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					UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Project of the Government of
                 Cuba PROJECT DOCUMENT




No. and Title


Priority actions to consolidate biodiversity protection in the Sabana-Camagüey
Ecosystem
                      Global Environmental Fund (GEF)
Duration:                                5 years
Project site:                                 Sabana-Camagüey Region
Sector and subsector CITMA/UNDP               Environment (Biodiversity)

                                              Other ( )
Government executing agency:                  Government of Cuba. Ministry of Science, Technology and
                                              Environment (CITMA)




Estimated beginning date:                     March, 1999


Contributions of the Government:              US $15 269 000 (in kind)


Contributions of the UNDP:                     US$ 3 889 000
Brief description: The Project proposed here supplements critical activities of sustainable development in the
Sabana-Camag0ey Ecosystem to be financed and implemented by the Government of Cuba, with others that are
specifically oriented to protect biodiversity of global significance. The project activities aim at incorporating biodi-
versity to the integrated coastal zone management by means of a zonation, the establishment of essential protected
areas (a total of 127 547 ha) for the demonstration and potential replication, a monitoring program for biodiversity,
institutional strengthening, and training, education and awareness of the population's key sectors, including decision-
makers.
In representation of:                        Signature                 Date                Name/Title
Government:
UNDP                                                                    Ariel Francais, Resident Rep.
                        Priority actions to consolidate biodiversity protection in the
                                       Sabana-Camagüey Ecosystem

Table of Contents
A. CONTEXT .................................................,,,.............................................. 2 1. Description of
   the subsector ...................................................................................                              2 2. Strategy of
3. Previous assistance received by the country ...................................„„„„„„„„„„„„„„,                          5

   4. Institutional framework of the subsector.......................................„„„„„„„„„„„„„„,                                              6 B. JUSTIFIC
2. Expected situation at the end of the project........................................„„„„„„„„„„„„                                  8
3. Beneficiaries.................................................................................................... 10
4. Strategies of the project and institutional arrangements ...........................................„,                            11

1.         Reason for the assistance of UNDP as Executing Agency............................................                                      12

6.   Special considerations ........................................................................................                              13
7. Coordination Arrangements ................................................................................ 14

     8. Support Capacity of counterparts .........................................................................                                15 C. DEVELO
....................................................................................................26
1. Contribution of the Government ...........................................„„„,..„...„„„„„„„„„
                                                                                                                                              2
7

     2. Contributions of the UNDP/GEF ...............................................„„„„,.„„,.„„„„„„
                                                                                                                                              2
7 G. PREVIOUS OBLIGATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS ........................................29 1.
Previous obligations ...........................................................................................
                                                                                                                                              2
9

     2.            Pre-requisites             ...................................................................................................
                                                                                                                                               2
9 H. REVISION OF THE PROJECT, REPORTS AND EVALUATION ......................... 29 I.
LEGAL       CONTEXT                      ......................................................................................30             J.
BUDGETS..................................................................................................32
        1. Budget of the Government contribution to the Project.................................................
                                                                                                                                               3
                                                                                                                                               2

     2. Budget of the contribution of UNDP to the Project .....................................................
                                                                                                                                              3
     3 3. Budget of the contribution of Capacity 21 Program to the Project CUB/98/G31
     ................. 34 4. Budget of the summed contribution of UNDP and Capacity 21 to the
     Project..................... 35 Annex I: Work plan
     ..............................................................................................
                                                                                                                                              3
     8
                 Annex II:               Revisions of the project ............................................................................
                                                                                                                                          51
Annex III: Training program ..................................................................................
                                                                                                                                            5
2
Annex VII: Complementary Project of Capacity 21. ......................................................
                                                                                                                                            6
3
L. FIGURES .................................................................................................73 FIGURE 1. MAP
OF THE STUDY AREA ............................................................ 73 M. ACRONYMS
.............................................................................................74
                         Priority actions to consolidate biodiversity protection in
                                    the Sabana-Camagüey Ecosystem


A. CONTEXT

1. Description of the subsector

The Sabana-Camagüey Ecosystem covers an area of 75,000-kmz, encompassing the
northern Sabana-Camagtiey Archipelago (SCA) along with its shallow sea shelf, the
northern central watershed of the main island from Punta de Hicacos to Nuevitas Bay,
and the Exclusive Economic Zone of the adjacent ocean (see map in Annex V). The ar-
chipelago or SCA stretches approximately 465 km along the north-central coast of Cuba
and is comprised of some 2,517 keys that account for 60% and 93.8% of the total number
and area, respectively, of all Cuban keys. The SCA contains extensive plant formations,
such as Cuban wetlands and dry forests - of high global significance (Dinerstein et al.,
1995) - and mangroves are common on the keys and along the main island's coast. The
biggest keys are populated with a variety of vegetation types, including mangroves, semi-
deciduous forests, microphyllous evergreen forests, coastal xeromorphic plant complexes
on sandy and rocky coasts, and halophytic communities.
The SCA also possesses coral reefs of great regional significance. The entire outer border
of the marine shelf is fringed by a fore reef, while it is estimated that there are over 100-
km of reef crests and over 500-km of fore reefs, with lush sea-grass beds. Kelleher et. al.
(1995) recognises the need to strengthen protected areas in reefs of the SCA. On the other
hand, the Nature Conservancy (1998) considers the marine shelf of the SabanaCamagüey
Archipelago as a high priority conservation zone. The SCA also forms an essential part of
the Greater Antilles and Bahamian Marine Ecosystem, one of the Global 200 Ecoregions
listed as global priorities for conservation of biodiversity by the World Wildlife Fund
(Olson and Dinerstein,1997).
This rich mosaic of terrestrial and marine habitats contains a high diversity of plants and
animals and high levels of endemism, ranking the zone among the richest in Cuba, itself
the island with the greatest diversity in the West Indies. Cuba also ranks unusually high
relative to the US and Canada when compared on an area-by-area basis: 39 times as
many bird species per hectare, 30 times as many amphibian and reptile species per
hectare, and 27 times as many plant species per hectare. Due to its enormous natural
value and its vulnerability to marine pollution, this zone was declared a Particularly
Sensitive Sea Area by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). Such recognition
has only previously been granted to the Australian Great Barrier Reef.
To date, 708 species of terrestrial flora have been recorded in the area, of which 126 are
endemic and 12 are of localised distribution. The SCA also harbours a wide diversity of
both species and subspecies of terrestrial fauna, representing large numbers of endemic and
migratory species: 958 species of terrestrial fauna have been recorded, 542 of them insects,
(though a poorly studied group), and 209 species of birds. The highest endemism rates are
found in molluscs and reptiles.
Due to its geographic location, the SCA serves as a destination and migratory corridor for
many birds. Of birds, 48% migrate between Cuba, North America and South America. It is
estimated that from 35 % to 52 % of the total number of birds found on the keys according
to vegetation type are migratory. Of migratory birds, four are endangered (Charadrius
melodus, hermivona celata, Falco peregrinus and Falco columbarius) while one is subject to
lesser risk under managed conditions (Phoenicopterus Tuber). Eleven endemic genera have
been recorded, along with 107 endemic species and 47 endemic subspecies of which 33 are
exclusive to the SCA. Cuba, as an Endemic Bird Area, is listed among the top fifteen pri -
orities world-wide for conservation by Birdlife International. Putting Biodiversity on the
Map: Priority Areas for Global Conservation. 1992. International Council for Bird Preser -
vation, Cambridge, U.K.
In the soft bottoms of the marine shelf, 88 macroalgae and seagrass species have been
identified, with 155 species of algae found in reefs. To date, 447 benthic invertebrate
species have been found on the soft bottoms of the marine shelf and 374 in the reef. To
date, 447 species of benthic invertebrates have been inventoried in the soft bottoms of the
marine shelf and 374 in the reefs (for reefs, only information about sponges, gorgonians,
scleractinia, milleporina and mollusks has been included). The diversity of fish species is
also very high, with 642 registered species.
In several taxonomic groups it has been demonstrated that, as a result of increased
sampling efforts both on the keys and the marine shelf, the number of species discovered
has tended to rise, providing a clear demonstration of the SCA's enormous potential for
discovery of new species. The SCA is home to species of great importance to conservation,
both globally and regionally. Species such as the flamingo, the manatee (endangered), the
queen conch, migratory birds, iguanas, snails belonging to the Cerion and Ligus genera, the
Antilles crocodile, and dolphins, may be seriously threatened by expanding economic
activities.
The Sabana-Camagiiey Archipelago appears to be very important in the biogeographic
processes related to biological diversity in the northern Greater Caribbean and therefore in
conservation and sustainable use of regionally shared natural resources. Migratory marine
species, (turtles, sharks, beak fish, tuna) and numerous metapopulations of reef and
seagrass species are shared with both the United States and The Bahamas (and possibly
Bermuda).
Evidence also points to the SCE as a propagule source for the Greater Caribbean region.
From 1991 to 1997, drift cards launched from the north of the Sabana-Camagtiey
Archipelago (Baha-
mas Channel) reached eastern Florida (23% of the cards) and other coasts of eastern USA and
Bahamas. Others were recovered in Bermuda with 0.8% in southern Jamaica. At the same time,
it has been demonstrated that the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary imports larvae of species 1 to 2
months into their larval phase from a wide area of the Sabana-Camagiiey Archipelago (from
Cdrdenas Bay to Cayo Coco) and from other areas of western Cuba. (Roberts, 1997)

2. Strategy of the country

Policies, legislation and institutions
In 1994, as a result of increasing awareness of the crucial importance of the environmental
dimensions of economic development and sustainability, Cuba created the Ministry of Science,
Technology and Environment (CITMA) with its Environment Agency, the Environment Units in
CITMA's Provincial Delegations, the National Centre for Protected Areas, the Environment
Management and Auditing Centre, and the Environmental Information, Dissemination and
Education Centre (CIDEA). Just before, the National Centre of Biodiversity (belonging to the
Institute of Ecology and Systematics) was created.
To incorporate the environmental dimension into the country's development, considerable sup-
portive or enabling legislation has been formulated and approved: the Law on the Environment
(July 1997); the Resolution on Environmental Impact Assessment, and Resolution 168/95 "Rules
for the Realization and Approval of Environmental Impact Assessments " (October 1995); the
Law on the Tax System (October 1994) introducing taxes to be levied on use or exploitation of
natural resources, and for use in environmental protection; the Resolution on Inspection by
Government of the Environment and Toxic Chemical Products (1995) and the creation of
CITMA's Environmental State Inspection Body; the Law on Foreign Investment highlighting the
principle of sustainable development and addressing environment protection in the process of
foreign investment; the Decree-Law 164 "Rules for Fisheries "(May 1996) and the creation of
the Inspection Body of the Ministry of Fisheries; and Resolution 111/96: Regulations on
Biological Diversity (1996). Currently, the Law on Soil Use, Territorial Ordering and Urbanism,
the Decree-Law on Protected Areas, and the Decree-Law on Management of the Coastal Zone
are under discussion and pending approval. Finally, Cuba is currently preparing a National
Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (UNEP-GEF), in which the protection of the SCE and
especially the SCA are emphasised.
Cuba participated in the United Nations Conference on the Environment held in Rio de Janeiro,
signed Agenda 21 and has signed and ratified both Global Conventions (CBD, UNFCCC). Cuba
also participated in the World Conference on Sustainable Development of Small Island States,
and is a signatory and active member of an important number of international and regional agree-
ments, conventions, and protocols relating to the environment, (Convention on International
Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora-CITES, Basel Convention on the Control
of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal, MARPOL, CEPOL,
SPAW, Protocol of Kyoto, etc.). In 1994, Cuba developed a National Program for Environment
and Development as a national Agenda 21, which became the National Environmental Strategy
in 1996.
Environmental management and conservation of biodiversity
Current basic activities undertaken by the Cuban Government include hydrographic basin man-
agement plans in areas with ecosystems and species of global significance (e.g., Turquino-
Manati Plan, Commission for Hydrographic Basin Management, among others), and pollution
reduction in key biodiversity areas of the SCE. At the same time, Cuba has developed a globally
important National Program Manatee Protection to be implemented within the framework of the
protected area system identified under the initial, pilot project and to be implemented under the
project proposed here.

In the mid-1980s, due to its natural, archaeological, cultural and scientific value, the Ministry of
Science, Technology and Environment (CITMA) - the former Cuban Academy of Sciences - des-
ignated the SCA as a high priority area for biodiversity conservation. The Government has pro-
posed much of the central part of this ecosystem as a Biosphere Reserve. This reserve will be in-
tegrated into the broader system of protected areas proposed by the initial pilot project.
In addition, in collaboration with the Institute of Ecology of Jalapa, Veracruz, Cuba is preparing
a Coastal Biodiversity Atlas financed by Science and Technology for Development (CYTED),
participates in the UNESCO project "Mangrove Recovery in Selected Areas of the Cuban
Archipelago " , a n d i s also taking part in the regional Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity
project (CARICOMP) funded by UNESCO and UNEP.
Other relevant activities include the construction and operationalization of the Coastal
Ecosystem Research Centre in Cayo Coco, and construction of infrastructure for mitigation of
marine environmental degradation.

In 1992, the Global Environment Facility, during its Pilot Phase, authorized US$ 2.0 million in
financing to assist Cuba in an initial pilot project entitled Protecting Biodiversity and
Establishing Sustainable Development in the Sabana-Camagüey Ecosystem. This project formed
the first part of a planned three-phase process to ensure the conservation of biodiversity in the
context of sustainable development in the ESC. The initial phase of the project ended in 1997
and was subject to an independent evaluation (Avilable on request from UNDP-GEF, New
York). This evaluation assessed the accomplishments of the project against the objectives of the
Project Document, as well as against the defining features of coastal zone management initiatives
as described by The Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental
Protection (GESAMP; Olsen et al. 1997).

3. Previous assistance received by the country
The projects related to the biodiversity subsector executed in Cuba by means of international
technical assistance are:

• Protecting biodiversity and establishing a sustainable development in the Sabana-Camagüey
   Ecosystem (UNDP/GEF)
• Country Study on Biological Diversity (UNEP) •
National Strategy of Biodiversity (UNEP)
• Atlas of coastal biodiversity, in collaboration with the Inst. of Ecology of Jalapa (CYTED) •
Mangrove swamps recovery in selected areas of the Cuban Archipelago (UNESCO)
• Regional project CARICOMP (UNESCO/UNEP).
4. Institutional framework of the subsector

In 1975, the new Constitution of the Republic of Cuba recognized the need to protect the envi-
ronment, and in 1977 it was created the National Commission for the Protection of Environment
and the Natural Resources (COMARNA). All the central institutions were members of that insti-
tution and all the provinces and municipalities were represented in the then Academy of Sciences
of Cuba and in COMARNA. Within COMARNA, the technical specialists, scientists and envi-
ronmental agents coordinated and integrated the work of several sectors to decide in an environ-
mentally responsible way. Also, it was in charge of all the aspects related to international pro-
grams, agreements, conventions, protocols and treaties regarding environment.
In 1994, there was a deep restructuring of the state apparatus in search of more functional effi-
ciency, and in the environmental arena, the functions of COMARNA and the Academy of Sci-
ences were absorbed by the new Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment (CITMA).
COMARNA disappeared as such, but not its functions: they were strengthened and perfected in
the new institutional structure. The name of the Academy of Sciences of Cuba is assumed, as
originally, by a new organization of members selected among outstanding scientists to assist pol-
icy problems and scientific guidance of the country, and to stimulate and reward excellent scien-
tific works, among other functions.
CITMA acts as rector of the scientific, technical and environmental policy. Within the environ-
mental branch, its operative function is executed through the new Environmental Agency, which
is in turn integrated by the Center of Environmental Inspection and Control (CICA), the National
Protected Area Center (CNAP), the Center of Environmental Information, Management and
Education (CIGEA), and several scientific institutes (that belonged to the Academy of Sciences
of Cuba before), such as the Institute of Ecology and Systematic, Institute of Oceanology,
Institute of Tropical Geography, Institute of Meteorology, and the Coastal Ecosystems Research
Center. The National Zoological Park, the National Aquarium, and the National Museum of
Natural History also belong to the Environmental Agency. This Ministry maintains its
representation at the level of provincies in the Provincial Delegations of CITMA (DPCITMA)
whose activity related to environment is carried out by the Environmental Units (UMA) in each
province.
The mentioned institutions under CITMA, together with other institutions and scientific and
technical dependencies from the Ministry of the Revolutionary Armed Forces, Ministry of the
Fishery Industry, Ministry of the Basic Industry, Ministry of Economy and Planning, Ministry of
Education, Ministry of Higher Education, Ministry of the Construction, Ministry of the Industry
of Construction Materials, Ministry of Tourism, etc., have worked jointly in integral studies and
projects of the SCE, the recently concluded first stage of the project of reference
CUB/92/G31being the
last carried out. These and other institutions and ministries (Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of
Sugar Industry, National Institute of Hydraulic Resources, etc.) will participate in the present
project because they play an important role in the implementation of the integrated coastal zone
management in the SCE.

