CONSUMER BANKRUPTCY PRACTICE 201

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					                  CONSUMER BANKRUPTCY PRACTICE
                              2010

                                      Syllabus

For each session, the Syllabus usually has a list of readings and an assignment.
Readings listed at the beginning of a session are required, and students must read
them prior to the class session. Generally, students will not be expected to “recite”
cases, but should understand their basic holdings, especially decisions of the
Supreme Court, and how they apply to the topics or problems to be covered in that
session.

When the session lists problems, the problems will be posted on the Instructor’s website.
Students must review the problems prior to class and be prepared to discuss and resolve the
issues they present in the class discussion.

After the readings and the assignment, the Syllabus has an outline of topics and issues that
relate to the general subject to be covered in class that day. Citations to cases and other
materials in the body of the outline are suggested readings that provide more information and
insight into the issues to be covered. Students are encouraged to read the text of each
statutory section and Rule referenced in the outline prior to class.
Unless otherwise indicated, references to sections are to the Bankruptcy Code, title 11 of the
United States Code, and references to “Rules” are to the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy
Procedure.

Readings marked “*” are available for download on the Instructor’s web page.

There is no book for this class. Students must have copies of the United States Bankruptcy
Code, the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.
Students should bring copies of the Code and the Rules to each class. The Rules are
available for download on Westlaw, Lexis, or at http://www.law.cornell.edu/rules/.

Questions may be addressed to the instructors by telephone or e-mail. In addition, the
instructors will be available in the commons area of the law school at 8:30 on Monday
mornings prior to class.

Further information with regard to course objectives and expectations are set forth in a
separate document.




                    Mercer Syllabus (2010) 1-5-10 Page 1 of 22
Session 1: Introduction and Overview (1/11)

       Reading:       * Overview of Individual Bankruptcy Cases (PWB)
                      * Introduction to Chapter 13 Plans (PWB)
                      * Selected Georgia Statutes relating to real property foreclosure; personal
                      property repossession and disposition; writs of possession; remedies under
                      the Motor Vehicle Sales Financing Act; and collection of judgments.
                      * Bankruptcy forms – Petition, Statement of Financial Affairs, Schedules,
                      Forms 22A and 22C
                      28 U.S.C. §§ 157, 1334
                      Rules 7001, 9013, 9014

       Assignment:    Review the facts of the case of Walter and Frieda George. Class discussion
                      will include consideration of what problems the Georges face, what remedies
                      creditors can pursue, and what options the Georges have.

                      Note: Major projects for completion of this course will be your
                      representation of the Georges and the filing of Chapter 7 and Chapter
                      13 petitions on their behalf. You should begin reviewing the facts you
                      have and the forms for the filing of bankruptcy cases to determine what
                      additional information you will need to complete a proper filing on
                      behalf of your client.

1. Introduction; Course Objectives

2. What do debtors face? Enforcement of claims under state law –

   a. Real estate foreclosure and pursuit of deficiency

       DANIEL F. HINKEL, PINDAR’S GEORGIA REAL ESTATE LAW AND PROCEDURE (6TH ED . 2004)

      John Alden Life Ins. Co. v. Gwinnett Plantation, Ltd., 220 Ga.; App. 846, 470 S.E.2d 482
   (1996)

   b. Personal property repossession and pursuit of deficiency

   c. Real property possession (eviction)

   d. Obtaining and enforcing a judgment

       i. Writ of fieri facias; recordation

       ii. Levy and sale


                           Mercer Syllabus (2010) 1-5-10 Page 2 of 22
       iii. Garnishment

          Limitation on garnishment to 25 percent of disposable income, Federal Consumer
       Protection Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1673.

