U S Aircraft Carrier Evolution and introduction to by swr14649

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									                                                             Up Dated June 6, 2008; bwh

  U S Aircraft Carrier Evolution and introduction to Carrier Foreign Water Feet
               Deployments FWFD from September 1945 to Present


Foreign Water Fleet Deployments began in earnest in 1946, with USS Midway (CVB-1)
and USS Boxer (CV-21) the only two carriers deployed in 1945 under the U. S. Navy’s
east coast and west coast separation of responsibility between the Atlantic Fleet (6th
Fleet) and Pacific Fleet (7th Fleet) in 1945.

USS Hancock (CV-19) made three "Magic Carpet" deployments in the Pacific
Ocean, and while counted as deployments for the carrier, are not counted as Foreign
Water Fleet Deployments.

Carriers were evaluated individually, and deployments include Panama Canal, Suez
Canal, Cape Horn and Cape of Good Hope transits that exceeded a month, conducting
training exercises and visiting countries, enroute for the most part to a new homeport on
an inter fleet transfer. In many cases carriers underwent overhaul in east coast shipyards,
and upon conclusion of overhaul often returned to the west coast.

Foreign Water Fleet Deployments are based on carrier deployments extending a month or
longer in foreign waters and or shorter if a carrier visited a foreign country or in a
particular region for a significant event or humanitarian relief.

Carriers made deployments extending a month or longer to other Oceans and Seas while
on Westpac and Carriers on Mediterranean Sea deployments often transited the Suez
Canal or Cape of Good Hope to other Oceans and Seas thereby making deployments
extending a month or longer.

Carriers operating in Seas and Oceans requiring Suez Canal transits which only travel
through the Med, operating in the Med less then a month are considered Med voyages,
rather then deployments to the Med, as the carrier merely traveled through the Med on
home port transits to and from the east or west coast or to the Red Sea, North Arabian
Sea, Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf and or Indian Ocean, returning home through the Suez
Canal.

Carriers operating in the Mediterranean Sea without entering the Adriatic Sea, Ionian
Sea, Ligurian Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea, Aegean Sea, Gulf of Sidra - Surt (Sirte) and Sea of
Crete are counted as Mediterranean deployments.

Several Carriers made Panama Canal transits that were considered cruises and or voyages
rather then deployments since the length of time deployed was less then a month, and
foreign port of call if any, was not reported, while several Carriers made transits that
were not reported enroute to the east or west coast:
Following her shakedown cruise USS Essex (CV-9) sailed to the Pacific in May 1943 to
begin a succession of victories which would bring her to Tokyo Bay. Her transit from the
east coast not reported;

USS Princeton (LPH-5), former CVS-37, CVA-37, and CV-37 &Valley Forge June
1946 South Atlantic, Caribbean Sea, Panama Canal and Western Pacific and or Cape
Horn and South Pacific and Western Pacific Voyage on her Home Port transfer to the
West Coast;

USS Philippine Sea (CV-47) first reported Panama Canal transit, for her new new
homeport of San Diego, California and transfer to the Pacific Fleet, steaming south
through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea; operating with the United States Atlantic
Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, departing Norfolk,
Virginia 24 May 1950, arriving in June was counted as a voyage;

USS Leyte (CVA-32), former CV-32 & Crown Point former Crown Point with (CVG-
3) (6 Sep 1950 to 3 Feb 1951) transit from the East Coast to and from Norfolk, Virginia
is not reported on her first “Westpac” deployment; on her first Korea Combat cruise,
transiting the Panama Canal via the Caribbean Sea into the Pacific Ocean, Suez Canal
transit or steaming around Cape of Good Hope; operating with the United States Atlantic
Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, into the Indian Ocean to
the Sea of Japan or Yellow Sea. Returning home either through the Suez Canal or
through the Indian Ocean around Cape of Good Hope; her first tour of duty with TF 77 in
the Far East to support United Nations Forces in Korea, operating under the direction of
the 7th Fleet in the Pacific in the Sea of Japan or Yellow Sea;

USS Shangri-la (CVS-38), former CVA-38 & CV-38 October 1952 South Atlantic,
Caribbean Sea, Panama Canal and Western Pacific Cruise and Home Port transfer to the
West Coast;

USS Valley Forge (LPH-8), former CVS-45, CVA-45 & CV-45 late 1953 Western
Pacific, Panama Canal, Caribbean Sea, South Atlantic Voyage and Home Port transfer to
the East Coast;

USS Forrestal (AVT-59), former CV-59 & CVA-59 with CVG-1 embarked second
deployment, operating with the U.S. Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the
direction of the 2nd Fleet, conducting operations in the Azores and in the eastern
Atlantic, ready to enter the Mediterranean Sea during the Suez Crisis. While not called
upon, her second deployment (7 November 1956 to 12 December 1956), was the only
reported Carrier deployment to the Azores and islands that are the autonomous region of
Portugal and is counted as an Eastern Atlantic deployment. Forrestal represented more
than one step in the evolutionary chain of modern carrier aviation. Besides her sheer size
and weight, she was the first built with an angled flight deck, which allows simultaneous
takeoffs and landings.
She also featured four catapults and four deck edge elevators to move aircraft from the
hangar bay to the flight deck; keel was laid down at Newport News Shipbuilding and
Dry-dock Co., Newport News, Virginia 14 July 1952;

USS Boxer (LPH-4), former CVS-21, CVA-21 & CV-21 1959 to 1960 Western
Pacific, Panama Canal, Caribbean Sea, South Atlantic Cruise and Home Port transfer to
the East Coast; and

USS Valley Forge (LPH-8), former CVS-45, CVA-45 & CV-45 6 January 1962
seventh reported voyage in the Caribbean Sea and fourth Panama Canal transit bound
for San Diego, California and duty with the Pacific Fleet Home Port transfer to the West
Coast.

Carriers that visited Common Wealth States, i.e. American Samoa AS; Guam; Guam;
Northern Marianas MP; Federated States of Micronesia FM; Puerto Rico PR and US
Virgin Islands VI in the Caribbean Sea and Canada were not counted as Foreign Water
Fleet Deployments, with the exception of visits to Canada while on a deployment lasting
a month or longer. The following visits to Canada occurred while carriers were either
under going training, carrier qualifications or deployments:

USS Coral Sea (CV-43), former CVA-43, CVB-43 & CV-42 visited Vancouver, B.C.
18 to 22 March 1960, on her cruise enroute to her new home port, arriving Alameda, Ca.
1 April 1960 for her new assignment undergoing western Pacific and Far East
deployments. Departed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington 11 March
1960, with Captain James S. Gray Jr., a former XO of the ship, in command (arriving 25
January 1960), upon completion of sea trials and a post-overhaul inspection and survey
evaluation. Commencing once recommissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, upon
completion of her 1st SCB 110A conversion (11 March 1960 to 1 April 1960),
decommissioned 24 April 1957;

USS George Washington (CVN-73) conducted flight deck certifications off the coast of
Virginia on 27 March 1999; underway in the Western Atlantic on 17 May 1999 and the
Western Atlantic from 19 July to 16 August 1999; making a port call at Halifax, Nova
Scotia, Canada from 16 to 18 August 1999;

USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) was underway in the Eastern Pacific on 12 July 1999
and the Eastern Pacific on 26 July 1999; making a port call at Esquimalt, B.C., Canada
from 28 July to 2 August 1999;

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) departed from Norfolk, Va. on 22 September 1999;
conducting Carrier Qualifications from 22 September to 29 September 1999; making a
port call at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada on 30 September 1999; returning to Norfolk,
Va. on 7 October 1999;
On 1 July 2000, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) arrived Everett, Washington,
disembarking CVW-14 operating out of her home port at Naval Air Station Lemoore at
San Diego, Calif., ending her Eastern Pacific deployment conducting underway
training, Carrier Qualifications (CQ), multinational exercise RIMPAC 2000 and
JTFEX (Joint Task Force Exercise) near the Hawaii Is. Underway in the Eastern
Pacific conducting CQ for FA-18E/F of VFA-122 from 3 to 6 April 2000, making a port
call at San Diego, CA. on 10 April 2000 and called at Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
from 13 to 17 April 2000. Underway in the Eastern Pacific, transiting to a multinational
exercise RIMPAC 2000 near Hawaii from 15 to 23 May 2000, Abraham Lincoln made
a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 30 May 2000. Underway for a multinational
exercise RIMPAC 2000 from 5 to 15 June 2000, conducting JTFEX (Joint Task Force
Exercise) near the Hawaii Is. from 19 to 26 June 2000; her seventh deployment since
her commission;

USS Nimitz (CVN-68), former (CVA(N)-68) conducted sea trials and Carrier Air Wing
ELEVEN carrier qualifications off the coast of San Diego, Calif. from 7 to 17 August
2002 and Tailored Ship's Training Availability Two and Three, off the coast of California
from 3 to 16 September 2002. Arriving in Esquimalt, Victoria, B.C., Canada from 19 to
16 September 2002, followed by further Tailored Ship's Training Availability Two and
Three, off the coast of California from 22 to 26 September 2002, completing TSTA II/III
and FEP (Final Exercise Period) 26 September 2002;

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) underway in the Eastern Pacific from 13 to 14 July
2004; making a port call at Victoria, B.C., Canada from 15 to 16 July 2004; and

On 1 November 2004, USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) with CVW-14 embarked
arrived San Diego, California, Calif., disembarking CVW-14 operating out of her home
port at Naval Air Station Lemoore, ending her third “Westpac” deployment operating
with the Pacific Fleet and 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific participating in RIMPAC '04,
on her third Indian Ocean deployment (4th voyage), her fourth Arabian Sea/Gulf
(Persian Gulf) deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation
Southern Watch , operating under operational control of the US Naval Forces Central
Command and 5th Fleet., enforcing the no-fly zone south of the 32nd parallel in Iraq,
while U.S. Naval Forces Central Command operational control extends to the Indian
Ocean following the war with Iraq (Operation Desert Storm), with the Commander, 7th
Fleet, serving as naval component commander for Central Command. Underway in the
Eastern Pacific from 24 May to 6 June 2004 and the Gulf of Alaska, John C. Stennis
participated in Northern Edge '04 from 7 to 16 June 2004, making a port call at Victoria,
B.C., Canada from 18 to 21 June 2004. Underway in the Pacific from 22 to 26 June 2004,
John C. Stennis headed for Hawaii waters to take part in the RIMPAC '04 on 27 June
2004, underway in the Pacific from 27 to 28 June 2004, making a port call at Pearl
Harbor, Hawaii from 29 June to July 2004. Underway in the Pacific from 6 to 21 July
2004, John C. Stennis made a port call at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 22 to 25 July 2004.
Underway in the Western Pacific from 28 July to 19 August 2004 and the East China
Sea on 20 August 2004.
John C. Stennis made a port call at Sasebo, Japan from 21 to 24 August 2004. Departing
Sasebo on 25 August 2004, John C. Stennis operated in the Western Pacific from 25 to
27 August 2004 and then headed for the East China Sea on 30 August 2004, returning to
the Western Pacific on 31 August 2004, making a port call at Port Kelang, Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia from 1 to 5 September 2004. Underway in the South China Sea from
8 to 21 September 2004, John C. Stennis headed for the Indian Ocean, operating there
from 22 to 27 September 2004, making a port call at Fremantle, Australia from 28
September to 1 October 2004, prior to returning to the Indian Ocean, operating there
from 2 to 12 October 2004, returning to the Pacific via the South China Sea, operating
in the Pacific from 13 to 31 October 2004; her fifth deployment since her commission.

USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) underway in the Eastern Pacific from 7 to 8 August
2006, visiting Esquimalt, Victoria, B.C., Canada from 9 to 11 August 2006; underway in
the Eastern Pacific from 13 to 19 August 2006; visiting San Diego, Calif. from 20 to 21
September 2006; conducting Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the
coast of Southern California from 22 September to 16 October 2006; returning to
Bremerton on 17 October 2006.