Cuba is maintaining a sustained trend towards refining the decision making process regarding
land use and physical planning as well as environmental issues in development at policy level.
This can be seen in the expeditious strengthening of the institutional framework and legal
system, and the increased awareness, experience and know-how of Government. The Institute of
Physical Planning (of the Ministry of Economics and Planning) is the governing agency for
physical planning and regulation of land use and its work is closely co-ordinated with CITMA
concerning environmental issues. As it has the necessary logistical, technical and human
resources, the Ministry of Fisheries also plays an important role in environmental management
and is supported by the new Decree-Law 164 Rules for Fisheries and its body of fishery
inspectors.
In spite of being a developing country, Cuba possesses the human resources required to carry out
researches and the biodiversity protection program by means of the integrated management of
coastal ecosystems, proposed in this project, as it has been demonstrated with the highly success-
ful execution of the reference or associate project CUB/92/G31. This is determined by more than
one century of scientific tradition of the country, and by the great emphasis and investment of
resources of the Government in education and scientific development of the country. Therefore,
Cuba occupies an advanced and privileged position to take the project to an end. The community
of scientists that work on the aspects of biodiversity and environmental management at present
includes internationally well-known specialists in their respective disciplines. Also, the country
possesses herbaria, botanical gardens, natural history museums, and scientific libraries that were
founded more than 150 years ago. The suitability of the scientific personnel of the country has
been emphasized by the group of appraisers in charge by the GEF for the final evaluation of the
Project of reference CUB/92/G31 (Olsen et al., 1997).

B. JUSTIFICATION OF THE PROJECT
1. Problems to approach, the present situation
The problems and threats to be approached were identified by the pilot project CUB/92/G31. The
main current and potential threats identified for the SCA are summarized next:
• 31 % of Cuba's sugar cane production takes place in the watersheds of the main island oppo-
    site the keys, accounting for localised pollution at river mouths. While locally more serious,
    this pollution has not constituted a serious threat to the keys to date due to the wide marine
    expanse separating them from the main island. Other potential sources of pollution include a
    number of rice plantations, and the tilapia culture ponds in Morón and near the Mdximo
    River which discharge nutrients into the sea. All these threats to sustainable development
    and biodiversity are currently receiving special attention from the Cuban Government
    through actions including institutional and legal strengthening, establishment of authorities
    for watershed
management, implementation of inventories and audits of pollution sources, investments in
waste treatment, etc.

•   SCA has been a traditional fishery area where some resources have suffered
    overexploitation, and certain fishery areas have been deteriorated due to noxious fishing
    practices. Up to the present, there are no marine protected areas that contribute to the
    recovery and maintenance of fishery resources of the region.

•   The SCA is presently the focus of an expanding, large-scale tourism development program.
    The development of "sun and sand" tourism requires basic environmental measures such as
    preservation of water quality, adequate waste treatment, appropriate design measures regard
    ing infrastructure and location, etc. Biodiversity protection has not yet been a significant
    factor in tourism development planning. Human exploitation of the SCR's keys to date has
    been very limited and is restricted mainly to more conventional tourism development on
     Coco and Guillermo keys. Currently planned tourism must be developed in an ecologically
     responsible manner, compatible with biodiversity conservation. Otherwise, planned
     infrastructure and activities will pose a serious threat to the flora, fauna, habitats and
     landscapes of the SCA.

2. Expected situation at the end of the project

The expected situation at the end of this project is the following:
1. Eight key priority protected areas will be established for conservation, demonstration and po-
   tential replication. These areas have been selected as a result of studies carried out during the
   pilot phase of the project, and their management reflects the implementation of the conserva-
   tion priorities identified in the Strategic Plan of the SCE. Protected areas will be legally estab-
   lished, their management plans will be designed and implemented, visitors centers will be cre-
   ated, information will be printed for its distribution, interpretive talks will be established, park
   personnel will be qualified in biodiversity planning and management, and minimum scientific
   and logistical equipment will be provided to assure the monitoring and feedback for planning
   and management functions. It should be pointed out that the SCA has been mostly
   uninhabited and that its resources have been very little used by the inhabitants from the main
   island.
2. Institutional capacities will have been consolidated and coordinated for an integrated longterm
     sustained management. There will exist a Integrated Coastal Management Authority
     (Autoridad para el Manejo Integrado Costero - AMIC) of the SCE. This will imply formal
     structuring not only institutional but also inter-institutional, personnel's relevant training and
     acquisition of the minimum equipment necessary for integrated coastal management. At the
     end of the project the AMIC of the SCE will be formalized and implemented. As a result,
     the prevalent sectoral focus regarding biodiversity management will have been eliminated,
     as well as the lack of coordination and integration in decision making, and there will be an
     authority responsible for coastal management. During the pilot phase, the project was very
     successful in the achievement of an inter-sector and inter-institutional coordination to solve
     the issues or specific problems as they were identified, although as such, it could be
     characterized as more
or less ad hoc. The objective of this activity is to be based on this experience to formalize and
structure successful coordination agreements among the sectoral institutions. For that purpose,
inventories and quick ecological assessments will be being carried out in areas that contain
biodiversity of global significance, prioritized for the need of protection or the existing threats.
Relevant training and the necessary minimum equipment will have been received for the actions
scheduled; and biodiversity management based on relevant scientific informations will avoid that
decisions are made without considering the biodiversity of global significance.
3.   The classification and detailed planning in prioritized areas incorporating the conservation
     and biodiversity protection approaches will have been carried out. Taking into consideration
     the emphasis placed during the first phase of the project on physical planning as a
     fundamental way to achieve biodiversity conservation in the archipelago. The follow-up
     actions in this context will include training of the personnel involved and supply of the
     minimum equipment necessary. Contrarily to the wide classification of the ecosystem that
     was carried out in the pilot phase, this project will carry out the classification to a reduced
     scale with the objective of offering a more precise information for planning at local level in
     the areas with high biodiversity.

4.       There will exist a network of small stations for biodiversity monitoring. Workshops will
be carried out to train the personnel and analyze periodically the results of the monitoring state
and tendencies that affect the biodiversity of global significance, and their answers to man-
agement actions and factors of environmental stress. The minimum scientific and logistical
equipment will have been provided. This approach will allow an adaptive management by means
of the incorporation of the feedback coming from the results of monitoring of the effects of the
actions and stress factors on biodiversity.
5.       The application of the principles of resource economy will have begun for biodiversity
conservation and management. It will have implied the training of personnel, four case studies
with the corresponding workshops, and minimum equipment. This will allow to include the costs
of environmental variables and biodiversity conservation in the plans and development programs
and it will avoid that the benefits coming from mechanisms and economic incentives are wasted.
Although during the pilot phase some trainings were carried out successfully on resource
economy, this project will apply the principles/practices of resource economy in the mentioned
case studies, to learn through practice, with the objective of improving the technical capacity and
keeping updated the policy directed to optimize the monetary revenues for individual protected
areas and the system as a whole.
6. Education and awareness will have advanced as for biodiversity conservation. This includes
     the design and introduction of provincial educational policies on biodiversity; workshops
     and seminars to sensitize decision-makers and the different economic and community
     sectors that affect biodiversity; production of didactic materials, promotion of the values of
     biodiversity through the mass media; collaboration with different educational levels;
     workshops, conferences, chats, seminars and events that promote the protection of
     biodiversity of global significance, activities of popular participation; and systematic
     evaluation of the population's perception on biodiversity, environment, and sustainable
     development. This way, the project will incorporate the principles and values of biodiversity
     in the environmental education and the
curricula and activities oriented toward sustainable development that are planned or implemented
on the part of the Government of Cuba. Although during the pilot phase the general sensitization
and educational activities were increased successfully, this project will adopt a more systematic
focus based on the experience to incorporate the elements of biodiversity in the objectives,
programs and standard educational activities.
7.   A great global benefit will also be obtained with the conservation of valuable biodiversity
     resources of the SCE.

3. Beneficiaries

The country will be favored by the most systematic and rigorous implementation of the
integrated coastal zone management for biodiversity protection, by means of the co-management
modality. The creation of the Integrated coastal Management Authority of the SCE, of eight
protected areas, the network of monitoring and management laboratories, among other actions,
will undoubtedly have a transcending effect in the capacity of CITMA and the country in general
for biodiversity protection and the establishment of sustainable development.
CITMA and other national and local scientific-technical institutions will increase their capacity
to carry out scientific researches relevant to biodiversity management and monitoring, by means
of the training and equipment that they will receive. Also, it will increase their capacity to
approach biodiversity issue and environment of the region, with more effective knowledge and
tools.
The National Protected Area Center (CNAP), the National Enterprise for the Protection of Flora
and Fauna, and the Provincial Delegations of CITMA will have benefitted from the starting of
establishment and operation of a vast protected area system in the SCE that includes marine
areas for the first time, in an official way. There will be a properly prepared personnel for the
management of this areas. This management will be executed on scientific bases and a
monitoring that will facilitate quick answers before management issues that so require.
The National Institute of Physical Planning (IPF) and the Ministry of Construction (MICONS),
among other related organizations will be benefitted because they will be able to continue the up-
ward rhythm of incorporation of planning and design approaches and techniques that include
biodiversity and environmental economy, as well as eco-technologies and constructive methods
of low impact in the development planning.
The communities of the SCE that work inside the mentioned economic sectors based on the
biodiversity values of SCA (Ministry of Tourism and tourist companies, as well as Ministry of
the Fishery Industry) will be benefitted by a bigger stability and durability of the resources, for
an increased environmental quality and for a greater environmental sensibility in their acting.
They will also have a greater participation in the decisionmaking process thanks to the
implementation of co-management. This will elevate the ethical self-esteem of population when
feeling authors of the biodiversity protection and sustainable development of their country.
 The rest of the country and the Caribbean nations will be able to benefit with the application of


                                                1
                                                0
the positive experiences and shared information from this GEF project.

4. Strategies of the project and institutional arrangements

The strategy for biodiversity conservation and sustainable development of the SCE, developed in
the initial pilot phase of the project, will be implemented with the broad participation of a wide
variety of stakeholders. These include the sectors, disciplines, institutions and territories found in
or belonging to the SCE. Among the main stakeholders involved in designing the current
proposal are the institutions of several ministries, local and provincial administrations and non-
governmental organizations, including fishermen, construction workers, tourism, hotels, etc. The
strategy for the SCE was formulated in numerous workshops and meetings using participatory,
consensus building methods for problem analysis and identification of solutions and priorities.
The project proposed here will initiate implementation of the strategic plan for biodiversity pro-
tection and sustainable development of the Sabana-Camagüey Ecosystem, as drafted in the initial
pilot project. As previously stated, this strategy will be implemented with the aim of achieving
integrated management of coastal ecosystems with interdisciplinary, multisectoral, and transterri-
torial participation as well as local community participation. Cuba currently possesses a variety
of mechanisms for consultation and popular participation (Account Rendering Assemblies of
Local Government), mass organizations (Technical Brigades of Working Youths, Cuban
Pioneers' Union, Junior-School Students' Federation, Committees for the Defence of the
Revolution, Cuban Women's Federation, University Students' Federation, etc.) and non-
governmental organizations (National Union of Cuban Architects and Engineers, Pro Naturaleza,
Cuban Botanical Organisation, Cuban Zoological Society) that make it possible to guarantee
broad community participation regarding environmental issues.

The Steering Committee-composed of representatives of the different sectors and disciplines
relevant to the objectives of the project in SCA- will be integrated within the Integrated Coastal
Management Authority of the SCE that will be formalized and implemented officially during the
execution of the present project. The Steering Committee will have an important role within the
AMIC of the SCE to assure that appropriate environmental regulations are established and that
they are formulated so that economic development initiatives are appropriately evaluated by the
AMIC, as it is established by the legislation in force and in phase of approval. As a result of the
initial pilot project, there already exist the relevant strategy, structure and institutional
infrastructure so that the Steering Committee can successfully continue the execution of its
responsibilities, based on the pilot phase's experiences with the objective of implementing the
project activities in an effective and efficient way. The Committee will meet periodically and
promote the inter-sectoral integration and coordination.
The National Protected Area Center of CITMA, together with the National Enterprise for the
Protection of Flora and Fauna of the Ministry of the Agriculture, and with the support of the Pro-
vincial Delegations of CITMA and the organizations of People's Power of the Provinces and Mu-
nicipalities involved will have the mission of the gradual implementation of the vast Protected
Area System in SCA (Special Region for Sustainable Development that includes protected areas
of different use categories and protection). The Environmental Units of CITMA will play an im-
portant and direct role in each one of the provinces.
The Institute of Physical Planning, of the Ministry of Economics and Planning, and its Provincial
Directorates of Physical Planning will participate with other relevant institutions of the project to
establish a clear delineation between the areas to be protected and the areas prioritised for devel-
opment. It will also continue conceptual strategic environmental planning for other important
keys where biodiversity may be seriously damaged by tourism development, should adequate
territorial ordering be overlooked. These keys are mainly Pared6n Grande, Las Brujas,
Ensenachos, Cruz and Esquivel.

Environment monitoring of the broader SCE will be carried out through a network of small Envi-
ronment Monitoring Stations to be created in the provinces to implement this project. CITMA
will be responsible for the implementation of this network through its Provincial Delegations and
with the support of the Popular Power bodies (local government) in the relevant provinces and
municipalities. CITMA's Environment Units will play an important and direct role in this.
CITMA's Environment Units together with the National Center for Protected Areas, the National
Center of Biodiversity and the National Enterprise for Flora and Fauna Protection (Ministry of
Agriculture) together with the participation of other relevant institutions, (Fisheries Ministry, Na-
tional Institute of Hydraulic Resources, Ministry of Sugar, Ministry of Construction, Ministry of
Tourism, etc.), will lead the operational planning for environmental rehabilitation and recovery
actions (affected species, habitats and landscapes identified by the pilot project). This will
involve measures to control organic loading and pollution, regulate dams and reservoirs,
construct culverts and bridges in marine roads (bermroads), reintroduce species, monitor and
protect threatened species populations, as well as carry out environmental education, research,
monitoring, etc.