       iv. Receiver

   e. Tax claims and liens

           26 U.S.C. §§ 6321, 6322, 6323

           O.C.G.A. § 48-2-56

           In re Tuggle, 22 B.R. 439 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 1982)

   f. Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

   g. Contempt in domestic relations cases

3. Overview of Chapter 7 – Liquidation of assets and distribution to creditors in accordance with
   priorities.

4. Overview of Chapter 13 – Debtor may propose plan for satisfaction of all or some debts and
   retention of property. Summary of basic plan and confirmation principles of § 1322 and § 1325

   a. Concept of chapter 13 – plan and confirmation requirements of § 1322 and § 1325;
      provisions of § 1326

   b. Chapter 13 discharge under § 1328 and lien extinguishment under § 506(d)

   c. Fundamental plan requirements – § 1325

       i. Miscellaneous requirements (filing fee, comply with Chapter 13, title 11) – § 1325(a)(1),
          (2)

       ii. Payment of Chapter 13 Trustee commission – § 1326(a)

       iii. Length of plan – § 1322(d)

       iv. Employer deduction orders; submission of income – § 1325(c); § 1322(a)(1)

       v. Who makes payments to creditors – § 1326(c)


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   d. Good faith – § 1325(a)(3)

   e. Priority and administrative claims; payment of debtor’s attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees –
      § 1326(b)

   f. Secured creditors – General rule is to pay value of collateral, with some exceptions requiring
      greater payments. Treatment of secured claims to be discussed at length.

   g. Unsecured creditors generally

      i. Projected disposable income test – § 1325(b)

      ii. Best interest test – § 1325(a)(4)

      iii. Good faith – § 1325(a)(3)

      iv. Classification and unfair discrimination – § 1322(b)(1)

          (1) Generally

          (2) Student loans

          (3) Cosigned debts

          (4) Criminal restitution, NSF checks

      v. Other

5. Fundamental bankruptcy principles

   a. Equality of distribution; priorities

          Bailey v. Glover, 88 U.S. 346 (1874) (It is obviously one of the purposes of the
          Bankruptcy law that there should be a speedy disposition of the bankrupt’s assets. This
          is second only in importance to securing equality of distribution.”)

          § 507(a)

   b. Fresh start and discharge

          Local Loan Co. v. Hunt, 292 U.S. 234 (1934)



                          Mercer Syllabus (2010) 1-5-10 Page 4 of 22
           §§ 727; 523, 524(a); 1328

    c. Claims

           §§ 101(5); 101(12)

           Ohio v. Kovacs, 469 U.S. 274 (1985)

    d. Property of the estate, exclusions, and exemptions; role of nonbankruptcy law

           §§ 541; 1306

           United States v. Whiting Pools, 462 U.S. 198 (1983); In re Witko, 374 F.3d 1040 (11th
       Cir. 2004); In re Rozier, 376 F.3d 1323 (11th Cir. 2004); In re Kalter, 292 F.3d 1350 (11th
       Cir. 2002); In re Lewis, 137 F.3d 1280 (11th Cir. 1998)

           § 522; O.C.G.A. § 44-13-100

           Butner v. United States, 440 U.S. 48 (1979)

    e. Secured claims; bifurcation and valuation; role of nonbankruptcy law

           § 506(a)

          Associates Commercial Corp. v. Rash, 520 U.S. 953 (1997); Dewsnup v. Timm, 502 U.S.
       410 (1992)
.
    f. Automatic stay

           § 362

    g. Adequate protection

           § 361

          United Sav. Ass’n of Texas v. Timbers of Inwood Forest Assocs., Ltd., 484 U.S. 365
       (1988); In re Murel Holding Corp., 75 F.2d 941 (1935)

6. The Bankruptcy Code – Statutory structure, principles of statutory construction

           * Some Principles of Statutory Construction

7. The “players” in bankruptcy cases: Debtor, Creditors, Trustee, U.S. Trustee


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8. Introduction to Bankruptcy Litigation

     a. Cases, proceedings, adversary proceedings, and contested matters

        Rules 7001, 9013, and 9014

     b. Bankruptcy Jurisdiction

        28 U.S.C. §§ 157, 1334

           Northern Pipeline Const. Co. v. Marathon Pipe Line Co., 458 U.S. 50 (1982);
        Granfinanciera, S.A. v. Nordberg, 492 U.S. 33 (1989)

     c. Personal jurisdiction – service of process

        Rule 7004

     d. Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure

     e. Federal Rules of Evidence

9.   Introduction to Bankruptcy Forms

     1/18 – Law School closed due to Martin Luther King, Jr., Observance; No class

Session 2: Preparing to File (1/25)