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) departed Everett on 20 September 2007, underway in
the Eastern Pacific on 20 September 2007, conducting carrier qualifications for FRS off
the coast of Southern California on 21 September 2007, followed by a visit to San Diego
from 21 to 22 September 2007. Departing San Diego, Abraham Lincoln conducted
carrier qualifications for FRS off the coast of Southern California from 22 to 28
September 2007, joining other U.S. Navy ships and aircraft parading through San Diego
Bay during the annual Port of San Diego Sea and Air Parade, which is the flagship event
of San Diego's month-long Fleet Week celebration on 29 September 2007. The Sea and
Air Parade is the flagship event of San Diego’s month-long ―Fleet Week‖ celebration, an
annual event paying tribute to the city’s close ties to the military. The parade consistently
draws upward of 100,000 spectators and is visible from most of downtown San Diego as
the ships steam through the bay. Lincoln’s crew manned the rails in dress whites as the
90,000-ton aircraft carrier passed in front of the San Diego skyline and moored at Naval
Air Station North Island. Abraham Lincoln underway in the Eastern Pacific from 30
September to 2 October 2007, made a port call to Victoria, British Columbia from 3 to 5
October 2007. Guests from Victoria, British Columbia, as well as visiting Sailors from
Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Calgary (FFH-335) were welcomed to a reception
in the hangar bay of Abraham Lincoln on 3 October 2007. Friends and family of Sailors
stationed aboard Abraham Lincoln were treated to an up-close look at life aboard a
Nimitz-class aircraft carrier during Friends and Family Day Cruise in the Strait of Juan de
Fuca on 6 October 2007. Abraham Lincoln returned to Everett 6 October 2007.
Carriers that made foreign port calls on their deployment that were less then one month:

On 5 November 1964, USS Independence (CVA-62) with CVW-7 embarked arrived
Norfolk, Virginia, ending her fifth Mediterranean Sea deployment operating with the
Sixth Fleet, having operated in the Northern Atlantic, crossing the Artic Circle 22
September 1964 (Royal Order of the Bluenose). Independence conducted NATO
Teamwork exercises in the Norwegian Sea and off the coast of France, thence to
Gibraltar; on her fourth deployment; her seventh deployment (8 September 1964 to 5
November 1964), since her commission as a Forrestal Class Attack Aircraft Carrier at the
Brooklyn Naval Shipyard;

The second Wright (CC-2), former AVT-7 & CVL-49, arrived Norfolk, Va. 21
December 1963, ending her home port transfer from San Diego, California via the
Panama Canal. Her first deployment since her recommission at Puget Sound Naval
Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington on 11 May 1963, with Capt. John L. Arrington, II, in
command. Reclassified an auxiliary aircraft transport, redesignating AVT-7 on 15 May
1959 while assigned to the Bremerton group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Remained
inactive until 15 March 1962, when she was taken to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard,
Bremerton, Washington for conversion to a command ship and reclassified as CC-2.
Recommissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington on 11 May
1963, with Capt. John L. Arrington, II, in command;

On 3 March 1971, USS Wasp (CVS-18) with Commander, ASWGRU 2, CVSG-54
and Detachment 18 from Fleet Training Group, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, embarked
arrived Quonset Point, R.I., ending her eighth Northern Atlantic deployment and her
ninth voyage in the North Atlantic operating with the United States Atlantic Command
(Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet, her sixth Mediterranean Sea
deployment operating with the 6th Fleet and 13th deployment as an ASW Aircraft
Carrier since her reclassification to an antisubmarine warfare aircraft carrier CVS-18,
effective on 1 November 1956. Commencing refresher training at Bermuda, Wasp
stopped briefly at Rota, Spain upon conclusion, and then proceeded to the Mediterranean
Sea for participation in the "National Week VIII" exercises with several destroyers for the
investigation of known Soviet submarine operating areas.

Secretary of the Navy John Chafee, accompanied by Commander, 6th Fleet, Vice
Admiral Isaac C. Kidd, Jr. paid a visit on 12 February 1971. Shortly thereafter, Wasp
detached early from the "National Week" exercise on 15 February 1971, to support USS
Kennedy (CVA-67) as she steamed toward Gibraltar (Soviet ships trailed Wasp and
John F. Kennedy until they entered the Strait of Sicily when the Soviets departed to the
east). Upon conclusion, Wasp visited Barcelona, Spain, commencing her homeward
journey on 24 February 1971; her 20th foreign waters deployment since she was first
recommissioned (14 January 1971 to 3 March 1971); and
On 20 November 2000, USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) with CVW-5 embarked arrived
Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan), ending her fifth deployment in foreign waters
as a forward deployed carrier operating with the 7th Fleet off the Korea Peninsula and
Japan, underway in the Western Pacific off the Japan coast from 26 September to 8
October 2000, underway in the Sea of Japan from 10 to 11 October 2000, making a port
call at Otaru, Hokkaido, Japan from 13 October to 16 2000, participating in the multi-
national Exercises Foal Eagle '2000, joining the exercise on 25 October 2000 as the
striking arm of Battle Force 7th Fleet, underway in the Sea of Japan from 16 October to
1 November 2000, concluding exercise "Foal Eagle 2000" (scheduled from Oct. 25 to
Nov. 3) with forces of the Republic of Korea in the Sea of Japan on 31 October 2000,
making a port call at Pusan, Republic of Korea from 2 to 5 November 2000, trained with
the Japanese Self Defense Force in Exercise Keen Sword (7 to 17 November 2000,
underway in the Sea of Japan from 6 to 15 November 2000, underway in the Western
Pacific from 16 to 19 November 2000, steaming 4,750 miles, joining three exercises and
two port visits CVW-5 flew 3,411 sorties and 3,345 traps; her 28th deployment ended
(26 September to 20 November 2000), since her commission 29 April 1961.

The longest reported deployment:

On 21 August 1969, Arlington (AGMR-2), former Saipan CC-3, AVT-6 & CVL-48
arrived for the first time, at her homeport Long Beach, Calif., ending her second
“Westpac” deployment, her first Combat tour operating under the direction of the 7th
Fleet in the Pacific and South China Sea off Vietnam. Departed Hampton Roads 7 July
1967 operating with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the
direction of the 2nd Fleet, transiting the Panama Canal via the Caribbean Sea into the
Pacific Ocean. Forward deployed for over two years, Arlington’s deployment the
longest to date.

From the beginning of Naval Aviation, aircraft carriers have played a role in nearly every
world conflict with the exception of World War I, the Iraq/Iran and the Afghan/Soviet
Union Wars. A portal to the past and a gateway to the future best describe my
publications on U. S. Aircraft Carrier Deployments. Carriers were evaluated
individually, and deployments include Panama Canal, Suez Canal, Cape Horn and Cape
of Good Hope transits that exceeded a month, conducting training exercises and visiting
countries, enroute for the most part to a new homeport on an inter fleet transfer. In many
cases carriers underwent overhaul in east coast shipyards, and upon conclusion of
overhaul often returned to the west coast. Until the U. S. Navy releases Carrier Ship
Logs, Deployment Charts and Letter of Instructions (LOI’s), the exact numbering of
carrier deployments will never be known. Counting of Foreign Water Fleet Deployments
is within a count of ten, and numbering of deployments although not 100 percent correct
is the most accurate accounting to date and establishes the foundation for future reports
once all required information is released by the U. S. Navy.

Color coding of carriers allows an individual to follow east and west coast carriers
operating away from there home port with the 2nd, 6th, 7th, 5th and Central Command. Red
represents east coast and blue west coast deployments:
USS Boxer (CV-21) with CVAG-19 embarked was the first carrier deployed under the
U. S. Navy’s east coast and west coast separation of responsibility between the Atlantic
Fleet (6th Fleet) and Pacific Fleet (7th Fleet) in 1945.

By the end of 1949, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) North Atlantic deployment
(27 October to 23 November 1949), with CVG-6 embarked was the U. S. Navy’s thirty
seventh Foreign Water Fleet Deployment.

USS Midway (CVB-41) with CVG-4 embarked was the first carrier deployed in 1950, on
the U. S. Navy’s thirty-eighth Foreign Water Fleet Deployment under the U. S.
Navy’s east coast and west coast separation of responsibility between the Atlantic Fleet
(6th Fleet) and Pacific Fleet (7th Fleet).

USS Randolph (CVS-15) December 1963 deployment with CVSG-58 embarked
operating in the Atlantic made the U. S. Navy’s 308th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment.

USS Valley Forge (LPH-8), former CVS-45, CVA-45 & CV made the U. S. Navy’s 309
to 313th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment and the first deployment beginning in 1964,
on her 1st Vietnam Combat Cruise, her 7th Westpac and 2nd South China Sea.

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked, made the last deployment of 1976 and
the U. S. Navy’s 512th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment, on her 13th South China Sea
deployment, her 10th Vietnam Peace Patrol Cruise, and 10th deployment as a forward
deployed carrier stationed at Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan).

USS Midway (CV-41) with CVW-5 embarked, on her 14th South China Sea
deployment and 11th deployment as a forward deployed carrier stationed at Yokosuka,
Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) was the U. S. Navy’s 513th Foreign Water Fleet
Deployment and the first deployment in 1977.

USS Forrestal (CV-59) with CVW-6 embarked, 1st Mediterranean Sea deployment was
the U. S. Navy’s 649th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment and the last deployment of
1989.

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) with CVW-8 embarked first South Atlantic
deployment and shakedown cruise conducting acceptance trials operating with the
United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 2nd Fleet was
the U. S. Navy’s 650th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment and the first deployment in
1990.

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) with CVW-5 embarked, on her Fall Underway Period in the
Western Pacific, Sea of Japan and the South China Sea and 16th deployment as a
forward deployed carrier stationed at Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan) was the U.
S. Navy’s 774th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment and the last deployment in 2005.
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) with CVW-14 embarked, on her first “Westpac” and
first Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea/Gulf (Persian Gulf) deployment in support of
Operation Iraqi Freedom was the U. S. Navy’s 775th Foreign Water Fleet Deployment
and the first deployment in 2006.

The following five U.S. Navy fleet carriers were assigned training duty with the Naval
Air Training Station, Pensacola, Florida from 1947 to 1991:

The second Wright (CC-2), former AVT-7 & CVL-49 (31/03/47 to 26/01/49); the
second Cabot (AVT-3), former CVL-28, CV-28 & Wilmington (CL-79) (27/10/48 to
21/01/55); the Monterey (AVT 2), former CVL-26, CV-26 & Dayton (CL-78)
(15/09/50 to 16/01/56); the second Antietam (CVS-36), former CVA-36 & CV-36
(21/04/57 to 23/10/62); and the fifth Lexington (AVT-16), former CVT-16, CVS-16,
CVA-16, CV-16 & Cabot (29/12/63 to 08/11/91).

Two decommissioned Light aircraft carriers (CVL:s) were transferred to France and one
to Spain under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program: The second Langley (CVL-27),
former (CV-27), Fargo (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-27) (01/08/51 to 20/03/63); and
the Belleau Wood (CVL-24) former CV & New Haven (CL-76) (05/11/53 to 01/10/60)
to France. The Dedalo, former Cabot AVT-3, CVL-28, CV & Wilmington (CL-79)
was loaned by the U. S. to Spain, after over twelve years in "mothballs", in whose navy
she served as Dedalo from 1967 to 1972 and then purchased from the U. S. by Spain in
1972.

―The scrapping of the treaty system in 1937 allowed the US to begin building more
carriers. Prior to World War II, the Navy built Yorktown-class carriers to the largest
tonnage (25,000 tons) that the treaties of the time allowed. The ships resulting were large,
flexible and powerful, giving the US Navy a five-ship carrier force totaling 134,000 tons
in 1939, which with the addition of the 20,000 ton USS Wasp CV-7 brought the US
Navy up to the full treaty limit in tonnage in 1940. Langley AV-3, former, CV-1 &
Jupiter (AC-3) was reclassified a Sea Tender and its tonnage was not counted as the
carrier tonnage past 1937.

Yorktown and Enterprise were quickly completed after the lessons learned from
operations with the large battle cruiser conversion Lexington class, versus the smaller.
When the Naval Expansion Act of Congress passed on 17 May 1938, an increase of
40,000 tons in aircraft carriers was authorized. This permitted the building of USS
Hornet (CV-8) laid down in 1939 and USS Essex (CV-9) laid down in April 1941,
which was to become the lead ship of its class; the Essex class carrier, although this
classification was latter dropped in the '50’s. Improvements to the Yorktown design
brought about the Essex (CV-9) class‖ (Ref. 688).

More than a month before Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor, U-562 torpedoed the
destroyer USS Reuben James (DD-245), sinking her with a heavy loss of life-the first
loss of an American warship in World War II.
At the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor (December 7, 1941), three operational carriers
were stationed in the Pacific: USS Enterprise (CV-6), USS Lexington (CV-2), and USS
Saratoga (CV-3). (USS Langley AV-3 was also in the Pacific but in October 1936 it had
been converted from an operational carrier to a seaplane tender.) USS Ranger (CV-4),
USS Wasp (CV-7), and the recently commissioned USS Hornet (CV-8) remained in the
Atlantic.

―USS Yorktown (CV-5) and USS Hornet (CV-8) were transferred to the Pacific in
December 1941 and March 1942. USS Wasp (CV-7) entered the Pacific in June 1942.
USS Ranger (CV-4) was dispatched to the Pacific after a overhaul in July 1944‖ (Ref.
607).

Iowa class battleships; Baltimore-class heavy cruisers; Fletcher-class destroyers and
starting in December 1942, the Essex class and Independence class carriers started to
enter service.

―The Independence class light carriers were a result of President Franklin D. Roosevelt
interest in Navy shipbuilding plans. In August 1941, with war clearly in prospect, he
noted that no new fleet aircraft carriers were expected before 1944. The December 1941
Pearl Harbor disaster demonstrated the urgent need to have more carriers as soon as
possible and the President proposed to quickly convert some of the many cruisers then
building. Studies of cruiser-size aircraft carriers had shown their serious limitations.
Navy responded by greatly accelerating construction of the big Essex class aircraft
carriers and, in January 1942, reordering a Cleveland class light cruiser as an aircraft
carrier. Plans developed for this conversion showed much more promise than expected
and two more light cruisers were reordered as carriers in February, three in March and a
final three in June 1942. Completed in January-December 1943, simultaneously with the
first eight Essex’s, the nine Independence class ships were vital components of the great
offensive that tore through the central and western Pacific from November 1943 through
August 1945. Eight of them participated in the June 1944 Battle of the Philippine Sea
(Battle of the Philippine Sea which effectively eliminated Japan’s carrier air power,
supplying 40 percent of the fighters and 36 percent of the torpedo bombers).

The Independence class design featured a relatively short and narrow flight deck and
hangar, with a small island. To compensate for this additional topside weight, the cruiser
hulls were widened amidships by five feet. The typical air group, originally intended to
include nine each of fighters, scout-bombers and torpedo planes, was soon reoriented to
number about two dozen fighters and nine torpedo planes.