1. Reason for the assistance of UNDP as Executing Agency

The assistance of UNDP is requested because it is a non-profitable, multilateral, neutral organi-
zation of assistance for development. The content of this Project is included within the objectives
defined for UNDP in the cooperation records with the Government of Cuba in the envi-
ronmental sector. Also, UNDP has the biodiversity sector among its prioritized lines of activity.
UNDP can count on the political will of the Government of Cuba, shown by means of the recog-
nition of the importance of preserving its rich biodiversity patrimony, and the ratification, in
March, 1994, of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Cuba has also developed the National
Environmental Strategy (1996) as part of its national application of Agenda 21. This strategy
identifies several problems related to environmental management that constitute a pre-requisite
for biodiversity protection in Cuba, such as the control and planning of marine pollution in the
fragile insular area of the keys. A series of regulations and decrees offer support to the
environmental strategy. Cuba is also preparing a National Biodiversity Strategy and an Action
Plan, with the support of UNEP, where Sabana-Camagüey Ecosystem (SCE) in general, and the
SabanaCamagüey Archipelago (SCA) in particular, have been identified as priorities for
conservation.



                                                12
6. Special considerations

The project is oriented to the protection of biodiversity in Cuba, of notably high level and of
great regional connotation in the north of the Great Caribbean, in an area where great tourist
development is planned, and where other activities such as fishing and sugar industry, and
agriculture in general, make necessary the search for the protection of biodiversity and the
ecological sustainability.

Keeping in mind:

-    the national efforts that have been carried out in the field of environmental conservation and
     the sustainable use of natural resources;
-    the scientific-technical level of our country;

-    the richness of biological diversity values in the region, of importance for the Great Carib-
     bean;
-    the high fragility of the ecosystems given by their insular condition;

-    the commitments acquired by Cuba in the Agreements of Rio de Janeiro (signed and
     ratified), the Action Program for Sustainable Development of Small Insular Developing
     States, approved in the Conference of Barbados;
    - the great and well known success of the stage of the project that is ending (CUB/92/G31);
-    that Cuba has signed and ratified the Convention on Biological Diversity; and others previ-
     ously mentioned, amid the great economic difficulties that we face; and
- the wide participation of women in the society (more than 50% of the project personnel is
     feminine),
we consider that there exist elements that fully justify the eligibility of the Republic of Cuba to
undertake the project that intends to execute. A guarantee of great significance in favor of the eli-
gibility of Cuba to carry out this project is the excellent qualification received in the final evalua-
tion of the project of reference CUB/92/G31 by the inspectors of GEF (Olsen et al., 1997). It is
also necessary to keep in mind the potential of technical cooperation for the replication of the
project experiences in other developing countries.
This project is conceived in general as the phases 3 (formal adoption and financing) and 4 (im-
plementation of programs) of the cycle of Integrated Coastal Management of GESAMP (1996),
having corresponded the first stage to the phases 1 (identification and evaluation of problems and
opportunities) and 2 (elaboration of programs).
The protection of biodiversity of regional and global importance present in the SCE will be
possible when assuring the incorporation of the principles and practices of biodiversity
conservation in the current and planned programs and projects of sustainable development, by
means of the coordinated implementation of sustainable development and the incremental
activities in the area of greater biodiversity of global significance- the SCA. The alternative
action course is based on the products and experiences obtained in the pilot phase as well as in
the recommendation and discoveries of the independent evaluation, and it is guided by the
priorities and interests of the Strategic Plan.



                                                 13
The project uses the approach of incremental costs to obtain additional benefits for global biodi-
versity apart from those that are derived from the existing and planned national efforts. The proj-
ect also uses additional resources coming from the Government of Cuba, Capacity 21 and other
donors. Cuba is aware of the importance of the biodiversity under its management, but it can not
finance its protection in the required way by means of its own limited resources. For this reason,
it is needed of the support of GET to elevate to the maximum the benefits for biodiversity that
will be obtained from this significant conservation initiative in Cuba.

7. Coordination Arrangements
For the integrated coastal management and the implementation of the biodiversity protection
strategy, the coordination and integration among the participant institutions are essential
elements. CITMA will direct the research , monitoring and management activities at national
level and will be responsible for the coordination and integration of the activities of the research
centers and national economy entities (private companies, ministries, universities, etc.).
The activities of the GEF project will be executed by a group of institutions under the direction
of CITMA, coordinated by a Cuban Steering Committee and later on, once formalized and
implemented, by the Integrated Coastal Management Authority of the SCE. The participant
institutions or collaborators are:
1.   Institute of Oceanology (IDO), CITMA

2. Institute of Ecology and Systematics (IES),
CITMA 3. Coastal Ecosystems Research Center
(CIEC), CITMA 4. Institute of Tropical Geography
(IGEO), CITMA
5. Institute of Meteorology (INSMET), CITMA

6. National Protected Area Center (CNAP), CITMA

7. Center for Environmental Inspection and Control (CICA), CITMA

8. Center for Environmental Information, Management and Education (CIGEA),
CITMA 9. Direction of Environmental Policy of CITMA
10. National Aquarium of Cuba (ANC), CITMA

11. Environmental Unit (UMA) of Matanzas, Provincial Delegation of CITMA
12. Environmental Unit (UMA) of Villa Clara, Provincial Delegation of CITMA
13. Environmental Unit (UMA) of Sancti Spiritu, Provincial Delegation of
CITMA 14. Environmental Unit (UMA) of Ciego de Avila, Provincial Delegation
of CITMA 15. Environmental Unit (UMA) of Camagdey, Provincial Delegation
of CITMA
16. GeoCuba, MINFAR

17. Institute of Geology and Paleontology (IGP),
MINBAS 18. Institute of Forestry Investigations
(1117), MINAGRI
19. National Enterprise for the Protection of Flora and Fauna (ENPFF),
MINAGRI 20. Center of Fishery Investigations (CIP), MIP
21. Faculty of Economy of the University of the
Havana 22. Institute of Physical Planning (IPF), MEP
23. Higher Polytechnical Institute "José Antonio Echevarria" (ISPJAE),
MES 24. Provincial Delegation of Physical Planning (DPPF) of Matanzas,
MEP 25. Provincial Delegation of Physical Planning (DPPF) of Villa
Clara, MEP


                                             14
26. Provincial Delegation of Physical Planning (DPPF) of Sancti Spiritu, MEP 27. Provincial
Delegation of Physical Planning (DPPF) of Ciego de Avila, MEP 28. Provincial Delegation of
Physical Planning (DPPF) of Camagiiey, MEP 29. National Institute of Hydraulic Resources
(INRH)
30. Higher Pedagogical Institute of Matanzas, MINED 31. Higher
Pedagogical Institute of Villa Clara, MINED 32. Higher Pedagogical
Institute of Sancti Spiritu, MINED 33. Higher Pedagogical Institute of
Ciego de Avila, MINED 34. Higher Pedagogical Institute of Camagüey,
MINED 35. Ministry of Construction (MICONS)
36. Ministry of the Industry of Construction Materials (MIMC) 37. Ministry of
the Sugar Industry (MINAZ)
38. Ministry of Tourism (MINTUR) 39.
Corporation "Gaviota"
40. Corporation "Cubanacdn" 41. Corporation
"Horizontes" 42. Agency "Rumbos"
43. National Union of Architects and Engineers of Cuba (UNAIC)
Other Cuban institutions could participate or collaborate in the project if necessary.

8. Support Capacity of counterparts

The personnel's training and experience level of the relevant institutions and agencies is gener-
ally high and the project CUB/92/G31has partly contributed to it. Cuban specialists (scientists,
engineers, architects, etc.) are well qualified and familiarized with the last theories and method-
ologies in their respective disciplines. If they had the appropriate technical assistance, they can
undertake research and monitoring programs, integrated coastal management, protected area
management and environmental planning, undoubtedly at the level of international standards.
However, they need consultancies in certain specialized areas, as well as in other areas where a
constant updating would be necessary, in spite of the existence of a good knowledge, due to our
great economic restrictions. Also, there is the infrastructure that facilitates in great measure the
execution of the relevant professional activities, as well as capacity to undertake the amplifica-
tion of this infrastructure according to the needs of the monitoring (environmental monitoring
stations, at present in process of assignment and remodeling) and of the protected area system to
be implemented (interpretive centers, administrative and control facilities, minimum services,
etc.). The Coastal Ecosystems Research Center, quite well equipped, with some additional fi-
nancing, will facilitate many of the actions of this GEF project and will be the coordination
center of the monitoring of the environmental monitoring stations that will be implemented,
among other possible functions that are to be determine within the context of SCE integrated
management.
The National Protected Area Center, the Center for Environmental Inspection and Control, the
Center for Environmental Information. Manai2ement and Education_ and the Environmental (nro-
vincial) Units, all from the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment, recently created,
constitute a decisive environmental institutional strengthening in the country that guarantees the
success of the execution of the urgent and ambitious objectives of this project, just as it happened
with the project CUB/92/G31.

All the ministries involved in this project have training conditions and the necessary minimum
infrastructure to begin the present project, as counterparts of international high level specialists.

C. DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE
The general development objective of the Project is to assure the conservation of valuable marine
and terrestrial biodiversity of Sabana-Camagüey Ecosystem (SCE) and in particular of the
Sabana-Camagüey Archipelago (SCA), north of Cuba.
The project is included in the framework of action of GEF Operative Program of Coastal, Marine
and Freshwater Ecosystems. This project is also inside the priorities established by the Conven-
tion on Biological Diversity in Article 8, and particularly in Annex 1.
D. IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVES, RESULTS AND ACTIVITIES

Immediate objective 1
 1. Establish eight key protected areas for conservation, demonstration and potential replication.

Success Approaches
Existence of 8 protected areas approved by the Government, in areas of biodiversity of global
significance, with their management plans.
Minimum infrastructure and equipment necessary for the monitoring and feedback required for
the functions of protected area planning and management.
Greater sensitization and participation of the communities and actors in the matters related to
biodiversity conservation.
Qualified personnel linked to the protected areas for their successful management.

Result 1.1

1.1 Eight protected areas implemented and legally established, functioning with their
management plans.
Activities of the result 1.1                              Responsible parties




                                                 1
                                                 6
1.1.1 Elaboration of proposals and presentation to    Ministry of Science, Technology and
Enthe Government                                      vironment, National Protected Area
Center, Provincial Delegations of CITMA and Local Organizations of the People's Power

1.1.2 Elaboration of management plans                    Management of Protected Areas
1.1.3 Construction or assignment of the infra-           Protected Area Management and
       Project structure (visitors' centers, management and
       observation facilities, interpretive trails,
       signaling and mooring buoys, etc.) and
       minimum scientific and logistical
       equipment to ensure the monitoring and
       feedback for the protected area planning
       and management functions
1.1.4 Establishment of the personnel payroll for the       Protected Área Management protected
       areas (park rangers, scientific
       technical, management, and service
       personnel)

 1.1.5 Training of the personnel of the protected         Direction of the Project, National Pro

       areas (scholarships, training on protected ar-     tected Area Center, Protected Area
       Maneas, study tours, events, consultancies, etc.) agement and Provincial Delegations of
       CITMA
         1.1.6 Functioning of protected areas (surveillance         Protected Area Management,
                                                                                      Provincial

      and control; elimination of exotic species;               Delegation of CITMA, National
                                                                                    Protected

  rescue of endemic and endangered species                  Area Center, National Enterprise for
                                                                                             the

       or those of global significance, rehabilitation   Protection of Flora and Fauna, Park
       Rangof valuable areas; interpretive services,     ers Bodies, and others breeding farms
       ex situ, etc.)

Result 1.2

1.2 Distributed information on the SCA biodiversity and on its importance and need of
    protection in the eight protected areas.
Activities of the result 1.2                             Responsible parties
1.2.1 Elaboration of posters, brochures and leaf-         Provincial Delegations of CITMA, Na

       lets on local biodiversity and related topics     tional Protected Area Center, National
                                                         Enterprise for the Protection of Flora
                                                         and Fauna, Center for Environmental
                                                         Information, Management and
                                                         Education, and Direction of the
                                                         Project


                                                  1
                                                  7
1.2.2 Participation in local radio and TV pro-            Provincial Delegations of CITMA, Na

grams, as well as utilization of the press and            tional Protected Area Center, National

      other media to promote topics relevant to          Enterprise for the Protection of Flora
      and protected areas                                Fauna and Center for Environmental
      Information, Management and Education
1.2.3 Interpretive talks                                  Provincial Delegations of CITMA, Na-
                                                          tional Protected Area Center, National
                                                          Enterprise for the Protection of Flora
                                                          and Fauna and Center for
                                                          Environmental Information,
                                                          Management and Education
Result 1.3

1.3 Dissemination and exchange of protected area management experiences.
Activities of the result 1.3                           Responsible parties
1.3.1 Workshops to exchange experiences and               Provincial Delegations of CITMA,
Namethodological discussions                              tional Protected Area Center and
National Enterprise for the Protection of Flora and Fauna


Immediate objective 2

2. Consolidate the institutional coordination capacities for an integrated, sustained and long term
   coastal management in aspects related to biodiversity conservation).

Success Approaches
The prevalent sectoral focus will have been eliminated for biodiversity management and the lack
of coordination and integration in the decisionmaking and there will be a single legal authority
responsible for coastal management.
Capacity to generate successful coordination agreements among sectoral institutions with very
defined procedures for decisionmaking and the communication channels.
Biodiversity management based on relevant scientific information will avoid to take decisions
without considering the biodiversity of global significance.
Flexible adaptation of management, planning and zonation to the requirements of conservation
of high biodiversity values of global significance.
   Zonation and planning compatible with the conservation requirements of the biodiversity of
                                               global


                                                 18
significance.
Adaptable management by means of the incorporation of feedback coming from the results of
monitoring the effects of the actions and the stress factors on biodiversity.
Physical existence of the biodiversity monitoring stations.
Inclusion of the costs of environmental variables and biodiversity conservation in the
development plans and programs, avoiding that the benefits coming from mechanisms in
particular and economic incentives are wasted.

Personnel qualified in the necessary disciplines for biodiversity management.
Result 2.1

2.1 Integrated Coastal Management Authority (AMIC) of the SCE, formalized and in operation.

Activities of the result 2.1                               Responsible parties
 2.1.1 Multisectoral participative discussion of the         Ministry of Science, Technology and
                                                                                              En

   proposal for structure, functions, attribu-                 vironment, Environmental Agency,
                                                                                            and

       tions, and subordination of the Integrated      Provincial Delegations of CITMA,
       EnviCoastal Management Authority                ronmental Units, Direction of
       Environmental Policy of CITMA, Direction of the Project and Legal Advisor of CITMA
 2.1.2 Presentation of the AMIC proposal to the              Ministry of Science, Technology and
                                                                                              En

       Government for its approval                         vironment
2.1.3 Acquisition of the minimum equipment nec-            Direction of the Project essary for the
       Integrated Coastal Manage
       ment

 2.1.4 Relevant training of the personnel related to       Direction of the Project the Integrated
       Coastal Management in as
       pects related to biodiversity
2.1.5 Implementation of the AMIC                           Environmental Agency, Direction of
                                                           Environmental Policy of CITMA,
                                                           Provincial Delegations of CITMA and
                                                           Direction of the Project
Result 2.2
2.2.1 Inventories and quick ecological assessments implemented in areas that contain
      biodiversity of global significance, prioritized because of the protection needs or for the
      existing threats.



