Part A self-evaluation INTRODUCTION This self by raj17529

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									Part A: self-evaluation
INTRODUCTION
This self-evaluation form (SEF) is primarily designed to:

    q   assist you in your own self-evaluation, and

    q   be used as the basis of the inspection of your school or setting.

The form is in three parts:
Part A                       SELF-EVALUATION
Part B                      FACTUAL INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR SCHOOL
Part C                      INFORMATION ABOUT COMPLIANCE WITH STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS




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WELCOME TO YOUR SELF-EVALUATION FORM
GUIDANCE ON COMPLETION
When to complete the form

     q   The SEF is a summative document, intended to record the outcomes of your ongoing process of rigorous self-evaluation.

     q   There is no fixed time in the year when it should be completed. It is usually best done to fit in with your normal cycle of
         review and planning. It is recommended that schools update their SEF at least annually.

     q   Part B contains statistical and other factual information. Some of this is pre-populated by Ofsted, as and when the
         information becomes available. You are advised to ensure that the factual information is up to date.

Purpose of the form

     q   The SEF is intended to record the outcomes of your self-evaluation. As such, it should be an accurate diagnostic document
         with all conclusions fully supported by the evidence. Keep Part A short and to the point. It should indicate key strengths and
         weaknesses and what needs to be tackled to effect improvement. Through the SEF, the school will want to point to
         evidence that substantiates its own judgements about the quality of its work. Inspectors will make considerable use of the
         SEF when discussing their arrangements for inspection. The impact of your self-evaluation in helping to bring about
         improvement will be a major factor in their judgements about the effectiveness of your leadership and management and
         your capacity to improve in the future.

How to fill the form in

     q   It is helpful if you check the factual information and complete Part B first and then Part C; the information can then be
         drawn upon to help complete Part A.
     q   Part A, the evaluative section, is laid out in sections that correspond to the headings of the evaluation schedule in the
         framework for the inspection of schools, although overall effectiveness is placed last in the SEF. Please complete the
         sections dealing with achievement and standards, and personal development and well-being first, since
         these outcomes will form the basis for your judgements in other sections.
     q   Reference is made in Part A to the Guidance for Inspectors of Schools. This guidance is in two parts. Conducting the
         inspection: guidance for inspectors of schools indicates how aspects of the school might be explored by inspectors,
         and Using the evaluation schedule: guidance for inspectors of schools contains advice on how to pitch judgements
         about the quality of provision and its outcomes.
     q   In addition, you can refer to the guidance on self-evaluation published by Ofsted and the Department for Education and
         Skills in March 2005 and June 2006*. These documents each contain a section giving detailed advice on completing some
         sections of the form. These documents are available on Ofsted's website.
     q   Each section of the SEF asks you to grade aspects of your work on a four-point scale, as follows:

Grade 1:    Outstanding
Grade 2:    Good
Grade 3:    Satisfactory
Grade 4:    Inadequate

     q   It is most important that you complete this form rigorously and objectively. The grade descriptions in in Using the
         evaluation schedule: guidance for inspectors of schools will assist you in reaching accurate judgements.

     q   When completing the text boxes in Part A you should summarise your main findings and illustrate these with the evidence
         which led to the judgements you have made. Bear in mind any prompts included with the main questions. It is not
         intended that you should provide large amounts of statistical data and descriptive detail. You should use
         evidence selectively to support the main judgements about your performance.

     q   If you have a special needs resource base, extended provision or other specific provision, please ensure that evidence about
         it is provided at suitable points within the SEF.

     q   Each section of the form has a ‘Help' button which you can use to help you fill in particular sections.

     q   Please complete this form electronically via the Ofsted website.

The term ‘school' is used to cover all providers, including those that term themselves ‘colleges' or use a similar
designation. It also covers those providers that are not technically schools, such as children's centres and pupil
referral units.
[1]Conducting the inspection: guidance for inspectors of schools, Ofsted, September 2007, available on the Ofsted website www.ofsted.gov.uk
Using the evaluation schedule: guidance for inspectors of schools, Ofsted, September 2007, available on the Ofsted website www.ofsted.gov.uk
[2]A new relationship with schools: improving performance through school self-evaluation, Department for Education and Skills/Ofsted, March 2005
Improving performance through school self-evaluation and improvement planning, Department for Education and Skills/Ofsted June 2006


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[3]Using the evaluation schedule: guidance for inspectors of schools, Ofsted, September, 2007, available on the Ofsted website www.ofsted.gov.uk




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1. Characteristics of your school
What are the main characteristics of your school?
Drawing on Parts B and C of this form and other relevant data, write a brief description of its features.
(Please note that this is an opportunity for a brief written summary of the main characteristics of the school and it
is not necessary to repeat tables of data.)
1a

Please outline the main characteristics of the learners, including:
- their attainment on entry and how you know this
- their social and economic backgrounds, indicating the level of prosperity or deprivation.
Please enter text here

I: Attainment on entry
1:1 Nursery
The attainment on entry of Nursery pupils 2007 suggests slightly below average attainment on entry(0.73 average number
of ELG scale points covered):

     q   100% of Nursery children working at the first Early Learning Goal in Disposition and Attitude
     q   98% of Nursery children working at the first Early Learning Goal in Social Development and 100% in Emotional
         Development; 92% beyond this at the next stepping stone
     q   33% of Nursery children were working at the first ELG in Language for Communication and Thinking and 2% working at
         ELG1 for linking sounds and letters
     q   85% of children at ELG1 for Reading; 100% working at the first ELG for Writing.
     q   100% of Nursery children met the first ELG in Numbers for Labels and Counting
     q   100% of children were at the first Early Learning Goal for Knowledge and Understanding of the World
     q   50% of children were at the first ELG for Physical Development and 100% working at the first Early Learning Goal for
         Creative Development.

This cohort of pupils demonstrate strengths in: emotional development, writing, numbers for labels and counting,
disposition and attitudes, knowledge of the world and creative development. Areas for focus are: calculating, linking sounds
and letters, language for communication and thinking, and physical development.
1:2 Reception
Autumn Term 2007baseline data (informed by observations set against Early Learning Goals) showed average attainment on
entry(overall average number of scale points covered 2.9):

     q   Disposition and Attitude average number of scale points covered 3.21
     q   Social Development average number of scale points covered 3.24 andEmotional Development 2.78
     q   Language for Communication and Thinking average number of scale points covered 2.91;Linking Sounds and Letters 2.59
     q   Reading average number of scale points covered 2.41 and Writing 2.3
     q   Numbers for Labels and Counting averge number of scale points covered 3.47 and Calculating 2.48
     q   Shape, Space and Measures average number of scale points covered 2.9
     q   Knowledge and Understanding of the World average number of scale points covered 2.85
     q   Creative Development average number of scale points covered 3.55 and Physical Development 2.97.

This cohort of pupils demonstrate strengths in: creative development, numbers for labels and counting, social
development, disposition and attitudes and physical development. Areas of focus are: linking sounds and letters, calculating,
reading and writing. Gender comparisons suggest girls attainment on entry is above that of boys across all aspects
but a gap of only 0.2 average number of scale points covered.
1.3 The school is placed in a high achieving County family grouping at Key Stage 2 based on high overall average points
scores at Key Stage One. Similarly, at Key Stage One, the school is placed in a high achieving family group based on end of year
average Foundation Stage Profile overall scores.
2: social and economic backgrounds, level of prosperity or deprivation

     q   The school attracts pupils from a wide area well beyond its catchment which reflects the popularity of the school and the
         high regard the wider community has for the school. The school has been over-subscribed for the past three years;
         indications are this will also be the case for entry into Reception in 2008.
     q   68% of pupils come to the school from the local electoral Ward (Trinity).
     q   The school's immediate catchment is above the English average in terms of the percentage of high social class households
         and well below average for overcrowded households. However, this is not the case for all areas in which pupils live.
     q   The percentage of minority ethnic children is well below the national average across all local wards. 95% of pupils are
         white British. The percentage of pupils with English as an additional language is well below the national average. The
         percentage of pupils with Special Educational Needs and Statements is also well below the national average.
     q   There are 7.4% more boys than girls in the school with significantly more boys than girls in years 1, 3, 4 and 6.
     q   The percentage of pupils eligible for free school meals is low.
     q    Including the Dosthill area, the percentage of adults with higher education is well below the English average. This

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         indicates the complexity of the social and economic background of the children that attend the school. Raising educational
         aspiration is an important aspect of what the school aims to do.



1b

Please summarise briefly your distinctive aims and describe any special features of your school. For example:
- whether your school is a trust school, and if so, your distinctive aims, and any contributions trust status makes in driving up
school improvement
- whether your school has a religious character
- any special units
- significant partnerships with other providers or agencies (such as shared arrangements for the curriculum, federal
arrangements, or partnerships with employers)
- whether your school is an extended school and the rationale for the range of services you offer or make available through the
school, in relation to the needs of pupils, their families and the community
- whether your school is a training school
- whether your school has other particular characteristics, including significant awards you have received, for example
International Schools Award; Healthy Schools Award; Arts Mark Award
- whether your school is implementing the Sustainable Schools framework

Please enter text here

     q   The aims and values of the school emphasise the strong partnership between parents, pupils, the staff and the
         community. Our school logo includes the phrase 'Growing Together' which encapsulates this.
     q   School aims and values are embedded in school policies and are reflected in the culture of the school. A comprehensive
         examination of this was undertaken 2005-06 involving staff and pupils.
     q   The school has been identified by the local authority as a successful school (based on value added data and other
         information) and was chosen to be part of the National College for School Leadership Sustaining Success programme
         (2005-06).
     q   The school is becoming recognised for its innovative approaches to learning and teaching, to continuing professional
         development (e.g. peer-coaching and internal 'networking') and leadership. The school was featured in a local authority
         digest in April 2006.
     q   We are committed to raising standards whilst at the same time maintaining a broad and balanced curriculum which
         extends to our out of hours learning activities. We are a learning school that aims to take account of developments in
         practice and research evidence to provide the best possible learning experiences for all of our pupils. Our Senior
         Management Team has been re-designated as a Lead Learning Team where the focus of discussion is on learning.
     q   There is a strong commitment to sport in the local area which is reflected in the school. Links to local sports organisations
         result in broad provision including tennis, cricket, swimming, tag rugby, football, netball, cross-country and athletics. The
         school regularly competes in and wins local competitions - the school is full of trophies and awards which demonstrate its
         sporting success. The school was awarded an Activemark (silver) award in 2004 and a second award in 2008.
     q   The school is also committed to improving the environment and achieved Green Flag Eco schools statusin the Autumn
         Term 2006. Furthermore, the school won a Staffordshire Green and Travelwise Award in 2006.
     q   Although not a Church School, the school has strong links with local churches which include integrated curriculum
         activities and assemblies led by local religious leaders including the Vicar of St Paul's and members of the Baptist Church.
     q   The school is part of a strong Pyramid which works with other Primary Schools that feed the local High School. This has
         been renamed the Wilnecote and Dosthill Learning Partnership. The focus is on transition, staff development, sharing
         curriculum expertise and importantly meeting the needs of vulnerable families in the local area, working with outside
         agencies as appropriate. A business plan for the establishment of a Community and Learning Partnership which will
         ensure the core offer of services is in place locally is being developed for implementation from April 2008.
     q   The school has also been part of a Primary Learning Network and is currently a member of a Large Schools Network.
         This supports the development of innovative projects which impact on leadership and learning.
     q   The school lets out its facilities to local groups including the Brownies and Guides. A before- and after-school club that
         includes holiday provision is also privately run on the site by a local Nursery provider. Furthermore, the school runs its
         own Breakfast Club from 8.30am which is well attended by children, parents and staff.
     q   The school attracts significant numbers of trainees including those completing initial teacher training in a range of
         Universities and NVQ college students training as Teaching Assistants. The school also regularly hosts work experience
         students.
     q   The school was successful in achieving Investors in People accreditation - Autumn 2007.
     q   The school has also achieved Healthy Schools status- Spring 2008.




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1c

Please outline specific contextual or other issues that act as aids or barriers to raising performance. For example:
- any difficulties in recruiting and retaining staff or governors, for example in science and maths
- recent or impending reorganisation
- mobility of learners and any significant impact on behaviour
- particularly important facts in your recent history, such as change of leadership.
Please enter text here

Difficulties in recruiting and retaining staff, or governors

     q   The school experiences no difficulty in recruiting or retaining staff. The Governing Body is almost full. The two most recent
         elections for parent-governors were contested requiring a vote.

