Regulations).
Bildschirmarbeitsverordnung   Verordnung über Sicherheit     Ordinance on H&S for       Governs working with
(BildscharbV)                 und bei der Arbeit an          work on display screen     visual display units such
                              Bildschirmgeräten vom          equipment dated            as computer monitors,
                              4 Dez 1996 zuletzt             4 Dec 1996 last            CCTV, etc.
                              geändert am 25 Nov 03.         amended on 25 Nov 03.
PSA-Benutzungsverordnung      Verordnung über Sicherheit     Ordinance on H&S           Governs the provision,
(PSA-BV)                      und Gesundheitsschutz bei      when using personal        use and maintenance of
                              der Benutzung persönlicher     protective equipment       PPE.
                              Schutzausrüstungen bei der     dated 4 Dec 1996.
                              Arbeit vom 4 Dez 1996.
Lasthandhabungverordnung      Verordnung über Sicherheit     Ordinance on H&S           Governs manual
(LasthandhabV)                und Gesundheitsschutz bei      when handling manual       handling.
                              der manuellen Handhabung       loads dated 4 Dec 96
                              von Lasten bei der Arbeit      last amended on
                              vom 4 Dez 1996 zuletzt         27 Nov 03.
                              geändert am 27 Nov 03.
Gefahrstoffverordnung         Verordnung zum Schutz vor      Ordinance on               Regulates the marketing,
(GefStoffV)                   gefährlichen Stoffen,          dangerous substances,      packaging, labelling and
BG CHV 5                      Neufassung vom 15 Nov          new edition dated 15       use of hazardous
                              1999, geändert durch die       Nov 1999, amended by       substances. Control of
                              BetrSichV am 27 Sep 02,        the Workplace Safety       Substances Hazardous to
                              zuletzt geändert am            Ordinance on 27 Sep 02     Health (COSHH).
                              23 Dec 04.                     last amended on
                                                             23 Dec 04.
Chemikalienverbots-           Verordnung über Verbote        Ordinance on the
verordnung                    und Beschränkung des           prohibition and
(ChemVerbotsV),               Inverkehrbringens              restrictions on bringing
                              gefährlicher Stoffe,           into use certain
                              Zubereitungen und              dangerous chemicals
                              Erzeugnisse nach dem           dated 19 Jul 1996 as
                              Chemikaliengesetz vom          last amended on
                              19 Jul 1996, zuletzt           21 Jun 05.
                              geändert am 21 Jun 05.
Biostoffverordnung            Verordnung über Sicherheit     Ordinance on H&S for       Governs the working with
(BioStoffV)                   und Gesundheitsschutz bei      Work involving             biological substances and
BG CHV15                      Tätigkeiten mit biologischen   Biological Agents dated    working in such
                              Arbeitsstoffen vom             27 Jan 1999 as last        hazardous areas.
                              27 Jan 1999, zuletzt           amended on 23 Dec 04.
                              geändert am 23 Dec 04.
Röntgenverordnung             Verordnung über den            Ordinance on x-rays of     Governs the manufacture
(RÖV)                         Schutz vor Schäden durch       8 Jan 1987, as last        and use of eqpt producing
BG CHV 14                     Röntgenstrahlen vom            amended on 30 Apr 03.      X-rays (with limits of 5 kV
                              8 Jan 1987, zuletzt                                       accelerating electrons