                                                 1
                                                 9

Activities of the result 2.2                               Responsible parties
2.2.1 Relevant training in specialized inventories         Direction of the project
      and quick ecological assessments
2.2.2 Minimum equipment necessary for the ac-              Direction of the project
       tions of inventories and quick ecological as
       sessments
2.2.3 Assessment of the health status of coral             Institute of Oceanology, Coastal Ecosys
       reefs.                                              tem Research Center and Monitoring Sta
                                                           tions.
2.2.4 Assessment of the health status of man-              Institute of Ecology and Systematics,
       grove swamps.                                       Coastal Ecosystem Research Center, In
                                                           stitute of Forestry Researches of the Min
                                                           istry of Agriculture, Terrestrial Ecosystem
                                                           Research Center and Monitoring Stations.
2.2.5 Assessment of the health status of seagrass          Institute of Oceanology, Coastal Ecosys
       beds.                                               tem Research Center, Center for Coastal
                                                           and Environmental Studies and Monitor
                                                           ing Stations
2.2.6 Inventory of marine and terrestrial species          Institute of Oceanology, Institute of Écol
       in protected areas.                                 ogy and Systematics, Coastal Ecosystem
                                                           Research Center, Center for Coastal and
                                                           Environmental Studies, Terrestrial Eco
                                                           system Research Center, National Aquar
                                                           ium and Monitoring Stations.
2.2.7 Inventory and mapping of marine and ter-             Institute of Ecology and Systematics, In
       restrial ecosystems in protected areas.             stitute of Oceanology, Coastal Ecosystem
                                                           Research Center, National Protected Area
                                                            Center, Center for Coastal and Environ
                                                           mental Studies, Terrestrial Ecosystem
                                                           Research Center, Monitoring Stations and
                                                           Geocuba.
2.2.8 Consolidation and enrichment of the bio-              Institute of Ecology and Systematics, In
       logical collections that serve as frameworks         stitute of Oceanology and Coastal Eco
        for the validation of inventories.                  system Research Center.
Result 2.3
20
2.4 Detailed zonation and planning carried out in prioritized areas, incorporating the criteria for
    conservation and protection of the biodiversity of global significance.
Activities of the result 2.3                               Responsible parties
2.3.1 Detailed zonation of protected areas.                National Protected Area Center,
                                                           Research Centers and Provincial
                                                           Delegations of CITMA
2.3.2 Planning at detailed scale of the keys Coco, Guillermo, Santa Maria and Sabinal for the
        protection of high biodiversity values.
Institute of Physical Planning, National Protected Area Center, Research Centers and Provincial
Delegations of CITMA
2.3.3 Planning at strategic scale on the environmental bases, of the keys Esquivel, Francés,
        Ensenachos, Paredón, Cruz, Las Brujas y Fragoso, for the protection of high biodiversity
        values.
Research Centers, National Protected Area Center, Institute of Physical Planning, Provincial
Delegations of CITMA and Local Organizations of the People's Power.
2.3.4 Supply of the minimum equipment necessary for the ecological zonation and planning
Direction of the Project

2.3.5 Training of the planning personnel to include       Direction of the Project the
       environmental dimension in master plans
       and projects (workshops, scholarships, etc.)

Result 2.4

2.4 Network of small biodiversity monitoring stations in operation.

Activities of the result 2.4                              Responsible parties

2.4.1 Training of the monitoring personnel to             Direction of the Project analyze
       periodically the results of the
       monitoring status and trends that affect
       the biodiversity of global significance
       and its answers to management actions
       and the environmental stress factors
       (workshops, scholarships, etc.)

2.4.2 Supply of the minimum scientific and logis-         Direction of the Project tical
      equipment necessary for monitoring.

  2.4.3 Construction of the infrastructure of the           Provincial Delegations of CITMA,
                                                Envi


                                                  2
                                                  1
    monitoring stations.                               ronmental Units and Local Organizations
                                                       of the People's Power.
2.4.4 Annual methodological workshops on moni-            Direction of the Project toring.

2.4.5 Biodiversity monitoring in the SCE                  Monitoring stations and scientific
                                                          institutions.
Result 2.5
2.5 Bases established for the inclusion of the principles of resource economy in the biodiversity
    conservation and management.

Activities of the result 2.5                               Responsible parties
2.5.1 Training of the personnel in environmental           Direction of the Project economy
       (scholarships, events, consultants,
       etc.)

 2.5.2 Four specific case studies to learn through          Faculty of Economy of the University
                                                                                              of

practice, with the objective of improving the               Havana, Higher Politechnical Institute

technical capacity and keeping informed the                "José Antonio Echevarria", Council of

       policy oriented to optimize incomes for in-         Experts and Provincial Delegations of
       dividual protected areas and the system as a        CITMA whole.

2.5.3 Workshops on the results of the 4 case stud-         Faculty of Economy of the University
of ies.                                                    Havana, Higher Politechnical Institute
"José Antonio Echevarria" and Council of Experts
2.5.4 Development of specific softwares for envi-          Faculty of Economy of the University
of ronmental economy for the SCE conditions.               Havana and Higher Politechnical
Institute "José Antonio Echevarria"

2.5.5 Minimum equipment for software use, mod-             Faculty of Economy of the University
of eling and mathematical operations                       Havana and Higher Politechnical
Institute "José Antonio Echevarria"

 2.5.6 Researches on the economic evaluation of             Faculty of Economy of the University
                                                                                              of

biodiversity resources, environmental costs                 Havana, Higher Politechnical Institute

       and benefits.                                       "José Antonio Echevarria" and
                                                           Council of Experts.
 2.5.7 Economic management of impact caused by              Faculty of Economy of the University
                                                                                              of

pollution.                                                  Havana, Higher Politechnical Institute


                                                 2
                                                 2
"José Antonio Echevarría" and Council of Experts
 2.5.8 Studies on the design of economic instru-          Faculty of Economy of the University
                                                                                            of

      ments for biodiversity, protected areas and     Havana, Higher Politechnical Institute
      focused policy.                                 "José Antonio Echevarria" and
      Council of Experts
Immediate objective 3
2. Educate and inform the community and actors involved in the use of the territory, for
   biodiversity conservation.

Success Approaches
Incorporation of the principles and values of biodiversity to environmental education and the
curricula and activities guided toward the sustainable development planned or implemented on
the part of the Government of Cuba.

Inclusion of the design and introduction of provincial educational policies on biodiversity.
Availability of a guiding strategy in the environmental education activity in the provinces.
A more systematic approach in the environmental education based on the experience to
incorporate the elements of biodiversity to the objectives, programs and standard educational
activities.
Knowledge of the education degree and environmental awareness in the community as a way to
feedback the programs and action plans.

Result 3.1

3.1 Provincial strategies and environmental education programs elaborated and in execution.
Activities of the result 3.1                              Responsible parties
3.1.1 Workshops to elaborate environmental edu-           Center for Environmental Information,

 cation strategies and programs directed to the sus-      Management and Education, National

       tainable use of biodiversity.                             Aquarium, and Direction of the
                                                                                       Project.

Result 3.2

3.2 Communities and actors with a higher degree of knowledge, sensitivity and participation in
    biodiversity issues in SCE.
Activities of the result 3.2                             Responsible parties


    3.2.1 Workshops and seminars to sensitize deci-          Direction of the Project, Center for
                                                                                            Envi


                                                   23
   sionmakers and different economic and                ronmental Information, Management and
    community sectors that impact biodiversity.               Education, and Environmental Units
3.2.2 Production of didactic materials on biodi-            Direction of the Project, Center for
Enviversity.                                                ronmental Information, Management
and Education, and Environmental Units

    3.2.3 Promotion of biodiversity values and on the           Direction of the Project, Centro for
                                                                                               Envi

  Project through mass media (press confer-                   ronmental Information, Management
                                                                                            and

    ences, radio, T. V., Internet, WEB, national                Education, National Aquarium and
                                                                                            Envi

       networks, etc.)                                      ronmental Units

3.2.4 Collaboration with the different teaching       Center for Environmental Information,

       levels on biodiversity issues (training of pro-    Management and Education,
       National fessors and teaching materials on biodiver- Aquarium and Environmental
       Units. sity)

3.2.5 Workshops, conferences, talks, seminars and Direction of the Project, Center for Envi

       events that promote the protection of biodi-         ronmental Information, Management
       and versity of global significance.                  Education, National Aquarium and
       Environmental Units.

3.2.6 Activities of popular participation                   Center for Environmental Information,
                                                            Management and Education, and
                                                            Environmental Units.

3.2.7 Edition and reproduction of promotional         Direction of the Project, Center for Envi

       materials on biodiversity (videos, bulletins,        ronmental Information, Management
       and posters, workbooks, games, pictures, etc.)       Education, National Aquarium and
       Environmental Units.

3.2.8 Elaboration of itinerant expositions and in-    Center for Environmental Information,

    crease in the use of local museums on biodi-                Management and Education, and
                                                                                        Envi

       versity.                                             ronmental Units.
3.2.9 Development of national and international       Direction of the Project and Center for
           events to exchange experiences on biodiver-                 Environmental Information,
                                                                                    Management

       sity conservation.                                  and Education
3.2.10 Development of environmental campaigns        Center for Environmental Information,

    oriented to the promotion of biodiversity                     Management and Education, and
                                                                                          Envi

         conservation.                                     ronmental Units.

3.2.11 Promote the incorporation of artistic mani-   Center for Environmental Information,

festations to the educational and awareness                Management and Education, Union of

        activity on biological diversity.                            Cuban Writers and Artists and
                                                                                         Environ


                                                24
Result 3.3
mental Units
3.3 Systematic assessment of the population's perception on biodiversity, environment, and
     sustainable development.
Activities of the result 3.3 Responsible parties
3.3.1 Design and application of instruments to      Center for Environmental Information,

      evaluate the environmental perception of the         Management and Education, and
      Envicommunity and actors in relation to the          ronmental Units. biodiversity in SCA.
E. INPUTS

The project separates a realistic baseline from a baseline for sustainable development. The latter
is strengthened by the project. The realistic baseline is $96,97M and that of sustainable devel-
opment is $100,05M. Therefore, the strengthened baseline is $3,08M. The incremental costs to
cover biodiversity protection have a GEF component of 3,8M, a Cuban component of 12,9M and
a Canadian component of 27M.

The following matrix (Table 1) shows the project components and the breakdown of the costs in
the contributions of GEF and those that do not come from GEF (in millions of USD). The In-
crease 1 shows the financing not coming from GEF that has been strengthened through imple-
mentation activities that are of concern for the sustainable development at national level.
Table 1. Matrix of the costs and financing sources of the components of the project that will be
financed, at least partly, by GEF (GdC = Government of Cuba).
  Components              Increase 1                 Increase 2               GEF      Not     TOTAL
                 (Financing not coming from                                   Total   GEF
                 GEF strengthened by the                                              Total
                 baseline of sustainable de
                    velopment)
                                                     GEF             Not GEF
 Protected Areas                             0,000    2,400                     12,940   2,400   12,94      15,340
 and Manage                                                                                      0
 ment                                                         Of which,
                                                              GdC = 12,913 and
                                                              Canadian
                                                              sources = 0,027
 Consolidated                                2,588   1,083                       0,000   1,083   2,588       3,671
 capacity for the
 long-term man-     Of which, GdC = 2,001,
 agement of         Capacity 21= 0,314 y
 coastal zones      Canadian
                    sources = 0,273
 Education and                               0,491   0,293                       0,000   0,293   0,491       0,784
 awareness
                    Of which, GdC = 0,355 y
                    Capacity 21 = 0,136
 SUBTOTAL                                 3,079      3,776                      12,940   3,776   16,01      19,795
                                                                                                 9
                    Of which, GdC = 2,356,                    Of which,
                    Capacity 21 = 0,450 y                     GdC = 12,913 y
                    Canadian sources = 0,273                  Canadian
                                                              sources = 0,027
 Costs of sup-                                       0,113                               0,113               0,113
 porting the
 project
                                                                                                              -
 TOTAL                                       3,079   3,889                      12,940   3,889           16,01
                                                                                                            _
                                                                                                         9t7 19,908
                                                                                                         1
The activities of the baseline of sustainable development will be financed by the Government
from Cuba, the UNDP / Capacity 21 and Environment Canada, among other Canadian institu-
tions. The Increase 2 represents the costs of activities beyond the national interest in sustainable



                                               2
                                               6
development that generates global benefits in a primary way. It has also been secured for In-
crease 2 certain quantity of financing not coming from the GEF (coming from the Government
of Cuba and from Canadian institutions).
1. Contribution of the Government

The expenses enumerated here refer to the second stage of a three-stage program signed in the
Project Document CUB/92/G31 in December 1993.

                                                                                                  Cuban Pesos
Previous investment in the SCA at the begin-                                                       79,401,780
ning of the project since the first stage:                                                       (US $ 106,76
*Note: US $1 = 1 Cuban Peso
                                                                                                    millions)*
investment of the Government in this project
                                                                                                         US$
Scientific/technical personnel full time                                                            6'075,000
Support personnel                                                                                   2'025,000
Facilities                                                                                   420,000
Equipment                                                                                    640,000
Miscellanies                                                                               3'508,000
Total investment in the project (5 years)                                           US $12,913,000

2. Contributions of the UNDP/GEF

                                                                                                US$
Payment and expenses of consultants                                                          550,000
Mission costs                                                                                 70,000
Subcontracts                                                                                  60,000
Training                                                                                     520,000
Scientific equipment                                                                       1'944,500
Miscellany*                                                                                  744,500
Total investment of the project (5 years)                                             US $3,889,000
*                                                                           $ 116,000 US
F.Miscellany includes the administrative costs of OPS for PA for an
   RISKS
  amount of
Institutional and financial sustainability after the project
The institutional and financial sustainability beyond the life of the project is guaranteed by the
firm conviction and political will of the Government on the vital importance and urgent need of
biodiversity protection as a capital guarantor of the true sustainable development of the country.
The Government will guarantee the operation of the Protected Area System and of the Integrated
Coastal Management Authority once concluded the project, including the long-term monitoring
program. The Government, in spite of the enormous economic difficulties the country is facing,
has not stopped to invest important amounts in the scientific research, institutional improvement
and environmental legislation and policies, among other aspects.
In Cuba, it is in process of creation the National Environmental Fund, aided by the recently ap-
proved Environmental Law, and that will allow to give continuity to financing activities to
protect biodiversity in fundamental ecosystems, such as those of the SCE. Also, it is foreseen
that protected areas gather funds for conservation for the concept of entrance payment and other
activities. It is expected that 40% of these revenues is kept inside the respective protected area
administrations and they will be managed and redistributed in accordance with the earning
possibilities and necessities of each protected area. The design and legal establishment of the
Fund is expected to be concluded at the end of the year in course. The activities of the
Component B of the proposed project will support the identification and design of economic
instruments directed to generate appropriate revenues for the protected area system and to
capitalize in a progressive way the Environmental Fund.

The existing institutional and legal system, together with the increasingly participative character
of decisionmaking will contribute to the maintenance of the activities for biodiversity conserva-
tion. Sustainability will be increased in the course of time by means of an increasingly improved
legal framework: the Resolution on Environmental Impact Assessment, the Decree-law
Regulation of Fishery, and the Environmental Law, as well as the Decree-law of Coastal Zone
Management, in approval phase, and other new laws, will contribute to the sustainability of the
objectives of the project.

Necessary investment and personnel for the execution of this project
The risk of not achieving the basal or incremental investment is minimum. It is very unlikely that
there is a shortage of appropriate personnel for the actions proposed due to the great availability
of highly qualified people in the different educational levels. The participation of the provinces
and the involved sectors has been ensured from the implementation of the GEF pilot project and
due to their participation in the design of the project.
G. PREVIOUS OBLIGATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS

1. Previous obligations None


2. Pre-requisites
The Government will contribute the personnel and budgets as it is indicated in the Section E
Contributions.