These were limited-capability ships, whose principal virtue was near-term availability.
Their small size made for sea keeping problems and a relatively high aircraft accident
rate. Protection was modest and many munitions had to be stowed at the hangar level, a
factor that contributed greatly to the loss of Princeton in October 1944.

Independence class small aircraft carriers, (CVL 22-30)
Fiscal Years 1941 (#s 22 – 26), 1942 (#s 27-30)
After WW II erupted and until it’s successful conclusion by Allied forces, the U.S. Navy
ordered 32 aircraft carriers of the Essex and the related Ticonderoga class, of which the
keels of 26 were laid down, with twenty-four actually entering service between 1942 and
1950. CV-35 and CV-46 were cancelled while under construction and nine others before
their keels had been laid down.

The Second Reprisal (CV-35) of the United States Navy would have been a
Ticonderoga-class fleet carrier. Her keel was laid down on July 1, 1944, at the New York
Naval Shipyard, of New York, New York. On August 12, 1945, when Reprisal was about
half complete, construction was cancelled. In 1946, the hulk was launched without
ceremony to clear the slipway, and was used in Chesapeake Bay for various experiments,
culminating on April 1, 1948, in explosives tests. Although inspected during January
1949 with a view to completing her as an attack carrier, the plan was dropped and
Reprisal was sold on August 2, 1949, to the Boston Metals Corporation of Baltimore,
Maryland, and, in November 1949, broken up. Despite this fact, USS Reprisal (CV-35)
appeared as if in service in 1997 on the television show JAG. Her part was played by
USS Forrestal (CV-59).

CV 44 - cancelled January 11, 1943

Iwo Jima (CV-46), a Ticonderoga-class aircraft carrier, was under construction by
Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va., but was canceled 12
August 1945. Her partially completed hull was scrapped.

CV-50 - Bethlehem Steel Company
CVs 51 & 52 - New York Navy Yard
CV-53 - Philadelphia Navy Yard
CVs 54 and 55 - Norfolk Navy Yard
CVB 56 - cancelled March 28, 1945
CVB 57 - cancelled March 28, 1945

Essex Class (CV-9) was to be the prototype of the 27,000-ton (standard displacement)
aircraft carrier commissioned 31 December 1942, considerably larger than the Enterprise
(CV-6) yet smaller than the Saratoga (CV-3). On 9 September 1940, eight Essex class
ships were ordered (CV-12 to 19) and Bennington (CV-20) and Boxer (CV-21) were
ordered on 15 December 1941. CV-14 & 15, 19 and 21 were ordered as Essex-class and
modified during design and construction and became those of the directly-related
Ticonderoga or "long hull" class carriers and 11 commissioned as Essex Class carriers‖
(Ref. 688):

Essex Class (CV-9-13, 16-18 20, 31 & 34)
Fiscal Years 1941 (#s 9-18), 1942 (# 20 & #21) and 1943 (#31 & #34)
Lexington (CV-16) commissioned on 17 February 1943; originally to be laid down as
the "Cabot" but was renamed "Lexington" during construction after the Lexington (CV-2)
was lost in the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942. Yorktown (CV-10) commissioned
on 15 April 1943; originally to be named the "Bon Home Richard", but changed after the
Yorktown (CV-5) was lost at the Battle of Midway 7 June 1942. Bunker Hill (CV-17)
commissioned on 25 May 1943. Intrepid (CV-11) commissioned on 16 August 1943.
Wasp (CV-18) commissioned on 24 November 1943; name changed from "Oriskany"
after the Wasp (CV-7) was sunk in September 1942 in the South Pacific while escorting a
troop convoy to Guadalcanal.

Hornet (CV 12) commissioned on 29 November 1943; name changed from "Kearsarge"
when the Hornet (CV-8) was lost in October 1942 in the Battle of Santa Cruz Islands on
November 29 that year. Franklin (CV-13) was commissioned on 31 January 1944.
Bennington (CV-20) was commissioned on 6 August 1944.

Nineteen more Essex class ships were ordered or scheduled, starting with ten of them on
7 August 1942. Though only two of the ships, the Bon Homme Richard (CV-31)
commissioned on 26 November 1944; and the Oriskany (CV-34) commissioned on 25
September 1950 where laid down as Essex "short hull" keels. The remainder became the
Ticonderoga or "long hull" class ships. Ticonderoga-class aircraft carriers often are
classified as Essex class vessels and their development was intertwined with the Essex
class and the Oriskany (CV-34), a highly modified sister-ship that was the prototype of
the SCB-27 modernization program, constituted the industrial age's largest class of heavy
warship‖ (Ref. 688).

Ticonderoga Class (CV-14-15, 19, 21, 32 & 33, 36-40, 45 & 47) "long hull‖
Fiscal Years 1941 (#s 14-15, 19 & 21), 1942 (# 21), 1943 (#s 32 & 33, 36-40) and 1944
(#s 45-47).

CV-34 was ordered and laid down as an Essex-class vessel, and was completed in 1950
to the much modified SCB-27A design and could be considered to be Ticonderoga-class.

Lead Ship (Ticonderoga (CV-14): Number of Ships: 21 ordered, 15 laid down, 13
commissioned
Displacement: 27,200 ton (ton: A United States unit of weight equivalent to 2000
pounds) s/ 34,880 tons (standard)
Length: 888 ft (271 m)
Beam: 93 ft (28.3 m)
Height: 147 ft (45 m)
Draft: 23 ft (7.0 m)
Speed: 33 knots
Range: 15,000 nautical miles (28,000 km) at 15 knots (28 km/h)
Patrol Endurance: 75 days
Performance: 150,000 horsepower (112 MW)
Complement: '340 Officers/ 2900 Enlisted
Propulsion: Westinghouse geared turbines (turbines: Rotary engine in which the kinetic
energy of a moving fluid is converted into mechanical energy by causing a bladed rotor
to rotate); 8 - Babcock & Wilcox boilers (boilers: Sealed vessel where water is converted
to steam) connected to four shafts

From 1941 to 1945, 24 CVs, three CVBs and 11 CVLs were constructed, and with the
exception of CVB-43 still under construction as of 1945, were all launched by year’s end
1945:

Essex Class (CV 9-13, 16-18, 20 & 31)
Fiscal Years 1941 (#s 9-18), 1942 (# 20) and 1943 (# 31)

Independence class small aircraft carriers, (CVL 22-30)
Fiscal Years 1941 (#s 22 – 26), 1942 (#s 27-30)

Midway Class (CVB 41-43)
Fiscal Years 1943 (#s 41-42) and 1944 (# 43)

Ticonderoga Class (CV 14-15, 19, 21, 32-33, 38-40, 45 & 47),
Fiscal Years 1941 (#s 14-19), 1942 (# 21), 1943 (#s 32-40) and 1944 (#s 45-47)

Saipan Class (CVL 48 & 49)
Fiscal Years 1944 (#s 48 & 49)
CVBs, CVs, CVLs & AV-3 KEEL LAID DOWN AND LAUNCH 1911 to 1945

LAID       NO. OF    U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER NAME                LAUNCHED
DOWN       SHIPS     & HULL NO’S
           WITH
           SAME
           NAME
18/10/11   First     Langley AV-3, former, CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-3)     14/08/12
                     Converted to CV-1 - 24/03/20 to 20/03/22        Reds. 25/10/36
                     Renamed Langley
8/01/21    Fourth    Lexington (CV-2), former CC 1                   03/10/25
25/09/20   Fifth     Saratoga (CV-3), former Battle Cruiser #3       07/04/25
26/09/31   Sixth     Ranger (CV-4)                                   25/02/33
21/05/34   Third     Yorktown (CV-5)                                 04/04/36
1935       Seventh   Enterprise (CV-6)                               03/10/36
01/04/36   Eighth    Wasp (CV-7)                                     04/04/39
1939       Seventh   Hornet (CV-8)                                   14/12/40
04/41      Seventh   Essex (CV-9) (Inactivated September 1945)       31/07/42
01/05/41   Fourth    Independence (CVL-22), former CV-22 & light     22/08/42
                     cruiser Amsterdam, CL-59
15/07/41   Fifth     Lexington (CV-16), former Cabot                 23/09/42
02/06/41   Fourth    Princeton (CVL-23), former CV-23 &              18/10/42
                     Tallahassee (CL-61)
11/08/41             Belleau Wood (CVL-24), former CV-24 & New       06/12/42
                     Haven (CL-76)
01/12/41   Fourth    Yorktown (CV-10), former Bon Homme Richard      21/01/43
09/41                Bunker Hill (CV-17)                             07/12/42
17/11/41             Cowpens (CVL-25), former CV-25                  17/01/43
29/12/41             Monterey (CVL-26), former CV-26 & Dayton        28/02/43
                     (CL-78)
16/03/42             Cabot (CVL-28), former CV-28 & Wilmington       04/04/43
                     (CL-79)
12/41      Fourth    Intrepid (CV-11)                                26/04/43
11/04/42   Second    Langley (CVL-27), former CV-27, Fargo (CL-      22/05/43
                     85) & Crown Point (CV-27)
26/10/42             San Jacinto (CVL-30), former CV-30 & Reprisal   26/09/43
                     & light cruiser Newark (CL-100)
31/08/42             Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 & Buffalo (CL-    01/08/43
                     99)
18/03/42   Ninth     Wasp (CV-18), former Oriskany                   17/08/43
03/08/42   Eighth    Hornet (CV-12), former Kearsarge                30/08/43
12/42      Fifth     Franklin (CV-13)                                1/10/43
26/01/43             Hancock (CV-19) former fourth Ticonderoga       24/01/44
 LAID       NO. OF     U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER NAME                LAUNCHED
 DOWN       SHIPS      & HULL NO’S
            WITH
            SAME
            NAME
 01/02/43   Fourth     Ticonderoga (CV-14), former Hancock             08/05/44

 15/01/43              Shangri-la (CV-38)                              24/02/44
 02/43      Second     Bon Homme Richard (CV-31)                       29/04/44
 10/05/43   Second     Randolph (CV-15)                                28/06/44
 15/03/43              Antietam (CV-36)                                20/08/44
 09/43    Fifth        Boxer (CV-21)                                   14/12/44
 15/03/43 Second       Lake Champlain (CV-39)                          02/11/44
 Contract Reclass.     CVB-43, former CV-42                            NAMED
 Awarded 15/07/43      LAID DOWN 24/01/44                              Coral Sea
 14/06/43 CVB                                                          10/10/44
 27/10/43              Midway (CVB-41)                                 20/03/45
 01/12/43              Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42), former Coral    29/04/45
                       Sea (CVB-42)
 14/09/43   Fifth      Princeton (CV-37), former Valley Forge          08/07/45
 02/44                 Bennington (CV-20)                              28/02/44
 07/09/44              Valley Forge (CV-45)                            18/11/45
 10/07/44            Saipan (CVL-48)                             08/07/45
 21/02/44 Third      Leyte (CV-32), former Crown Point           23/08/45
 21/08/44 Second     Wright (CVL-49)                             01/09/45
 19/08/44            Philippine Sea (CV-47)                      05/09/45
 01/05/44            Oriskany (CV-34)                            13/10/45
 01/03/44            Tarawa (CV-40)                              12/03/45
 05/05/45 Third      Kearsarge (CV-33)                           05/05/45
 CV-22, CV-23, CV-24, CV-25, CV-26, CV-27, CV-28, CV-29 & CV-30 reclass. CVL

From 1941 to 1945, 21 CVs, 2 CVBs and 9 CVLs were commissioned while CVLs were
commissioned as Independence class small aircraft carriers (CVL 22-30). 7 of the 11
CVLs were either redesignated or reclassified from CVs prior to or after commission,
while Langley (CVL-27); Bataan (CVL-29) and two Saipan Class CVLs, Saipan
(CVL-48) commissioned 14 July 1946 and Wright (CVL-49) commissioned on 9
February 1947 were laid down as CVLs.