Recent or impending reorganisation

     q   A District Review has had implications for the Pupil Admission Number for the school and its overall size increasing
         Reception PANfrom 79 to 84 from 2010.

Mobility of learners

     q   % stability is 81.2% (Raiseonline 2007 full report) which is belowthe national average. The school has had a
         significant level of inward mobility over recent years. This has had no detrimental impact on behaviour. The school
         successfully inducts new pupils and has established procedures for this.

Particularly important facts in your recent history, such as change of leadership

     q   The school opened a designated Nursery for 52 part-time pupils from September 2005 (previously having had a Pre-
         Reception class with a January and April intake).
     q   From April 2006, following restructuring, three Assistant Headteachers were appointed, recruited from within the school.
     q   From September 2006, four Phase Leaders were appointed again recruited from within the school.
     q   An Advanced Skills Teacher was also appointed from within the school from September 2006.

Barriers to raising performance

     q   Aspects of the school accommodation presentchallenges due to the numbers of children and staff in the school e.g. having
         a single hall which is also used as a space for eating at lunchtime - this impacts on curriculum provision in some areas
         e.g. drama and PE. Also mobile classrooms which are not linked to the main building which present security issues. The
         majority of classrooms are also undersize which presents challenges to the organisation of learning activities. There have
         been a number of improvements to the accommodation and this continues to be a priority.

Aids to raising performance include:

     q   A strong school ethos propagated and supported by all stakeholders.
     q   A high level of professionalism amongst all staff - teaching and support staff.
     q   Staff commitment to raising standards.
     q   Parental and community support including an active PTA.
     q   The well-being of staff in school is good and there is a strong, supportive culture within the staff
     q   Pupils are generally highly motivated, well behaved and a significant number achieve at above national averages
     q   Good leadership distributed through the school.




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1d

Please outline briefly the main priorities in your improvement/development plan, and how they reflect the context
in which you work.
Please enter text here

The following have all been identified from examination of a comprehensive set of school self-review data and are priority
areas for development; to:

     q   Continue to raise attainment in English, particularly in writing at level 4 and above and at level 5.
     q   Increase the percentage of pupils achieving at level 4 and above in mathematics.
     q   Maintain the results achieved at Key Stage 1 and ensure achievements made in the Foundation Stage are built on in Year
         1 and subsequently in Year 2.
     q   Continue to increase the rate of progress in Years 3, 4 and 5 so that all pupils make an average of 3 points progress in a
         year in reading, writing and mathematics.
     q   Further develop approaches to Assessment for Learning focusing on questioning.
     q   Impement the revised Literacy and Numeracy frameworks.
     q   Continue to develop approaches and procedures for assessment of pupils, together with analysis of progress and
         achievement focusing on areas beyond the core curriculum.




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2. Views of learners, parents/carers, community and other stakeholders
What are the views of learners, parents/carers and other stakeholders, inlcuding hard to reach groups and how do
you know?

2a

How do you gather the views of learners, parents/carers and other stakeholders, such as those accessing
additional services; how often do you do this, and how do you ensure the impartiality of the information?
Please enter text here

Views of learners:

     q   These have been collected by holding pupil conferences with groups of pupils from Reception through to Year 6 (Summer
         2005; Year 2 and Year 6 Spring 2006). This has also been integrated into monitoring and evaluation of learning e.g.
         Mathematics Spring Term 2007 where pupil conferencing was completed with six pupils from each class.
     q   Themes/questions are devised which each interviewer e.g. members of the Lead Learning Team uses.
     q   Impartiality is ensured by having a random sample of pupils from all year groups (Reception upwards), gender and ability
         balanced.
     q   Ongoing views of learners are also obtained from the School Council who meet regularly to discuss issues which are
         informed by the outcomes of Class Council discussions. Also from groups such as the Eco Committee and School Travel
         Plan Working Group.
     q   During the summer term 2007, the school trialled the use of an e-questionnaire with 47 pupils randomly selected from 5
         classes, Year 2 upwards. The questionnaire focused on whole school issues. A decision has been made to extend the
         use of the questionnaire to the whole school in 2007-08.

Views of parents/carers:

     q   Extensive consultation has been carried out and parental views have been taken into account when deciding on
         improvement priorities. These were collected through a questionnaire sent out to all parents (Summer 2005) which was
         then analysed. Impartiality was ensured by sending out the questionnaire to all parents. Approximately a third of pupils'
         parents completed the 2005 questionnaire ensuring a wide spectrum of opinion being represented. Returns were also
         anonymous to ensure that parents were comfortable in expressing their views. This process was repeated in the Spring
         Term of 2007 and will be bi-annual henceforth. On this occasion, almost half (46%) of pupils' parents chose to complete
         the questionnaire.
     q   An Interim Parent Questionnaire was also sent out in the Summer Term 2006. This was sent to a random sample of 200
         parents to evaluate progress on the areas for improvement identified from the 2005 questionnaire referred to above,
         together with views on areas identified for development in 2006-07.
     q   The Parent Teacher Association are also a group which is often consulted on proposals and asked to feedback on any
         concerns.
     q   On an ongoing basis, Parent Governors also feedback the views of parents who approach them to discuss issues.
     q   Parents' Evenings and informal personal contacts with parents e.g. on the playground, are also used as ways of obtaining
         views.

Other stakeholders:

     q   Staff views are regularly sought through informal discussion and questionnaires e.g. well-being questionnaire (last
         completed Spring 2007); priorities for and reviews of the School Improvement Plan, Staff Questionnaire June 2007;
         consultation with the Change Team (see Minutes - ongoing) and a review of the school Aims and Values (throughout
         2005-06).
     q   An open-door policy on behalf of the Head Teacher and Leadership Team ensures that staff feel happy to approach
         members to share views.
     q   Individual teacher consultations with the Head Teacher (Summer 2005) included sharing views of the school. Performance
         Management also provides an opportunity for consultation with staff.




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2b

What do the views of learners, parents/carers and other stakeholders, including your hard to reach groups, for
example young carers, tell you about:
- the learners' standards
- personal development and well-being,
- the quality of your provision, (curriculum; teaching and learning; and care, guidance and support)
- parents'/carers' views of the transition arrangements for pupils joining the school
Please enter text here

Parents/carers:

     q   The Interim Parent Questionnaire (Summer 2006) showed parents to be highly positive concerning the areas for
         improvement focused on during 2005-06 (see Interim Parent Questionnaire 2006 Analysis/Report). They werealso almost
         totally in agreement concerning the areas for improvement identified for 2006-07 (at least 94% in agreement).

Consultation 2007:

     q   Highest ranking responses from parents(highest percentage of strongly agree plus tend to agree) were: my child
         respects his/her teachers (100%), my child is respected by his/her teachers (98%) the school has a good reputation in
         the community (99%), I feel welcome when I visit the school (97%), the school is well led and managed (97% ) my child
         likes school and is happy to come (97%), teachers are approachable and sympathetic (97%), the school meets the needs
         of my child (97%), I am happy about the kinds of things my child is learning (99%), plus, letters and other forms of
         communication are helpful (98%).
     q   Lowest ranking responses from parents(lowest percentages of strongly agree plus tend to agree) were: parents'
         evening apart, the only time I have contact with the teacher is to resolve a problem (54% (there appears to be some
         confusion over the wording/response to this question), I receive regular information about my child's progress (83%),
         there is a good range of extra-curricular activities at the school (84%), school reports give me an accurate and helpful
         picture of my child's progress (84%), my child is not bullied or harassed at the school (87%), I am confident if I complain
         about something I will get a sympathetic hearing (89%) and the Governors work well for the school (82% (18% don't
         know)).
     q   85% of parents believe the school is improving (13% responded 'don't know').
     q   The school works very effectively and has a very positive relationship with parents reflected in the survey
         findings; parents clearly show a great deal of satisfaction with the school.
     q   When Nursery parents were consulted on induction arrangements, a highly positive response was received particularly
         concerning home visits.
     q   Reception parents have recently been asked their views on transition arrangements(December 2007). Their views
         on the induction process and communication are very positive; almost all aspects receiving a good or excellent from all
         who responded to a questionnaire. Written comments were also largely positive concerning the induction process and
         different aspects of communication. (See Summative Report compiled by Reception Teacher).

Learners:

     q   Outcomes from pupil conferencing tell us that pupils are very positive about the school in terms of the progress
         they are making and the way in which their needs are met.
     q   The recent e-questionnaire showed that children know they have a school council, understand school rules and how to
         use the library, know about the monitors we have in school, are positive about display boards in corridors, do not worry
         about going to the toilet and know who can help when they feel unwell (most 'happy' percentage outcomes).
     q   Children's least happy responses were concerning cloakrooms (overcrowded and belongings not safe), do not know who
         their School Council representative is, do not understand why certain decisions are made and a small
         percentage recorded an 'unhappy' response to having someone to talk to when angry or upset and having somewhere to
         go if they need extra help with work.




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2c

How do you share with parents/carers and other stakeholders the collated findings about their views?
Please enter text here

     q   Following the analysis of the Parent Questionnaire (2005), a meeting was arranged to discuss the outcomes of the
         questionnaire and to explore issues raised. All parents were invited although only six attended.
     q   Collated findings from the 2005 consultation were also posted on the school web-site for parents and others to view.
         Views are also communicated through the weekly Newsletter.
     q   Feedback is given to staff informally and through staff meetings e.g. Extended Inset July 2006; also through meetings with
         the Chair of the Change Team and publication of Reports e.g. Staff Questionnaire Analysis 2007.
     q   Feedback is given to pupils through the School Council and through assemblies.



2d

Give an evaluation of areas where you have successfully involved learners, parents/carers and stakeholders in
improving provision
- include the ways you have used the views of stakeholders, including pupils, to influence the priorities noted in section 1d (please
cross-refer to any relevant comments in the leadership and management section)
- include ways in which you have sought to involve and engage with parents/carers, in supporting improved outcomes for their
children
Please enter text here

Area: I receive regular information about my child's progress. I am kept well informed about how my child is
getting on.
Action:

     q   Homework Policy revised and expectations for each year group made clear.
     q   Home Learning Journal created and issued to pupils/parents.
     q   Interim Report sent out to all parents before the Spring Term Parents' Evening making it clear the ability and progress
         made by each pupil.
     q   Revised School Report which makes progress and relative achievement clear.
     q   Revised Summer Term Open Evening to include children demonstrating learning/activities.
     q   Increased number of Parent Governors by three.
     q   All parents invited to attend a meeting to discuss the outcomes and ways forward following the completion of the previous
         Parent Questionnaire.

In the Interim Parent Questionnaire 2006, 83% of parents felt that this had improved, 91% of parents strongly agreeing or
tending to agree with the statement above (up from 86% 2005). In the Parent Questionnaire 2007, 94% of parents strongly or
tended to agree that they are kept well informed about how their child is getting on and 83% felt they receive regular information
about their child's progress.
Area: My child is not bullied or harassed at school.
Action:

     q   Anti-bullying fortnight. Poster competition. Assemblies. Class activities.
     q   Displays around the school - inside and outside.
     q   Year 6 theatre company - 'Katie Clay' and follow-up workshops.
     q   Resources purchased including books for the library and signs for the playground e.g. friendship stop.
     q   Link made from the website for pupils/parents to e-mail a senior member of staff to report bullying.
     q   Revised Anti-bullying Policy which included involvement from interested parents (revised Autumn 2007).
     q   Summary Policy circulated.

In the Interim Parent Questionnaire, 83% of parents felt that this had improved, 83% of parents strongly agreeing or tending to
agree with the statement above (up from 81% 2005). In the Parent Questionnaire 2007, 87% of parents strongly or tended to
agree that their child is not bullied or harassed.
Area: There is a good range of extra-curricular activities at the school.
Action:

     q   Previously established clubs maintained e.g. tag rugby, hockey, dance, drama, orchestra and choir. School Council.
     q   Eco-schools Action Group and Supergrounds Action Group - both involving children.
     q   Continued involvement and success in sports events e.g. swimming gala and cross-country.
     q   Further clubs established: ICT (Year 1 and Year 4), football at lunchtime and after school. Football during half-term
         breaks/holidays.
     q   French Club and Easter trip to France for Year 5 and 6 pupils.
     q   More pupils involved in Clubs as a result.