The Government will establish a Steering Committee to guide the project.
The Government will designate the counterpart groups of the appropriate agencies.
The Government will consider the results of the explorations, researches, pilot experiences, and
management actions and plans of this project, in the decisionmaking for the constructions and
the future sustainable development of the region and other areas of the country with similar
conditions or where they are applicable. It will also establish the mechanisms that guarantee the
control and application of the guidelines and acting standards to assure the fulfillment of the
general objectives (as it is established in this GEF Project Document) for the Sabana-Camagüey
region.
The Document of the Project will be signed by the UNDP and the assistance to the project will
only be offered if the pre-requisites specified previously are or can be completed. When it is an-
ticipated the non fulfillment of one or more pre-requisites, the UNDP can, to its discretion, sus-
pend or finish its assistance.

H. REVISION OF THE PROJECT, REPORTS AND EVALUATION

The project will be subject to combined annual revisions by representatives of the Government
and the UNDP. The first of these meetings will take place in the first 12 months of the beginning
of the full execution of the project. The national coordinator of the project will prepare and
submit to each revision meeting a Project Performance Evaluation Report (PPER). Additional
PPERs can be requested during the project, if it is necessary.
The final report of the project will be prepared for its consideration in the meeting of final revi-
sion. This should be prepared in draft with enough anticipation to allow its revision by the Gov-
ernment and the UNDP at least four months before the final revision.
The project will be subject to evaluation by the middle of its execution. The organization, refer-
ence terms, and precise schedule will be resolved after consultation among the parties to the
project document.
The preparations for the project monitoring and evaluation include the obtaining, analysis and
popularization of data and information on aspects related with the progress of the
implementation

                                               29
and the evaluation of the impacts. CITMA will carry out in an internal and permanent way the
monitoring of the progress of the project implementation and the evaluation of the
implementation and impact of the project will take place by the middle, at the end and after its
conclusion, just as it was determined by the Steering Committee.
Based on the monitoring and assessment activities, the project will be able to incorporate and
share those "learned lessons." This will help the administration of the project evaluate the
qualitative execution systematically and according to the chronogram of the work plan objectives
and, if necessary, to take the correction measures. The discoveries of the monitoring and
assessment will be incorporated directly to decision-making and to the improvement of the
project quality, as well as to the current and coming GEF initiatives; the learned lessons will be
compiled, published and disclosed to elevate the public awareness in connection with the project
activities and to base its credibility nationally as well as internationally.
The baseline data and those that are updated in a permanent way are crucial to measure the prog-
ress of the project implementation and to evaluate its impact. The project will identify the imple-
mentation indicators and impact that are objectively verifiable, including the means and verifica-
tion sources. Emphasis will be made in the obtaining and systematizing of the data already avail-
able coming from diverse sources in order to avoiding an expensive gathering of primary data.
The current strategies of the UNDP for project monitoring and report (Projects Tripartite
Revision [PTR], Program Performance Evaluation Report [PPER], medium term and final
revision) will be applied and supplemented according to the monitoring and evaluation
procedures of the GEF such as the Project Implementation Revision [PIR] and the independent
and programmed evaluations of the projects.

1. LEGAL CONTEXT

This project document will be the instrument referred as such in the Article 1 of the Agreement
of Basic Standard Assistance among the Government of Cuba and the United Nations
Development Program, signed by the parties in . The executing agency of the receiving country,
with the purpose of the Agreement of Standard Basic Assistance, will refer to the cooperative
agencies described in that agreement.
Only the following types of revisions can be made to this project document with the signature of
the resident representative of the UNDP, whenever he or she makes sure that the other
signatories of the document of the project do not have objections to the proposed changes:
Revisions in, or additions of, any of the annexes of the project;
Revisions that do not imply significant changes in the immediate objectives, results, or activities
of the project; but rather are caused by the readjustments of the results already agreed because of
increase in prices due to inflation; and
Mandatory annual revisions that reprogram the delivery of the agreed results of the project due to

                                                            30
increase in prices of the experts and other items due to inflation or taking into account the flexi-
bility of expenses of the agency.
  J. BUDGETS
  1. Budget of the Government contribution to the Project

Country: Cuba Number of the project: CUB/98/G31
  Title of the project: Priority actions to consol biodiversit prote                                     in the                Sabana- Ecos
                                              idate y          ction                                                          Camagiie em
 Code           Description                      Total                     1999                       2000                   2001    y
                                           h/m               $       h/m               $       h/m             $       h/m             $        h
10.00      PROJECT
           PERSONNEL
10.01      Scientific/technical     17,357         6,075,000       3,471       1,215,000      3,471    1,215,000 3,471         1,215,000       3,4
10.02      Support Personnel         8,766         2,025,000       1,753         405,000      1,753      405,000 1,753           405,000       1,7
11.99      Total Component                         8,100,000                   1,620,000               1,620,000               1,620,000
30.00      TRAINING
31.00      Training                                  245,000                      45,000                 50,000                  50,000
39.00      Total Component                           245,000                      45,000                 50,000                  50,000
40.00     EQUIPMENT
41.00     Fungible                                   200,000                     70,000                  60,000                  50,000
42.00     Equipment
          Not fungible Equip-                        440,000                    150,000                 100,000                  80,000
          ment
49.00      Total Component                           640,000                    220,000                 160,000                 130,000
50.00      MISCELLANY
51.00      Operations and                          3,508,000                    701,600                 701,600                 701,600
           maintenance
52.00      Facilities                                420,000                    220,000                 100,000                 100,000
59.00      Total Component                         3,928,000                    921,600                 801,600                 801,600
99.00      GREAT TOTAL                            12,913,000                   2,806,600               2,631,600               2,601,600
2. Budget of the contribution of UNDP to the Project (In US Dollars)
Country:                   Cuba
Number of the project: CUB/98/G31
  Title of the project: Priority actions     to consolidate biodiversity       prote in the       Saban      Ecosy
                                                                               ction              a-         stem
Code       Description                                           Total                1999              2000                   2001
                                                                                                  Cama
                                                          m/h              $    m/h             $ guey
                                                                                                    m/h         $        m/h               $    m
10.00      PROJECT PERSONNEL
11.50      Consultants                                   45.8       550,000                50,000            100,000              150,000
11.99      Total of the component                        45.8       550,000                50,000            100,000              150,000
16.00      MISSION COSTS
16.01      Mission Costs                                   70        70,000                 7,000             12,000               16,000
19.00      Total of the component                         70       70,000                7,000          12,000          16,000
20.00      SUBCONTRACTS
22.01      National Subcontracts                                   60,000                5,000          20,000          20,000
29.00      Total Component                                         60,000                5,000          20,000          20,000
30.00      TRAINING
31.00      Scholarships                                           180,000               36,000          36,000          36,000
32.00      Study tours                                            120,000                               30,000          30,000
33.00      In-Service training                                    100,000               20,000          20,000          20,000
34.00      Meetings and events                                    120,000                8,000          28,000          28,000
39.00      Total of the component                                 520,000               64,000         114,000         114,000
40.00      EQUIPMENT
45.00      Fungible Equipment                                     258,000              38,700           64,500          64,500
46.00      Not Fungible Equipment                               1,686,500             252,975          843,250         252,975
49.00      Total of the component                               1,944,500             291,675          907,750         317,475
50.00      MISCELLANY                                                                                                       I

51.00      Operation and maintenance                              328,500               28,500          50,000          50,000
52.00      Report Costs                                            40,000                                               10,000
53.01      Rentals                                                200,000              15,000           50,000          50,000
53.02      Others                                                  60,000               5,000           15,000          15,000
54.00      OPS Adm. costs for PA                                  116,000             116,000
59.00      Total of the component                                 744,500             164,500          115,000         125,000
99.00      Great Total                                         3,889,000              582,175         1'268,750       74:2,475
33
3. Budget of the contribution of Capacity 21 Program to the Project CUB/98/G31
(In US Dollars)
Country:                        Cuba
Number of      the project: CUB/98/G31
Title of the    project: Priority actions to   consolidate biodiversity       prote in the     Sabana     Ecosys
Code           Description                                     Total          ction 1999       -      2000tem        2001
                                                                                               Camag
                                                         m/h              $    m/h           $ üey
                                                                                                 m/h          $  m/h            $   m
10.00          PROJECT PERSONNEL
11.50          Consultants                              3.25       32,500      2.0      20,000 1.25     12,500
11.99          Total of the component                   3.25       32,500      2.0      20,000 1.25     12,500
16.00          MISSION COSTS
16.01          Mission Costs                             1.0       10,000
19.00          Total of the component                    1.0       10,000
20.00          SUBCONTRACTS
20.01          National subcontracts
29.00          Total component
30.00          TRAINING
31.00          Scholarships                                        60,000               30,000          30,000
32.00          Study tours
33.00          In-Service Training                                220,000               25,000          65,000          50,000
34.00          Meetings and events                                 24,000                6,000           6,000           6,000
39.00          Total of the component                             304,000               61,000         101,000          56,000
40.00           EQUIPMENT
41.00          Fungible Equipment
42.00          Not Fungible Equipment                              66,500               33,250          33,250
49.00           Total of the component                             66,500               33,250          33,250
50.00             MISCELLANY
51.00             Operation and                                      12,000               3,000              3,000                 2,000
52.00             maintenance
                  Report Costs                                       15,200               3,000              3,000                 4,000
53.01             Rentals
53.02             Others                                             17,500               3,500              3,500                 3,500
54.00             OPS Adm. costs for PA                              13,600              13,600
59.00             Total of the component                             58,300              23,100              9,500                 9,500
2003
10,000 10,000
                                                                                                     30,000 3,000 33,000
2,000 1,200 3,500 6,700

99.00        Great total                                   471,300             137,350           156,250                       65,500
national consultancy. The total amount of national and Capacity 21 contributions amount to 650,050 USD.

                                                                                 34
4. Budget of the summed contribution of UNDP and Capacity 21 to the Project (In US Dollars)
Country:                Cuba
Number of the project: CUB/98/G31
     Title of the project: Priority actions to   consolidate biodiversity protection in the       Saba      Ecosystem
                                                                                                  na-
Code          Description                                        Total                1999        Cama 2000                 2001
                                                                                                  güey
                                                           m/h             $   m/h            $   m/h            $   m/h              $    m
10.00         PROJECT PERSONNEL
11.50         Consultants                                 48.5      582,500     5.8      70,000    9.4    112,500    12.5     150,000      12
11.99         Total of the component                      48.5      582,500     5.8      70,000    9.4    112,500    12.5     150,000      12
16.00         MISS16N COSTS
16.01         Mission Costs                                 80       80,000       7       7,000    12       12,000    16       16,000
19.00         Total of the component                        80       80,000       7       7,000    12       12,000    16       16,000
20.00         SUBCONTRACTS
22.01         National Subcontracts                                  60,000               5,000             20,000             20,000
29.00         Total Component                                        60,000               5,000             20,000             20,000
30.00         TRAINING
31.00         Scholarships                                          240,000              66,000            66,000              36,000
32.00         Study tours                                           120,000                                30,000              30,000
33.00         In-Service Training                                   320,000              45,000            85,000              70,000
34.00         Meetings and events                                   144,000              14,000            34,000              34,000
39.00         Total of the component                                824,000             125,000           215,000             170,000
40.00        EQUIPMENT
45.00        Fungible Equipment                                     258,000              38,700            64,500              64,500
46.00        Not Fungible Equipment                               1,753,000             286,225           876,500             252,975
49.00        Total of the component                               2,011,000             324,925           941,000             317,475
50.00         MISCELLANY
51.00         Operation and maintenance                             340,500              31,500             53,000             52,000
52.00         Report Costs                                           55,200               3,000              3,000             14,000
53.01         Rentals                                               200,000              15,000             50,000             50,000
53.02         Others                                                 77,500               8,500             18,500             18,500
54.00         OPS Adm. costs for PA                                 129,600             129,600
59.00         Total of the component                                802,800             187,600           124,500             134,500
99.00         Great total                                         4,360,300             719,525          1,425,000            807,975
35
Justification of UNDP budget:
Mission Costs include the missions for Project evaluation and international meetings. National
Subcontracts cover national audits, access to INTERNET, insurance of vehicles, security
services against burglary and subscription to computer security systems.
     The financing profiles regarding training are shown in Annex III, while the required equip-
ment is reflected in Annex IV.
In Miscellany, the item of Operation and Maintenance includes repair and maintenance of boats,
terrestrial vehicles, and technological and not technological equipment; that of Report Costs
covers the design and edition Project documents; that of Rentals refers to boats, facilities for
project activities and load transportation; and the one of Others refers to communications, bank
commissions that are not included in the expense, and postal shipping.
   K. ANNEXES
Annex I:. Work plan
Annex II: Revisions of the project Annex III: Training program Annex IV: Equipment
requirements Annex V:           Description of responsibilities Annex VI: Representatives of
the agencies
Annex I: Work plan

                                                                PRELIMINARY WORK PLAN

Objective 1: Establish eight protected areas that are key to conservation, demonstration
and potential replication
Results and activities            Responsible parties                      QUARTERLY PROGRAM (in the
original the format is per month)

                                                                I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV I II
                                                                III IV
Result

1.1 Eight protected areas implemented and legally established in operation, with their management plans.
Activities


                                                                 MEMO
1.1.1 Elaboration of the proposals          National Protected
         and presentation to the Gov-
                                            0
                                            Area Center and Pro-
                                                    P   I   E   ME         CITMA
                                                                                             P   ,




ment plans. 1.1.2 Elaboration of the manage-     National    Protected
                                         Protection       of     Flora
                                         Enterprise for the


                                             .. Fauna, vincial Delegations of




1. 1.3 Construction or assignment of
         the infrastructure and scien-
          tific and logistical equipment.
                                             Provincial Delegations
                                             of CITMA, National
                                             Protected Area Cen-
                                                                                     OEM on
                                                                                      MEN
                                                                       I



                                             ter, Environmental                                                and
                                             Units .

                                             tions of the People's Power.
                                                                   38
                                                                                                           ME
1.1.4 Establishment of the payroll of Provincial Delegations
                                                                                                           NE


                                                                                0                           M
               protected area workers of CITMA, National                                                   M
                                        Protected Area Cen -


                                                                                0
                                        ter and National En-




                                                                        1
                                                                                                           0E
                                                                                        K                           :
                                      terprise for the Pro                                                      M~ : :                     1


                                                                                                                :




                                                                                                            MI
                                                                                                      11




                                                                                            '-
                                      tection of Flora and     I                                                                               Ir



                                        Fauna.

1.1.5 Training of the protected area Direction of the Proj          Î       i   i           i              iN            V/   NONE




         personnel ect and National Pro-
                                                                                              r
                                                                                            I M
                                                                                                V                                                     -----
                                                                                            FNI                                                       -




                                                                        1
                                                                                                  I

                                      tected Area Center
   1.1.6 Protected area operation Provincial Delegations
                                     of CITMA, National
                                       Protected Area Cen                                                                                           MII


                                                                                                                                                              0M
                                       terand National En-                                                                                          F/",
                                                                                                                    1:
                                                                                                                                     /0>




                                                                                                                              E
                                                                                                                          1




                                                                                                                                                               E
                                       terprise for the Pro
                                      tection of Flora and




                                                                        1
                                                                                                                                                                   F
                                        Fauna                                                                                                                  '
Result
1.2 Promoted information on the SCA
                                                                                                                              N                                    /

    biodiversity and its importance
    and need of protection.




