Day1

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					     Formative
Assessment Institute

Presented by:
 Pam Lange
Jennifer Nehl
               Outcomes
• To reconnect with colleagues.

• To continue dialogue about clear learning
  targets.

• To develop an understanding of using strong and
  weak student work.

• To develop of understanding of how rubrics
  drive instruction.
       Credit Options
Sign-up participants

Reminder: Sign in each In-service day

• Two PTSB Credits

• Two Graduate Credits – University of
  Wyoming
Textbooks
 Formative Assessment
      Wikispace

http://fai2.tie2.wikispaces.net/
Ice Breaker
                    M & M
         Based on the color you selected, share . . . .

Red            One thing you took back to your
               colleagues from October’s training.
Yellow         How you implemented Learning Targets.
Blue           The best assessment you have
               administered in your classroom?
Orange         One way you build relationships with
               students.
Green          The best gift you have ever received?
Brown          How you utilize rubrics.
The M & M “Survival” Kit
Red       Eat at the first sign of frustration.
Orange    Eat to minimize depression.
Green     Eat to calm your fears.
Yellow    Eat when you feel a headache
                coming on.
Blue      Eat to reduce the screaming urge.
Brown     Eat ANYTIME!

  If all symptoms appear at the same time…
          Eat the WHOLE DARN BAG!
Relevance
Listen…and prepare to retell
•Traveler Safety Message #1
  •Retell this to your partner.

•Traveler Safety Message #2
  •Retell this to your partner.

 Which message was the easier one
   to remember and/or retell?
    Why do you think that is?
Stickiness

   Mental duct tape—
   like mental Velcro
   but stronger!
   •The Kidney Heist and
   other urban legends

   •Successful is predictable.
21st   Century Skills
You want to invent new ideas, not new rules.
 The Curse of Knowledge:


Partner up!


• Tappers—you will tap out a song
• Listeners—you will try to guess the song
                    Results
• How many of you thought you did a
  great job of tapping out the song?
• How many of you correctly guessed the
  song?




       Perception              Reality
        •1 in 2               •1 in 40
         •50%                  •2.5%
Clarifying Content Priorities
                    Nice to
    Worth Being      know
    Familiar With
      Important
                     Foundational
      to Know
                    Concept Skills


          Big
                    Big Picture
         Ideas
                 Unexpected

• Surprise—gets attention
• Interest—keeps attention

• Avoid gimmickry; create a GAP
• Gaps between what we know and what we want to
  know create curiosity.
• K-W-L Charts
• Open the gap by creating a mental itch.


  http://www.aef.com/exhibits/social_responsibility/ad_council/2434
      Table Discussion
• What key components are needed to
  be in place in your classroom to make
  your content sticky?

• What conditions already exist for you?

• What can you change to make your
  content/lessons sticky?
Rubrics
What Makes a Good Rubric?

   • Performance Criteria
   • Qualities of a good rubric
   • Assessment for and of learning

                  Stiggens, Arter, Chappius,Chappius
   Performance Criteria of
        a Good Rubric
• Defines quality for teachers
• Describes quality for students
• Judgments are more objective,
  consistent, and accurate
• Focus teaching
• Use of the rubric influences the design
• Track student learning (Formative
  Assessment!!!)
                   (Page 200, Doing it Right, Doing it Well)
    Qualities of a Good Rubric
•   Available in student-friendly version
•   Define various levels of success
•   Aligns to standards
•   Consistent language
•   Contains descriptive detail
•   Not negative at the ‗low‘ end
•   Include only those aspects of a performance
    or product that are most valued.
                        (Page 201, Doing it Right, Doing it Well)
The purpose of your
 rubric shapes the
      design.
R4R (Rubric for Rubrics)
Rubrics Samples
   Looking at Sample Rubrics
• Look at R4R.
• Based on what we‘ve discussed, review
  the sample rubrics.
• Determine which rubrics are effective
  and which are weak.
• You will have 20-30 minutes.
    • (approximately 10 minutes per rubric)

• Be prepared to discuss your findings.
   Looking at Sample Rubrics
• As a group, determine a rubric rating for
  each of the four traits listed on the R4R.
    • Ready to Roll
    • On its Way
    • Not Ready