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    q   Termly Sports Newsletter.

In the Interim Parent Questionnaire, 70% of parents felt that this had improved (23% don't know), 88% of parents strongly
agreeing or tending to agree with the statement above (up from 74% 2005). In the Parent Questionnaire 2007, 84% of parents
strongly or tended to agree that there is a good range of extra-curricular activities at the school.
Area: My child has adequate facilities, resources and accommodation at the school.
Action:

    q   Sinks in mobile classrooms, widening of pathways, toilets in mobiles, refurbishment of four mobile classrooms,
        replacement of windows; relocated library, medical room, improved office accommodation and ICT facilities.
    q   Foundation Stage Play area.
    q   Natwest Supergrounds and Science area.
    q   Conservation Area and pond.
    q   Access to cold, filtered water in all classrooms.
    q   16 wirelessly network connected laptops purchased to increase ICT provision for pupils in mobile classrooms.

In the Interim Parent Questionnaire, 89% of parents felt that this had improved, 90% of parents strongly agreeing or tending to
agree with the statement above (up from 88%). In the Parent Questionnaire 2007, 95% of parents strongly or tended to agree
that their child had adequate facilities, resources and accommodation at the school.
The views of stakeholders have directly influenced the following priorities that have formed part of the School
Improvement Plan 2006-07:

    q   To formulate a revised teaching and learning policy which includes the role of pupils as 'lead learners';
    q   To raise parental awareness of extra-curricular activities;
    q   To establish a Homework/Study Support Club;
    q   To review and revise the complaints procedure and ensure that all parents are aware of the Policy and the response they
        can expect when a complaint is made.

The views of parents have directly influenced the following priorities that have form part of the School
Improvement Plan 2007-08:

    q   To consult with parents on the effectiveness of and revise accordingly, the current end of year report format and Interim
        Report;
    q   To devise further mechanisms for reporting progress to parents.

The views of pupils have influenced the following priorities:

    q   To re-design and upgrade cloakroom areas in consultation with the School Council.
    q   To seek ways to maintain the profile of School Council representatives and identify methods for feeding back on decisions.
    q   To continue to develop teaching and learning approaches to meet the needs of SEN pupils.
    q   To ensure that pupils know who they can talk to if angry or upset including adults and peers (the School Council will also
        be involved in this).




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3. Achievement and standards
How well do learners achieve?
To help you focus your comment and judgements in completing this section, please consult the relevant pages in
the Guidance for Inspectors of Schools.
In answering the following questions, please make clear the main evidence, such as performance data, assessments and records
of learners' progress, on which your evaluation is based (but please use data selectively, avoiding the copying out of
tables of descriptive information). If the school's own interpretation of standards and achievement is not reflected in published
data, then this needs to be carefully explained.
3a

How well do learners achieve, and how high are their standards? For example:
- test, assessment and examination results; whether learners reach challenging targets
- the standards of learners' current work (noting any significant differences between past results and current work)
- learners' progress including comparisons with the progress of similar pupils in other schools. Note any significant differences in
the progress of groups of learners, including any groups that are achieving particularly well or are underachieving (for example,
pupils with learning difficulties and disabilities , looked after children, particular minority ethnic groups, including Gypsy, Roma and
Traveller learners, those who join the school other than at the normal date of admission, and those who are socially or
economically disadvantaged) and the extent of the school's success in closing any gaps in attainment
- the extent to which information and communication technology (ICT) capability and other key skills enable learners to improve
the quality of their work and make progress
- the extent to which any extended services contribute to better achievement and higher standards.
Please enter text here

 Standards:

     q   Standards at the end of Key Stage 1 have been consistently above national and local averages, including those of similar
         schools (‘family group') since 2003. Attainment across all subjects is significantly higher than the national average
         (Average Point Score and % of pupils attaining or surpassing each level). Pupils leave Key Stage 1 two terms ahead of
         national expectations (comparison of APS).
     q   Standards across all subjects at the end of Key Stage 2 are also above national and local averages. Since 2006,
         standards have been highest in English and Science. Pupils leave Key Stage 2 approximately a term ahead of national
         expectation (comparison of APS).
     q   At the end of Key Stage 2 2006, Mathematics attainment was below the County and ‘family group' average at level 4 and
         above, although above at level 5. An examination of points progress for this group year-on-year showed that there had
         been a lack of progress in Years 3 and 4 that contributed to their under-attainment. Standards in Mathematics rose at the
         end of 2007. It is also noteworthy that attainment levels in the test were below teacher assessed levels, particularly at
         level 5.
     q   Notably the cohort of pupils who completed their Key Stage 2 tests in 2007 included 23% who were not in the school for
         the whole of Key Stage Two. Furthermore, 16.4% of this year group were on the SEN register more than double that of
         the school population as a whole (7.3%).
     q   Standards in Key Stage 2 are rising. Attainment across subjects was higher in 2007 - above or well above national
         averages (see QCA test data and NFER Analysis).

 Targets/learners' current work:

     q   Highly challenging Statutory Targets have been met or closely met over successive years (although not in Mathematics at
         Key Stage 2 in 2006).
     q   Learners generally meet or come close to meeting very challenging targets in all year groups.
     q   Current pupils in Year 2 and Year 6 are expected to achieve their end of year targets. (School tracking data analysis/SEN
         records/Reflection on performance against targets, LA data)
     q   Examination of school data including non-statutory QCA results, indicates that there has historically been a greater rate of
         progress in Years 5 and 6 than between Years 2 and 3, Years 3 and 4. (School tracking data analysis, Assessment and
         records of pupils progress/Scrutiny of work).
     q   There was an improvement in the rate of progress of lower junior pupils in 2006-07. However there remains an historic
         shortfall for staff in Years 5 and 6 to address with some groups of pupils.

 Groups of learners:

     q   Generally there is little difference between groups of pupils within the school. However an analysis of 2007 end of Key
         Stage data shows a gender gap in favour of girls both at Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2. This is also reflected in data for
         Years 3. 4 and 5.
     q   At the end of KS1 2007, SEN pupil Average Points Scores were well below those identified as no SEN and close to national
         figures for this grouping. This is also reflected in the end of KS2 data for this grouping.
     q   At the end of KS2 2007, contextual value added figures show the least progress for boys below level 2 (98.6 compared to
         99.6 for the cohort as a whole).
     q   An examination of data for pupils currently in the school in Key Stage 2 shows that generally it is lower achievers/SEN

Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                             Page 12 of 35
        pupils who make less progress than others. Strategies have been devised and are being implemented to meet their
        specific needs.

Progress:

    q   In 2006, CVA was 99.8 and so close to the national average. CVA in English and Science was maintained at an
        average/above average level. However, there was a steep decline in CVA in Mathematics (down to 99.4 with a
        confidence interval of 0.6). Together with other analysis, this prompted a focus on Mathematics in the School
        Improvement Plan for 2006-07 continued in 2007-08.
    q   In 2007, CVA was 99.6 - again close to average. CVA in English was highest. Mathematics showed some improvement
        (99.5) and so the previous decline has been halted.
    q   91% of pupils progressed by 2+ levels in reading in 2007, 69% in writing and 72% in mathematics.
    q   Analysis of points progress shows that in each year group 2006-07, progress was good in reading, writing and
        mathematics (although due to pupils not completing the test papers in Year 3 results show less than expected progress in
        mathematics).

Trends over time:

    q   At the end of Key Stage 1 based on average points scores, the trend was upwards across all subjects up to 2006. The
        overall decline in 2007 was most significantly due to a decline in the writing APS (although still well above the national
        APS).
    q   At the end of Key Stage 2 based on average points scores, the trend between 2006 and 2007 is slightly up/stable. As
        aniticpated, there was a slight rise in APS in mathematics in 2007 compared to 2006. Similarly, there was a rise in APS in
        English between 2006 and 2007 but unexpectedly a decline in APS in Science.

ICT capability/other key skills - impact on quality of work &; progress:

    q   Indirect evidence from planning, lesson observation and pupil conferencing shows that ICT capability is having a significant
        impact on the quality of work and progress. As a result of remodelling the ICT suite and purchasing additional equipment,
        opportunities for pupils to utilise ICT skills across the curriculum have been increased e.g. each class now has a dedicated
        ICT lesson in the suite in addition to a second lesson where ICT is used in another area of the curriculum each week. The
        use of Espresso and Education City software as well as other available media are being extensively utilised across the
        curriculum. Pupils are confident in their use of ICT and respond enthusiastically to opportunities made available. They
        access the Internet to extend their knowledge and understanding often following up enquiries they have identified for
        themselves.
    q   Wirelessly newtwork connected laptops are being used in mobile classrooms on a daily basis by each class; where
        appropriate these are also used as a pooled resource.
    q   Specialist software and equipment is also utilised which impacts on the progress of pupils with specific needs including
        those with Special Educational Needs.
    q   Assessment of ICT capability was a focus for development in 2006-07. The previous assessment system has been
        overhauled and annual tracking of pupil attainment in ICT has been put in place. This will allow us to identify specific
        aspects of ICT capability that require improvement in the future and will be used to inform teacher planning.
    q   Our involvement in the Primary Learning Network project 2005-07 which involved exploiting the potential of innovative ICT
        to raise standards in writing had a demonstrable impact on the quality of writing and motivation to write. Several staff
        have expertise in this area and a bank of resources has been produced.
    q   Other key skills, notably those linked to Building Learning Power, are proving to have a highly significant impact on the
        quality of work and progress. Where this approach is most embedded, the standard of teaching and pupil progress is at
        its best. Key skills in English and Mathematics are being applied in other curriculum areas (see long-term curriculum plan)
        and monitoring from informal reviews of books and displays show a positive influence on the quality of work and progress
        in these subjects although no formal processes exist at present for evaluating their impact.

Contribution of extended services to better achievement and higher standards:
N/a




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3b

Where relevant, how well do learners achieve in the Foundation Stage relative to their starting point and
capabilities?
Please enter text here

      q   The Foundation Stage Profile Report (2007) shows that pupils perform above the LEA average in all areas (+1.2 average
          scale points overall): Communication, Language and Literacy +1.3, Mathematical Development +1.1, Knowledge and
          Understanding of the World +1.3, Personal, Social and Emotional Development +1.4, Physical Development +0.8 and
          Creative Development +1.1.
      q   Almost all pupils by the end of Reception achieve at the expected level (i.e. 6+) and a significant percentage at a high
          level (i.e. 8+).
      q   Average scale points across most areas of learning were the same for both boys and girls. Where there were
          differences, these were small and varied in terms of favouring either boys or girls.
      q   Analysis shows that there was an increase in average scale points across all aspects of the Foundation Stage Profile
          compared to 2007, most notably in Communication, Lanaguage and Literacy (+0.6).
      q   Achievement in Reception is at least good and often outstanding. The average number of scale points covered 2006-07
          increased by 5.0 compared to baseline results.
      q   Achievement in Nursery is also good - an increase of 2.6 average scale points compared to baseline.



3c

On the basis of your evaluation, what are your key priorities for development?
Please enter text here

q    To maintain and build on progress made in 2006-07 notably improvements made in mathematics and rates of progress in Years 3-
5.
q  To increase the rate of progress of individual learners across all year groups who have been identified as underachieving/making
less than average expected progress.
q To investigate the decline in Science CVA 2007 and act on recommendations resulting from this.

q To ensure our approach to personalised learning addresses meeting the needs of boys as a group.

q To continue to focus on standards and achievement in Mathematics.

q To continue to focus on the achievement of pupils identified as SEN.




3Grade

Please enter grades in boxes below.
To guide judgement, please consult grade descriptions in Guidance for Inspectors.