Saipan Class (CVL 48 & 49)
Fiscal Years 1944 (#s 48 & 49)
            COMMISSIONED U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS
               (CV’s, CVB & CVL’s) 1927 to 1945

TOTAL NO.    NO. OF    U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER                    COMM
OF COMM      SHIPS     NAME & HULL NO’S
CARRIERS     WITH
BY DATE      SAME
OF COMM      NAME
1            First     Langley AV-3, former, CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-      07/04/13
                       3) Converted to CV-1 - 24/03/20 to 20/03/22    Resd.
                       Renamed Langley                                11/04/37
2            Fourth    Lexington (CV-2), former CC 1                  14/12/27
3            Fifth     Saratoga (CV-3), former Battle Cruiser #3      16/11/27
4            Sixth     Ranger (CV-4)                                  04/06/33
5            Third     Yorktown (CV-5)                                07/06/42
6            Seventh   Enterprise (CV-6)                              12/05/38
7            Eighth    Wasp (CV-7)                                    16/09/42
8            Seventh   Hornet (CV-8)                                  20/10/41
9            Seventh   Essex (CV-9) (Inactivated September 1945)      31/12/42
10                     Independence (CVL-22), former CV-22 &          14/01/43
                       light cruiser Amsterdam, CL-59
11           Fifth     Lexington (CV-16), former Cabot                17/02/43
12           Fourth    Princeton (CVL-23), former CV-23 &             25/02/43
                       Tallahassee (CL-61)
13                     Belleau Wood (CVL-24) former CV-24 &           31/03/43
                       New Haven (CL-76)
14           Fourth    Yorktown (CV-10) former Bon Homme              15/04/43
                       Richard
15                     Bunker Hill (CV-17)                            24/05/43
16                     Cowpens (CVL-25), former CV-25                 28/05/43
17                     Monterey (CVL-26), former CV-26 & Dayton       17/06/43
                       (CL-78)
18           Second    Cabot CVL-28, former CV-28 & Wilmington        24/07/43
                       (CL-79)
19           Fourth    Intrepid (CV-11)                               16/08/43
20           Second    Langley (CVL-27), former CV-27, Fargo          31/08/43
                       (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-27)
21           Second    San Jacinto (CV-30), former Reprisal & light   15/10/43
                       cruiser Newark (CL-100)
22                     Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 & Buffalo        17/11/43
                       (CL-99)
23           Ninth     Wasp (CV-18), former Oriskany                  24/11/43
24           Eighth    Hornet (CV-12), former Kearsarge               29/11/43
 TOTAL NO.       NO. OF     U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER                     COMM
 OF COMM         SHIPS      NAME & HULL NO’S
 CARRIERS        WITH
 BY DATE         SAME
 OF COMM         NAME
 25              Fifth   Franklin (CV-13)                           31/01/44
 26                      Hancock (CV-19) former fourth Ticonderoga 15/04/44
 27            Fourth    fourth Ticonderoga (CV-14), former Hancock 08/05/44
 28                      Bennington (CV-20)                         06/08/44
 29                      Shangri-la (CV-38)                         15/09/44
 30            Second    Randolph (CV-15)                           09/10/44
 31            Second    Bon Homme Richard (CV-31)                  26/11/44
 32            Second    Antietam (CV-36)                           28/01/45
 33            Fifth     Boxer (CV-21)                              16/04/45
 34            Second    Lake Champlain (CV-39)                     03/06/45
 35                      Midway (CVB-41)                            10/09/45
 36                      Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42), former     27/10/45
                         Coral Sea (CVB-42)
 37            Fifth     Princeton (CV-37), former Valley Forge     18/11/45
 38                      Tarawa (CV-40)                             08/12/45
 CV-22, CV-23, CV-24, CV-25, CV-26, CV-27, CV-28, CV-29 & CV-30 reclass. CVL

Iwo Jima (CV-46), a Ticonderoga-class aircraft carrier, was under construction by
Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va., but was canceled 12
August 1945. Her partially completed hull was scrapped.

During World War II, twenty-one U.S. Navy fleet carriers (CVs), Langley (AV-3),
former, CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-3) and nine Light aircraft carriers (CVLs) conducted
operations and fourteen Carriers and one CVL served after the War (included in the count
of 21 and noted with a *), earning 215+ Battle Stars.

Carriers include the first eight built before World War II:

Langley AV-3, former, CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-3) 4 Battle Stars (NUC)
Lexington (CV-2), former CC 1 2 Battle Stars
Saratoga (CV-3), former Battle Cruiser #3 7 Battle Stars
Ranger (CV-4) 2 Battle Stars
Yorktown (CV-5) 3 Battle Stars
Enterprise (CV-6) 20 Battle Stars (PUC/ NUC)
Wasp (CV-7) 2 Battle Stars and
Hornet (CV-8) 4 Battle Stars
  COMMISSIONED U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIERS AND AV-3 1911 to 1941

 TOTAL NO.       NO. OF     U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER                     COMM
 OF COMM         SHIPS      NAME & HULL NO’S
 CARRIERS        WITH
 BY DATE         SAME
 OF COMM         NAME
 1               First        Langley AV-3, former, CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-        07/04/13
                              3) Converted to CV-1 - 24/03/20 to 20/03/22      Recom.
                              Renamed Langley                                  11/04/37
 2                Fourth      Lexington (CV-2), former CC 1                    14/12/27
 3                Fifth       Saratoga (CV-3), former Battle Cruiser #3        16/11/27
 4                Sixth       Ranger (CV-4)                                    04/06/33
 5                Third       Yorktown (CV-5)                                  30/11/37
 6                Seventh Enterprise (CV-6)                                    12/05/38
 7                Eighth      Wasp (CV-7)                                      25/04/40
 8                Seventh Hornet (CV-8)                                        20/10/41
 Langley (single ship) - converted from a collier
 First US carrier built from start as a carrier: USS Ranger (CV-4)
 Yorktown Class (Yorktown, Enterprise, Hornet) - based on an expanded Ranger design
 Lexington Class (Lexington & Saratoga) - converted from battlecruisers
 Most decorated US ship in World War II: USS Enterprise (CV-6), earned 20 out a possible
 22 battle stars
 Wasp (single ship) - design restricted due to limited tonnage remaining in the Washington
 treaty
 Shortest career: Hornet (CV-8), 12 months, October 1941 to 27 October 1942

Nine Light aircraft carriers (CVLs):

Independence (CVL-22), former CV-22 & light cruiser Amsterdam, CL-59 8 Battle Stars
Princeton (CVL-23), former CV-23 & Tallahassee (CL-61) 9 Battle Stars
Belleau Wood (CVL-24), former CV-24 & New Haven (CL-76) 12 Battle Stars (PUC)
Cowpens (CVL-25), former CV-25 12 Battle Stars (NUC)
Monterey (CVL-26), former CV-26 & Dayton (CL-78) 11 Battle Stars
Cabot (CVL-28), former CV-28 & Wilmington (CL-79) 9 (PUC) Battle Stars
Langley (CVL-27), former CV-27, Fargo (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-27) 9 Battle
StarsSan Jacinto (CVL-30), former CV-30, Reprisal & light cruiser Newark (CL-100) 5
Bate Stars (PUC)
Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 & Buffalo (CL-99)* - 6 Battle Stars
Carriers that served during the War II in addition to the eight Carriers at the
beginning of the War:

Seventh Essex (CV-9) (Inactivated September 1945)* 13 Battle Stars (PUC)
Fifth Lexington (CV-16), former Cabot)* 11 Battle Stars (PUC)
Fourth Yorktown (CV-10), former Bon Homme Richard* 11 Battle Stars (PUC)
Bunker Hill (CV-17) 11 Battle Stars (PUC)
Forth Intrepid (CV-11)* 5 Battle Stars
Night Wasp (CV-18), former Oriskany* 8 Battle Stars (6 NUC)
Eight Hornet (CV-12), former Kearsarge* - 9 Battle Stars (PUC)
Fifth Franklin (CV-13) 4 Batle Stars
Hancock (CV-19) former fourth Ticonderoga* 4 Battle Stars (NUC)
Fourth Ticonderoga (CV-14), former Hancock* 5 Battle Stars (3 NUC)
Bennington (CV-20)* 3+ Battle Stars
Shangri-la (CV-38)* - 2 Battle Stars
Randolph (CV-15)* - 3 Battle Stars and
Second Bon Homme Richard (CV-31)* 1 Battle Star

       AV-3, CV’s AND CVL’s THAT PARTICIPATED IN WORLD WAR II

 TOTAL NO.    NO. OF U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT                         COMM         BATTLE
 OF COMM      SHIPS CARRIER NAME & HULL NO’S                                  STARS
 CARRIERS     WITH
 BY DATE      SAME
 OF COMM      NAME
 1 (NUC)      First   Langley AV-3, former, CV-1 &               07/04/13     4
                      Jupiter (AC-3) Converted to CV-1 -         Resd.
                      24/03/20 to 20/03/22                       11/04/37
                      Renamed Langley
 2            Fourth  Lexington (CV-2), former CC 1              14/12/27     2
 3            Fifth   Saratoga (CV-3), former Battle             16/11/27     7
                      Cruiser #3
 4            Sixth   Ranger (CV-4)                              04/06/33     2
 5            Third   Yorktown (CV-5)                            07/06/42     3
 6 (PUC/ NUC) Seventh Enterprise (CV-6)                          12/05/38     20
 7            Eighth  Wasp (CV-7)                                16/09/42     2
 8            Seventh Hornet (CV-8)                              20/10/41     4
 9 (PUC)      Seventh Essex (CV-9) (Inactivated                  31/12/42     13
                      September 1945)
 10                   Independence (CVL-22), former              14/01/43     8
                      CV-22 & light cruiser Amsterdam,
                      CL-59
 11 (PUC)     Fifth   Lexington (CV-16), former Cabot            17/02/43     11
TOTAL NO.    NO. OF U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT                  COMM       BATTLE
OF COMM      SHIPS CARRIER NAME & HULL NO’S                         STARS
CARRIERS     WITH
BY DATE      SAME
OF COMM      NAME
12           Fourth Princeton (CVL-23), former CV-23                9
                    & Tallahassee (CL-61)
13 (PUC)            Belleau Wood (CVL-24), former        31/03/43   12
                    CV-24 & New Haven (CL-76)
14 (PUC)     Fourth Yorktown (CV-10), former Bon         15/04/43   11
                    Homme Richard
15 (PUC)            Bunker Hill (CV-17)                  24/05/43   11
16 (NUC)            Cowpens (CVL-25), former CV-25       28/05/43   12
17                  Monterey (CVL-26), former CV-26      17/06/43   11
                    & Dayton (CL-78)
18 (PUC)     Second Cabot (CVL-28), former CV-28 &       24/07/43   9
                    Wilmington (CL-79)
19           Fourth Intrepid (CV-11)                     16/08/43   5+
20           Second Langley (CVL-27), former CV-27,      31/08/43   9
                    Fargo (CL-85) & Crown Point (CV-
                    27)
21 (PUC)            San Jacinto (CVL-30), former CV-     15/10/43   5
                    30 & Reprisal & light cruiser
                    Newark (CL-100)
22                  Bataan (CVL-29), former CV-29 &      17/11/43   6
                    Buffalo (CL-99)
23 (6 NUC)   Ninth  Wasp (CV-18), former Oriskany        24/11/43   8
24 (PUC)     Eighth Hornet (CV-12), former Kearsarge     29/11/43   9
25           Fifth  Franklin (CV-13)                     31/01/44   4
26 (NUC)            Hancock (CV-19) former fourth        15/04/44   4
                    Ticonderoga
27 (3 NUC)   Fourth fourth Ticonderoga (CV-14), former   08/05/44   5
                    Hancock
28                  Bennington (CV-20)                   06/08/44   3+
29                  Shangri-la (CV-38)                   15/09/44   2
30           Second Randolph (CV-15)                     09/10/44   3
 TOTAL NO.       NO. OF U. S. NAVY AIRCRAFT       COMM                      BATTLE
 OF COMM         SHIPS CARRIER NAME & HULL NO’S                             STARS
 CARRIERS        WITH
 BY DATE         SAME
 OF COMM         NAME
 31              Second Bon Homme Richard (CV-31) 26/11/44                    1
                                                                              215+
 CV-22, CV-23, CV-24, CV-25, CV-26, CV-27, CV-28, CV-29 & CV-30 reclass. CVL
 PUC - Presidential Unit Citation
 12 WW II Carriers and 1 CVL deployed after the war = 80 Battle Stars – 215+ WW II
 Carrier Battle Stars = 135 + 80)
 NUC - Navy Unit Commendation
 Fleet Carriers
 Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
 Carrier Summaries = Reference 1 and 72 unless otherwise specified.

During World War II, four CVs (the fourth Lexington (CV-2), former CC 1; the third
Yorktown (CV-5); the eighth Wasp (CV-7) and the seventh Hornet (CV-8)), one CVL
(the fourth Princeton (CVL-23), former CV-23 & Tallahassee (CL-61)) and Langley
(AV-3), former, CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-3) were sunk by enemy action.

             CV’s, CVL and AV-3 SUNK DURING 1942 to 1945

 SHIP                              COMM                *SANK         Struck from
                                                                     the Naval
                                                                     Vessel
                                                                     Register (Navy
                                                                     List)
 Langley (AV-3), former, CV-1      07/04/13            27/02/42      After 27/02/42
 & Jupiter (AC-3) Converted to     Resd. 11/04/37
 CV-1 - 24/03/20 to 20/03/22
 Renamed Langley
 fourth Lexington (CV-2),          14/12/27            8/5/42        After 8/5/42
 former CC 1
 third Yorktown (CV-5)             30/11/37            07/06/42      07/06/42
 eighth Wasp (CV-7)                25/04/40            16/09/42      16/09/42
 seventh Hornet (CV-8)             20/10/41            12/10/42      13/01/43
 fourth Princeton (CVL-23),        25/02/43            20/10/44      Some time
 former CV-23 & Tallahassee                                          after 20
 (CL-61)                                                             October 1944
The fifth Saratoga (CV-3) was sank by the U. S. Navy during the atomic bomb tests
during Operation Crossroads at Kwajalein, Bikini Atoll Marshallese, part of the
Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI); and the fourth Independence (CVL-22),
former CV & light cruiser Amsterdam, CL-59 survived after two separate atomic
bomb tests, the highly radioactive hulk taken to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and San Francisco,
Calif. for further test.

Japanese Fast Carriers in World War II

―Shinano (CVB) 62,000 tons 27 knots (Converted from a Yamato-class battleship.) Sunk
in 1944 while on shakedown trials by a U.S. submarine.

Akagi and Kaga (CV) 36,500 tons and 38,200 tons, 31 knots (Converted from battle
cruisers and similar to the Lexington and Saratoga). Both sunk at Midway by carrier
planes.

Shokaku and Zuikaku (CV) 25,675 tons, 34 knots (Similar to our Essex-type carriers).