• As a group, agree upon an overall rating
  for the whole rubric.
    • Ready to Roll
    • On its Way
    • Not Ready
Looking at Sample Rubrics

 • What did you find?
      – Sample #1
      – Sample #2
      – Sample #3
Steps in Rubric Development
     (Using past student work)
 Step 1: Establish a knowledge base
 Step 2: Gather samples of student
         performance
 Step 3: Sort student work by level of quality
 Step 4: Cluster the reasons into traits
 Step 5: Identify sample performance that
         illustrate each level
 Step 6: Make it better!!
  Steps in Rubric Development
               (Using past student work)
1. Look at your criteria from Social Studies assessments.
2. Review the qualities and criteria for good rubrics (200-201).
3. Identify the learning targets, qualities, standards,
   benchmarks, etc. that will be assessed.
4. Choose the learning targets, qualities, standards,
   benchmarks, etc. that will be assessed as your proficient.
   This column gives the assessor a standard to work from.
      1.   What would an advanced look like?
      2.   What would basic look like?

5. Maintain consistent vocabulary, terminology, and criteria
   throughout traits.
Steps in Rubric Development
    (Using past student work)


 You will have 25 minutes to
     develop your Rubric
Rubrics Without
 Student Work
What Makes a Good Rubric?
  • Performance Criteria
  • Qualities of a good rubric
  • Assessment for and of learning

                 Stiggens, Arter, Chappius,Chappius
   Performance Criteria of
        a Good Rubric
• Defines quality for teachers
• Describes quality for students
• Judgments are more objective,
  consistent, and accurate
• Focus teaching
• Use of the rubric influences the design
• Track student learning (Formative
  Assessment!!!)
                   (Page 200, Doing it Right, Doing it Well)
    Qualities of a Good Rubric
•   Available in student-friendly version
•   Define various levels of success
•   Aligns to standards
•   Consistent language
•   Contains descriptive detail
•   Not negative at the ‗low‘ end
•   Include only those aspects of a performance
    or product that are most valued.
                        (Page 201, Doing it Right, Doing it Well)
The purpose of your
 rubric shapes the
      design.
       Steps in Rubric Development
                (Without past student work)

1.   Look at your unit, project or lesson for rubric development.
2. Review the qualities and criteria for good rubrics (200-201).
3. Identify the learning targets, qualities, standards, benchmarks, etc.
   that will be assessed.
4. Choose the learning targets, qualities, standards, benchmarks, etc.
   that will be assessed as your proficient. This column gives the
   assessor a standard to work from.
       1.   What would an advanced look like?
       2.   What would basic look like?
5. Maintain consistent vocabulary, terminology, and criteria throughout
   traits.
• Use a Learning Target

• If you don‘t have a
  learning target, you can
  use a standard/
  benchmark.
       Wyoming Standards
     Grade 4 Fine and Performing Arts

4.2 AESTHETIC PERCEPTION - Students
respond to, analyze, and make informed
judgments about works in the arts.

 4.2.2 Students recognize and describe the
 skills, techniques, processes, and technologies
 relevant to artistic works of music.
         Proficient
4.2.2 Student recognizes and describes
the skills, techniques, processes, and
technologies relevant to artistic works
of music.
         Proficient
How many traits or characteristics
     are we assessing? Four

4.2.2 Student recognizes and describes
the skills, techniques, processes, and
technologies relevant to artistic works
of music.
        Pizza Transition: Key

Crust               Pepperoni

Sauce                Jalapenos

Cheese
                     Olives
              Pizza Transition
1. Look at all 5 pizzas

2. Arrange pizzas in order of highest quality to
   lowest quality.

3. In your group, give your rationale for
   determining the pizza‘s proficiency level .

4. Be prepared to share your justification whole-
   group.
             Pizza Transition
•   Remember to look at the BIG picture.
•   If someone says, ―I don‘t like pepperoni‖ or
    ―I‘m a vegetarian,‖ s/he will score the pizza
    low.
•   You will have these situations/discussions in
    the proficiency rubric development at which
    point the GROUP must determine what quality
    ―looks like.‖
•   Remember to be unbiased and fair.
Steps in Rubric Development
   (Without past student work)
Steps in Rubric Development
    (Using past student work)


 You will have 25 minutes to
     develop your Rubric
Steps in Rubric Development
    (without past student work)


Use a learning target you
have written for your class.
Steps in Rubric Development
    (without past student work)


ALWAYS review, edit and improve!!!
              Rubrics
WITH & FOR your Students:
• Student generated rubrics do not vary
  greatly from teacher created rubrics.