                              Outstanding       Good      Satisfactory Inadequate
Learners' achievement                             X
in their work
Learners' standards in                            X
their work




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4. Personal development and well-being
How good is the overall personal development and well-being of the learners?
To help you focus your comment and judgements in completing this section, please consult the relevant pages in
the Guidance for Inspectors of Schools. Your answers here should focus on learners' outcomes; the school's
contribution to these outcomes will be covered in section 5.
In answering the following questions, please make clear the main evidence on which your evaluation is based (for
example: evidence of participation rates, evidence of learners' spiritual, moral, social and cultural development which runs as a
theme across all of these areas (4a - 4f), and data on the number of recorded bullying or racist incidents in school).
4a

To what extent do learners adopt healthy lifestyles? For example:
- whether learners take adequate physical exercise, and eat and drink healthily
- learners' growing understanding of how to live a healthy lifestyle (for example, through education about smoking, substance
abuse and sexual health risks).
Please enter text here

 Learners display a good understanding of how to live a healthy lifestyle:

     q   Pupils enthusiastically take part in a minimum of 2 hours PE/week (informal observations/pupil conferencing).
     q   Many pupils are involved in physical recreational activities - many of these take place at school: daily lunchtime coaching,
         after-school clubs etc. Children also take advantage of the local clubs available for them to join including rugby, hockey,
         gymnastics, dance and football. (Clubs over-subscribed; significant numbers involved - Activemark).
     q   The school competes against other local institutions in a range of sports on a regular basis. The school wins many of
         these competitions (display, press cuttings).
     q   Children enthusiastically engage in physical activities at break times making effective use of the playground markings that
         promote the development of physical skills and the extensive range of sports equipment provided. (Infomal observation).
     q   Whilst at school, children eat healthily (school meals menu; healthy tuck shop from Feb 2008). Emphasis is placed on
         eating a healthy breakfast at the start of the day. We have a Breakfast Club that is well attended (regularly in excess of 40
         pupils).
     q   Pupils have ready access to clean, chilled, filtered water. They drink water at regular intervals understanding the need to
         keep hydrated (evident in response to being questioned).
     q   Children respond very positively to the annual visit of the Staffordshire Life Education Caravan (feedback received).
     q   Many children respond to the challenge of taking part in both the national and local Walk to School Weeks which take
         place annually. Many children wanted to be part of the School Travel Plan Working Group and those involved have shown
         considerable enthusiasm and commitment (attend regular meetings and give generously of their free time).
     q   Personal hygiene, drugs awareness, relationships and sex education are all taught as part of the curriculum. As a result
         children understand the health risks associated with smoking and substance abuse (evident when questioned).
     q   Children's emotional health and well-being is good; they learn effectively how to recognise the signs of personal stress
         and how to manage it (evident from observations and discussion with pupils).




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4b

To what extent do learners feel safe and adopt safe practices? For example:
- whether learners feel safe from bullying, including any religious, racial (including Gypsy, Roma and Travellers of Irish heritage),
sexual and homophobic incidents
- the extent to which learners have confidence to talk to staff and others when they feel at risk
- the extent to which learners adopt safe and responsible practices in using new technologies, including the Internet.
Please enter text here

Learners feel safe and adopt safe practices:

     q   When questioned, pupils tell us they feel safe and are able to explain school processes for dealing with misbehaviour,
         bullying, racist incidents other forms of discrimination (pupil conferencing/informal discussions)
     q   There is a very low incidence of formal reporting of bullying and racism (see Racist Incident reporting file/Bullying Incident
         file/HT Reports to GB)
     q   Children show good respect for the personal dignity of others (informal observations, pupil conferencing)
     q   Pupilconferencing and informal discussion with pupils tells us that pupils are confident and comfortable with talking to
         adults in the school about their concerns knowing that they can confide in and gain strong support from staff. Older pupils
         appropriately act as buddies and confidants (observations, informal feedback).
     q   Children have a strong awareness of their responsibilities to keep themselves and others safe acting responsibly in high
         risk situations including when using the Internet (observations; informal discussion, pupil conferencing).
     q   Children show respect for their environment (observations, incidents of deliberate acts such as graffiti almost unknown).
     q   Children respond positively to specific safety related projects such as the school's work with the local Road Safety Unit
         (observations, feedback).



4c

How much do learners enjoy their education? For example:
- their attitudes and participation, including any significant variations for specific groups of pupils
- how the school's overall absence rate compares with other schools, including those in similar circumstances
- the number of pupils who are persistently absent
Please enter text here

     q   Almost all children demonstrate excellent attitudes.They are trustworthy and polite. Visitors to the school frequently
         comment on the impeccable manners of pupils and their friendliness (see recorded comments).
     q   Children collaborate readily with others and often take the initiative (observations).
     q   Children report very favourably on how well they enjoy school: they find the school welcoming, friendly and happy. They
         have a strong sense of enjoyment. They make very positive comments about their teachers. (Pupil conferencing)
     q   Learners take pride in their work and enthusiastically involve themselves in lessons (observations).
     q   Children enjoy curriculum linked visits that enrich their experience; these include a residential opportunity at an outdoor
         education centre for Year 6 pupils and an opportunity to visit a foreign country (pupil conferencing/feedback; numbers
         involved).
     q   Children are keen to come to school demonstrated by good attendance rates compared to other/similar schools(96%
         for the Autumn Term 2007 -3.7% authorised absences and 0.43% unauthorized absences;2.9% of absences are due to
         illness and 1% agreed holidays). Absence is almost exclusively due to illness or holidays taken during term time.
         Punctuality is very good.(See attendance records)
     q   Very few pupils are persistently absent. Such absence is usually due to long-term illnesses. Analysis of end
         of Autumn Term 2007 data shows that 1.56% of (8) pupils of statutory age had attendance below 80% for this period.
         (See EWS Register Inspection Report). In all instances, parents have been notified of concerns and attendance continues
         to be closely monitored.




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4d

How good is the behaviour of learners? For example:
- what proportion of lessons is significantly disrupted by poor behaviour?
Please enter text here

     q   Almost all children demonstrate exemplary behaviour. Visitors to the school frequently comment on this and
         positive feedback is received when pupils are engaged in off-site visits (see recorded comments).
     q   Pupils show a growing self-awareness and ability to reflect on the choices they make (observations, when questioned).
     q   Discussions with pupils and observations of their behaviour show that they have a strong moral framework gained from
         the examples set in school and supported by home.
     q   No lessons are significantly disrupted by poor behaviour (defined internally as requiring a complete change to the
         planned lesson and/or lesson objectives/learning outcomes not being able to be achieved and/or requiring intervention on
         the part of a colleague/more senior colleague).



4e

How well do learners make a positive contribution to the community? For example:
- learners' growing understanding of their rights and responsibilities, and of those of others
- how well learners express their views and take part in community activities both within and beyond the school.
Please enter text here

Learners are outstanding in their contribution to the school and wider (global) community.

     q   Learners readily express their views in a clear manner responding to more formal opportunities to do this as well as the
         more informal. They also listen to the opinions of others and demonstrate high levels of consideration for others
         (observations, discussion with pupils).
     q   Learners make important contributions to how the school runs responding enthusiastically to join the School Council or
         groups such as the Eco-School Committee, the Supergrounds Committee and the School Travel Plan Working Group (see
         membership information; observed meetings).
     q   Pupils raise significant amounts of money for a range of Charities each year including the NSPCC. A considerable sum was
         raised following the Tsunami in Asia. Children regularly show a great deal of initiative identifying projects they wish the
         school to get involved with e.g. the most recent Blue Peter appeal (see records of fundraising/Newsletters).
     q   Annually, pupils and parents donate very generously to a Harvest collection which is distributed to local elderly residents
         as well as charities including The Samaritans. Pupils nominate individuals to receive their Harvest gift (Newsletter, press
         cuttings and photographs).
     q   Pupils regularly take part in inter-school sporting competitions. Amongst others, the school is currently the larger schools'
         athletics champions -for more than ten years consecutively (see trophies displayed in the hall and entrance).
     q   Pupils also take an active part in local events e.g. the VE commemoration activities which took place at the local Church in
         the summer of 2005 and the annual Arts Festival activities at the local High School (see Newsletters, photogpahs).
     q   Older pupils readily accept the responsibility of performing tasks around the school and make a valuable contribution to
         the community e.g. by giving up break times to support younger pupils and to carry out tasks for teachers. Large numbers
         of Year 5 and Year 6 pupils apply to be 'Dosthill Buddies' at lunchtime, supporting younger pupils on the playground.
         (Observations)
     q   Children are developing extremely well the knowledge, understanding and attitudes that will enable them to become
         informed and responsible citizens (discussion with pupils).
     q   See also the Learning and Teaching Policy and the Learners' Charter which was developed by pupils and makes clear their
         understanding of their rights and responsibilities as learners of the school.




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4f

How well do learners prepare for their future economic well-being? For example:
- through the development of literacy, numeracy, information and communication technology, financial and enterprise
capability, economic and business understanding, and understanding of sustainable development
- learners' developing understanding of different types of work
- learners' acquisition of the social skills and other workplace skills, essential to their future economic well-being.
Please enter text here

Learners are well prepared for their future economic well-being:

     q   Children make good progress in the acquisition of literacy, numeracy and ICT skills (see assessment data).
     q   Children (age appropriate) demonstrate a good understanding of financial literacy, business and the economic
         environment e.g. they frequently organise their own fundraising events - Year 6 pupils design games for the PTA
         Christmas Fayre and raise significant sums as a result (also evident when learners questioned).
     q   Pupils also have a good understanding of sustainable development (evidenced in their enthusiasm and understanding
         when taking part in discussions, assemblies, activities related to eco-schools, walk to school etc.)
     q   Learners are able to describe different types of work and many have at least general ideas of occupations they strive to
         belong to in the future (informal discussion with pupils of all ages).
     q   Learners acquire social skills and other workplace skills well:
             r children show a strong self-confidence that empowers them to take initiative and to work constructively with others

                (observations).
             r weekly assemblies are used to value success in personal and well as in academic achievements. As a result, pupil

                self-esteem and aspiration is high. Pupils are very positive about celebration assemblies (Pupil Conferencing).
             r children are exposed to and respond positively to change and decision-making; learners were involved in

                developing the school logo, discussing the aims and values of the school and formulating the Learners' Charter.
     q   Children understand the importance of education and the opportunities that attaining at a high level will present them in
         the future (evidenced from informal discussion with pupils).



4g

Where relevant, how good are the personal, social and emotional development and well-being of learners in the
Foundation Stage?
Please enter text here

     q   By the end of the Reception year, learners in the Foundation Stage reach well above average expectations in
         personal, social and emotional development (see Profile analysis).
     q   Progress in these areas is good evidenced from the termly analysis of the Early Learning Goals.
     q   Teachers in the Foundation Stage plan a range of experiences for the children in order to develop their skills in these
         areas.
     q   Reception children are included in Pupil Conferencing exercises and are able to talk about their experiences well. They are
         among the most positive groups of pupils in terms of their feeling of well-being in the school (see Pupil Conferencing
         question responses).



4h

On the basis of your evaluation, what are your key priorities for development?
Please enter text here

     q   To achieve Healthy Schools status (achieved Spring 2008).
     q   To monitor and evaluate Personal, Social and Health Education provision to ensure the quality of teaching and learning.
     q   To assess children's progress and achievement in PSHE in line with QCA guidance.
     q   To work towards increasing: the number of pupils walking to school from 47% to 52% by September 2009; the number of
         staff car sharing from 4% to 10% by September 2009; and the number of pupils travelling to school by car with other
         children (car sharing) from 2% to 5% by March 2010.
     q   To launch a walking bus to encourage more pupils to walk to school, numbers on the walking bus to increase from 0% to
         5% by March 2009.




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4Grade


                                                Outstanding Good Satisfactory Inadequate

Learners' personal development and well-being                X




Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                          Page 19 of 35
5. The quality of provision
Your evaluation of the quality of provision should take account of the impact of teaching, the curriculum and the
school's care, guidance and support on the standards achieved and the personal development and well-being of
learners.
To help you focus your comment and judgements in completing this section, please consult the relevant pages in the
Guidance for Inspectors of Schools.
In answering the following questions, please make clear the main evidence, such as monitoring of teaching, on which
your evaluation is based.
5a

How good is the quality of teaching and learning?
- how well teaching meets individuals' needs and encourages their progress
- how well teaching promotes positive behaviour and learning
- the suitability and rigour of assessment in planning learning and monitoring learners' progress
- the involvement of parents and carers in their children's learning and development.
Please enter text here

How well teaching meets individual learning needs:
Overall, assessment supports staff in matching teaching to the ability of individuals and groups. Individual learning needs are
well met in the school through:

     q   Good support to learners with SEN which was confirmed by a LA review(Autumn 2004) and school monitoring2007 (see
         evaluative Report). Individual Education Plans are in place and there is clear evidence of pupil progress as a result of their
         implementation (see reviews/SENCo analysis).Parents play an important role in their implementation and are involved
         through regular reviews and contact with the SENCo (review documentation).
     q   The needs of abler pupils being met through differentiated planningand higher expectations of their achievement/progress
         (see observations and targets - curriculum and end of year levels).
     q   Teaching and learning is strengthened by the deployment of Teaching Assistants to meet the identified needs of year
         groups/classes/groups/individuals (observations).
     q   Intervention projects are used to raise attainment e.g. ELP, use of TAs, focus groups, Mathematics groups in Years 5 and
         6 to raise attainment/accelerate progress and Springboard (see ongoing records kept on pupils involved, work scrutiny
         and data analysis).