     Reading: §§ 101(12)(A), 526-528;

                § 707(b)(4); Rule 9011

                *Chart on Professional Responsibility Rules (PWB)

                § 109(h); In re Ross, 338 B.R. 134 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2006); In re Dixon, 338 B.R.
                383 (B.A.P. 8th Cir. 2006)

                § 109(e); In re Leggett, 335 B.R. 227 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2005)

                § 109(g)

                §§ 329, 330 (esp. § 330(a)(4)(B)); Rule 2016

                *Paul Bonapfel, Ethics Pure and Simple? Not When Fees Are Involved! (Coastal


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                Bankruptcy Law Institute, Savannah, Georgia, April 27, 2007) (Unpublished)
                (Excerpts TBA)

                *Paul Bonapfel, Bankruptcy Litigation: Motions and Other Contested Matters,
                (Coastal Bankruptcy Law Institute, Savannah, Georgia, May 7, 2004) (Unpublished)
                (Excerpts TBA)

                § 342(b), (c), (e), (f), (g)

                § 521; Rule 1007; Official Forms 1, 6, 7, 8, 22A, 22C

                §§ 1308; 1325(a)(9)



   Assigment:       Review facts about the Georges and consider what their objectives and
                    alternatives may be. Consider, also, what additional information about their
                    situation you will need to advise them properly and what you must consider in
                    determining whether and when they should file a bankruptcy case and, if so,
                    under what chapter.

1. Debtor’s objectives: Retain assets, minimize debt

2. Whether to file and whether to file Chapter 7 or 13

3. Filing of petition – individual (§ 301) or joint (§ 302). Involuntary petitions (§ 303)

4. Eligibility – § 109

   a. Prepetition credit counseling briefing – § 109(h)

       i. General rule and consequences of failure to comply.

       ii. Requirements for “exigent circumstances” temporary waiver.

   b. § 109(e) requirements for chapter 13: Individual with –

       i. Regular income; and

       ii. Debts within debt limits.

           (1) Secured v. unsecured; and



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           (2) Noncontingent, liquidated v. Contingent or unliquidated.

   c. Effect of previous cases on eligibility

       i. § 109(g)

       ii. § 349(a) dismissals “with prejudice”

5. Pre-petition considerations

   a. Notices

       i. Notice to debtor – § 342(b); Procedural Form B 201

       ii. Notices to creditors

           (1) Importance of proper address – §§ 342(c), (g)

           (2) Creditor requests for notice – §§ 342(e), (f)

   b. Debt relief agency rules – §§ 526-528

       i. Applicability

       ii. Prohibition on advising incurring of debt; Constitutionality

              Millavetz, Gallop & Millavetz, P.A. v. United States, 541 F.3d 785 (8th Cir. 2008),
              cert. granted, 129 S.Ct. 2769 (June 8, 2009).

       iii. Required disclosures

       iv. Requirements re fee arrangements

   c. Attorney responsibilities

   d. Attorney’s fees and disclosures – §§ 329, 330; Rule 2016

   e. Tax return issues –

       i. Provide tax returns to trustee – § 521(e)(2); Rule 4002(b)(3), (b)(4)

       ii. Requests for additional returns – § 521(e)(2)(C); § 521(f)



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       iii. Tax returns required for confirmation in Chapter 13 cases – § 1308, 1325(a)(9)

       iv. Dismissal, 521(j)

   f. Continuing disclosure requirements – § 521(f), § 521(g)

   g. DSO disclosures – § 704(a)(10), (c); § 1302(b)(6); (d)

   h. Photo identification for § 341 meeting – § 521(h); Rule 4002(b)(1).

