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Issue Y2K The Great War for Tale

VIEWS: 2 PAGES: 11

									Larry Bossidy

(Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done)
“I saw that leaders placed too much
  emphasis on what some call high-
 level strategy, on intellectualizing
    and philosophizing, and not
 enough on implementation. People
    would agree on a project or
initiative, and then nothing would
   come of it.” —Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/
     Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
 “Execution is a systematic
    process of rigorously
discussing hows and whats,
   tenaciously following
  through, and ensuring
accountability.”                       —Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/
     Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
 “Execution is
 the job of the
   business
leader.”                           —Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/

   Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
 (“Leaders
„do‟ people.
Period.” )
         —TP
    The Leader‟s Seven Essential Behaviors
*Know your people and your business
*Insist on realism
*Set clear goals and priorities
*Follow through
*Reward the doers
*Expand people‟s capabilities
*Know yourself
Source: Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/ Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
“Realism is
the heart of
execution.”
—Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/ Execution:
 The Discipline of Getting Things Done
 “robust
dialogue”
        —Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/
Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
   “The person who is a little less conceptual but is
absolutely determined to succeed will usually find the
     right people and get them together to achieve
objectives. I‟m not knocking education or looking for
   dumb people. But if you have to choose between
 someone with a staggering IQ and an elite education
who‟s gliding along, and someone with a lower IQ but
    who is absolutely determined to succeed, you‟ll
       always do better with the second person.”
          —Larry Bossidy (Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/
         Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done)
                 Duct Tape Rules!

 “Andrew Higgins, who built
 landing craft in WWII, refused to
  hire graduates of engineering
schools. He believed that they only teach you
   what you can’t do in engineering school. He
started off with 20 employees, and by the middle
of the war had 30,000 working for him. He turned
 out 20,000 landing craft. D.D. Eisenhower told
me, „Andrew Higgins won the war for us. He did
 it without engineers.‟ ” —Stephen Ambrose/Fast Company
 Ye gads: “ThomasStanley has not
   only found no correlation
between success in school and an
 ability to accumulate wealth,
 he‟s actually found a negative
   correlation. „It seems that school-related
evaluations are poor predictors of economic success,‟ Stanley
concluded. What did predict success was a willingness to take
   risks. Yet the success-failure standards of most schools
penalized risk takers. Most educational systems reward those
who play it safe. As a result, those who do well in school find it
                   hard to take risks later on.”
 Richard Farson & Ralph Keyes, Whoever Makes the Most Mistakes Wins

								
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