Management of learners: positive behaviour and learning:
Systematic whole school monitoring and evaluation processes that include scrutiny of pupils' work, lesson observations,
performance management outcomes, pupil conferencingand analysisof a comprehensive range of assessment dataconfirm that:

     q   Teaching and learning are generally good with some outstanding features often displayed.Teaching and
         learning in the Foundation Stage and some of the classes in Key Stage 1 is often outstanding (lesson observations). This
         is reflected in the standards achievedby pupils at the end of the Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 including pupil
         progress information. Whilst there is evidence of some outstanding teaching and learning in Key Stage 2, overall this is
         good and never less than satisfactory (lesson observations, assessment data).
     q   Teachers' subject knowledge is good with a high level of expertise across the staff in a range of subject areas. This is
         enhanced through In-service training and a range of focused CPD opportunities. This promotes pupil knowledge, skills and
         understanding.
     q   Most teachers have consistently high expectations of all pupils and plan challenging lessons for pupils that extend learning
         and are a catalyst for progress. Learning intentions are always shared with the class and reflected upon during the
         plenary so that pupils know what they are learning and have clear expectations of lesson outcomes.
     q   The principles of Building Learning Power are becoming embedded across the school which is impacting on pupil
         motivation, collaboration and independence.
     q   Support staff are almost always used effectively to meet the needs of learners. At Key Stage 2, they are more often
         targeted at supporting less able learners which increases their access to the lesson content and presents them with
         further challenge.
     q   A range of methods and resources are also used to ensure that the needs of all learners are met.
     q   Evidence from observations both formal and informaltogether with the perspective of visitors and parentsshow that
         learners are very well managed resulting in very high standards of behaviour. Clear systems exist including
         rewards and sanctions together with a staged response to any misbehaviour which staff skilfully utilise. Low-level
         disruption is dealt with effectively and on the few occasions in which any more serious behaviour is displayed, successful
         strategies are employed.

The suitability and rigour of assessment in planning learning and monitoring learners' progress:
Assessment procedures are good overall and outstanding in several classes.

     q   Assessment for learning principles are becoming embedded across the school ('Learning Walk' June 2005, lesson
         observations and District Inspector monitoring report: 'The school is well advanced in its thinking relating to Assessment

Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                            Page 20 of 35
        for Learning and there is clear evidence of this approach having positive impact on the pupils.')
    q   The use of success criteria has become embedded particularly in writing and is proving to be effective in raising standards
        (see lesson observations, pupil work and data analysis).
    q   Peer- and self-assessment strategies have been developed and promote learning (lesson observations).
    q   Pupil targets in English are linked to Skills ladders (recently revised). Layered targets across the school in Writing have
        been introduced (February 2006) and in Reading (April 2006). Leaflets have been compiled and distributed to parents to
        support achievement of layered targets in Literacy. These targets enable staff to monitor progress over short periods and
        to personalisetheir teaching (see layered target records/analysis).
    q   'I can' statements in Mathematics linked to weekly learning objectives have begun to be used to track individual pupil
        progress and class/year group achievement (see 'I can' data and summative analysis). This is being used to adapt
        planning to meet individual and class/year group needs (see planning including focus group intervention).
    q   Pupil tracking is an embedded part of practice (updated mid-year by staff; stored on central database), is used to monitor
        progress and to identify pupils who require further support. This is tied in with Performance Management processes (see
        data analysis/Reports).
    q   A 'Feedback Policy' indicates the good practice that exists in the school and the outstanding practice that is also
        demonstrated (confirmed by lesson observations/reviews of marking).
    q   Foundation stage staff collect and record information on children's experiences and achievements across the six areas of
        learning to inform the assessment of Early Learning Goals (see Foundation Stage Profile). Observational notes and
        photographs reflecting achievements across the six areas of learning are kept as evidence towards the achievement of the
        Early Learning Goals. Judgements have been moderated by an external Adviser and the processes involved, as well as the
        accuracy of conclusions reached, praised (see EY Adviser visit notes).
    q   Non-statutory tests are completed in Years 3 to 5. Results are analysed and question-level analysis is also used to identify
        strengths and weaknesses within aspects of Literacy and Numeracy (see data analysis/whole school summary). This is
        used to inform planning.
    q   Use is made of Fischer Trust data to aid target setting and ensure high expectations of pupils are maintained (see targets
        - individual pupils and class/year groups).
    q   Diagnostic comment-only marking is becoming an embedded part of practice - work is marked regularly and increasingly
        more consistently (work scrutiny Autumn 2005 & Summer 2006; current evidence of learning).
    q   Targets are set for pupils based on what they have achieved and are revised upwards where appropriate (see target
        information).

Parents and carers are involved in their children's learning and development in a variety of ways:

    q   Annual Reports to parents are detailed and well received (see Parental Comments retained as evidence).
    q   An Interim Report(see copies) has been developed which presents parents with a clear picture of their child's targets,
        progress and relative achievement.
    q   Curriculum information is communicated to parents each term and there are weekly Newsletterswhich regularly refer to
        aspects of children's learning.
    q   There are three Parents' Evening each year where information is exchanged and parents also have the opportunity to
        review pupil books.
    q   Induction events for parents for Nursery and Reception pupils include detailed information about learning experiences.
        These are complimented by SATs workshops for Year 2 and Year 6 parents (see information provided to
        parents/handouts).




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5b

How well do the curriculum and other activities meet the range of needs and interests of learners? For example:
- the extent to which the curriculum or activities match learners' needs, aspirations and capabilities, building on prior attainment and
previous experience
- how well the curriculum meets external requirements, for example progress in early reading during the Foundation Stage and Key
Stage 1, and towards language and learning entitlement at Key Stage 2, and is responsive to local circumstances
- the extent to which the provision enables and encourages learners to be healthy, contributes to learners' personal development
and well-being, and promotes equality of opportunity and community cohesion
- the extent to which enrichment activities, including where appropriate, extended services and out-of-classroom learning, contribute
to learners' enjoyment and achievement
- the extent to which learners have opportunities to develop creativity, key skills, enterprise capability, economic and business
understanding, and financial capability
- the extent to which any extended services contribute to improving learners' personal development and well-being.
Please enter text here

The extent to which the curriculum or activities match learners' needs, aspirations and capabilities, building on
prior attainment and experience:

     q   Because our children demonstrate high attainment on entry, we are continuing to develop a challenging, broad & balanced
         curriculum which builds on prior learning, exploits cross-curricular links and focuses on key skills (see long-term
         curriculum plan, medium- and short-term planning).
     q   In response to pupil, parent and staff feedback together with national developments, we are continuing to remodel our
         curriculum, school policies and schemes of work. For example, pupil conferencing showed that pupils enjoy identifying and
         researching their own questions. ‘Wonder Walls' have been established and are being used effectively in a range of
         mainly foundation subjects.
     q   External materials are utilised and adapted - including differentiated for less and more able achievers e.g. Primary
         Strategy frameworks for Literacy and Numeracy plus QCA schemes (see planning).
     q   The curriculum is supported by subject specialists where appropriate e.g. in modern foreign languages.
     q   Year group/collaborative planning is informed by subject leaders/specialists e.g. Literacy units leading to a quality written
         piece at the end of a specific period of time.
     q   Planning is sufficiently flexible to enable revisions to be made to meet the needs of individuals and groups of pupils e.g.
         from analysis of most recent assessment information. Prior assessments are used to indicate the specific needs of pupils
         in aspects of the curriculum e.g. in Numeracy in Year 3 (see planning).
     q   Transition arrangements are effective and ensure that the needs and interests of pupils are identified and passed
         between staff (see details of transition programme, minutes of meetings).
     q   Staff commitment to improve through CPD - courses, INSET, coaching, visits, national programmes such as LftM (see
         planning samples).
     q   Effective use is made of high quality support staff (lesson observations) targeted in response to individual needs utilising a
         range of strategies within the classroom with groups and individuals e.g. through precision teaching.

How far the curriculum meets external requirements and is responsive to local circumstances:

     q   Planning fully meets all statutory requirements including Religious Education and the locally agreed syllabus (see long-,
         medium- and short-term planning).
     q   The school takes an active part in an annual Arts Festival in collaboration with the local High School and other feeder
         schools (see programme of events and details of activities classes/year groups involved in).
     q   The school holds an annual Creativity Fortnight. This has included visits from a professional dancer, a poet and an Indian
         artist in addition to a wide range of activities organised by staff (see planning).
     q   Opportunities to explore the local environment are integrated into the curriculum e.g. study of the local Norman Chapel,
         study of the impact of the main road and local industry in Geography, strong links with the local Church explored through
         the RE and the wider curriculum.
     q   Due to the wide range of local sports clubs and enthusiasm for physical activity from pupils and parents, the school has
         established strong links with these organisations, which includes specialist coaching both within the formal curriculum and
         part of out of school activities e.g. rugby, football and hockey (see display, press cuttings, club information).
     q   From September 2006, Modern Foreign Languages have been taught to all Key Stage 2 pupils; French in Years 3 and 4,
         German in Years 5 and 6. The school is an active member of a local cell collaborating with other schools including the
         High School. The school makes use of expertise such as a German Assistant who has worked with Years 5 and 6 pupils
         this academic year and the skills of teaching staff. The work of the co-ordinator has been recognised as exemplary. She
         has been supported in attending a course to learn Spanish and has used this to establish a Year 2 Spanish Club (see
         timetables, planning, CPD records).

The extent to which enrichment activities and, where appropriate, extended services contribute to learners'
enjoyment and achievement:

     q   Because of feedback from parents and pupilsregarding the impact of these activities on enjoyment and achievement, the
         school funds peripatetic music lessons for a large number of pupils and is part of a Key to Music project where all pupils in

Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                            Page 22 of 35
        Year 3 are learning the violin alongside their teachers.
    q   Residential visits are also integrated into the curriculum e.g. in the Year 6 visit to Coven Outdoor Education Centre. These
        also include a bi-annual residential visit to France.
    q   The relevance of the curriculum is made real by visits e.g. to Shugborough, to the Sea-Life Centre and to Cadbury World.
    q   A wide range of high quality extra-curricular activities are organised and are well attended: a number of sports
        (supported by specialists), an ICT club, Gardening Club, French and Spanish clubs, an orchestra and a school choir.
    q   The diversity of the provision ensures that all learners are able to develop skills and access activities that they enjoy.
        There is high demand and take up for out of hours learning activities.
    q   Visitors also form part of the school's enrichment activities e.g. theatre companies, story tellers and the local Vicar (e.g
        Year 2 wedding and visit from 'Samuel Pepys') linked to the curriculum. These are well planned, integrated and impact on
        achievement and enjoyment.
    q   The school outside environment is also used to support the curriculum not only in the Foundation Stage but also
        throughout the school e.g. by the development of a Conservation Area and Inspiration Garden, playground markings and
        the development of a Science Garden. A tyre park and picnic tables present further opportunities for pupils of all ages to
        learn out of the classroom.
    q   Enrichment activities including out-of-classroom learning contribute significantly to learners' enjoyment and achievement:
        pupils tell us this when engaged in pupil conferencing and other forms of consultation. They report enjoyment of learning
        and a sense of achievement.
    q   60% of parents strongly agree and a further 39% tend to agree that they are 'happy about the kinds of things (their) child
        is learning'(2007 - slight increase on 2005).

The extent to which the provision enables and encourages learners to be healthy, contributes to
learners' personal development and well-being, and promotes equality of opportunity and community cohesion:

    q   Provision encourages pupils to adopt a healthy and safe attitude e.g. through the PSHE curriculum, input from the Life
        Education Caravan annual visit and the school's work with the Road Safety team.This includes curriculum projects linked
        to Science and Geography in addition to road safety. These are embedded within the curriculum.
    q   Pupils feel that they are encouraged to be healthy especially through the PE curriculum, the sports clubs available and
        inter-school competitions and Sports' days (pupil conferencing).
    q   Data analysis shows that equality of opportunity is secured by the provision e.g. attainment and achievement of gender
        groups and ethnic minorities (see Equal Opportunities Policy. Disability Equality Scheme and data analysis).
    q   Community cohesionis promoted through the PSHE curriculum, the school's proactive approach to bullying and racism, the
        RE and Geography curriculum, the school's approach to assemblies/collective worship and the involvement of visitors in
        the school from a range of cultures. Informal discussion with pupils confirms that they have a strong sense of the school
        as a community and of belonging. Exposing pupils, who belong to a mainly white British community, to a more diverse
        range of cultures and backgrounds is appreciated as vital and an area for continuing development.