Shokaku sunk by a U.S. submarine. Zuikaku sunk by carrier planes N.E. of Luzon.

Taiho (CV) 29,300 tons, 33.3 knots (Sunk in 1944)

Junyo and Hiyo CVs 24,100 tons, 25.5 knots (Hiyo sunk in 1944 by carrier planes)

Unryu, Amagi, Katsuragi CVs 17,150 tons, 34 knots (Unryo sunk)

Soryu CV 15,900 tons, 34 knots (Sunk at Midway by carrier planes)

Hiryu CV 17,300 tons 34 knots (Sunk at Midway by carrier planes)

Zuiho and Shoho CVLs 11,000 tons, 28 knots (Similar to Cabot but slower) Zuiho sunk
in 1944 by carrier planes. Shoho sunk in Coral Sea by carrier planes.

Chitose and Chiyoda CVLs 11,190 tons, 28.9 knots (Both sunk in Battle of Cape Engano
in 1944 by carrier planes)

Ryujo CVL 10,600 tons, 29 knots (Sunk in Solomons by carrier planes)

Hosho CVL 7,400 tons (Used mostly for training)‖ (Ref. 641).
WORLD WAR II HISTORY

 Sank due to Sank by the World War             World War
 Enemy       U. S. Navy  II CV &               II Battle
 Action                  CVL                   Stars

 1-AV           1-CV            22 + 9         215+
 4-CV           1-CVL
 1-CVL

―Capitalizing on wartime experience, USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) and her sisters, USS
Midway (CVB-41) and USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42), battle-class carriers,
were constructed with the most advanced damage control innovations possible, including
an armored flight deck and intensive internal subdivision not found on any carrier or
other combatant before or since during World War II.

―A redesignation from CV to CVB was made on 10 June 1942. CV was used to designate
multi-role Fleet Carrier's‖ (Ref. 35/43).

―The CVB-41-class ships were to be named for what had been determined to be the three
naval turning points of the war in the Pacific: Coral Sea, Midway and Leyte Gulf. Iowa
class battleships; Baltimore-class heavy cruisers; Fletcher-class destroyers and starting in
December 1942, the Essex class and Independence class carriers started to enter service.

Most of the carriers were named after American battles and famous former Navy ships.
The second Antietam (CV-36), fifth Boxer (CV-21) and second Lake Champlain
(CV-39) were commissioned prior to the end of World War II (15 August 1945) but did
not participate in World War II.

Fourteen fleet carriers (CVs) and one Light aircraft carrier (USS Bataan (CVL-29),
former CV-29 & Buffalo (CL-99)) that served in World War II saw active service after
the end of World War II. Panama Canal, Cape Horn and Cape of Good Hope transits
made during World War II by any of these 13 carriers are included in the counting by
carrier.

The Valley Forge (CV-45); Midway (CVB-41); Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42),
former Coral Sea (CVB-42); fifth Princeton (CV-37), former Valley Forge and
Tarawa (CV-40) were commissioned after World War II and during 1945.

The CORAL SEA (CVB-43), former CV-42; Valley Forge (CV-45); third Kearsarge
(CV-33); Saipan (CVL-48); third Leyte (CV-32), former Crown Point; second
Wright (CVL-49); Philippine Sea (CV-47) and Oriskany (CV-34) were laid down in
1944 and all but CVB-43 and CV-33 were launched during 1945.

Midway Class (CVB 41-43)
Fiscal Years 1943 (#s 41-42) and 1944 (# 43)
Two World War II fleet carriers (CVs) (Bon Homme Richard & Essex) and one Light
aircraft carrier (CVL) (Bataan) made Korea Combat crusies, while the fourth Yorktown
(CVS-10), former CVA-10, CV-10 & Bon Homme Richard participated in World War
II, made one Korea Peace Keeping cruise and saw action in the Vietnam conflict/war.

The Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), former CVA-31 & CV-31 saw action in World
War II, Korea and Vietnam.

The Bennington (CVS-20), former CVA-20 & CV-20; Hancock (CV-19), former,
CVA, CV-19 & fourth Ticonderoga; Shangri-la (CVS-38), former CVA-38 & CV-
38; the fourth Intrepid (CVS-11), former CVA-11 & CV-11; the eighth Hornet
(CVS-12), former CVA-12, CV-12 & Kearsarge and the fourth Ticonderoga (CVS-
14), former CVA-14, CV-14 & Hancock saw action in World War II and Vietnam.

USS United States (CVA-58), the third ship of the US Navy named for its nation, was to
be the lead ship of a radical new design of aircraft carrier. On 29 July 1948 President of
the United States Harry Truman approved construction of five "supercarriers", for which
funds had been provided in the Naval Appropriations Act of 1949. The keel of the first of
those five postwar carriers was laid down on 18 April 1949 at Newport News
Shipbuilding. The flush-deck United States was designed to launch and recover the
100,000 pound (45 t) aircraft required to carry early-model nuclear weapons, which
weighed as much as five tons. The ship would have no island and be equipped with four
aircraft elevators and four catapults. The construction cost of the new ship alone was
estimated at US$190 million. The additional thirty-nine ships required to complete the
accompanying task force raised the total cost to US$1.265 billion. United States was also
designed to provide air support for amphibious forces and to conduct sea control
operations, but its primary mission was long-range nuclear bombardment. That mission
put the ship in harm's way long before construction began. The United States Air Force
viewed United States as a challenge to their monopoly on strategic nuclear weapons
delivery.

Swayed by limited funds and bitter opposition from the United States Army and Air
Force, Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson announced on 23 April 1949 — five days
after the ship's keel was laid down — the cancellation of construction of United States.
Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan immediately resigned, and the subsequent "Revolt of
the Admirals" cost Admiral Louis Denfeld his position as Chief of Naval Operations, but
atomic bombs went to sea on the aircraft carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1950.
COMMISSIONED CARRIERS AS of 31 December 2007

CVN-63; CVN-65; CV-67; CVN-68; CVN-69; CVN-70; CVN-71; CVN-72; CVN-73;
CVN-74; CVN-75 and CVN-76

With the decommissioning of John F. Kennedy (CV-67), former CVA-67 (the 55th
Aircraft Carrier of the U. S. Navy) in FY 2006; Carl Vinson (CVN-70) (58th) under
going a 3 ½ year RCOH; and Harry S. Truman CVN 75 (63rd) commencing DPIA
(Docked-Planned Incremental Availability) January to thanksgiving 2006, the number of
carriers operating will be as low as nine during 2006. This is the lowest number of active
carriers since before WW II.

Commencing with the Antietam (CVS-36), former CVA-36 & CV-36, hull number
would no longer be in order of constructed carrier, and of the total carriers commissioned
less those cancelled, hull number counting remained consistent, while the actual number
of commissioned carries as of Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) total 64. George H.W. Bush
(CVN-77) will be once commissioned the 65th commissioned carrier.

The 1st ship in the new series of hull numbers begins with CVN-21 (66th). Actual
construction is to begin in January 2007 at Northrop Grumman Corp.'s Newport News
shipyard. Initial capability is set for 2015. CVN-22 (2nd ship in the new series) will
commence construction in January 2011, planned to join the fleet in 2018. CVN-23 (3rd
ship in the new series) scheduled to replace CVN-68 Nimitz in 2024.

Midway CV 41 - class

Displacement: 45,000 tons originally - 62,000 tons full load
Length: 968-979 feet
Beam: 121 feet
Flight Deck Width: 238 feet
Speed: 30-plus knots
Power Plant: 12 boilers, four geared steam turbines and four shafts,
212,000 shaft horsepower
Aircraft: Approximately 65 - 137 at various times
Armament: Sea Sparrow missiles; 3 Phalanx CIWS 20mm mounts
Combat Systems: SPS-48C 3-D Air Search Radar;
SPS-49 Air Search Radar and SPS-65
Navigation Radar: 2 Mk115 Fire Control; WLR- 1 ESMWLR-10;
and ESMWLR-11 ESM
Complement: 2,533 ship's company; 2,239 in air wing
Forrestal CV 59 - class

Displacement: 75,900 to 79,300 tons full load
Length: 1,063 to 1,086
Beam: 129 feet
Flight Deck Width: 252 feet
Speed: 30-plus knots
Power Plant: Eight boilers, with Forrestal's plant approximately 50 percent lower
pressure than other ships in class; four geared steam turbines, four shafts (260,000 shaft
horsepower for Forrestal, 280,000 for others)
Aircraft: Approximately 75
Armament: Sea Sparrow missiles and 3 Phalanx CIWS 20mm mounts
[installed during SLEP]
Combat Systems: SPS-48C 3-D Air Search Radar; SPS-49 Air Search Radar and
SPS-673 Mk91
Fire Control: SLQ-29 EWWLR-1; ESMWLR-3 and ESMWLR-11 ESM
Complement: 3,019 ship's company 2,480 in air wing

John F. Kennedy CV 67 – class

Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Corp.,
Newport News, Virginia
Speed: Over 30 knots
Engines: Four, geared turbine
Boilers: Eight
Number of Catapults: Four, steam powered
Arresting Gear: Four wires
Effective Landing Area: 80,588 sq.
Number of Aircraft Elevators: Four
Elevator Lifting Capacity: 130,000 pounds each (58,500 kg)
Breadth at Flight Deck: 252 feet
Size of Elevators: 4,000 square feet
Number of Screws, Blades: four, five
Aircraft Capacity: 80+ - One squadron of F-14; three of F/A-18; Four Prowlers; Four
Hawkeyes; Six Vikings; two Shadows; Eight Sea Kings or Seahawks
Catapult Length: 263 feet (79.7 m)
General Quarters Repair Lockers: Eleven
Sea Sparrow Launcher: Two, eight missiles each
Close-in Weapons System (CIWS) Mounts: Two batteries,
1,500 rounds each
.50-cal Gun Mounts: Nine / M-60 Gun Mounts: Two
Enterprise CVN 65 - class

Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia
Cost: annual running costs estimated at $220 m
Crew: Ship's Company: 3,320 - Air Wing: 2,600
Power Plant: Eight A2W reactors, four shafts
Length: 336 m (1,101 ft)
Flight Deck Width: 76 m (252 ft)
Beam: 40 m (133 ft)
Displacement: 89,600 tons full load
Speed: 33.6 knots (62 km/h) after 1996 or 1999 refit
Aircraft: 85+ - One squadron of F-14; Three of F/A-18; Four Prowlers; Four Hawkeyes;
Six Vikings; Two Shadows; Eight Sea Kings or Seahawks
Armament:
Two Sea Sparrow launchers
3 x 20 mm Phalanx CIWS mounts
Two Shadows; Eight Sea Kings or Seahawks

Kitty Hawk CV 63 – class

Builder: New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey
Total Cost: $265,200,000 in 1961
Draft: 36 feet
Total Height Above Waterline: 201 feet
Total Number of Decks & Levels: 8 decks (down) and 11 levels (up)
Electrical System Capacity: 14,000,000 watts
Fuel Capacity: 4,000,000 gallons (15,200,000 liters)
Anchors: Two - 30 tons each (27.3 mt)
Weight of Anchor Links: 360 pounds each (162 kg)
Max Length of Anchor Chain: 1,080 feet (327.6 m)
Propellers: Four, 21 feet wide (7m)
Estimated Number of Spaces: 2,400+
Flight Deck Area: 4.1 acres
Number of Catapults: Four ( Steam Powered )
Catapult Length: 263 feet (79.7 m)
Arresting Gear: Four
Effective Landing Area: 120 feet (36.4 m)
Aircraft Elevators: Four
Elevator Lifting Capacity: 130,000 pounds each (58,500 kg)
General Quarters Repair Lockers: Eleven
Aircraft Capacity: 80+ - One squadron of F-14; Three of F/A-18; Four Prowlers; Four
Hawkeyes; Six Vikings; Two Shadows; Eight Sea Kings or Seahawks
Rolling Airframe Missile Launchers: Two, 21 missiles each
Sea Sparrow Launcher: Two, eight missiles each
Close-in Weapons System (CIWS) Mounts: Two batteries, 1,500 rounds each
.50-cal Gun Mounts: Nine / M-60 Gun Mounts: Two
Nimitz class multirole aircraft carriers (7+3 ships)

Cost: $3.5 billion; projected service life: 50 years
Displacement: 101,000-104,000 tons full load
Dimensions: 1092 x 250 x 37-39 feet/332.8 x 76.2 x 11.3-11.9 meters
Propulsion: 2 A4W reactors, steam turbines, 4 shafts, 280,000 shp, 30+ knots
Weight of screws: 66,200 lbs. (30 t) each
Number of catapults: 4
Number of aircraft elevators: 4
Crew: approx 3000 (including flag) + approx 2900 air wing
Radar: SPS-48E 3-D air search, SPS-49(V)5 2-D air search (CVN 76: SPS-49A(V)1),
Mk23 target acquisition, 2 SPN-46 air traffic control, SPN-43B air traffic control, SPN-
44 landing aid
Fire Control: 3 Mk91 NSSM guidance systems with Mk95 radars
EW: SLQ-32(V)4 jamming/deception suite, Mk36 SRBOC decoy RL, SLQ-25A Nixie
torpedo countermeasure
Aviation: full flight deck with angled deck, 684 x 108 x 26.5 foot/208.4 x 32.9 x 8 meter
hangar, 4 deck-edge elevators, 4 C13 catapults; up to 80+ aircraft
Armament: 3 Mk29 8-cell NATO Sea Sparrow (CVN 68: 2 Mk29), 4 20mm Phalanx
CIWS (CVN 68 & 69: 3 CIWS), CVN 68: 2 21-cell RAM

Concept/Program: USN's primary carrier class. The Nimitz class is considered the finest
carrier design ever; the ships will be in production for over 30 years, and the last will be
in service up to 80 years after the first was completed. CVN 77, the final ship of this
class, will be a "transition" ship to the new CVNX design, and will differ considerably
from the other ships of the class. Although some references consider CVN 71-76 as a
separate class from CVN 68-70, progressive overhauls and modernization have
eliminated many of the differences.