6. Timing of filing of petition. The timing of the filing of a petition is critical. The timing may
   affect a number of issues, including:

   a. Calculation of “current monthly income.” § 101(10A). This is important for purposes of the
      means test (§ 707(b)(1), (b)(2)), and projected disposable income in a chapter 13 case, §
      1325(b).

   b. Denial of discharge due to fraudulent conveyance within year of filing. § 727(a)(2).

   c. Exceptions to discharge –

       i. for certain taxes based on tax year and date of filing returns, § 523(a)(1); and

       ii. for credit card debts based on presumption of fraud for certain types of debts incurred
           within specified times prior to filing. § 523(a)(2)(C)

   d. Limitations on automatic stay based on filing of prior cases, §§ 362(c)(3), (c)(4).

   e. Eligibility under § 109(g).

   f. Prejudicial dismissal of previous case – § 349(a).

   g. Whether transfers to third parties are avoidable as preferential transfers (§ 547(b)) or as
      fraudulent transfers (§ 548(a)).

   h. Filing of petition extends statutes of limitation that has not expired as of the date of filing:

       i. Limitations on actions a debtor may commence,§ 108(a).

       ii. Limitations on claims against the debtor, § 108(c).

7. Information for preparation of statement of financial affairs, schedules of assets and liabilities,
   schedules I & J, Form 22A or 22C


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   a. Schedules, Statement of Financial Affairs (SOFA)

   b. Schedules I & J; Form 22A or 22C

   c. “Pay advices” – § 521(a)(1)(B)(iv)

   d. Effect of failure to file required information – § 521(i)

      In re Parker, 351 B.R. 790 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2006)

8. Overview of Bankruptcy Litigation

   a. Jurisdiction

      i. Subject matter jurisdiction. 28 U.S.C. §§ 1334, 157

              In re Heartwood, 358 B.R. 462, 468-69 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2007)

      ii. In rem concept.

              Tennessee Student Assistance Corp. v. Hood, 541 U.S. 440 (2004).

   b. Personal jurisdiction; service – Rule 7004

      i. Insured depository institutions

      ii. Governmental entities; IRS

   c. Status of bankruptcy courts.

   d. Adversary proceeding vs. contested matter

   e. Incorporation of Federal Rules of Civil Procedure

      Pleading jurisdiction and core or non-core nature of proceeding. Rule 7008(a)

   f. Discovery

      i. Adversary proceedings

      ii. Contested matters



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      iii. Rule 2004

      iv. Identification of experts

   g. Witnesses and subpoenas, Federal Rule 45

   h. Stay litigation

   i. Stay of certain orders – stay relief, sale of assets


Session 3: Discharging Debt and Retaining Assets – Discharge, Dischargeability, and Exempt
Property (2/1)

   Reading:       Discharge and Dischargeability

                  § 727(a); Rule 4004
                  § 523(a), § 523(c), Rule 4007
                  § 523(d)
                  § 1328
                  § 524(a)
                  FDS National Bank v. Alam (In re Alam), 314 B.R. 834 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2004)
                  In re Jacobs, 490 F.3d 913 (11th Cir. 2007)
                  *Chart on Dischargeability of Tax Claims
                  * Tax dischargeability checklist

                  Exempt Property

                  § 522; Rule 4003
                  O.C.G.A. § 44-13-100(a)
                  Judge Massey’s Website on § 522(f) Lien Avoidance

                  Exemption Planning

                  In re Coady, ___ F.3d ___, 2009 WL 4342514 (11th Cir. 2009)
                  In re Jennings, 533 F.3d 1333 (11th Cir. 2008)
                  In re Addison, 540 F.3d 805 (8th Cir. 2008)

   Assignment:    Be prepared to discuss problems posted on Instructor’s web page on discharge,
                  dischargeability, exempt property, and motions to avoid liens.

1. Chapter 7 Discharge – § 727; Rule 4004



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2. Exceptions to Discharge (Dischargeability) – § 523; Rule 4007

   a. Taxes (and debts incurred to pay taxes)

       See provisions on tax liabilities, 26 U.S.C. § 6672, 7501; O.C.G.A. § 48-7-108; 48-8-35.

   b. Domestic support obligations; other domestic debts

   c. False pretenses, false representation, actual fraud

           Presumptions relating to credit card debts

   d. Student loans

   e. Fraud or defalcation while acting in fiduciary capcity, embezzlement, or larceny

   f. Willful and malicious injury

   g. Condominium or coop fees after entry of order for relief

   h. Unscheduled debts

3. Chapter 13 Discharge – § 1328

   a. Standard discharge – § 1328(a)

   b. “Hardship” discharge – §1328(c)

   c. Differences in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 discharges