The extent to which learners have opportunities to develop creativity, key skills, enterprise capability, economic
and business understanding and financial capability:

    q   Opportunities exist for pupils to develop creativity through the planned curriculum (see planning), activities which
        encourage the development of creativity within lessons and the implementation of Building Learning Power which
        promotes creative thinking (see classroom displays and planning).
    q   Due to the lack of aspiration with regard to education within the community particularly to higher education opportunities,
        Year 4 pupils were introduced to a Young Enterprise module that focused on this in 2006-07. This was shown to impact
        positively on pupil attitudes and understanding (see evaluation by teacher involved). Further Young Enterprise projects
        are planned for the future.
    q   Pupils have opportunities to work in teams across the curriculum, notably in PE, Design Technology and Science (see
        planning).
    q   Key skills such as communication and those grounded in ICT are developed within specific subject areas and applied
        across the curriculum (see planning).




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5c

How well are learners guided and supported?
For example:
- the quality and accessibility of care (including integrated day care), advice, guidance and support to safeguard learners' welfare,
promote their personal development and help them achieve well
- the extent to which the school and any additional services contribute to the learners' capacity to be healthy, including vulnerable
groups, such as looked after children
- the effectiveness of any exclusion provision used by the school to support and reintegrate learners back into mainstream lessons
- the effectiveness of steps taken to reduce absence, including persistent absence, and raising the proportion of pupils with high
levels of attendance
- action taken to promote equality of opportunity, to ensure that all learners achieve good outcomes
- the extent to which the school supports learners in raising their individual standards through marking, assessment and personal
targets.
Please enter text here

The school provides very good support, advice and guidance:

     q   The effectiveness of the school's pastoral arrangements is reflected in the academic successthat pupils achieve (see
         attainment and achievement data).
     q   Highly challenging pupil targetsare set annually from Year 1 onwards, reviewed mid-academic year and strategies
         identified to support pupils to meet targets, particularly for those who are making less than expected
         progress. These are shared and discussed with parents (see tracking data).
     q   ‘Layered targets'are in place for Reading and Writing which pupils understand and self-assess (see tracking data and
         classroom displays, evident from discussion with pupils). Diagnostic marking supports pupilsin making progress (see
         evidence of learning/books).
     q   Learners are guided to self- and peer-assesstheir work resulting largely from the embedding of success criteria
         across the curriculum (lesson observation, pupil learning/work).
     q   Highly challenging targets are often met or closely reached(see data analysis). Further support and strategies to
         re-engage pupils or to promote further progress are identified and implemented for those who do not reach these (see
         Performance Management Records/Reports).
     q   Staff have very good knowledge of pupils and their individual needs. Teaching Assistants and other support staff
         are well trained and qualified (see NAPTA questionnaire analysis).
     q   Induction arrangementsare very good (informal observation; parental feedback). Care is taken to support all pupils but
         especially the more vulnerable in their transition from one year group to the next (see Agenda for meetings between staff
         handing on/receiving pupils).
     q   The needs of Looked After Children and any on the Child Protection Registerare well met. Procedures followed
         and meetings attended (see records including PEPs). Where appropriate the advice and assistance of support services is
         sought and appropriate referrals made (SEN records).These impact positively on academic and personal development.
         The school has been determined a 'Dyslexia Friendly' establishment (level 1) and is working towards full status.
     q   There have been no permanent exclusions from the school and no recent temporary exclusions(see Exclusion
         records).
     q   The school has continued to implement an effective transition project for Year 6 pupilswhich was started with the
         local authority SEN Behaviour Support staff focusing on vulnerable pupils and their transition to High School (informal
         feedback).
     q   The medical needs of pupils, including those with more complex difficulties are met. There is good liaison between the
         school and the School Nurse who offers support to individual children and families on a range of issues including
         emotional needs. Care plans are in place for asthmatic pupils, those with nut allergies and similar conditions. First Aiders
         are available at all times during the school day (CPD records).
     q   Provision of child care to meet local needsis in placee.g. a 'breakfast club' and a before/after school club through
         the premises being let to a private provider (include extended holiday care also).
     q   Celebration Assemblies (twice weekly), Sports Assemblies and Key Stage Assemblies are used to share good work and to
         celebrate achievements. Care is taken to ensure that all learners have the opportunity to have their work
         celebratedat an appropriate time in the year. Certificates, 'colours' and medals are given to children to make their
         achievements which are sent home for parents to share (see displays, also evident from discussion with pupils and
         parents).
     q   Welfare is further safeguarded through effective risk assessment procedures(see records).
     q   Steps taken to reduce absence are effective: data for 2004-07 shows that attendance is above national averages
         and has been maintained at this. Current academic year analysis shows this trend continuing. Measures to reduce
         absence include: issuing of 100% and 95%+ certificates to pupils termly, letters to parents for pupils with below 85%
         attendance termly, meetings with parents to discuss attendance issues as appropriate, clear systems that are applied
         effectively for noticing school of absences and chasing reasons for absence together with requests for leave for holidays.
         Reminders about attendance are featured in the weekly Newsletter and targets/current percentages shared. Where there
         have been concerns regarding individual pupil attendance the school has worked closely with local authority personnel and
         can demonstrate an impact. Recently, the Attendance Policy has been revised to include penalty notices and a points
         system to inform decision making about authorising or not authorising holidays. It is anticipated that this will result in a
         further reduction in absence.
     q   Pupil conferencing reveals that children feel well supported and able to access advicefrom older pupils such as

Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                          Page 24 of 35
         playground buddies and all members of staff.
     q   65% of parents strongly agree and a further 32% tend to agree that their child 'likes school and is happy to come' (2007 -
         a slight increase on 2005).



5d

Where relevant, what is the quality of provision in the Foundation Stage, including where appropriate the quality of
day care?
Please enter text here

Consistently good and often outstanding teaching and learning are observed in the Foundation Stage(see records
of observations).This is confirmed by LA Advisers on their visits to our settings (see termly visit records):

     q   Staff cultivate excellent relationships with children which provides a sense of security and trust.
     q   Creative learning environments are developed which stimulate learning.
     q   Activities are well planned and informed by on-going assessment information.
     q   There are high expectations of learners which pupils readily respond to.
     q   The expertise of staff is kept up to date through local training and networking opportunities - see CPD records/EY Adviser
         Visit records.
     q   Teaching Assistants make a very valuable contribution to children's learning.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development provision is very good:

     q   Staff help children to learn independently.
     q   Self-assessment and peer review is a feature of the work in Reception.
     q   Children develop confidence and enhance their self-esteem as a result of the environment created.
     q   Positive relationships and good role models enhance children's social development.
     q   Children learn and achieve well.

Communication, Language and Literacy provision is very good:

     q   Children achieve very well, above local average expectations, in speaking and listening, writing and reading.
     q   Children demonstrate a love of books and of writing.
     q   Lots of opportunities are created for children to talk and to write, always with a clear purpose.
     q   Role-play areas stimulate talk and writing.

Mathematical Development provision is very good:

     q   Very good teaching leads to pupil achievement in this area.
     q   Children achieve very well, above local averages.
     q   Good use is made of resources and links made across the curriculum.

     q   Knowledge and understanding of the World provision is also very good.Children achieve very well, above local
         averages.
     q   Physical Development provision is goodand is being improved through the planned use of an outside 'classroom'
         environment which has been designed to develop physical skills.
     q   Creative Development provision is also good.Again pupils achieve above local averages.
     q   A wealth of opportunities are created by staff for pupils to be creative. Role-play areas are planned carefully to stimulate
         the use of imagination. Creative activitiesare integrated well with other areas of provision.

See lesson observation records, evidence of learning, displays and Profile data as evidence for the above.

     q   Good links exist between the school and the before and after school club (Footsteps) - these include half-termly meetings
         and a good working relationship between school and Footsteps staff.




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5e

On the basis of your evaluation, what are your key priorities for development of your provision?
Please enter text here

Pupil Progress:

     q   See SEF 3c

Teaching and learning:

     q   To further develop approaches to Assessment for Learning focusing on questioning.
     q   To identify and implement strategies for increasing pupil productivity in lessons.
     q   To raise awareness of gender equality issues; develop and implement strategies for meeting the particular needs of boys
         and girls.

Curriculum and out of hours learning

     q   To establish a Homework/Study Support Club
     q   To carry out systematic monitoring of medium- and short term planning on a regular basis.
     q   To increase parent/carer involvement in the learning of their children and their own learning.
     q   To consult with parents on the effectiveness of, and revise accordingly, the current end of year report format and the
         Interim Report. To devise further mechanisms for reporting progress to parents.
     q   To continue to remodel the curriculum.
     q   To implement the revised Literacy and Numeracy frameworks.
     q   To develop approaches to phonic teaching taking into account national guidelines (Letters and Sounds).
     q   To determine the school's readiness for and prepare for the introduction of a Learning Platform.
     q   To develop approaches to e-safety.
     q   Improve pupils' awareness of different cultures (area for development: Ofsted October 2007).

 Care, guidance and support for learners:

     q    To meet the requirements of the Disability Equality Duty through producing and publishing a Disability Equality
         Scheme/Action Plan. (Plan published December 2007)
     q   To work with the local authority and other partners to establish the Wilnecote and Dosthill Community and Learning
         Partnership.
     q   To continue to develop teaching and learning approaches to meet the needs of SEN pupils focusing on appropriate pace,
         marking/feedback, target group support from the teacher, the learning environment and the quality of relationships.
     q   To review current provision for and identify developments in the use of ICT to support pupils with SEN.
     q   Foundation Stage - to ensure the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage are met by September 2008 taking
         into account the guidance provided (including the welfare requirements).



5Grade

 Please enter grades in boxes below.
To guide judgement, please consult grade descriptions in Guidance for Inspectors.

                              Outstanding        Good      Satisfactory       Inadequate

Quality of teaching                                X
and learning

Quality of the                                     X
curriculum and other
activities

Quality of care,                                   X
guidance and support
for learners




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6. Leadership and management
Your evaluation of leadership and management should take account of their impact in terms of the outcomes for
learners and the quality of provision.
To help you focus your comment and judgements in completing this section, please consult the relevant pages in the
Guidance for Inspectors of Schools.
In answering the following questions, please make clear the main evidence on which your evaluation is based.
6a

What is the overall effectiveness of leadership and management? For example:
- how effectively leaders and managers at all levels set clear direction leading to improvement and promote high quality care and
education
- how performance is monitored and improved through quality assurance and self-evaluation
- how effectively leaders and managers use challenging targets to raise standards, including statutory targets and attendance
targets
- how well equality of opportunity is promoted and discrimination tackled so that all learners achieve their potential; and how well
leaders and managers monitor the impact of the school's equality and diversity policies in relation to all groups of learners
- how well leaders and managers promote the professional development of the whole school's workforce and promote a suitable
work/life balance for them
- how effectively resources are deployed to achieve value for money, including the impact of continuing professional development
upon outcomes for learners
- how effectively links are made with other providers, services, employers and other organisations to promote access to integrated
care, education and any extended services
- how effectively governors (and, if appropriate, other supervisory boards) discharge their responsibilities
- the governing body is working towards, or has met, the Financial Management Standard in Schools
- do procedures for safeguarding meet current government requirements, for example child protection procedures, vetting systems,
risk assessments and disaster plans?
Please enter text here

Clear direction:

     q   The clear vision of the Headteacher and others in senior roles has resulted in raised standards of teaching (lesson
         observations and book scrutiny; pupil progress data, planning)and a sharp focus on learning and learners that is shared
         by all (evidenced in classroom environments, staff discussions/meetings, pupil engagement with learning, lesson
         observations, School Improvement Plan, Learning and Teaching Policy and Learners' Charter)
     q   Effective, sustained leadership across the school is evidenced from Average Point Scores at the end of Key Stage 1 and
         Key Stage 2 that are on the whole consistently significantly above the national average for all core subjects for several
         consecutive years.(See data analysis/Raiseonline Full Report)
     q   As a result of the detailed analysis of pupil data for each year group and for classes, staff are very clear on what the
         priorities for improvement are, are more aware of their accountability and consequent responsibility in ensuring all
         learners make good progress (see data analysis).
     q   The accountabilities of leaders have been made clear as a result of linking the structure of the School Improvement Plan
         with their roles and with areas for self-evaluation. The school continues to improve because it identifies areas for
         development from analysis of Raiseonline and other assessment data in addition to a range of outcomes from extensive
         monitoring and self-evaluation. (See School Improvement Plan, evidence file of monitoring and evaluation)
     q   As a result of the Lead Learning Team (Senior Management Team) including temporary members from the teaching and
         support staff there has been an increase in the contribution to the strategic direction of the school and understanding of
         how the vision (aims and values) can be realised. (Terms of Reference and Minutes of meetings)
     q   Pupils are healthy, safe, enjoy school, make a positive contribution and are well prepared for the future because of the
         strong steer that is provided by leaders at all levels of the school. Support staff including those who maintain the building
         are instrumental in creating a positive ethos (Ofsted Report 2007, informal observation, feedback from parents and
         visitors).
     q   Pupils and parents are also clear on the direction in which the school is moving because this is shared with them, their
         views are taken into account and they contribute to the vision. (See SEF Section 2).