                                                                        1
Activities




                                                                                            0                                 MMIO
 1.2.1 Elaboration of posters, bro- Provincial Delegations
                 chures and leaflets of CITMA, National
                                        Protected Area Cen

                                                                                                                              E
                                       ter, National Enter
                                      prise for the Protec
                                        tion of Flora and
                                                                                    i

                                                                                            0                                    E
                                                                                                                              N M
                                        Fauna, and Direction
                                        of the Project


                                                                                                                              0                               -
                                                                                                                                                              0
 1.2.2 Participation in local programs Provincial Delegations
                                                                        I     I    I    i               : e          0          0    0
        of radio and TV, as well as of CITMA, National I




          utilization of press and other Protected Area Cen-                                               % j
          media ter, National Enter


                                                                                                           E o So
                                                                                                            0
                                             prise for the Protec-
                                             tion of Flora and
                                             Fauna

           1.2.3 Interpretive talks Provincial Delegations
                                            of CITMA, National
                                            Protected Area Cen-
                                                                                                      No
                                                                                                           n l En
                                                                                                               M
                                                                                                               E1 /
                                                                                                                                         0
                                            ter and National En-

                                                                                                           o   En EEO                        ME

                                                                                                           E
                                                                                                                                             N
                                            terprise for the Pro-
                                                                                                               S                             0
                                                                                                               Mo
                                            tection of Flora and
                                            Fauna                                                          ,   N1
                                                                                                               E /
 Result
                                                                                                           N   O
 1.3 Dissemination and exchange of
                                                                                                               E
                                                                                                               E1
                                                                                                               M
       experiences on protected area
                                                                                                           O     i/
                                                                                                               Mm
       management.

 Activities
                                                                                                               E
     1.3.1 Workshops to exchange expe- Provincial Delegations
           riences and for methodologi- of CITMA, National                                                    E                 0 N
                                                                                                                                0 , EO
           cal discussions Protected Area Cen
                                           ter, National Enter
                                                                                                                         V' :


                                                                                                                                 1  N
                                           prise for the Protec-
                                                                                                           E
                                                                                                                                11



                                                                                                                                N            pE
                                                                                                                                             M
                                           tion of Flora and                                                                    M
                                            Fauna
                                                                                                           O                    O            oM
                                                                                                                                             I ,,
                                                                                                                                E
40
                                                                                                                                N            ll
Objective 2: Consolidate the institutional coordination capacities for an integrated,
sustained, long-term coastal zone management in aspects related to biodiversity
                                                                                                                                N
conservation
Result
                                                                                                                                E
Results and activities            Responsible parties                       QUARTERLY PROGRAM (in the
original the format is per month)

                                                              I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV I II III
                                                              IV
2.1 Integrated Coastal Management Authority (AMIC) of the SCE formally established and in operation
Activities

                            2.1.1 Multisectoral participative dis-    Environmental

                          cussion of the proposal of                 Agency, Provincial

                            structure, functions, attribu-            Delegations of

                           tions, and subordination of the            CITMA, Environ

        Integrated Coastal Manage-      mental Units, Direcment Authority       tion of Environmental
        Policy of CITMA and Direction of the Project
                      2.1.2 Presentation fo the proposal     Direction of Environ

                           for the AMIC to the Govern-                mental Policy of

      ment for its approval                 CITMA and Direction of the Project
2.1.3 Acquisition of the minimum            Direction of the Projequipment necessary for the ect Integrated
Coastal Manage
        ment



mau PENN
2.1.4 Relevant training of the per-         Direction of the Proj

             _ _ . _, •         _ grated coastal management in aspects related to biodiversity
                                                                      4
                                                                      1



     2.1.5 Implementation of the AMIC Direction of Environ
                                     mental Policy of
                                     CITMA and Direction
                                     of the Project

Result
2.2 Inventories and quick ecologi
       cal assessments in areas that
       contain biodiversity of global
       significance, prioritized be
       cause of the protection needs
       or the existing threats.
Activities

 2.2.1 Relevant training in specialized Direction of the Prod-
     inventories and quick ecological ect and Consultant
                                                                 N                       l
                                                                                                   m
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                                         tem Research Center
                                         and Monitoring Sta
                                         tions

2.2.4 Assessment of the health Institute of Ecology
                                                                          1
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       status of mangrove swamps and Systematics,
                                       Coastal Ecosystem
                                       Research Center,
                                       Terrestrial Ecosystem
                                                                      s                          o
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                                          Monitoring Stations

2.2.5 Assessment of the health status of seagrass beds
2.2.6 Inventory of marine and terrestrial species in protected areas

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Result
2.3 Detailed zonation and planning in
    prioritized areas incorporating the
    criteria for the conservation and
    protection of biodiversity of global
    significance

Activities



                                                                      M '0m    E
2.3.1 Detailed zonation of protected National Protected
       areas Area Center, Re                                          j
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2.3.2 Detailed planning of the keys Institute of Physical             ' E
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       Coco, Guillermo, Santa Maria Planning, Research
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2.3.3 Environmental planning at Research Centers,                                         VON


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         protection of high biodiversity gations of CITMA
                                                                          , .                    po,
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2.3.4 Supply of the minimum equip- Direction of the Proj-                                               E      OO
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       ment necessary for the eco- ect                                                                 V/      Z/1,
       logical zonation and planning                                                                   50 01


2.3.5 Training of planning personnel Direction of the Proj
       in the inclusion of the biodi- ect
       versity dimension in master
                                                                      N 1 0E
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       plans and projects
                                                                      E m01
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Result
2.4 Network of small biodiversity                                                    "
     monitoring stations                                                             O
Activities                                                                           "
2.4.1 Training of the monitoring Per- Direction of the ProJ-    ~~                   1 M/
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                                                                                     1%
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          sonne) ect
 2.4.2 Supply of minimum scientific Direction of the Proj
        and logistical equipment for ect
        monitoring

  2.4.3 Construction of the infrastruc- Provincial Delegations
        ture for the monitoring sta- of CITMAÏ Environ
        taons mental Units and Or-                                               ~

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                                         ganizations of the      1
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                                         Peoples Power
 2.4.4 Annual methodological work- Direction of the Proj
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          shops on monitoring ect                                           op .
 2.4.5 Monitoring of biodiversity in the Monitoring Stations
        SCE and scientific institu-
                                                                             "M 1    F1
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 2.5 Aplication of the principles of                                        N                        I
     resource economy for biodiver
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     sity conservation and manage
                                                                             :

                                                                                                     E
     ment
 Activities

                                                                                                     E
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          environmental economy ect
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2.5.2 Four specific case studies to learn through practice, with the objective of improving the technical
        capacity and keeping informed the policy oriented to optimize incomes for the individual protected

                                                                                                     I
        areas and the system as a whole
2.5.3 Workshops on the results of to      Faculty of Economy of

the University of Havana, Higher Politechnical Institute °José Antonio Echevarría" and Council of Experts
2.5.4 Development of specific soft-    Faculty of Economy of
ware for environmental econ- the University of Ha
omy for the conditions of the   vana, and Higher SCE Politechnical Institute "José Antonio Echevarría"
2.5.5 Minimum equipment to use the      Faculty of Economy of

software, and for modeling              the University of Haand mathematic operations   vana, and
Higher Politechnical Institute "José Antonio Echevarría"




                                                                      4
                                                                      6
"José Antonio Echevarria", and Council of Experts 2.5.7 Studies on the design of eco-    Faculty of
Economy of
       nomic instruments for biodi-       the University of Ha
       versity, protected areas and       vana, Higher
focused policy Politechnical Institute "José Antonio Echevarria", and Council of Experts




Objective 3: Educate and increase the awareness of the community and actors involved
            in the use of the territory, for biodiversity conservation
Result
Results and activities            Responsible parties               QUARTERLY PROGRAM (in the
original the format is per month)

                                                         I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV I II III
                                                         IV
3.1 Provincial strategies and programs for environmental education
Activities
3.1.1 Workshops to elaborate envi-     Center for Environronmental education strategies mental
       Information, and programs directed to the Management and sustainable use of biodiversity
                                       Education, National Aquarium and Direction of the Project
Result

a M
3.2 Communities and actors with a higher degree of knowledge, sensitivity and participation in SCE
     biodiversity issues
Activities of the result 3.2

3.2.1 Workshops and seminars to        Direction of the Proj

         sensitize decisionmakers and ect, Center for Envi

         the different economic and    ronmental Informa

community
sectors that affect                    tion, Management biodiversity        and Education, and Environmental Units 3.2.2
                                                                            4
                                                                            8



      Promotion .         . ..




                                         in
      values and the Project             ect, Center for Envi

      through mass media                 ronmental Informa-               NEN
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                                                                                                           M

                                         Management



                                         and EducatiQn N a -    11      00M
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and Education, and Environmental Units
3.2.6 Activities of popular participa- Center for Environtion          mental Information, Management and
Education, and Environmental Units
3.2.7 Edition and reproduction of      Direction of the Proj

        promotional materials on       ect, Center for Envibiodiversity ronmental Information,
        Management and Education, National Aquarium and Environmental Units
3.2.8 Elaboration of itinerant exposi- Center for Environ
3.2.4 Collaboration with the different    enter    r Environ


      teaching levels on biodiversity    mental Information,           MEN
           -
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                                         Management and ..

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ronmental Units                                                                                       --
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3.2.5 Workshops, conferences,             irection o t e       roJ -

      talks, seminars and events         ect, Center for Envi

      that promote the protection of     ronmental Informa

      biodiversity of global signifi-    tion, Management cance and Education, National Aquarium and
      Environmental Units
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       tions and increase in the use mental Information,

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       of local museums on biodi- Management and
       versity Education, and Envi-
                                         ronmental Units
3.2.9 Development of national and Direction of the Proj
       international events to ex- ect and Center for
       change experiences on Environmental Infor
                                                                                  N
       biodiversity conservation mation, Management
                                         and Education                            E
3.2.10 Development of environ- Center for Environ
        mental campaigns directed mental Information,
        to the promotion of biodiver- Management and
        sity conservation Education, and Envi
                                         ronmental Units
3.2.11 Promotion of the incorpora- Center for Environ-         //j i                  i               i
        tion of educational and sen- Management and
        to the artistic manifestations mental Information,
         sitizing activities on biologi Education, Union of
                                                                 "
                                                                     0 1 ,
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         cal diversity Cuban Writers and
                                         Artists and Environ
                                         mental Units
                                                               N             M    I       _ E-   0i   N
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                                                                                                      :

Result
3.3 Systematic assessment of the
                                                               o             M
                                                                             11
                                                                                  N       =
                                                                                            N         I
    perception of the population on
    biodivertisy, environment and
                                                                             11   E                   M
    sustainable development

Activities
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                                                  Information,                 -                       /"
 environmental perception of commu- and
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                                                                                    ,

                                                                                                                  m0 -
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                                           Management
                                                                                                                  oi. - E
                                                                                                                   No'    '
 logical diversity of the SCA ronmental Units
Annex II: Revisions of the project
                                                                      1           FE    P1 ,

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                                                                                                                    n -N
                                                                                                                       01010
(To be completed at the beginning of the project)
Annex III: Training program                                                                                                          '

In order to guarantee the activities of management, research, monitoring, education and sustain-
able use of biodiversity, among others comprised within the objectives of the project, training
activities are needed, including scholarships, study tours, consultancies, seminars and
workshops.
The following are a group of aspects that will be included in the training of the participant and
collaborating personnel of the project:



Objective 1: Establish eight protected areas that are key to conservation, demonstration and potential
replication
Results                                      Training themes

     1.1   Eight protected areas implemented      •   Integrated management of marine/terrestrial protected
                                                                                                      areas

     and legalized, in operation with        •   Specialization for park rangers

     their management plans                  •   Rehabilitation techniques for populations of species

                                             •   Approaches and techniques for biodiversity protection

1.2 Disseminated Information on the          .   Interpretation and education activities in protected areas
    biodiversity of the SCA and on its
    importance and need of protection
1.3   Dissemination and exchange of          • Techniques for the organization, direction and facilitation
of experiences on protected area             workshops management


Objective 2: Consolidate the institutional co-ordination capacities for a long-term, sustained integrated
             coastal management in issues related to biodiversity conservation
Results                                      Training themes

              2.1    Integrated Coastal Management          •    Techniques for         coastal    zone integrated
                                                                                                      management

      Authority (AMIC) of the SCE, for-          (adaptable co-management )

      malized and in operation               •  Design and administration of information management net-
                                                works
                                             • Advanced operation of Geographic Information
                                             Systems •   Projects Administration
                                             • Techniques for the participative work
  2.2 Inventories and quick ecological assessments in areas containing biodiversity of global
      significance, prioritized for the needs of protection or the existing threats
• Inventories of marine biodiversity (species and ecosystems) • Inventories of terrestrial biodiversity
(species and ecosystems)
• Assessment of the vitality of coral reefs, mangrove swamps and seagrass beds
• Assessment of populations of endangered species or in risk of extinction
  2.3 Detailed zonation and planning in        •    Techniques for planning and zonation in ecologically sensi

     prioritized areas incorporating the           tive areas

     criteria on conservation and protec-         . Construction methods and materials of low impact on
     biodition of biodiversity of global signifi- versity
     cance                                    • Eco-technologies for energy generation and saving, and
                                                  recycling
                                                  Landscape architecture and design of low impact on biodi-
                                                  versity
2.4   Network of small biodiversity        •        Monitoring of marine biodiversity (species and
ecosystems) monitoring stations            .        Monitoring of terrestrial biodiversity (species and ecosys-
tems)
2.5 Application of the principles of re-       •    Environmental Economy source economy for biodiversity
    conservation and management

Objective 3: Educate and increase the awareness of the community and actors involved in the use of the
territory, for biodiversity conservation
Results                                        Training themes

3.1 Provincial environmental education         .    Public environmental education strategies and programs
3.2 Communities and actors with a       .    Approaches and techniques to work with human
    communigreater degree of knowledge, sen- ties
    sitivity and participation in
    SCE biodiversity issues
3.3   Systematic assessment of the         • Techniques for the assessment of the community
perception population perception on biodiver- on environment sity, environment, and sustainable
      development
Annex IV: Equipment requirements

Justification of the equipment budget

The high degree of scientific and professional experience of the available personnel to support
the project makes it necessary to assign a greater percentage of budget from this project to
equipment, contrary to the way it is done in other projects of the Caribbean and Latin America.
It is extremely difficult for Cuba to acquire and restore equipment (through the ways that are
generally available to other countries) to solve the problems relevant to biodiversity protection.
The requested equipment includes components for research, communication, information man-
agement, transportation by land and sea, cabinet work, dissemination of information, etc.