           In re Whitlock, 308 B.R. 917 (Bankr. M.D. Ga. 2004)

4. Procedures – dischargeability and discharge – Rules 4004, 4007

   Kontrick v. Ryan, 540 U.S. 443 (2004)

5. Effect of Discharge – §§ 524(a), (b), (e), (f), (j)

6. Nondiscriminatory treatment provisions – § 525

7. Property of the estate – § 541(a)

8. Exemptions and exclusions


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      William Houston Brown, Lawrence R. Ahern, III, and Nancy Fraas MacLean, BANKRUPTCY
   EXEMPTION MANUAL

   a. Choice of exemptions; extraterritorial effect – §522(b)

   b. Georgia exemptions

           In re Bramlette, 333 B.R. 911 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2005)

           In re Neary, 2004 WL 3222872 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. Apr. 21, 2004)

   c. Federal exemptions – 522(d)

   d. Exclusions – trusts, 401(k), IRA, etc. trusts

           Patterson v. Shumate, 504 U.S. 753 (1992); Rousey v. Jacoway, 544 U.S. 320 (2005)

   e. Effect of exemption – § 522(c)

9. Procedures for claiming exemptions, objections to exemptions; amendments – Rules 4002, 1009

   Taylor v. Freeland & Kronz, 503 U.S. 638 (1992)

10. Motions to avoid liens

   a. § 522(f) motions – Rule 4003(d)

       In re Lehman, 205 F.3d 1255 (11th Cir. 2000)

   b. Avoidance of liens using trustee powers (garnishment situation) – §§ 522(g), (h)

Session 4: Retention of Cars, Residence, and Other Property Secured by Liens (2/8)

   Reading:       Basic secured claim and valuation issues; bifurcation
                  § 506(a)
                  Associates Commercial Corp. v. Rash, 520 U.S. 953 (1997)
                  Till v. SCS Credit Corp., 541 U.S. 465 (2004)
                  In re Bateman, 331 F.3d 821 (11th Cir. 2003)

                  Treatment of Cars
                  § 722; § 524(c), (d), (e), (f), (k), (l), (m)
                  § 1325(a)(5) and “hanging paragraph” following § 1325(a)(9)


                         Mercer Syllabus (2010) 1-5-10 Page 13 of 22
                  Nuvell Credit Company, LLC v. Dean (In re Dean), 537 F.3d 1315 (11th Cir.
               2008); DaimlerChrysler Fin. Svcs Americas LLC v. Barrett (In re Barrett), 543 F.3d
               1239 (11th Cir. 2008); Graupner v. Nuvell Credit Corp. (In re Graupner), 536 F.3d
               1295 (11th Cir. 2008)

                   Treatment of Mortgages
                   § 524(j)
                   § 506(d)
                   Dewsnup v. Timm, 502 U.S. 410 (1992)
                   § 1322(b)(2), (b)(5)
                   Nobleman v. American Savings Bank, 508 U.S. 324 (1993)

   Assignment:     Be prepared to discuss problems posted on Instructor’s web page on treatment of
                   debts secured by motor vehicles, houses, and other property.

1. Basic Secured Claim Issues – bifurcation and valuation – § 506(a).

   a. Valuation – Rash

   b. Interest rate – Till

2. Basic principle that lien survives bankruptcy unless some action occurs in the case to affect it.
   E.g., In re Bateman, 331 F.3d 821 (11th Cir. 2003).

3. Chapter 7: Reaffirmation, Redemption, and “Ride-through”

       Reaffirmation – §§ 524(c), (d), – (d), (k) – (m)

       Redemption – § 722, Rule 6008

       “Ride-through” – In re Taylor, 3 F.3d 1512 (11th Cir. 1993); § 521(d)

       “Lien-stripping” not permitted. Dewsnup v. Timm, 502 U.S. 410 (1992)

4. Treatment of secured claims in Chapter 13 case – generally

   a. Bifurcation principle of § 506; “hanging paragraph” exception

   b. Modification under § 1322(b)(2), exception for principal residence

   c. Cure and reinstatement under § 1322(b)(5)

   d. Lien stripping – procedures


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5. Confirmation requirements for treatment of secured claim under § 1325(a)(5)

   a. Acceptance (affirmative required?) – § 1325(a)(5)(A)

   b. Surrender (partial surrender permitted?) – § 1325(a)(5)(C)

   c. Cram down – § 1325(a)(5)(B)