Monitoring and Improvement:

     q   Performance is constantly monitored and successful strategies implemented which result in improvement e.g. in standards
         of attainment and achievement (see Analysis of data including Interim 2008)and in learning and teaching (see Monitoring
         and Evaluation Reports informed by lesson observations, work scrutiny, pupil conferencing etc.)
     q   As a consequence of investing in leadership development e.g. course attendance, the development of Subject Leadership
         Teams, Headteacher completion of the LPSH programme, the Deputy Head completing the NPQH, three members of staff
         involved in Leading from the Middle, Lead teachers involved in the Primary Strategy Learning Networks programme,
         Subject Leaders attending local updates - leadership and management has improved with those in these roles having a
         clear understanding of their responsibilities and the outcomes expected from their work (see Performance Management
         and CPD Records).

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    q   The Change Team works effectively in reducing workload and improving work-life balance. (See Minutes and outcomes
        from Well-being Questionnaires)
    q   Effective policies are in place e.g. Pay Policy and Performance Management Policy. Polices are implemented by staff,
        monitored, reviewed, updated and improved. (Policies file, GB Minutes)
    q   Headteacher Appraisal and Performance Management processes impact on the school as a whole. Challenging targets are
        set for individuals and are invariably met (see Performance Management records).Targets are linked to School
        Improvement priorities and reflect detailed analysis of class strengths and areas for development. Procedures for tracking
        pupil progress are rigorous and include an interim annual review with Phase Leaders to challenge and support staff
        further. (Performance Management records and analysis of Assessment Data)
    q   Continued rising standards in areas for development demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring and school
        improvement. E.g. improved standards and achievement in writing, reversal of decline in mathematics results (2007).
    q   All staff are included in performance management arrangements and have areas for development identified which are
        monitored and reviewed (see records held in personnel files).

Promotion of professional development:

    q   Promotion of professional development of the whole school's workforce is a strength of the school indicated
        by the number of staff who have been promoted internally including from Teaching Assistants to Higher Level Teaching
        Assistants and support for a HLTA who has completed a Foundation Degree.
    q   Other support staff have completed training in order to carry out their roles effectively including those involved with
        financial management and lunchtime supervisory staff (see Performance Management and CPD records).
    q   External opportunities including courses and internal training have had a direct impact on raising standards and improving
        teaching in school. For example: in-house training of Phase Leaders to carry out their roles, initial Building Learning Power
        training that has been cascaded across the school, coaching within and beyond the school, ‘Big Write' training for all staff
        and assessment for learning (success criteria, peer- and self-assessment, questioning, use of response partners, layered
        targets in reading and writing).
    q   Investors in People accreditation Autumn 2007.
    q   As a consequence of investing in leadership development e.g. course attendance, the development of Subject Leadership
        Teams, Headteacher completion of the LPSH programme, the Deputy Head completing the NPQH, three members of staff
        involved in Leading from the Middle, Lead teachers involved in the Primary Strategy Learning Networks programme,
        Subject Leaders attending local updates - leadership and management has improved with those in these roles having a
        clear understanding of their responsibilities and the outcomes expected from their work. Next steps include further staff
        completing Leading from the Middle and others embarking on the Leadership Pathways programme (CPD and
        Perfromance Mamnagment records).
    q   Professional development is closely integrated with priorities identified from the School Improvement Plan and
        performance management processes (see SIP, CPD and PM records).

Equality of opportunity:

    q   Ethnic minority, SEN and EAL pupils are supported and their progress is specifically tracked to ensure that they attain their
        potential. Evidence from end of Key Stage assessments show that these pupils make at least expected and often good
        progress (see analysis and HT Reports to Governors).
    q   Teachers actively promote equality of opportunity and access. This is reflected in their use of a variety of teaching
        approaches and resources which engage all pupils in learning. (Lesson Observations)
    q   Staff present a positive role model to pupils. All forms of abuse and harassment are dealt with promptly and effectively
        (e.g. see Racist Incidents file).
    q   The school promotes tolerance and understanding, and celebrates the cultural diversity of pupil backgrounds. (Display,
        curriculum planning, assemblies)
    q   Opportunities presented from projects such as Computer Club for Girls and Key 2 Music are capitalised upon to ensure
        that the potential of all is recognised and pupils have the chance to develop a range of skills and talents.

Staff, equipment, resources and accommodation:

    q   Whilst the accommodation presents challenges, improvements continue to be made to create safe, attractive and suitable
        learning environments (see School Improvement Plan and Premises Minutes).
    q   Insurance is in place to cover the cost of short-term and longer term sickness absence which results in a continuity of
        provision for pupils of quality staff.
    q   Staff with QTS or highly experienced staff who know the children well are used for PPA and Leadership and Management
        time ensuring high standards of learning and teaching are maintained at all times.
    q   Resources are targeted to meet School Improvement priorities and the needs of groups of pupils. (Budget Plan).Outcomes
        show that these have had an impact e.g. Deputy Head support to Year 6 to ensure all needs are met and average
        expected level of attainment reached for most pupils, provision of an additional teacher in Year 5 to support raised
        standards in Mathematics.
    q   Effective deployment of teaching assistants and support staff (including four Higher Level Teaching Assistants) promotes
        access for individual and groups of pupils across the ability range, impacting positively on raising pupil performance
        (lesson observations).
    q   Staff are very well qualified and experienced. This includes teachers successfully mentored as NQTs, post-threshold staff,
        three Assistant Headteachers and an Advanced Skills Teacher. Because of our school those in these roles have been
        promoted from within (CPD and PM Records).

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    q   Resources are managed efficiently and effectively: they are stored centrally or in year group areas as appropriate; subject
        leaders have responsibility for monitoring their use and ensuring they are kept in good condition and not lost (see
        Inventories/storage).
    q   Newly purchased resources such as 16 wirelessly connected laptops for use in mobile classrooms and interactive
        whiteboards are impacting on teaching and on the quality of learning (lesson observations, staff feedback).

Value for money:

    q   Best value principles are embedded - supplies and services/contracts are reviewed in line with these. A tendering process
        is also used were appropriate. Audit records from the LEA confirm that school operates its financial procedures effectively
        (see Audit 2004 and FMSiS Report - Spring 2008).
    q   Highly skilled and experienced administrative staff, the Headteacher and Finance Committee work efficiently together to
        allocate and monitor budgets.(See HT budget monitoring reports/Finance Committee Meeting minutes).
    q   The priorities of the School Improvement Plan determine the spending plan which results in resources being targeted
        where there are needs focused on learning outcomes e.g. decision to utilise personalised learning funding 06-07 and 07-
        08 for Year 5 Mathematics intervention (see SIP and Budget).
    q   Because subject leaders and others have delegated responsibility for budgets and recognise the importance of
        accountability for this, resources are prioritised and purchased to meet learning needs. (Finance records and Subject
        Leader files).
    q   CPD has a direct impact on outcomes for learners which can be clearly demonstrated e.g. activities linked to raising
        standards in writing have impacted on outcomes at KS2; recent focused CPD on Mathematics for the subject leader and
        for staff is impacting on the quality of teaching and emerging evidence suggests learning (ongoing data analysis,
        mathematics monitoring and evaluation, Spring Term 2007)

Links with other providers:

    q   Opportunities to link with Networks are exploited and impact on learning e.g. Pyramid group: Wilnecote and Dosthill
        Learning Partnership, Subject Leadership groups, Headteacher Consortia, Large Schools Network group, NQT local
        support network and Primary Strategy Learning Network. As a result of work with this network, leaders enhanced their
        skills and writing standards/pupil attitudes to writing were raised.
    q   The school successfully works with teacher trainee institutions and effectively supports NQTs - we have a three-year
        successful track-record - all NQTs have successfully met induction standards.
    q   The school site is used by local community groups including the Brownies and Guides. In addition, the school is let to
        Footsteps who provide before/after school and holiday care. Consequently, children have a degree of continuity in
        approach in terms of their education and care which is valued by parents.

Governors fully discharge all of their responsibilities:

    q   At least in part because they help shape the direction of the school and understand the school's strengths and
        weaknesses. Furthermore, they are actively involved in all decision making regarding finance, the curriculum, staffing and
        premises/health and safety. (GB and Committee Meeting Minutes)
    q   Also because the GB is well organised (e.g. it has an annual planner which guides its work, terms of reference are clear
        and detailed) and takes the opportunity to become involved in developmental activities/training (see CPD records).
    q   Because of the experience of many members of the GB who are longstanding members (e.g. the Chair of Governors is
        currently the Chair of Staffordshire Council and the Chair of another GB) combined with training received, Governors are
        clear on their role and responsibilities.
    q   School improvement in key areas, including those identified in previous inspections, clearly demonstrate the impact that
        the GB has had.
    q   All statutory duties are fulfilled. (Governing Body and Committee meeting minutes, Headteacher Reports)
    q   Governors support and challenge the Headteacher and the leadership team ensuring appropriate targets are set in line
        with school improvement priorities and external advice is sought and acted on (Governing Body and Committee meeting
        minutes, HT Reports to the GB, HT Appraisal documentation, Deputy Head and Assistant Head Performance Management)
    q   They impact on others such as subject leaders and others in key roles e.g. the SENCO, through convening or attending
        meetings and inviting relevant staff to committee meetings where this is appropriate.
    q   FMSiS met January 2008.

Arrangements to keep learners safe:

    q   All statutory and local requirements are fully met and adhered to. Child protection is managed in line with the local
        safeguarding board policies and staff receive appropriate training and advice (updated regularly - see training records).
    q   Robust vetting systems in line with best practice integral to local HR systems are rigorously adhered to ensuring that only
        suitable staff are employed. Volunteers are also vetted appropriately including obtaining Enhanced CRB checks (see
        database).
    q   Risk assessments and required disaster plans have been undertaken, are in place and are updated as necessary. Risk
        assessments are also completed for educational visits and training provided to those in key positions. Appropriate external
        advice is also sought from local authority advisers and others e.g. a recent Fire Risk Assessment in line with revised
        requirements and guidance was completed by an ex-Governor who is an experienced Fire Officer (see H&S files).



Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                        Page 29 of 35
6b

Where relevant, what is the effectiveness of leadership and management in the Foundation Stage?
Please enter text here

     q   The leadership and management of the Foundation Stage is at least goodresulting in good and often outstanding
         pupil progress. Foundation Stage Profile information confirms that pupils achieve at a higher than local average level by
         the end of Reception in all areas of learning (2004 - 2007 Profile analysis);all pupils in the Nursery and in Reception also
         make significant progress from their various starting points (see termly data analysis including comparisons to baseline).
     q   The experienced Foundation Stage Leader has a clear vision and with the staff in the Foundation Stage maintains high
         expectations of all children meeting their needs in all areas (lesson observations, observations made by the Early Years
         Adviser, data analysis)
     q   Because termly analysis of the FSP data is used to inform planning, areas of weakness are addressed and strengths
         capitalised upon, pupils make good and often outstanding progress (see planning linked to data analysis).
     q   As outcomes from CPD and advice from the local authority are acted upon standards continue to improve e.g. to further
         promote outside learning opportunities.
     q   Continuity within the Foundation Stage and beyond is secured because effective links are made between the Nursery and
         Reception e.g. through working as a single Unit at appropriate times in the year;and between the Foundation Stage and
         Key Stage 1 e.g. through transition meetings between staff the sharing of analysis of FSP data and joint target setting for
         the end of Year 1.