                                                   Equipment
                                                                        Cost per unit   Total cost
Quant                      Equipment                          Model
                                                                          (US $)         (US $)
Eight protected areas:
8       Air conditioning equipment                       Panasonic               650          5200
32      Diving tanks                                     Sherwood                300          9600
8       Binocular                                        Nikon                   500          4000
8       VHSc Video Camera                                Sony                   1500         12000
8       Station wagon for 5 persons                      Toyota                19000        152000
8       Color TV 29"                                     Sony                    600          4800
8       Portable Compressor for diving tanks             Bauer                  5000         40000
8       Pentium Computer 450 MHz                         Acer Pentium           2500         20000
8       Dehumidifier                                     Daytron                 250          2000
16      SCUBA diving equipment                           Sherwood               1200         19200
8       Manual Xerox machine                             Canon                  1600         12800
8       Global Positioning System (GPS)                  Leica                  5000         40000
8       Motorboats FB 50 HP                              Yamaha                10000         80000
8       Overhead Projector                               Kodak                   300          2400
8       Portable electric plant 2.5 kw Diesel            Honda                  1500         12000
8       Jet Color Printer A 4                            HP                      300          2400
8       Radio-communication equipment                    Yaesu                  1000          8000
8       Slide Projector                                  Kodak                   450          3600
8       Video recorder                                   Sony                    300          2400
80      Walkie talkie                                    Yaesu                   300         24000
        TOTAL                                                                           456400

Five monitoring stations:
10      Air conditioning equipment                       Panasonic               650          6500
5       Magnetic agitator                                Bioblock                400          2000
5       DBO5 Analyzer                                    Aqualytic              2000         10000
5       Anemometer                                                               400          2000
20      Diving tanks                                     Sherwood                300          6000
5       Technical two-plate balance of 500 g             Sartorius               500          2500
10      Binoculars                                       Nilkon                  500          5000



                                                    54
5       Rowing boat                                      Yamaha                  600          3000
5       Oceanographic bottles 2L                                                  80           400
10      Calculator                                       Canon                    10           100
5       VHSc Video Camera                                Sony                   1500          7500
5       Photographic camera with accessories             Canon                  2000         10000
5       Submarine photographic camera with accesso-      Canon                  5000         25000
        ries
5       Station wagon for 5 persons                      Toyota                19000         95000
5       Stationary Diesel compressor for diving tanks    Bauer                  8500         42500
5       Portable Diesel compressor for diving tanks      Bauer                  5000         25000
5       Pentium Computer 450 MHz                         Acer                   2500         12500
5       Dehumidifier                                     Daytron                 250          1250
5       Digestor Kjheldal                                Karl Kolb              7000         35000
5       Manual Eco-sounder                               Gabel Co.              2000         10000
15      SCUBA diving equipment                           Sherwood               1200         18000
1       Automatic climate station                        Delta                 15000         15000
5      Drying heat cabinet                              Memmert       1000       5000
5      Vaporimeter                                                     500       2500
5      Xerox machine                                    Canon         1600       8000
5      Spectrophotometer vis IR close                   Nova 60      10000      50000
5      Freezer                                          Gold Star      400       2000
5      Global Positioning System (GPS)                  Leica         5000      25000
5      Hypsometer                                                     1000       5000
5      Refrigerated incubator                           Blanc Labo    3000      15000
5      Motor boats FB 50 HP                             Yamaha       10000      50000
5      Biological microscope                            Leica         3500      17500
5      Stereoscopic microscope (dissection)             Leica         4000      20000
5      Modem                                            GVC            100        500
5      Motorcycle with sidecar 350 cc                   Jawa          3000      15000
5      Pressure cooker                                  INPUD           20        100
5      Portable oxymeter                                Aqualytic      900       4500
5      Mono-plate spring balance of 2 Kg.               Fuji           300       1500
5      Mono-plate spring balance of 5 Kg.               Fuji           300       1500
5      pHmeter                                          Metrohm       1500       7500
5      Portable electric plant 2.5 kw Diesel            Honda         1500       7500
5      Pluviometer                                                     300       1500
5      Laser Printer A 4                                HP            1000       5000
5      Psycrometer                                                     500       2500
5      Salinity meter (conductimeter)                   Tsumuri        500       2500
5      Salinity meter (refractometer)                   Tsumuri        500       2500
5      Thermohydrographer                                             1000       5000
5      Maximum thermometer                                              25        125
5      Minimum thermometer                                              25        125
5      Tents                                                            60        300
5      TV Color 21"                                     Sony           500       2500
5      Video Recorder                                   Sony           300       1500
15     Walkie Talkie                                    Yausu          300       4500
       TOTAL                                                                 600400
Inventories and ecological assessments:
6 Air conditioning equipment                            Panasonic      650        3900
1       DQO Analyzer                                    Aqualytic     3000        3000
10      Diving tanks                                    Sherwood       300        3000
2       Photographic camera with accessories            Canon         2000        4000
1       VHSc Video Camera                               Sony          1500        1500
55
1       VHSc subm. video camera with a repository box   Sony          5000        5000
2       Color TV 29"                                    Sony           600        1200
1       Stationary compressor Diesel for diving tanks   Bauer         8500        8500
1       Portable compressor Diesel for diving tanks     Bauer         5000        5000
6       Pentium Computer 450 MHz                        Acer          2500       15000
5       Currentgrapher                                  Gabel Co.     4600       23000
5       Current meter                                   Gabel Co.     9000       45000
6       Dehumidifier                                    Daytron        250        1500
1       Manual Eco-sounder                              Gabel Co.     2000        2000
10      SCUBA diving equipment                          Sherwood      1200       12000
1       Infrared-close visible spectrophotometer        UNICAM       20000       20000
2       Global Positioning System (GPS)                 Leica         5000       10000
1       Motor boat with FB 50 HP                        Yamaha       10000       10000
1       Biological microscope                           Leica         3500        3500
1       Inverse biological microscope                   Leica         5000        5000
3      Stereoscopic microscope                               Leica        4000      12000
1      Portable electric plant 2.5kw Diesel                  Bauer        1500       1500
6      Laser printer A 4                                     HP           1000       6000
1      Tugboat                                               CEPRONA      2000       2000
2      Video recorder                                        Sony          300        600
4      Walkie Talkie                                         Yaesu         300       1200
1      Set of sensors for water quality monitor (nitrates,
       nitrites, ammonium, phosphates, sulfides, salin
       ity, temperature, oxygen, turbidity and pigments)     Gabel Co.   30000       30000
       TOTAL                                                                     235400
Four facilities for biological collections:
8 Air conditioning equipment                                 Panasonic     650       5200
4       Pentium Computer 450 MHz                             Hacer        2500      10000
8       Dehumidifier                                         Daytron       250       2000
24      Shelf with doors                                                    50       1200
24      Shelf without doors                                                 50       1200
4       Biological microscope                                Leica        3500      14000
4       Stereoscopic microscope - -                          Leica- -     4000      16000
4       Jet color printer A 4                                HP            300       1200
        TOTAL                                                                     50800
Planning and zonation:
6      Air conditioning equipment                            Panasonic     650       3900
6      Pentium Computer 450 MHz                              Acer         2500      15000
6      Digital Plain meter                                                2500      15000
6      Plotter color A 0                                     HP          10000      60000
       TOTAL                                                                      93900
Environmental economy:
1      Air conditioning equipment                            Panasonic     650        650
1      Pentium Computer 450 MHz                              Acer         2500       2500
1      Dehumidifier                                          Daytron       250        250
1      Laser printer A 4                                     HP           1000       1000
       TOTAL                                                                       4400
Environmental education:
1       Air conditioning equipment                           Panasonic     650        650
1       VHSc video camera                                    Sony         1500       1500
56
1 Photographic camera with accessories                       Canon        2000      2000
2 Color TV 29"                                               Sony          600      1200
2 Pentium Computer 450 MHz                                   Acer         2500      5000
1 Binder                                                                   100       100
1 Printing equipment 4 colors A 3                            RICOH       32000     32000
1 Automatic Xerox binder                                     Canon       10000     10000
8 Papergrapher A 2                                                          50       400
1 Laser printer A 3                                          HP           2500      2500
1 Laser printer color A 3                                    HP           8000      8000
1 Format editing set Super VHS                               JVC         21000     21000
2 Video recorder                                             Sony          300       600
        TOTAL                                                                    84950

Project Office:
2 Air conditioning equipment                           Panasonic                   650          1300
2 Pentium computer 450 MHz                             Acer                       2500          5000
1 Automatic Xerox binder                               Canon                     10000         10000
2 Microbus                                             Toyota                    25000         50000
1 Plotter color A 0                                    HP                        10000         10000
       TOTAL                                                                               76300

Regional Office (facility) for integrated management:
3 Air conditioning equipment                                                       650        1950
1 Station wagon for 5 persons                          Toyota                    19000       19000
1 Color TV 29"                                         Sony                        600         600
3 Pentium computer 450 MHz                             Acer                       2500        7500
1 Data show                                            Canon                      6000        6000
3 Dehumidifier                                         Daytron                     250         750
1 Binder                                                                           100         100
1 Fax machine                                          Canon                       600         600
1 Automatic Xerox binder                               Canon                     10000       10000
1 Microbus                                             Toyota                    25000       25000
      1 Modem                                          GVC                         100         100
1 Overhead projector                                   Kodak                       300         300
1 Plotter color A 0                                    HP                        10000       10000
1 Laser printer A 4                                    HP                         1000        1000
1 Jet color printer A4                                 HP                          300         300
1 Slide projector                                      Kodak                       450         450
1 Video recorder                                       Sony                        300         300
        TOTAL                                                                             83950
      TOTAL GENERAL                                                                      168650
                                                                                              0
Administrator of the project

Responsibilities: Responsible for the administrative activities of the Project. Execution of the
project funds.
Qualification: University graduate with experience in the administration of international proj-
ects.
Duration: 5 years
Investor of the GEF project

Responsibilities: Execute the purchase procedures of equipment for the Project.

Qualification: University graduate with experience in the execution of investments in interna-
tional projects.
Duration: 5 years
Coordinator of Environmental Education activities

Responsibilities: Coordinate and control the Environmental Education activities in the five
provinces involved.
Qualification: University graduate with experience in promotion
activities. Duration: 5 years
Inter-provincial coordinator of the Network of Monitoring Stations in the
SCE Responsibilities: Coordinate and control the monitoring activities of the Monitoring
Stations of the five provinces involved. Guarantee the methodological and database
standardization. Guarantee the compilation of the generated information in the GIS of the
project.
Qualification: University graduate with a Doctor degree. Be the Director of the Coastal Ecosys-
tem Research Center in Coco Key that will act as the coordinating center of the four monitoring
stations.
Duration: 5 years.
Responsible for the Biodiversity Conservation Working Group

Responsibilities: Direct the Biodiversity Conservation working group. Answers to the Direction
of the Project. Coordinates the tasks of the group and elaborates relevant collective proposals to
the group. Creates temporary ad hoc groups for the solution of problems of specific disciplines at
the request of the group or the Direction.
Qualification: University graduate in careers related to Natural Sciences, with wide experience
in ecology and conservation, and a Doctor degree. Experience in the direction of groups and
projects.
Duration: 5 years.

Responsible for the Environmental Education Working Group

Responsibilities: Direct the Environmental Education working group. Answers to the Direction
of the Project. Coordinates the tasks of the group and elaborates relevant collective proposals to
the group. Creates temporary ad hoc groups for the solution of problems of specific disciplines at
the request of the group or the Direction.
 Qualification: University graduate, with wide experience in environmental education or commu



                                               59
nication. Experience in the direction of groups and projects. Duration: 5 years.

Responsible for Water Quality and Coasts Working Group

Responsibilities: Direct the Water Quality and Coasts working group. Answers to the
Direction of the Project. Coordinates the tasks of the group and elaborates relevant collective
proposals to the group. Creates temporary ad hoc groups for the solution of problems of
specific disciplines at the request of the group or the Direction.
Qualification: University graduate, with wide experience in physical or chemical
oceanography, or in geology or related disciplines, and a Doctor degree. Experience in the
direction of groups and projects.
Duration: 5 years.

Responsible for the Reforestation Working Group
Responsibilities: Direct the Reforestation working group. Answers to the Direction of the
Project. Coordinates the tasks of the group and elaborates relevant collective proposals to the
group. Creates temporary ad hoc groups for the solution of problems of specific disciplines at
the request of the group or the Direction.
Qualification: University graduate in Biological Sciences, with wide experience in botany or
forestry and a Doctor degree. Experience in the direction of groups and projects.
Duration: 5 years.

Responsible for the Environmental Economy Working Group

Responsibilities: Direct the Environmental Economy working group. Answers to the Direction
of the Project. Coordinates the tasks of the group and elaborates relevant collective proposals
to the group. Creates temporary ad hoc groups for the solution of problems of specific
disciplines at the request of the group or the Direction.
Qualification: University graduate in Mathematics or Economy, with wide experience in Eco-
nomic Sciences and a Doctor degree. Experience in the direction of groups and projects.
Duration: 5 years.

Responsible for the Planning, Construction and Design Working Group Responsibilities:
Direct the planning, construction and design working group. Answers to the Direction of the
Project. Coordinates the tasks of the group and elaborates relevant collective proposals to the
group. Creates temporary ad hoc groups for the solution of problems of specific disciplines at
the request of the group or the Direction.
Qualification: University graduate in architecture, engineering or planning, with wide experi-
ence in physical planning and a Doctor degree. Experience in the direction of groups and proj-
ects.
Duration: 5 years.
Responsible for the Databases and GIS Working Group

Responsibilities: Direct the Databases and GIS working group. Answers to the Direction of
the Project. Coordinates the tasks of the group and elaborates relevant collective proposals to
the


                                               60
group. Creates temporary ad hoc groups for the solution of problems of specific disciplines at
the request of the group or the Direction.
Qualification: University graduate in Mathematics or Cybernetics, with wide experience in
geomatics and a Doctor degree. Experience in the direction of groups and projects.
Duration: 5 years.
5 persons responsible for the Provincial Councils of Experts

Responsibilities: Direct the provincial councils of experts. Answer to the Environmental Unit of
their province and the Direction of the Project. Coordinate the tasks of the council and elaborate
collective proposals. Creates temporary ad hoc groups for the solution of problems of specific
disciplines at the request of the Council or the Direction.
Qualification: University graduate. Experience in the direction of groups and
projects. Duration: 5 years.
Besides all these positions, the project will also include the whole institutional apparatus in the
environment field existing in the SCE and the capital that will participate in the Biodiversity
Protection and Integrated Coastal Management of the SCE.
Annex VI: Representatives of the agencies
Representatives of the institutions who revised and approved the project document Name
        Title Organization




Annex VII: Complementary Project of Capacity 21.
Results that will be financed by Capacity 21 Program (UNDP) and the Cuban Government as a
complement to the project "Priority actions to consolidate biodiversity protection in the Sabana-
Camagtiey Ecosystem"
Country: Republic of Cuba

Executing institution of the country: Environmental Agency (Ministry of Science, Technology
and Environment)


                               STRATEGY OF THE PROJECT
The present Project complements the Project CUB/98/G31 ("Priority actions to consolidate
biodiversity protection in the Sabana-Camagiiey Ecosystem") in the training in aspects related to
sustainable development. Specifically, the complementation is directed toward the tráining an
     'crease     awareness in the sustainability components that would complete the bjective
a 4d 3 of th   roJ'ect CUB/92/G31 that are focused specifically on aspects of the pr            'on
of

bi '       ' y of global significance within the framework of integrated coastal management of
biodiversity and the environmental education and awareness on biodiversity, respectively. The
results of this project are of special interest, mainly those related complementarily to the im-
plementation of a management authority (result 2.1), zonation and planning in areas with high
biodiversity values (result 2.3), monitoring of biological diversity (result 2.4), and strategies and
actions for the incorporation of principles and values of biodiversity to the community and actors
involved in the territory of the Sabana-Camagiiey Ecosystem (results 3.1 to 3.3).
2
The project proposed to Capacity 21 has been designed to advance toward sustainable develop-
ment, facing the lack of a sufficient training and sensitization in the involved actors, which has
been an important cause of the sectoral focuses of development, the construction of environ-
mentally inappropriate infrastructures, deficiencies in planning and zonation, overfishing, habitat
destruction due to noxious fishing practices, extraction of arid materials in the keys, inadequate
modality of oil exploitation and prospecting, introduction of exotic species, illegal hunting and
fishing, and tourism actions that are destructive to biodiversity. Therefore, this project is
considered indispensable for the implementation of the Integrated Coastal Management in the
Sabana-Camagiiey Ecosystem.
The institutional and financial sustainability beyond the life of the project is guaranteed by the
conviction and political will of the Government on the vital importance and urgent need of as-
suming a sustainable focus in the development of the country. The Government will guarantee
the operation of the Protected Area System and of the Integrated Coastal Management Authority
once concluded the project, including the long term monitoring program. In spite of the
enormous economic difficulties the country is going through, the Government has not stopped to
invest important amounts in scientific research, institutional improvement and environmental
63




        If a separate Capacity 21 project document is finally decided upon, it is likely that much
of the background narrative - justification, institutional arrangements, prior and ongoing
assistance, risks, etc. - will be drawn from the current GEF proposal given their
complementarity. However,
it is nevertheless recommended that monitoring requirements be streamlined to the extent
possible (ie. combining the GEF Project Implementation Report and annual Capacity 21
monitoring documents, discarding the PPER format-to avoid redundancies, scheduling joint
GEF/C21 monitoring missions, etc.) to rationalim the workload.