Builders: Newport News SB&DD/Northrop Grumman Newport News, VA.
Design: Based on previous USN carrier classes, but with general improvements
throughout. There have been progressive modifications throughout the history of the
class; each ship is more modern than the previous vessel. There are many detail
variations among the ships. CVN 76 will have a bulbous bow and a significantly
modified island - the island will be one deck lower than in previous ships, and will carry
all the ship's radars; the separate radar mast abaft the island will be eliminated.

Modernization: Starting with Nimitz, each ship will undergo a RCOH refueling and
overhaul, and will be brought up to the standards of the latest ships. The Nimitz RCOH
included complete electronics modernization, complete removal and reconstruction of the
upper two levels of the island, and significant rearrangement of radars, similar to the
CVN 76 configuration‖ (Ref. 674).

The Aircraft Carrier Industrial Base Coalition
http://www.acibc.org
George H. W. Bush (CVN 77)

The George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) is the 10th and final Nimitz-class aircraft carrier. This
evolutionary ship will pave the way to a new class of carriers. Named after the nation’s
41st president, this powerful warship of the 21st century will feature numerous
improvements and modernizations. Learn more about this state-of-the-art ship by visiting
the links below. http://www.nn.northropgrumman.com/bush

Northrop Grumman christened the nation’s 10th and final Nimitz-class aircraft carrier,
George H. W. Bush (CVN 77), on October 7, 2006. The ship’s namesake and 41st
President of the United States, George H. W. Bush, attended the ceremony and became
the first president in the shipyard’s 120-year history to participate in the christening of his
namesake ship.

Several members of the Bush family were on hand for the special occasion, including the
former president’s wife Barbara and their daughter, Doro Bush Koch. Mrs. Koch serves
as the ship’s sponsor and performed the traditional honor of breaking a bottle of
American sparkling wine across the ship’s bow during the ceremony.

President George W. Bush also attended and honored his father during the ceremony as a
special guest. http://www.nn.northropgrumman.com/bush/christening.html

Navy CVN-21 Aircraft Carrier Program: Background and Issues for Congress
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/RS20643.pdf

CVNX Program multirole aircraft carriers (0+2 ships)

Specifications unknown - evolved from Nimitz Class.

―Concept/Program: CVNX is a new carrier design intended to follow the Nimitz class in
production. The design will be gradually evolved from the existing Nimitz design, rather
than starting with a completely "clean sheet". Details are not yet determined, but the ships
will feature much lower manning, new electronic systems, electromagnetic catapults, and
a new propulsion plant. CVN 77, the final Nimitz class ship, will be a "transition" ship,
and will include some of the CVNX technology‖ (Ref. 674).

Builders: Northrop Grumman Newport News, VA.
CVN-78 Gerald Ford
http://www.freepowerboards.com/owcommandpost/viewtopic.php?p=9405#9405

The lead ship of the CVN-21 class, designated CVN-78, is intended to eventually replace
the USS Enterprise. Most of the recently retired aircraft carriers bore the names of
famous warships [Constellation, Ranger] or battles [Saratoga, Lexington]. Some older
aircraft carrier names have been applied to amphibious assault ships: Kearsarge,
Bonhomme Richard, Essex, Wasp.

In 2006 the Congress directed that CVN-78, a nuclear powered aircraft carrier of the
Navy, shall be named the USS Gerald Ford. In the 2006 Defense Authorization Bill,
Congress made the following findings. Gerald R. Ford served his country with honor and
distinction for the past 64 years, and continues to serve. Gerald R. Ford joined the United
States Naval Reserve in 1942 and served valiantly at sea on the USS Monterey (CVL-26)
during World War II, taking part in major operations in the Pacific, including at Makin
Island, Kwajalein, Truk, Saipan, and the Philippine Sea. The USS Monterey earned 10
battle stars, awarded for participation in battle, while Gerald R. Ford served on the vessel.
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/navy/batgru-78.htm

Navy Names Newest Carrier After President Ford
By Donna Miles
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Jan. 16, 2007 – With flags around the nation still at half staff in
memory of the late President Gerald R. Ford, Vice President Richard B. Cheney called
today’s naming of the Navy’s newest aircraft carrier in Ford’s honor an even more fitting
tribute because it looks to the future.
http://www.defenselink.mil/News/NewsArticle.aspx?ID=2710

The 38th President of the U. S. Gerald R. Ford dies at 93
http://www.freepowerboards.com/owcommandpost/owcommandpost-about1331.html

Preparations & Funeral of President Gerald Ford I
http://www.freepowerboards.com/owcommandpost/owcommandpost-about1330.html

Preparations & Funeral of President Gerald Ford II
http://www.freepowerboards.com/owcommandpost/owcommandpost-about1329.html

Preparations & Funeral of President Gerald Ford III
http://www.freepowerboards.com/owcommandpost/owcommandpost-about1328.html
       FORWARD DEPLOYED AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENTS
                (Yokosuka, Japan (NAF Atsugi, Japan))
                       (Sep 1973 to 7 Aug 2008)

Midway (CV-41),       Fifth Independence        Second Kitty Hawk     George Washington
former CVA-41 &       (CV-62), former           (CV-63), former       (CVN-73), the 61st
CVB-41, the 40th      CVA-62, the 50th          CVA-63, the 51st      aircraft carrier of
aircraft carrier of   aircraft carrier of the   aircraft carrier of   the United States
the United States     United States Navy        the United States     Navy
Navy                                            Navy

   11 Sep 1973 to         8 Aug 1991 to            6 Jul 1998 to             21 Aug 2008
     Aug 1991              30 Sep 1998             7 Aug 2008
         43                     11                      21            75 +

 U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENTS THROUGHOUT OCEANS AND
             SEAS FROM September 1945 to 31 December 2007

 World War     Battle Stars Korea           Korea Battle      Sea of Japan     Yellow Sea &
 II Service                 Combat          Stars                              Sea of Japan
                            Cruises
 1941 to 1945            80          24                  57             21                 46
 Korea Peace Sea of         Philippine      Vietnam           Vietnam          Vietnam
 Patrol        Japan &      Sea             Combat            Peace Patrol     Battle Stars
 Cruises       Philippine                   Cruise            Cruises
               Sea
            19            3           4              84            30                      53
 South China East China South               Andaman Sea Bering Sea    EastPac
 Sea           Sea          China Sea       & IO
                            & Indian
                            Ocean
           157            8           9               2             3            8
 NorPac        SoPac        Westpac       Indian Ocean Indian         North
                                                        Ocean, North Arabian Sea
                                                        Arabian Sea
                                                        and or
                                                        Arabian
                                                        Sea/Gulf,
                                                        (Persian
                                                        Gulf), & Med
                                                        Sea Voyage
              8          48           306            45             3          13
Indian            North    North       Cape Horn    Panama                      SoLant
Ocean, North      Arabian  Arabian     Transit      Canal
Arabian Sea       Sea &    Sea and or               Transit
and or            Indian   Arabian
Arabian Sea       Ocean    Sea/Gulf,
& Med Sea                  (Persian
Voyage                     Gulf) &
                           Indian
                           Ocean
              2         10          54           30                        26             45
EastLant        WestLant   NorLant & North Sea      NorLant              NorLant &
                           North Sea                                     Central &
                                                                         Eastern Lant
             4              6           1                 2           30            1
North Sea & Azores              Med Sea,     Med Sea        NorLant &    NorLant &
Arctic Circle                   NorLant &    SoLant &       Med Sea      Caribbean
                                Caribbean    SoPac                       Sea
                                Sea
              2               1          2                1                21            10
SoLant &          West Lant     Caribbean    Med &            Med Sea           Cape of
Caribbean         &             Sea          Caribbean                          Good Hope
Sea               Caribbean                  Sea                                Transit
                  Sea
             10               1         52                3             233               21
Suez Canal        Red Sea,      Med Sea      Med Sea &        Med Sea,          Med Sea ,
Transit           Gulf of       & Adriatic   Ionian Sea       Carib &           Adriatic &
                  Aden          Sea                           Ionian Sea        Ionian Seas
                  voyage
           128             121           1               2           1             1
Med Sea ,         Med Sea ,     Med Sea      Med Sea ,     Med Sea &   Med Sea ,
Ionian,           Tyrrhenian &               Tyrrhenian & Aegean Seas Adriatic &
Tyrrhenian,       , Adriatic,   Tyrrhenia    Aegean Seas               Aegean Seas
Aegean Seas       Ionian &      n Sea
& Sea of          Ligurian
Crete             Seas
              1               1          1                1                 1                 1
Med Sea &         Med Sea,      South        Med Sea,         Med Sea         Med Sea
Gulf of Sidra     Adriatic & China Sea,      Ionian & Sea     Aaegean Sea     Voyage, Red
- Surt (Sirte)    Gulf of       Indian       Arabian          & Arabian       Sea &
                  Sidra - Surt Ocean &       Sea/Gulf         Sea/Gulf        Arabian
                  (Sirte)       Gulf of      (Persian Gulf)   (Persian        Sea/Gulf
                                Aden                          Gulf)           (Persian
                                                                              Gulf)
              3             1           1                 1                 1            2
Med Sea,        Med Sea,        Med Sea & Med & Red   Carib, Med       Med,
Red Sea &       Carib &         Indian    Sea         & Ionian         Adriatic Sea,
Arabian         Indian          Ocean                 Seas             Red Sea &
Sea/Gulf        Ocean                                                  Indian Ocean
(Persian
Gulf)
            1               1            1        5                1                1
Med &           Med Sea,             Med Sea
                                Med Sea,              Med Sea          Med Sea &
Adriatic Sea,   North Sea            Voyage &
                                Red Sea &             Voyage &         Arabian
Arabian         & Artic              Indian Ocean
                                Arabian               Arabian          Sea/Gulf
Sea/Gulf        Circle               & North
                                Sea/Gulf              Sea/Gulf         (Persian
(Persian                             Arabian Sea
                                (Persian              (Persian         Gulf)
Gulf)                           Gulf)or Arabian       Gulf)
                                     Sea
            5           3          1              1                3               17
Med Sea,      Unreported Unreporte World Cruise       Unreported       SoPac &
Indian Ocean Lant         d Ocean                     Transit          Antarctic
& North
Arabian Sea
or Arabian
Sea
            2           8         20            13                 4             1
Norwegian     Western     *Red Sea    *Arabian        *Indian         *North
Sea           Pacific                Sea/Gulf         Ocean          Arabian Sea
              (Other than            (Persian Gulf)                  or Arabian
              Westpac)                                               Sea
            1           9          8            86               118            76
Operation     Operation   Operation Operation          Operation     Maritime
Desert Shield Desert      Southern   Enduring          Iraqi         Security
              Storm       Watch      Freedom           Freedom       Operations
                                                                     (MSO)
             8           11         50              15            20             8
World War      Korea        Korea      Vietnam         Total Battle
II Battle      Combat       Combat     Battle Stars    Stars
Stars          Battle Stars Cruises
1941 to 1945
215+                     57         24              53    215+190
U. S. Aircraft Carriers operated in the aforementioned oceans and seas while on deployment
ranging from a month or longer and in a few cases less then a month while operating in
various oceans and seas while on a 6-month or longer deployment. Oceans and Seas with an
asterisk represent the total deployments made by U. S. Aircraft Carriers, while the most
significant oceans and seas carriers operated in while on deployment are listed above. Total
Battle Stars include 12 aircraft carriers that operated during World War II that made Foreign
Water Fleet Deployments from 1945 forward and 34 Aircraft Carriers commissioned in from
1945 to 12 July 2003
Korea Combat and Peace Patrol Cruises are reflected as Sea of Japan Deployments, while
some carriers during the conflict/war deployed to the Yellow Sea. Carriers that had no
involvement in the Korea war that deployed to the Sea of Japan while on Westpac are listed.
Carriers that deployed to the Yellow Sea and Sea of Japan during Korea Theater of Operations
can be determined upon review of battle operations available on the internet illustrated within
U. S. Carrier Deployment History Books available at uscarrierhistory.com
Voyages and cruises of carriers are not depicted in the above chart with the exception of
carriers making transits through the Panama Canal and Cape Horn. Carriers that made Cape of
Horn transits traveled through the Southern Pacific and Southern Atlantic and actual
deployment to the Southern Atlantic or Southern Pacific can be determined by subtracting a
carriers Cape of Horn transits
Grouping of Oceans and Seas were determined by the most common areas carriers operated
while on deployment. Westpac’s and Mediterranean Sea deployments reflect the total number,
while the chart groupings of oceans and seas illustrate a carriers presence in any particular area
operating for the most part a month or longer, with the exception of carriers on a World Cruise
traveling through the Indian Ocean around Cape of Good Hope from the east coast or west
coast carriers transiting the Suez Canal from the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean
Total areas Carriers operated throughout oceans and seas do not reflect total Foreign Water
Fleet Deployments, as carriers deployed to several areas while on deployment, and while every
attempt was made to group together the most common areas a carrier operated, often a
particular ocean or sea not grouped together is listed separately
Carriers that made Indian Ocean deployments often deployed to other oceans and seas while
on a major over seas deployment and are listed separately, while at the end of the chart Indian
Ocean deployments are combined as well as North Arabian Sea or Arabian Sea/Gulf, (Persian
Gulf)
Carriers that made deployments around Cape of Good Hope, transits around Cape Horn and
through the Suez Canal that operated in the IO were not counted as IO deployments unless
actually operating in the IO.
12 WW II Carriers deployed after the war = 80 Battle Stars – 215+ WW II Carrier Battle Stars
= 135 + 80 + 110) = 325 + Battle Stars from 1941 to 1973 (190 – 80) = 57 Korea BS + 53
Vietnam BS)
 USS Sicily (CVE-118) received five battle stars for service in Korea‖ (Ref. 72); USS
 Badoeng Strait (CVE-116) received the Navy Unit Commendation and six battle stars for her
 services during the Korean action and USS Bairoko (CVE-115) received three battle stars for
 her Korean service. USS Point Cruz (CVE-119); USS Rendova (CVE-114) and USS Sitkoh
 Bay (CVE 86) battle stars unknown by researcher. Total Korean battle stars CV’s (50); CVL’s
 (7) and CVE’s (14) battle stars during Korea reflect: 69
 *Based on Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) MSO and OIF (7 November 2007 to 4 June 2008).
 Harry S. Truman upon conclusion of deployment did not mention OEF missions.