6. Cram down requirements – 1325(a)(5)(B)

   a. Retain lien until paid or discharge

   b. Pay value of secured claim

       i. Bifurcation – value of claim – Rash; § 506(a)

       ii. Present value – interest rate – 1325(a)(5)(B)(ii), Till

   c. Equal monthly payments

   d. Adequate protection – prepetition, postpetition

          Note effect of conversion of Chapter 13 case to Chapter 7 case after debtor has made
          payments – § 348(f)(1)(B)

7. “Hanging paragraph” issues (paragraph at end of § 1325(a)(9))

   a. Surrender in full satisfaction

   b. PMSI – financing of negative equity, other charges

   c. Personal use of motor vehicle

   d. Timing issue – In re Murphy, 375 B.R. 919 (Bankr. M.D. Ga. 2007)

8. Mortgages on principal residence

   a. Bifurcation not permissible. § 1322(b)(2); Nobleman.

   b. “Strip-off” is permissible. – § 1322(b)(5). In re Dickerson, 222 F.3d 924 (11th Cir. 2000).

   c. When deacceleration and cure is permissible. In re Williams, 393 B.R. 813 (Bankr. M.D. Ga.


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        2008); In re Geiger, 340 B.R. 422 (Bankr. M.D. Ga. 2006)

     d. Long-term debt is not discharged, an important issue when a second mortgage is involved.
        § 1328(a)(1), (c)(1)

9. Lien strip-off procedures

        Elizabeth M. Abood-Carroll, Are Adversary Proceedings Necessary to Strip Mortgagees’
        Liens in Chapter 13?, 28 AMER. BANKR. INST . J. 14 (July/August 2009)

        David Lloyd and Ariane Holtschlag, Chapter 13 Strip-Off of Junior Mortgages: Not
        Whether, But How Under Current Law, 28 AMER. BANKR. INST . J. 12 (July/August 2009)

        Cases illustrating evidentiary issues and trial preparation: In re Serda, 395 B.R. 450 (Bankr.
        E.D. Cal. 2008); In re Weichey, 405 B.R. 158 (Bankr. W.D. Pa. 2009); In re Hoch, 2009 WL
        2252144 (Bankr. D. Kan. Jul. 27, 2009).

10. Assumption or rejection of unexpired lease or executory contract – § 365; § 1322(b)(7)

Session 5: Dismissal of Chapter 7 Case for “Abuse” (Means Test) and Projected Disposable
Income in Chapter 13 Cases (2/15)

     Reading:      § 101(10A)
                   § 707(a), (b), (c)
                   In re Walker, 2006 WL 1314125 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2006) (Walker I); In re
                Walker, 383 B.R. 830 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2008) (Walker II).
                   § 1325(b)
                   *CHAPTER 13 PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE §§ 9F:1 – 9F:7 (Means Test Summary)
                   *CHAPTER 13 PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE §§ 9F:19 – 9F:22
                   In re Kagenveama, 541 F.3d 868 (9th Cir. 2008); In re Lanning, 545 F.3d 1269
                   (10th Cir. 2008), cert. granted 130 S.Ct. 487 (Nov. 30, 2009).
                   *List of Resources for Information for Means Test/Projected Disposable Income

     Assignment:   Review Forms 22A and 22C and the facts in the George case and begin analysis
                   of their projected disposable income.

                   Obtain means testing/PDI data for Means Testing Problems


1. Operation of means test generally; presumption – § 707(b)

2.   Operation of PDI test generally – § 1325(b)



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3. Current monthly income – § 101(10A)

   a. Sources of CMI; gross v. net income

   b. Included items

   c. Excluded items

4. Means test calculations and expenditures generally

   a. Surrender of collateral issues; debtor’s statement of intent and attorney responsibility

   b. Vehicle ownership issues

   c. Special circumstances – student loans

5. Projected disposable income generally

   a. Does disposable income = PDI?

   b. Surrender of collateral issues

   c. Vehicle ownership deduction issues

   d. Special circumstances – student loans

6. Applicable commitment period issues

7. Use of projected disposable income

   a. Attorney’s fees

   b. Student loans

   c. Timing of payments to unsecured creditors

Session 6: Electronic Case Filing and Case Management; Client Intake Interview (2/22)

   Reading: Rule 5005
            *BLR 5005-5, 5005-6, 5005-7, 5005-8, N.G.Ga.