3. BASIC PROJECT ELEMENTS

IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVE 1: To enhance the awareness and capacity for
environmentally-sound integrated coastal management among key institutions, sectors
and communities across the Sabana-Camaguey ecosystem.
OUTPUT 1.1 The consolidation of an environmental monitoring network to complement
ongoing coastal biodiversity monitoring activities, through the provision of training and follow-
up technical support to key sectoral institutions in the project area.
Activity 1.1.1 Design/implement 3 training workshops addressing prioritized water, soil and air
quality monitoring needs. The workshops shall be conducted at the Cayo Coco environmental
research station and Ciego de Avila University, targeting the following topics and institutional
participants:
         Terrestrial and Marine Water Quality: Training will address (i) analytical techniques for
water quality monitoring; treatment of residuals; and data base management including the
utilization of new software and statistical packages. Participants shall include technical personnel
from CITMA and its environmental research stations, as well as designated environmental focal
points for the ministries of Agriculture, Sugar, Hydrological Resources, Fisheries and
Construction in the five provinces comprising the project area.
         Soil Quality: Training will address the monitoring of soil degradation, salinity and coastal
erosion. Participants shall include technical personnel from CITMA and its environmental
research stations, as well as designated environmental focal points for the ministries of
Agriculture, Sugar and Construction in the five provinces .encompassing the project area.
         Air Quality: Training will address the monitoring of gaseous emissions, aerosol
emissions and rainwater quality. Participants shall include technical personnel from CITMA as
well as meteorologists and chemists with air quality monitoring responsibilities in the five
provinces encompassing the project area.
Activity 1.1.2 Design/implement 6 training workshops for monitoring the impact of capital
investments in tourism, construction; infrastructure development and waste treatment/disposal.
One workshop will be held in each province of the project area, followed by a regional encounter
in which case studies, methodologies, common challenges and other relevant issues will be
shared. Participants will be drawn from sectors and enterprises engaged in regional/land use
planning, economic development, conservation and tourism.
Activity 1.1.3       Design/implement training workshop addressing the monitoring the dynamics
of physio-geographic processes in coastal areas. This workshop will be target different sectors,
research, documentation and the use of different pedagogic techniques, directed at executive
decision makers at the provincial level and technical personnel with management
responsibilities. Activity      1.3.2 Hold 5 provincial workshops addressing general concepts
and guidelines for sustainable development and integrated environmental management, directed
at the Presidents and Vice presidents of the provincial Popular Power structures and assigned
sectoral directors. Activity 1.3.3 Hold 5 provincial workshops addressing applied guidelines,
approaches and case studies for sustainable development and environmental management,
targeting second-level provincial decision makers and sectoral managers (ie. physical planning
directors; provincial environmental delegations and municipal units; sugar and agro-processing
complexes; sectoral enterprises involved in tourism, construction, agro-processing, forestry and
fisheries).
Activity 1.3.4 Provide technical and logistical support to ongoing environmental coordination
initiatives in the project area (ie. assisting ad hoc inter-institutional committees for watershed
management, flora and fauna and óther regional priorities) through the provincial CITMA
delegations and environmental units.
Activity 1.3.5 Monitor the incorporation of sustainability concerns in development
administration and coastal management, identifying additional training/technical support
requirements and organizing subsequent workshops to address specific needs, as needed.
      Success Criteria for Output 1.3:
      - Greater consideration of environmental variables in municipal and local land use plans
      (planes parciales de ordenamiento territorial), as well as in the development plans for
      strategic economic sectors in the project area (ie. sugar industry, agriculture, fisheries,
      construction and tourism).
      - Implementation of measures by local government (poder popular) and the above-
      mentioned sectors encouraging integrated coastal management, ie. inter-institutional and
      cross-sectoral coordination initiatives, preventivelcorrective actions for environmental
      protection.
- Decreased incidence of negative environmental impacts in the project area, through the reduction
or mitigation of `contamination points' (focos de contaminación) documented by the provincial
environmental units of CITMA.

OUTPUT 1.4          Facilitation of environmental education and awareness initiatives at the
community level, linking local government, mass organizations and civil society.
Activity     1.4.1 Discuss and assign responsibilities to the provincial environmental units of
CITMA for the coordination of training/dissemination activities, as well as for the care of
equipment utilized for workshops, meetings and related activities in local communities.
Activity 1.4.2 Design, reproduce and classify didactic materials for training modules targeting
different community-based stakeholders. The training modules will be designed to accommodate
diverse pedagogic methods - both formal and non-formal - in order to encourage local
participation and appropriation of knowledge.
Activity 1.4.3 Schedule and implement a series of-workshops, seminars, contests, exchanges and
other activities in designated cot nrnunities across the project area, addressing priority local
conservation issues such as: Community vigilance and control of illegal hunting, fishing and
logging; the protection of habitats used by species óf flop/fauna facing extinction; appropriate
waste disposal methods; preventive local actions *dgainst environmental contamination, etc.
Activity 1.4.4      Provide non-financial direct support (logistical and in-kind') to small-scale
environmental awareness and protection initiatives managed by diverse community stakeholders
- local governments and Poder Popular delegates, schools, social and sports associations,
farming/fishing cooperatives, women's organizations and neighborhood committees (ie. Comités
de Defensa de la Revolución), among others.
      Success Criteria: for Output 1.4:
         - Sensibilization of community members and institutions concerning environmental
        legislation, institutional roles and local responsibilities for the prevention and control of
        locally-generated environmental contamination and degradation.
      - Increased support by community stakeholders to CITMA's environmental units in the early
        detection and control of local contamination points.
      - Greater initiative by commurdties in the prevention of environmental contamination
        derived from local economic activity.
        - Horizontal transfer of locally-managed environmental management initiatives between
        community stakeholders across the project area.

OUTPUT 1.5 Documentation, systematization and transfer of experiences and lessons drawn
from the CUB/92/G31 implementation process, to selected institutional and sectoral
representatives from other coastal zones with high biodiversity levels that are facing large-scale
investments in tourism and infrastructure development.
Activity 1.5.1 Organize and implement an internal evaluation workshop in each province,
bringing together diverse project participants and stakeholders. The workshops should be
scheduled in order to coincide with - and enrich - the project's final evaluation. A subsequent
workshop shall be held between participants drawn from the provincial encounters to synthesize
findings. The workshop findings - both quantitative and qualitative - shall be documented in
order to provide local inputs towards the formal evaluation process.
Activity 1.5.2 Establish contact with provincial government and sectoral representatives from
other coastal areas facing similar challenges, to determine information needs and modalities for
the dissemination/transfer of project experiences.
Activity 1.5.3 Schedule and implement a series of visits, exchanges and consultations directed at
sharing substantive project elements (addressing methodologies, institutional framework,
coordination aspects, constraints and solutions) and encouráging a replication of the process in
other locations.
       Success Criteria for Output 1.5:
       - A documented in-depth assessment of the projéct process by stakeholders
         representing different institutions and sectors in the ASC region.
       - The sharing of relevant project experiences and issues between the implementation team
         and workshop participants, and visiting delegations from other coastal zones facing
         accelerated tourism and infrastructure development.

'Under this activity, support could be provided to offset costs in photocopying, printing of
posters, transportation, prizes for contests, meals/per diem, provision of meeting space.
4. INPUTS

output 1.1
Initial Training:
- 10 workshops (estimated average of 5 days, 20 participants each) X US$ 5,000 = 50,000 (BL.
     32)
- International consultants: US$ 10,000 X 1.5 w/m = US$ 15,000 (BL 11)

-   National consultants: US$ 5,000 X,lw/m = US$ 5,000 (in-kind contribution, GOC)
UpdatelRefresher Training:
- 5 workshops X US$ 5,000 = US$ 25,000 (BL 32)

- International consultants: 10 000 X 5 = US$ 5,000 (BL 11)
- National consultants: US$5,000 X 1= US$ 5,000 (in-kind, GOC) - 3 Fellowships X US$10
000 = US$ 30,000 (BL 31)
SUBTOTAL: US$135,000

Output 1.2
Initial Training:
- 5 workshops X US$ 5,000= US$ 25,000 (BL 32)
- International consultants: US$ 10,000 X 0.75 w/m = US$ 7,500 (BL 11) - National
consultants: US$5,000 X 0.5 w/m = US$ 2,500 (in-kind, GOC)
UpdatelRefresher Training:
- 3 workshops X US$ 5,000 = US$'15,000 (BL 32)

- International consultants: US$ 10,000 X 0.5 w/m = US$ 5,000 (BL 11)
- National consultants: US$ 5,000 X 0.25 w/m = US$ 1,250 (in-kind, GOC) - 3 Fellowships
X US$ 10,000= US$ 30,000 (BL 31)
SUBTOTAL:    US$ 86,250
Output 1.2
Initial Training:
- National consultants: US$ 5,000 X 30 w/m = US$ 150,000 (in-kind, GOC) - Duty travel -
Nat'l consultants: US$ 1,800 X 5 cons. = US$,9 000 (BL 15) - Printing Costs = US$ 10,000
(BL 50)
- 10 workshops X US$ 5,000 = US$ 50,000 (BL 32)
--------------------------
* The asterisk identifies proposed in-kind contributions by the Government of Cuba. Monetary
figures are used to estimate the financial value of this contribution for illustrative purposes only.
In practice, technical assistance is often provided through agreements between national
institutions.
UpdatelRefresher Training:


- 2 Workshops X US$ 5,000 = US$10,000 ( B L 32)




- Facilitation of inter-institutional environmental networking initiatives = US$ 10,000 ( B L 50)

S U B T O T A L : US$ 239,000
Qutuut 1.4
Production of Training Materials:
- National consultants: US$5,000 X 3 w/m = US$15,000 (in-kind, GOO - Printing Costs:
US$ 10,000 ( B L 50)
Community-based Environmental Education:
- Duty Travel: US$ 5,000 ( B L 15)

- Community Workshops: 20 X US$ 1,000 (estimated average cost/workshop =
        US$ 20,000 ( B L 32)
- In-kind support for local environmental initiatives: US$ 200 (estimated average value/award)
        X 50 = US$ 10,000 ( B L 50)
SUBTOTAL: US$ 60,000
OUTPUT 1.5
Internal Evaluation Workshops:
- 5 provincial evaluation workshops and 1 regional systematization workshop: 6 X US$5,000
(estimated average of 5 days, 20 participants) = US$ 30,000 ( B L 32) - Elaboration and
printing of internal evaluation documents: 6 X US$ 200
        = US$ 1,200 ( B L 5 0 )
Transfer of project experiences:
- Travel & per-diem costs for field visits by 4-person delegations (ie. one representative of the
provincial government, environmental sector, tourism sector and an additional productive
sector) from 5 coastal areas with high biodiversity levels and undergoing rapid
tourism/infrastructure development.
Travel: 20 persons X US$ 200 = US$ 4,000 ( B L 15)

Per Diem expenses = 20 persons X US$ 50 X 5 days: US$ 5,000 ( B L 32 or 50)
Subtotal: US$ 40,200
SUBTOTAL OUTPUTS:             US$ 5 6 0 , 4 5 0
(cont')
-10-
DELEG. DE   4 PERSONAS (GOBIERNO PROVINCIAL, SECTOR AMBIENTAL,
SECTOR TURISTICO Y OTRO SECTOR PRODUCTIVO) DE LAS 5 PROVINCIAS
DURANTE UNA SEMANA
VI ATICOS - 5 000 (BL 53)
VIAJES - 200 X 5= 1 000 (BL 53)

SUBTOTAL: 37 200

TOTAL RESULTADOS: 561,450

MAS:

MISION C21 EV. MEDIO TERMINO/FINAL: 10,000 (2 SEMANAS CADA VEZ)

Material de Oficina: 400 X 60: 24,000
Fotocopias: 100 X 60: 6,000
Bibliografia (Publicaciones): 5,000
Operaciones y Mantenimiento:* 200 X 60: 12,000
Equipo Provincial para Capacitación, Divulgación, Eventos y Actividades
Comunitarias:

Proyectora de Slides X 5: 4,000 Overhead Projector X 5: 4,000
Screen for Slide/Overhead X 5: 1,00a Blackboard X 5: 500
Maquina Video y Televisor X 5: 4,000 Computadora/Impresora/Estabilizadora Voltaje
X 5: 10,000 Fotocopiadora X 5: 10,000
Camara de Video X 5: 4,000 Camaras Fotograficas X 5: 4,000 Computer
Projector System (Data Show) X 5: 25,000 Software: 10,000

SUBTOTAL EQUIPO: 76,500,

TOTAL PROYECTO: 694,950

MENOS CONTRIBUCION CUBANA (LINEA 17):

1.1 10,000 1.2 3,750
1.3 150,000 1.4 15,000
TOTAL CONTRIBUCION CUBA: 178,750
TOTAL CONTRIBUCION C 21: 516,200
Cuba: UNDP/GEF/Cap 21 ProDoc



       Subject: Cuba: UNDP/GEF/Cap 21 ProDoc Date:
         Fri, 28 May 1999 17:55:35 -0400 From:
         "Arundhati Kunte" <arundhati.kunte@undp.org>
         To: anita.nirody@undp.org
       CC: Nick Remple <nick.remple@undp.org>, Martin Krause <martin.krause@undp.org>
     Anita,
     A couple of things. First, did Hugo leave an electronic copy of
     his report with you?
     Second, I spoke with Martin Krause (our M&E coordinator) regarding
     streamlining of project reporting. He feels this can definitely be
     done and the GEF would also encourage this. Harmonization will have to
     take place in terms of:
     (1) timing -- the GEF annual Portfolio Implementation Review (PIR)
     has to be done in the summer (June-July). This project will be
     included in the annual PIR once it has been under implementation for
     at least one year (one year after signing of Pro Doc). Does Capacity
     21 have Nny fixed time in the year when project reports are expected?
                                                                CA -j-(J .
(2) issues on which the project must        -- the GEF has a format/set
report
of questions that the project must respond to I assume C 21 too has -)n
something like this. Depending on which one is more comprehensive, we
                                              .
can ensure that the format that goes out to th Cuba Country Office
includes all aspects important to both GEF an Capacity 21.
                                             e
                                              d
     So I'll make sure this "streamlining" is reflected at an
     appropriate place in the Pro Doc.
     Finally, on financial reporting, Paul Chan is not here at the moment,
     but I believe we do have quarterly financial reports. In any case, on
     this issue the project team in Cuba will have to report separately to
     the respective financial officers on how GEF monies and C 21 monies
     are being disbursed, right?
     Hope you have a nice and long weekend!
    Aru
    United Nations Development
    Programme Global Environment
    Facility Unit Tel: (212) 906 5975
    Fax: (212) 906 6998

				
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