                                    August 2008

 Operation Enduring              Operation Iraqi Freedom        Maritime Security
 Freedom                                                        Operations (MSO)
                            16                             20                              8

As of 31 December 2007, U. S. Aircraft Carriers have made 15 Operation Enduring
Freedom (OEF) and 20 Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) deployments as of USS Harry S.
Truman (CVN-75) 2007 3rd OIF deployment:

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69) (1 OEF & 1 OIF on same deployment)
USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) (1 OEF & 1 OIF)
USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) (1 OEF & 1 OIF)
USS Nimitz (CVN-68) (1 OEF & 2 OIF – OEF/OIF on same deployment)
USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) (1 OEF & 2 OIF)
USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) (1 OEF & 1 OIF on same deployment)
USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) (1 OEF & 2 OIF)
USS Constellation (CV-64) (1 OEF & 1 OIF on same deployment)
USS George Washington (CVN 73) (1 OEF & 1 OIF)
USS Enterprise (CVN-65) (3 OEF & 3 OIF – 2 OEF/OIF on same deployment)
USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) (2 OEF & 1 OIF – OEF/OIF on same deployment)
USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) (1 OEF & 3 OIF – OEF/OIF on same deployment)
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) (2 OIF)

 CVN-72 –7th   9th Westpac       CVW-2      NE        13 Mar                    789
 & Central     9h IO                                  2008
 Command
 (7th Arabian
 Sea and
 Persian Gulf)

         Most Likely 2nd Operation Enduring Freedom, 2nd Operation Iraqi Freedom
                        and 1st Maritime Security Operations (MSO)
 CVN-76 – 3rd, 3rd Westpac      CVW-14      NK         19 May                   792
 5th & 7th &                                           2008
 Central
 Command
 (1st Arabian
 Sea and
 Persian Gulf)

                         2nd Operation Enduring Freedom,
               2nd Maritime Security Operations (MSO) – Most likely

Aircraft Carrier Classifications:

CV - Aircraft Carrier
CVL – Light Aircraft Carrier
CVA-CVB and CVA(N) - Attack Aircraft Carrier
CVS - Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW) support aircraft carrier
LPH - Amphibious Assault Carrier
AGMR-2 - Communications Major Relay ship
CC-2 - Command Ship
CV and CVN – Multi-purpose Aircraft Carrier
AVT - Auxiliary Aircraft Transport
CVT-16 – Aircraft Training Carrier
Langley AV-3, former, CV-1 & Jupiter (AC-3), the first aircraft carrier of the United
States Navy completed overhaul and conversion to a seaplane tender at Mare Island
Naval Shipyard of Vallejo, California 26 February 1937.

Cruise Books In the Navy Department Library's Collection
http://www.history.navy.mil/library/special/cruise_list.html
―Records indicate USS Tarawa (CV-40) made the first Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf
voyage via the navy’s second Red Sea, Gulf of Aden voyage and second Suez Canal
transit made by a carrier, following operations in South China Sea via straits of Malacca,
upon completion of operations in the Yellow Sea operating with the Pacific Fleet and 7 th
Fleet, on her World Cruise and transfer to Norfolk, Va. from San Diego, Ca., on her
first Mediterranean Sea voyage operating with the 6 th Fleet, traveling through the North
Atlantic, reuniting with her former home port, and operating with the U.S. Atlantic
Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th Fleet, her third deployment
since her commission 8 December 1946‖ (Ref. 1-Tarawa and 72).

―USS Valley Forge (CV-45) with Air Group 11 (CVAG-11) embarked, flying the flag of
Rear Admiral Harold L. Martin, Commander of Task Force 38 departed San Diego,
California 8 October 1947, on her first “Westpac” deployment, her first South China
Sea and first Coral Sea and Tasman Sea voyage operating with the 7th Fleet and what
would turn out to be her first World Cruise, on her first Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf
voyage via the navy’s first Red Sea, Gulf of Aden voyage and first Suez Canal transit,
her first Mediterranean Sea voyage operating with the 6th Fleet and North Atlantic
voyage, traveling South through the Atlantic to the Caribbean Sea on her third
reported voyage, her first as a deployment and second Panama Canal transit operating
with the United States Atlantic Command (Atlantic Fleet) under the direction of the 8th
Fleet;‖ (Ref. 1-Valley Forge & 72).
        SUMMARY OF FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENTS
                       1945 TO 1949

YEAR      FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENT NO.      TOTAL
                                                  FLEET D.
1945     1 to 2                                   2
1946     3 to 11                                  9
1947     12 to 23                                 12
1948     24 to 31                                 8
1949     32 to 37                                 6
TOTAL    1 to 37                                  37

        SUMMARY OF FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENTS
                        1950 TO 1953

YEAR     FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENT NO.       TOTAL
                                                  FLEET D.
1950    38 to 52                                  15
1951    53 to 69                                  17
1952    70 to 90                                  21
1953    91 to 109                                 19
TOTAL   38 to 109                                 72


        SUMMARY OF FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENTS
                        1954 TO 1963

YEAR         FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENT NO.   TOTAL
                                                  FLEET D.
1954    110 to 127                                18
1955    128 to 142                                15
1956    143 to 163                                21
1957    164 to 189                                26
1958    190 to 209                                20
1959    210 to 222                                13
1960    223 to 242                                20
1961    243 to 265                                23
1962    266 to 290                                25
1963    291 to 308                                18
TOTAL   110 to 308                                199
        SUMMARY OF FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENTS
                        1964 TO 1976

YEAR         FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENT NO.   TOTAL
                                                  FLEET D.
1964    309 to 328                                20
1965    329 to 349                                21
1966    350 to 366                                17
1967    367 to 389                                23
1968    390 to 406                                17
1969    407 to 425                                19
1970    426 to 440                                15
1971    441 to 456                                16
1972    457 to 468                                12
1973    469 to 479                                11
1974    480 to 490                                11
1975    491 to 501                                11
1976    502 to 512                                11
TOTAL   309 to 512                                204

        SUMMARY OF FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENTS
                        1977 TO 1989

YEAR         FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENT NO.   TOTAL
                                                  FLEET D.
1977    513 to 524                                12
1978    525 to 531                                7
1979    532 to 543                                12
1980    544 to 551                                8
1981    552 to 561                                10
1982    562 to 573                                12
1983    574 to 583                                10
1984    584 to 593                                10
1985    594 to 603                                10
1986    604 to 614                                11
1987    615 to 625                                11
1988    626 to 635                                10
1989    636 to 649                                14
TOTAL   513 to 649                                137
         SUMMARY OF FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENTS
                         1990 TO 2008

YEAR           FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENT NO.    TOTAL
                                                     FLEET D.
1990     650 to 662                                  13
1991     663 to 671                                  9
1992     672 to 677                                  6
1993     678 to 685                                  8
1994     686 to 695                                  10
1995     696 to 700                                  5
1996     701 to 708                                  8
1997     709 to 713                                  5
1998     714 to 724                                  11
1999     725 to 729                                  5
2000     730 to 737                                  8
2001     738 to 745                                  8
2002     746 to 752                                  7
2003     753 to 758                                  6
2004     759 to 768                                  10
2005     769 to 774                                  6
2006     775 to 781                                  7
2007     782 to 787                                  6
2008     788 to 793                                  6
TOTAL    650 to 793                                  144

         SUMMARY OF FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENTS
                   September 1945 to 15 April 2008

YEAR            FOREIGN WATER FLEET DEPLOYMENT NO.     TOTAL
                                                       FLEET D.
1945 to 1949   1 to 38                                 37
1950 to 1953   29 to 308                               72
1954 to 1963   29 to 308                               199
1964 to 1976   309 to 512                              204
1977 to 1989   513 to 649                              137
1990 to 2006   650 to 781                              132
2007           782 to 787                              6
2008           788 to 793                              6
TOTAL          1 to 793                                793
         U. S. AIRCRAFT CARRIER DEPLOYMENTS BY HULL NO.
           CLASSIFICATION AND TOTAL DEPLOYMENTS FROM
                         September 1945 to 2008
East Coast Transfers                             19
West Coast Transfers                                                 35
TOTAL TRANSFERS                                                      54
CV                                                                   58
CVB                                                                  21
CVL                                                                  12
CVA                                                                  281
CVS                                                                  92
LPH                                                                  17
CVA(N)                                                               14
AGMR                                                                 2

CV                                                                   183
CVN                                                                  113
TOTAL DEPLOYMENTS                                                    793
FORWARD DEPLOYED DEPLOYMENTS                                         75
TOTAL DEPLOYMENTS LESS FORWARD DEPLOYED                              718
DEPLOYMENTS

CV, CVB, CVL, CVA, CVS, LPH, CVA, CVA(N), CC, AGMR, CV and CVN
deployments add up to the total reported Foreign Water Fleet Deployments.
CV/CVA deployment counts as a CV deployment
CVB/CVA deployment counts as a CV deployment
CV/CVS deployment counts as a CV deployment
CVA/CV deployment counts as a CVA deployment
AVT/CVT Carriers made no deployments

Museum Ship, Memorial National Historic Landmark:

Shortly after 15 March 1974, a campaign led by real estate developer Zachary Fisher and
the Intrepid Museum Foundation saved the fourth Intrepid (CVS-11), former CVA-11
& CV-11, Formally Dedicated as a Memorial.

The Navy Department approved the donation of the fourth Yorktown (CVS-10), former
CVA-10, CV-10 & Bon Homme Richard to the Patriot's Point Development Authority,
Charleston, South Carolina in 1974.
The fifth Lexington (AVT-16), former CVT-16, CVS-16, CVA-16, CV-16 & Cabot
was donated as USS Lexington Museum on the Bay on 15 June 1992 and now operates as
such in Corpus Christi, Texas.

The eighth Hornet (CVS-12), former CVA-12, CV-12 & Kearsarge was designated
National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service 4 December 1993.

The Midway (CVA-41), former CVB-41 was donated 12 September 2003 and began
her journey from the Navy Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington,
to San Diego, California via Oakland, Calif., in preparation for use as a museum and
memorial. Towed to the Broadway Pier in San Diego where she will be part of a major
museum ship devoted to carriers and naval aviation 10 January 2004.

Donation Hold for Museum Ship, Memorial, National Historic Landmark and ship
donated for Artificial Reef:

The Oriskany (CV-34) former CVA-34 &CV-34 was donated and transferred to the
State of Florida to be sunk with controlled charges 22 miles south of Pensacola 5 April
2004 for use as an artificial reef and is the first warship to be slated for this purpose.
Repossessed by the U. S. Navy when the contractor defaulted the contract, with the
contract terminated 30 July 1997. The ship remained at the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in
Beaumont, Tex., until December 2004 when she was towed to Pensacola, Fla., for
preparation to be sunk as an artificial reef. Oriskany was sunk 24 miles off the coast of
Pensacola, Fla., on 17 May 2006. The 888-foot ship took about 37 minutes to sink below
the surface.

RANGER IS LOCATED AT THE NAVSEA INACTIVE SHIPS ON-SITE
MAINTENANCE OFFICE, BREMERTON, WA.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Uss_ranger_cv-61.jpg

An effort is underway to establish the seventh Ranger (CV-61), former CVA-61 as a
museum ship from 2004 to 2008. Sits at the Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania awaiting sale to be scrapped as of 2005. Arrived from the
Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Beaumont, Texas after her transferr from civilian authority.
Repossessed by the U. S. Navy when the contractor defaulted the contract (terminated 30
July 1997) and transferred to the BeaumontReserve Fleet in Beaumont, Texas, to be
scrapped.

USS Ranger Museum Foundation http://www.ussrangercv61.org

USS RANGER CVA-61 http://www.uss-ranger.org

USS Ranger CV-A 61
http://www.geocities.com/ussrangerguy

Ranger Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/61.htm
The Saratoga (CV-60), former (CVA-60) & CVB-60 Donation Hold and stands firm as
2007, commencing 2 May 2005, with the announcement that Governor Donald Carcieri
recommended that the retired Navy super carrier be allowed to move to the former
Quonset-Davisville naval complex, at Pier 2 at Davisville, where it would open as a
museum, memorial, educational center and family attraction.