• Remember the teacher created rubric
  steps?
Steps in Rubric Development

  Step 1: Establish a knowledge base
  Step 2: Gather samples of student performance
  Step 3: Sort student work by level of quality
  Step 4: Cluster the reasons into traits
  Step 5: Identify sample performance that
               illustrate each level
  Step 6: Make it better!!

                        Stiggens, Arter, Chappius, Chappius
What Makes a Good Rubric?
  • Performance Criteria
  • Qualities of a good rubric
  • Assessment for and of learning

                 Stiggens, Arter, Chappius,Chappius
  Rubric Development
    Using Rubistar
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php
   Performance Criteria of
        a Good Rubric
• Defines quality for teachers
• Describes quality for students
• Judgments are more objective,
  consistent, and accurate
• Focus teaching/learning
• Use of the rubric influences the design
• Track student learning (Formative
  Assessment!!!)
                   (Page 200, Doing it Right, Doing it Well)
Steps in Rubric Development
  for Student Led Rubrics
  Step 1: Establish OUR knowledge base
  Step 2: Gather samples of student performance
  Step 3: Sort student work by level of quality
  Step 4: Describe the features of the work at
               each level.
  Step 5: Cluster the reasons into traits
  Step 6: Identify sample performance that
               illustrate each level

                        Stiggens, Arter, Chappius, Chappius
Steps in Rubric Development
  for Student Led Rubrics
  This step is imperative to student ownership.
  Once the students complete this step, they have
  an in-depth understanding of WHAT quality looks
  like and the VALIDITY of each component of
  quality.

  Step 4: Describe the features of the work at
              each level.
Steps in Rubric Development
  for Student Led Rubrics
Remember, you (your students) must be
  able to answer the following questions:
• What are we (the students) asked to
  do/perform?
  – What is the learning target?
• How clear are the instructions?
• How practical is the task?
• Is the task fair for all students?
Steps in Rubric Development
  for Student Led Rubrics
•You can use the same sorting logs and
―Analyzing Student Work‖ worksheets
that you would use to create your own.
•The Stiggens CD also contains several
sorting logs worksheets if you would like
to try different ones.
•Look on your CD under CH 7, click on
Rubric Development.
Steps in Rubric Development
  for Student Led Rubrics
• Pizza Rubric Activity

• This is a great activity to introduce
  levels of performance.

• Take this activity to the next level to
  develop an in-depth understanding of
  WHAT quality looks like and the
  VALIDITY of quality.
      Student Led Rubrics:
      Pizza Rubric Activity
1. Look at all five pizzas
2. Arrange pizzas in order of highest
   quality to lowest quality
3. List the characteristics which
   determine the level of quality on the
   back of each sheet.
4. Discuss with your elbow partner in
   discrepancies so you are both in
   agreement.
     Student Led Rubrics:
     Pizza Rubric Activity
Colors:
Dark Yellow: Crust
Dark Red:     Sauce
White:         Cheese
Brown:        Pepperoni
Green and Black: All the ingredients you
 want
Steps in Rubric Development
  for Student Led Rubrics
• Always remind your students to look at
  the BIG picture.
• What if they say, ―I don‘t like
  pepperoni‖, so they score the pizza low.
  You will have these situations in class
  at which point the CLASS must
  determine what quality ―looks like‖.
• Remind them of unbiased and fairness.
          Technology Sites
• http://rubistar.4teachers.org

• www.rubrics4teachers.com

• http://landmark-project.com/rubric_builder/
• Rubrician.com
• http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schro
 ckguide/assess.html
              Homework
• Differentiate your rubric use
  – Take this process/dialogue to a team
  – Fine-tune your rubric you developed today
     and use the rubric with your students
  – Bring student samples from a rubric you
    used
  – Evaluate existing rubrics you use
      Homework Discussion
• Did you find rubrics to evaluate?

• How/Why did you change them?

• How did rubrics help in guiding
  instruction and student
  understanding?

• Technology – did you/your teachers
  find any other valuable websites?
 See you
Tomorrow!

				
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