6c

On the basis of your evaluation, what are your key priorities for development of leadership and management?
Please enter text here

     q   To implement and subsequently review the revised Performance Management procedures and policy.
     q   To continue to improve leadership skills through involvement in the Leading from the Middle Programme, Leadership
         Pathways and the Consultant Leader Programme.
     q   To devise and implement an action plan for the transfer of the role of the SENCo in December 2008.
     q   To revisit the role of Subject Leader together with the responsibilities and accountabilities of Subject Leadership group
         members clarifying expectations regarding outcomes.
     q   To develop the CPD Policy to capture all aspects of current practice and in line with the revised Performance Management
         Policy.
     q   Ofsted, October 2007: Following monitoring of the effectiveness of the school's race equality policy governors to publish
         their findings to parents annually in the school's profile.



6Grade

Please enter grades in boxes below.
To guide judgement, please consult grade descriptions in Guidance for Inspectors.

                                                          Outstanding Good Satisfactory Inadequate

Effectiveness of leadership and management                                  X




Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                          Page 30 of 35
7. Overall effectiveness
How effective and inclusive is the provision of education, integrated care and any extended services in meeting the
needs of learners and why?
To answer the questions raised in this section of the form you should draw together your evaluations in the
previous sections.
To help you focus your comment and judgements in completing this section, please consult the relevant pages in the
Guidance for Inspectors of Schools.
In answering the following questions, please in each case make clear the main evidence on which your evaluation is
based.
7a

What is the effectiveness of any steps taken to promote improvement since the last inspection?
Please enter text here

Steps taken to promote improvement following Ofsted Inspection October 2007:

     q   Continued implementation of SIP - Mathematics Action Plan.
     q   Revision of Equal Opportunities/Race Equality Policy Spring 2008. School Profile to be amended to include outcomes of
         monitoring.
     q   District Inspector review of Race Equality Spring 2008 - proforma completed detailing school's effectiveness including
         evidence.
     q   Review of the curriculum plan and curriculum activities has begun to identify opportunities to extend cultural awareness.



7b

How effective and inclusive is the provision overall, including any extended services, and what are the main
strengths and weaknesses? For example:
- how effective is the school in enabling all learners to make good progress and achieve high standards
- how well does the school promote the personal development and well-being of all learners, including through working in
partnership with others
- how well does the school promote community cohesion
- how efficiently does the school use the resources available to it and how has the school achieved value for money in its provision
- where relevant, what is the overall effectiveness of boarding provision?
Please enter text here

Based on our self-evaluation informed by monitoring, we believe Dosthill Primary to be a good, very effective
school with high aspirations.
The main strengths are:

     q   the leadership of the school which is distributed throughout the organisation
     q   the consistency of standards achieved in core subjects at Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 including the contextual value
         added for different groups of pupils from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 2
     q   good overall achievement throughout the school
     q   provision for children in the Foundation Stage
     q   the quality of teaching which is good throughout the school with some outstanding practice
     q   very good pupil behaviour, attitudes to learning and all aspects of school life
     q   the extra-curricular opportunities made available to pupils
     q   the success pupils experience academically, on the sports field and in the arts
     q   a loyal staff who are pupil-centred, have high expectations and whose well-being is prized
     q   the positive ethos that exists in the school

The main weaknesses are:

     q   aspects of the accommodation that remain unsatisfactory and present a barrier to learning
     q   standards and achievement in Mathematics at the end of KS2.




Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                         Page 31 of 35
7c

How well does the school work in partnerships with others to promote learners well being?
Please enter text here

Highly effective links have been made with other organisations to promote the well-being of learners including:

     q   working as part of a Large Schools Network and as the lead school for a Primary Strategy Learning Network
     q   operating as part of a local Community Learning Partnership with two other primary schools and the local High School.
         This includes establishing a group which discusses and supports vulnerable pupils, a group dedicated to transition projects
         and activities linked to the High School's specialist Arts status
     q   active participants of the local sporting partnership scheme - the local High School is a satellite to the Sports' College in
         the area
     q   Natwest who have provided football strips and donated £5000 as part of their Supergrounds scheme in response to an
         application to further improve playground facilities
     q   local businesses who have donated materials and labour towards the landscaping of a central courtyard (Inspiration
         Garden) and the renovation of the school pond and conservation area
     q   local businesses who have donated benches in response to an appeal from the School Council
     q   local businesses who contribute to the Christmas and Summer Fairs run by the PTA and to the annual registered raffle -
         funds have directly impacted on learning e.g. through the purchase of digital cameras
     q   the local Church: members visit regularly and take assemblies, furthermore, activities are integrated within the curriculum
         e.g. a Year 2 mock wedding.
     q   local sports clubs who provide coaching expertise and work with the school in providing curriculum time and extra-
         curricular activities
     q   the local Baptist Church who send along members who take a fortnightly assembly. They also provide Year 6 pupils with a
         transition booklet
     q   during fundraising for the NSPCC in 2006, a representative spoke to children about safeguarding themselves and with
         parents
     q   a Barnardos worker visits school to support individual pupils
     q   strong established connections with and involvement of support services such as the Special Educational Needs Support
         Service, Behaviour Support, CAMHS, health professionals including the School Nurse and others as appropriate.

Links with others have impacted on the quality of teaching, the personal development and care of pupils, also on pupil enjoyment
and achievement (demonstrated through parent questionnaires and pupil conferencing).

7d

Where relevant, how effective is the Foundation Stage?
Please enter text here

     q   Standards in the Foundation Stage are very high: pupils achieve above local and national averages in all areas of the
         Profile. (See analysis 2004-2007; emerging data 2007-08)
     q   Pupil achievement in the Foundation Stage is at least good. There is clear evidence of learner progress well above
         national expectations from examination of value added information (e.g. Nursery and Reception baseline to achievement
         by the end of the Autumn term/Spring Term e.g. 3 or even 4 ELG's in several areas in Reception; ELG and stepping stones
         progress in Nursery)
     q   The quality of teaching in the Foundation Stage is good and often outstanding (lesson observations/learning walks).
     q   The Foundation Stage provision is a strength of the school.




Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                           Page 32 of 35
7e

What are your main priorities to further improve the overall effectiveness of the school??
Please enter text here

The targets contained in the SIP for 2007-08 are:
Pupil achievement:

     q   To continue to raise attainment in English, particularly in writing at level 4 and above and at level 5.
     q   To increase the percentage of pupils achieving at level 4 and above in mathematics.
     q   At Key Stage 1 the priority is to maintain the results achieved and ensure achievements made in the Foundation Stage are
         built on in Year 1 and subsequently in Year 2.
     q   To continue to increase the rate of progress in Years 3, 4 and 5 so that all pupils make an average of 3 points progress in
         a year in reading, writing and mathematics.
     q   To increase the rate of progress of SEN pupils and lower achievers across all year groups focusing in particular on
         mathematics.
     q   To continue to develop approaches and procedures for assessment of pupils and analysis of progress in areas beyond the
         core curriculum.

 Statutory targets for 2008:

     q   94% of pupils to achieve level 4 in mathematics at the end of Key Stage 2, 52% at level 5
     q   95% of pupils to achieve level 4 in English at the end of Key Stage 2, 59% at level 5

Teaching and Learning:

     q   To further develop approaches to Assessment for Learning focusing on questioning.
     q   To identify and implement strategies for increasing pupil productivity in lessons.
     q   To raise awareness of gender equality issues; develop and implement strategies for meeting the particular needs of boys
         and girls.

Personal development and well-being:

     q   To achieve Healthy Schools status.
     q   To monitor and evaluate Personal, Social and Health Education provision to ensure the quality of teaching and learning.
     q   To assess children's progress and achievement in PSHE in line with QCA guidance.
     q   To work towards increasing: the number of pupils walking to school from 47% to 52% by September 2009; the number of
         staff car sharing from 4% to 10% by September 2009; and the number of pupils travelling to school by car with other
         children (car sharing) from 2% to 5% by March 2010.
     q   To launch a walking bus to encourage more pupils to walk to school, numbers on the walking bus to increase from 0% to
         5% by March 2009.

Curriculum and out of hours learning:

     q   To establish a Homework/Study Support Club
     q   To carry out systematic monitoring of medium- and short term planning on a regular basis.
     q   To increase parent/carer involvement in the learning of their children and their own learning.
     q   To consult with parents on the effectiveness of, and revise accordingly, the current end of year report format and the
         Interim Report. To devise further mechanisms for reporting progress to parents.
     q   To continue to remodel the curriculum.

Care, guidance and support for learners:

     q   To meet the requirements of the Disability Equality Duty through producing and publishing a Disability Equality
         Scheme/Action Plan.
     q   To work with the local authority and other partners to establish the Wilnecote and Dosthill Community and Learning
         Partnership
     q   To continue to develop teaching and learning approaches to meet the needs of SEN pupils focusing on appropriate pace,
         marking/feedback, target group support from the teacher, the learning environment and the quality of relationships.
     q   Foundation Stage - to ensure the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage are met by September 2008 taking
         into account the guidance provided (including the welfare requirements).

Leadership and management:

     q   To gain Investors in People accreditation.
     q   To implement and subsequently review the revised Performance Management procedures and policy.
     q   To continue to improve leadership skills through involvement in the Leading from the Middle Programme, Leadership

Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                         Page 33 of 35
         Pathways and the Consultant Leader Programme.
     q   To devise and implement an action plan for the transfer of the role of the SENCo in December 2008.
     q   To revisit the role of Subject Leader together with the responsibilities and accountabilities of Subject Leadership group
         members clarifying expectations regarding outcomes.
     q   To develop the CPD Policy to capture all aspects of current practice and in line with the revised Performance Management
         Policy.



Care, guidance and support for learners:

     q   To meet the requirements of the Disability Equality Duty through producing and publishing a Disability Equality Scheme/Action
         Plan.
     q   To work with the local authority and other partners to establish the Wilnecote and Dosthill Community and Learning
         Partnership
     q   To continue to develop teaching and learning approaches to meet the needs of SEN pupils focusing on appropriate pace,
         marking/feedback, target group support from the teacher, the learning environment and the quality of relationships.
     q   Foundation Stage - to ensure the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage are met by September 2008 taking into
         account the guidance provided (including the welfare requirements).

Leadership and management:

     q   To gain Investors in People accreditation.
     q   To implement and subsequently review the revised Performance Management procedures and policy.
     q   To continue to improve leadership skills through involvement in the Leading from the Middle Programme, Leadership
         Pathways and the Consultant Leader Programme.
     q   To devise and implement an action plan for the transfer of the role of the SENCo in December 2008.
     q   To revisit the role of Subject Leader together with the responsibilities and accountabilities of Subject Leadership group
         members clarifying expectations regarding outcomes.
     q   To develop the CPD Policy to capture all aspects of current practice and in line with the revised Performance Management
         Policy.


7f

What is the capacity to make further improvement?
Please enter text here

Ofsted October 2007 - Leadership and Management: 'The school's good capacity to improve is seen in the way
that standards in writing have risen and pupils' facility with ICT has improved. '
This will continue to be achieved through:

     q   reflective practice
     q   effective analysis of evidence and data
     q   rigorous self-assessment utilising national materials and outcomes from research and involving all stakeholders
     q   clear, well thought out plans for improvement based on priorities identified from self-review/evaluation
     q   high expectations of ourselves and of learners
     q   the continued implementation of workforce reform and the enrichment of the capabilities of existing staff

There is a track record of success of the existing staff, including those in leadership positions, in securing success and
improvement. Parental views and assessment data such as the continued rise in KS1 standards and the school's success in
improving writing clearly indicate this.




Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                                          Page 34 of 35
7Grade

Please enter grades in boxes below.
To guide judgement, please consult grade descriptions in Guidance for Inspectors.

                                             Outstanding        Good       Satisfactory   Inadequate

Overall effectiveness                                             X

Capacity to make further                                          X
improvement

Improvement since the last                                        X
inspection

Quality and standards in Foundation                               X
Stage




Created on Friday 8 February 2008                                                                      Page 35 of 35

								
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