FORRESTAL IS LOCATED AT THE NAVSEA INACTIVE SHIPS ON-SITE
MAINTENANCE OFFICE, PHILADELPHIA, PA.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:USS_Forrestal-600px.jpg

The Forrestal (AVT-59), former CV-59 is on donation hold as a museum ship and
memorial at the Naval Station, Newport, Rhode Island as 2008.

USS FORRESTAL CVA/CV/AVT-59 ASSOCIATION, INC.
http://www.lancehatfield.com/2004wback.htm

Dedicated to USS Forrestal CVA/CV/AVT-59
http://members.aol.com/ILOVEFID/index.htm

USS Forrestal Association http://www.lancehatfield.com/cv59.htm
Why USS Forrestal CVA/CV/AVT-59 should be Saved.
http://members.aol.com/ILOVEFID/savefid.htm

PHF Forrestal CVA-59 http://members.tripod.com/forrestal_cva59/news.htm

Forrestal Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/59.htm

INTREPID IS LOCATED AT THE INTREPID SEA-AIR-SPACE MUSEUM PIER 86,
WEST 46TH STREET & 12TH AVENUE, NEW YORK, NY. SHE IS LISTED ON
THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES, REF. NO. 86000082 AND
DESIGNATED A NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK ON 1/14/1986.

The aircraft carrier Intrepid was successfully moved from Pier 86 to Bayonne, NJ.
Intrepid proceeded past the Statue of Liberty, then unfurled its gigantic American flag as
she passed historic Ground Zero shore point as a silent tribute to those who lost their lives
on September 11, 2001. The World War II vessel will be refurbished over the next two
years including opening now hidden areas of the ship to the public. While in dry dock,
the outside of the ship will be repainted in classic battleship gray, and many of the
military aircraft on its flight deck will be restored. Pier 86 will be entirely rebuilt as well.

Live video of ongoing renovations to Pier 86 and Intrepid can now be viewed daily on
http://www.intrepidmuseum.org through Earthcam.
INTREPID SAILS TO BAYONNE, NJ

Shortly after 15 March 1974, a campaign led by real estate developer Zachary Fisher and
the Intrepid Museum Foundation saved the fourth Intrepid (CVS-11), former CVA-11
& CV-11, Formally Dedicated as a Memorial.

Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum http://www.intrepidmuseum.org

Intrepid Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/11.htm

Officials to dedicate Center for the Intrepid at Fort Sam

1/23/2007 - FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas (AFNEWS) -- Officials here are opening the
Center for the Intrepid and two Fisher Houses Jan. 29 in a dedication ceremony at the
Brooke Army Medical Center.

More than 3,000 people, including wounded and recovering military service members
and their families, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Peter Pace, and Senators
Hillary Rodham Clinton and John McCain who supported the construction of the center,
will participate in the dedication ceremony for The Center for the Intrepid -- a $50
million, 65,000 square foot, state-of-the-art physical rehabilitation center -- and two new
Fisher Houses for hospitalized military members' families.

The dedication also features a performance by singer John Mellencamp and a military
flyover. Other expected special guests include Denzel Washington, Rosie O'Donnell and
country music group Big & Rich.

This project was made possible by the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund, which provides
assistance to our nation's military heroes who have been critically injured in the
performance of duty and their families, and the Fisher House Foundation. The IFHF
raised more than $90 million for military families, including funds for the center, which
also is known as the Armed Forces Physical Rehabilitation Center.

The Brooke Army Medical Center here plays a critical role in patient care, especially
wounded servicemembers from the war on terrorism, and in graduate medical education
and research. As the Army's only certified Level 1 trauma center, BAMC receives more
than 4,000 emergency room visits each month. BAMC is one of only 15 hospitals in the
United States that holds both Level 1 trauma certification and accreditation from the
American Burn Association.

The hospital has cared for more than 2,400 service members including Soldiers, Marines,
Sailors and Airmen, who were injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation
Enduring Freedom. http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123038584
YORKTOWN IS LOCATED AT THE PATRIOTS POINT NAVAL & MARITIME
MUSEUM 40 PATRIOTS POINT ROAD, MOUNT PLEASANT, SC. SHE IS LISTED
ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES, REF. NO. 82001519 AND
DESIGNATED A NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK ON 1/14/1986.

The Navy Department approved the donation of the fourth Yorktown (CVS-10), former
CVA-10, CV-10 & Bon Homme Richard to the Patriot's Point Development Authority,
Charleston, South Carolina in 1974.

York County Historical Museum, Inc. http://www.yorkcounty.gov/publicinfo/2006
149.pdf

USS Yorktown (CV-10) - Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum
http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/10m.htm

USS Yorktown Association CG 48, CVS 10, CVA 10, CV10, CV5
http://www.ussyorktown.com/yorktown

Yorktown Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/10.htm

Yorktown pictures and videos on Webshots
http://www.webshots.com/search?query=Yorktown
http://news.webshots.com/album/13369807QYivpDSYEQ

LEXINGTON IS LOCATED AT THE USS LEXINGTON MUSEUM ON THE BAY,
2914 NORTH SHORELINE BOULEVARD, CORPUS CHRISTI, TX

Corpus Christi Area Convention & Visitors Bureau/U.S. Navy Photograph

The fifth Lexington (AVT-16), former CVT-16, CVS-16, CVA-16, CV-16 & Cabot
was donated as USS Lexington Museum on the Bay on 15 June 1992 and now operates as
such in Corpus Christi, Texas.

USS LEXINGTON Museum on the Bay
http://www.usslexington.com

Lexington Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/16.htm
HORNET IS LOCATED THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER HORNET MUSEUM, PIER 3,
ALAMEDA POINT, ALAMEDA, CA.

The eighth Hornet (CVS-12), former CVA-12, CV-12 & Kearsarge is listed on the
National Register of Historic Places and was designated National Historic Landmark by
the National Park Service 4 December 1993.

USS HORNET MUSEUM http://www.uss-hornet.org

USS HORNET CV-12 CVA-12 CVS-12 by Dwayne Miles
http://www.its.caltech.edu/~drmiles/hornet.html

USS Hornet (CV-12, later CVA-12 & CVS-12), 1943-1998
http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-h/cv12.htm

USS HORNET: Ship's Log CVS-12
http://www.uss-hornet.org/history/ships_logcvs-12.html

USS Hornet CVS-12 http://www.worldspaceflight.com/addendum/recovery/hornet.htm

Hornet Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/12a.htm

MIDWAY WAS DONATED TO THE SAN DIEGO AIRCRAFT CARRIER MUSEUM
AND IS LOCATED IN SAN DIEGO. http://www.answers.com/topic/uss-midway

The Midway (CVA-41), former CVB-41 was donated 12 September 2003 and began her
journey from the Navy Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington, to
San Diego, California via Oakland, Calif., in preparation for use as a museum and
memorial. Towed to the Broadway Pier in San Diego where she will be part of a major
museum ship devoted to carriers and naval aviation 10 January 2004.


Midway: San Diego's Aircraft Carrier Museum – San Diego, Calif.
http://www.midway.org/site/pp.asp?c=coIMKTMCF&b=81432

USS Midway (CVB-41, later CVA-41 and CV-41), 1945-____
http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-m/cvb41.htm

Midway Photos
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:USS_Midway_(CVA-41)
USS Midway (CVA-41) pictures from history photos on webshots
http://news.webshots.com/photo/1065573605032430229zolStA

USS Midway (CVA-41) pictures
http://www.netmeister.net/~cpaige/Midway_unrep.html

Doyle Gallery: USS Midway CVA-41
http://www.donpellegrino.com/~grandpa/gallery/midway53

USS Midway – CVA-41 - Carrier Qualification cruise off San Clemente Island,
August 1963 http://www.movie-trains.com/cva41.html

Midway Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/41.htm
http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/41b.htm

USS Midway - Carrier Air Wing 5 http://cv41.org

List of Related Home Pages for USS Midway - CV 41
http://www.military.com/HomePage/UnitPageListHomePages/1,13491,200200,00.html

Oriskany was Disposed of by Donation for use as Artificial Reefing
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:USS_Oriskany_CV-34_SCB-27A.jpg

http://www.answers.com/topic/uss-oriskany-cva-34-jpg

The Oriskany (CV-34) former CVA-34 &CV-34 was donated and transferred to the
State of Florida to be sunk with controlled charges 22 miles south of Pensacola 5 April
2004 for use as an artificial reef and is the first warship to be slated for this purpose.
Repossessed by the U. S. Navy when the contractor defaulted the contract, with the
contract terminated 30 July 1997. The ship remained at the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in
Beaumont, Tex., until December 2004 when she was towed to Pensacola, Fla., for
preparation to be sunk as an artificial reef. Oriskany was sunk 24 miles off the coast of
Pensacola, Fla., on 17 May 2006. The 888-foot ship took about 37 minutes to sink below
the surface.

Official Home of the USS Oriskany (CV/CVA-34)
http://www.baconlinks.com/USS_Oriskany
Oriskany Museum and USS Oriskany Reunion Association
http://www.ussoriskany.com

USS Oriskany (CV-34, later CVA-34 and CV-34), 1950-2006
http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-o/cv34.htm

Oriskany Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/34.htm
SARATOGA IS LOCATED AT THE NAVSEA INACTIVE SHIPS ON-SITE
MAINTENANCE OFFICE, PHILADELPHIA, PA.

The Saratoga (CV-60), former (CVA-60) & CVB-60 Donation Hold and stands firm as
2007, commencing 2 May 2005, with the announcement that Governor Donald Carcieri
recommended that the retired Navy super carrier be allowed to move to the former
Quonset-Davisville naval complex, at Pier 2 at Davisville, where it would open as a
museum, memorial, educational center and family attraction. The USS Saratoga
Museum Foundation, Inc -- an all-volunteer group can raise the estimated $10 million
needed to prove the viability of the project and address extra expenses for homeland
security issues, environmental studies and the costs associated with an exit strategy
should the carrier have to be moved at a later date (In the Governor's proposal the space
would be reserved for the Foundation until May 1, 2007). Rremained at the Naval
Education and Training Center from her arrival 7 August 1998 until she returned to
donation hold on 19 January 2000 when the Secretary of the Navy placed Saratoga in
donation status, thus making her eligible to become a museum and memorial, transferring
to the Naval Station, Newport, R.I. where she remains in this status having had her status
changed to "disposal as an experimental ship. Preceded by donation hold once she arrived
at the Naval Education and Training Center on 7 August 1998; departing Naval Station
Newport, Rhode Island 3 August 1998. Deactivated in August 1998 at the Philadelphia
Naval Shipyard.

NAVSEA NDP – Donation Hold
                     http://www.navsea.navy.mil/ndp/shipHold_template.asp?txtDataID
                     =1337&txtType
D=44 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Cv60_bow.jpg

The Saratoga Museum Foundation http://www.saratogamuseum.org

USS Saratoga Museum Foundation, Inc. - History and Background of CV-60
http://www.saratogamuseum.org/misc/sarahistory.html

Saratoga Photo Gallery http://www.navsource.org/archives/02/60.htm

USS SARATOGA ASSOCIATION http://www.uss-saratoga.com
                      Ships Donated as a Museum and Memorial

Class              Hull                         Name

AGSS 212          AGSS 228                      DRUM
AGSS 212          AGSS 236                      SILVERSIDES
AGSS 212          AGSS 244                      CAVALLA
AGSS 212          AGSS 245                      COBIA
AGSS 285          AGSS 310                      BATFISH
AGSS 569          AGSS 569                      ALBACORE
AVT 16            AVT 16                        LEXINGTON
BB 34             BB 35                         TEXAS
BB 55             BB 55                         NORTH CAROLINA
BB 57             BB 59                         MASSACHUSETTS
BB 57             BB 60                         ALABAMA
BB 61             BB 62                         NEW JERSEY
BB 61             BB 63                         MISSOURI
CA 134            CA 139                        SALEM
CG 4              CG 4                          LITTLE ROCK
CV 41             CV 41                         MIDWAY
CVS 10            CVS 10                        YORKTOWN
CVS 11            CVS 11                        INTREPID
CVS 10            CVS 12                        HORNET
DD 448            DD 537                        THE SULLIVANS
DD 448            DD 661                        KIDD
DD 692            DD 724                        LAFFEY
DD 448            DD 793                        CASSIN YOUNG
DD 710            DD 850                        JOSEPH P. KENNEDY JR.
DD 945            DD 951                        TURNER JOY
DE 129            DE 238                        STEWART
IX 20             IX 20                         CONSTELLATION
IX 40             IX 40                         OLYMPIA
SS 342            SS 319                        BECUNA
SS 343            SS 343                        CLAMAGORE
SS 580            SS 581                        BLUEBACK
SSG 577           SSG 577                       GROWLER
http://www.nvr.navy.mil/nvrships/donate.htm

Ship Donation Program has been in existence since 1948. The authority to donate ships
is found in the Title 10 United States (U.S.C.), Section 7306. Ships are donated at no cost
to the Government. The current 47 donated ships represent a tangible reminder of the
Navy’s role in American history and commemorate the sailors who served on the ships,
as well as showcase naval tradition and heritage. These ships are located in 21 states
throughout the country. http://www.navsea.navy.mil/ndp/museums.asp

								
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