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 Legislation (abbreviated)         Full German title              English title                Explanation
                               geändert am 30 Apr 03.                                   and 5 mV accelerated
                                                                                        electrons).
Strahlenschutzverordnung       Verordnung über den           Ordinance on the           Governs the use of eqpt,
(StrlSchV)                     Schutz vor Schäden durch      Protection from Ionising   which emits ionising
BG CHV 10                      ionisierende strahlen vom     Radiation dated            radiation in order to
                               20 Jul 01, zuletzt geändert   20 Jul 01 as last          protect the H& S of those
                               am 1 Sep 05.                  amended on 1 Sep 205.      exposed to the emissions.
Gefahrgutverordnung Straße     Verordnung über die           Ordinance on Road          Governs the transport of
(GGVS)                         Beförderung gefährlicher      Transport of Dangerous     hazardous substances by
                               Güter auf Straßen vom         Goods dated                road.
                               12 Dez 1996, zuletzt          12 Dec 1996 last
                               geändert am 3 Jun 05.         amended on 3 Jun 05.
Gefahrgutkontroll-verordnung   Verordnung über die           Ordinance on the control   Governs the control by
(GGKontrollV)                  Kontrollen von                of the tpt of hazardous    Federal authorities of
                               Gefahrguttransportern auf     goods on the road and      vehs transporting
                               der Straße und in             in companies dated         hazardous on German
                               Unternehmen vom               27 May 1997 last           roads or within company
                               27 Mai 1997 zuletzt           amended on 2 Nov 05.       grounds.
                               geändert am 2 Nov 205.
Gefahrgutbeauftragten-         Verordnung über               Ordinance on Safety        Governs the employment,
verordnung                     beauftragten für              Advisers for the tpt of    training &responsibilities
 (GbV)                         Gefahrguter vom 26. Mär       dangerous goods dated      of safety advisers for the
                               1998, zuletzt geändert am     26 Mar 1998, as last       transport of dangerous
                               21 Dez 1999.                  amended on 21 Dec 99.      goods.
Baustellenverordnung           Verordnung über Sicherheit    Ordinance on H&S on        Governs H & S on
(BaustellV),                   und Gesundheitsschutz auf     Construction Sites dated   construction sites
                               Baustellen vom                10 Jun 1998.               including co-ordination of
                               10 Jun 1998.                                             sub contractors etc.
Druckluftverordnung            Verordnung über Arbeiten      Ordinance on Work in       Governs working in
(DrückluftVO)                  in Druckluft vom 4 Okt        Pressurised Air dated      pressurised systems
BG CHV 13                      1972, zuletzt geändert am     4 Oct 1972, last           including decompression
                               21 Jun 05.                    amended 21 Jun 05.         chambers for divers.
Berufskrankheiten-             Verordnung über               Ordinance on               Governs prevention, care
verordnung (BKV)               Berufskrankheiten vom         occupational illness       and related payments and
                               31 Okt 1997 zuletzt           dated 31 Oct 1997 last     lists the recognised
                               geändert am 5 Sep 02.         amended on 5 Sep 02.       illnesses in conjunction
                                                                                        with the social code.
Betriebssicherheits-           Verordnung über Sicherheit    Workplace Safety           Took effect on 01 Jan
verordnung                     und Gesundheitsschutz bei     Ordinance, introduced      2003. Supports
 (BetrSichV)                   der Bereitstellung von        on 07 Jul 2005.            government policy on
                               Arbeitsmitteln und deren                                 deregulation and
                               Benutzung bei der Arbeit,                                eradicates duplication
                               über Sicherheit beim                                     between legislative
                               betrieb überwachungs-                                    regulations and H&S
                               bedürftiger Anlagen und                                  regulations issued by the
                               über die Organisation des                                BG‟s. Imposes greater
                               Betriebliches Arbeits-                                   responsibility on the
                               schutzes vom 7 Jul 05.                                   employer to risk assess
                                                                                        activities. The main
                                                                                        changes are listed below.
Lärm – und Vibrations-         Verordnung zum Schutz der     Ordinance to protect the   This Ordinance was
Arbeitsschutzverordnung        Beschäftigten vor             employees against          introduced i.a.w two EU
(LärmV)                        Gefährdungen durch Lärm       hazards from noise and     pieces of legislation on
                               und Vibrationen vom           vibration at work dated    noise and vibration at
                               6 März 07.                    6 Mar 07.                  work. This legislation
                                                                                        reduced the action levels
                                                                                        by 5 dB(A).


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  Legislation (abbreviated)          Full German title             English title            Explanation
Bundesimmissionsschutz-         Gesetz zum Schutz vor        Federal Emission       Governs levels of
gesetz                          schädlichen Umwelt-          Protection Act dated   emissions permitted to be
(BimSchG)                       einwirkungen durch,          25 Jun 05.             released into the
                                Luftverunreinigungen,                               environment including, air
                                Geräusche,                                          pollution, noise, vibration
                                Erschütterungen, und                                and similar.
                                ähnliche Vorgänge vom
                                25 Jun 05.
Unfallverhütungs-vorschriften   Vorschriften über            Accident prevention    BGVR - are divided into
(UVV)                           Maßnahmen zur Verhütung      instructions.          the following categories:
                                von Unfälle.
                                Berufsgenossenschaftliches                               BG R - Regeln –
                                Vorschriften- und                                   regulations
                                Regelwerk (BGVR)
                                                                                          BG G - Grundsätze
                                                                                    – principles (test
                                                                                    procedures)

                                                                                         BG I -
                                                                                    Informationen –
                                                                                    information

                                                                                          BG V - Vorschriften
                                                                                    – Instructions, subdivided
                                                                                    into 4 categories:

                                                                                          BGV A – general
                                                                                    instructions and H&S
                                                                                    management
                                                                                    organisation.

                                                                                        BGV B –
                                                                                    occupational influences.

                                                                                        BGV C – type of
                                                                                    company/ activity.

                                                                                         BGV D – type of
                                                                                    workplace/process.




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