   Assignment: Prepare for a client intake interview with the Georges. Determine what additional
   information you will need to advise the client as to whether to file bankruptcy and, if so, what


                         Mercer Syllabus (2010) 1-5-10 Page 17 of 22
   chapter.

1. Client intake interview

2. Electronic Case Filing Training

Session 7: Representation of Parties in Chapter 7 Case (3/1)

   Readings:       §§ 329, 330; Rule 2016
                   In re Egwim, 291 B.R. 559 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. 2003)
                   In re DeSantis, 395 B.R. 162 (Bankr. M.D. Fla. 2008)
                   In re Goodman, 2009 WL 936910 (Bankr. N.D. Ga. Apr. 6, 2009)

   Assignment:     Prepare and submit completed Chapter 7 petition on behalf of the Georges.

1. Filing case for debtor

2. Claiming exemptions; objections to exemptions

3. Dealing with pending issues

   a. Pending garnishment, money in court

   b. Repossessed car

4. § 341(a) meeting

5. Reaffirmation

   a. Duty of attorney

   b. Considerations

6. Redemption

7. Motion to avoid lien
8. Conversion to Chapter 13

9. Financial management course – § 727(a)(110

10. Discharge/dischargeability litigation

   a. Settlement of discharge litigation


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   b. Attorney fee issues in dischargeability litigation

   c. Timing issues

   d. Issue preclusion issues

11. Trustee issues in Chapter 7 cases

12. Creditor issues in Chapter 7 cases

Session 8: § 341(a) Meeting (3/8)

   Assignment: Prepare to represent client at § 341(a) meeting.

Session 9: Preparation of Chapter 13 Plan and Representation of Parties in Chapter 13 Cases
(3/15)

   Reading:        *Annotated Chapter 13 Form Plan, N.D. Ga.
                   *Selected plans
                   §§ 1322(b), 1325, 1326

   Assignment:     Chapter 13 petitions, schedules, statement of financial affairs, Form 22C, plan,
                   to be filed by March 29.

1. The Chapter 13 Plan – further consideration of Chapter 13 plan and confirmation topics outlined
   in Session 1.

2. Turnover actions; getting property back

   a. Repossessed automobile

   b. Garnished wages paid into state court

3. Multiple filing – stay issues

   a. “Chapter 20" – Johnson v. Home State Bank, 501 U.S. 78 (1991)

   b. §§ 362(c)(3), 362(c)(4)

   c. Procedures; burdens of proof

4. § 341(a) Meeting


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5. Objections to confirmation

6. Overview of home mortgage issues and problems

7. Stay litigation

8. Preconfirmation modification

9. Confirmation hearing

10. Dischargeability determinations – timing, procedures

11. Effect of confirmation – § 1327

12. Postconfirmation modification – § 1329

   a. By debtor

   b. By Trustee or creditor

13. Discharge and exceptions – § 1328

14. Financial management course

15. Filing of proofs of claim – § 502(a), (b); Rule 3002

   a. Timing

   b. Car claim

   c. Home mortgage claim

   d. Other claims

   e. Filing by debtor – Rule 3004

        In re Bateman, 331 F.3d 821 (11th Cir. 2003)

16. Effect of Confirmation – § 1327

17. Postconfirmation modification – § 1329



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18. Discharge and exceptions – § 1328

19. Postconfirmation issues

   a. Defaults in postpetition payments on mortgage

   b. Defaults in payments to trustee

   c. Modification – § 1329

20. Dismissal

   a. § 109(g) issues
      i. Voluntary after stay
      ii. Order dismissing under § 109(g)
      iii. Prejudicial dismissal – § ___
      iv. Effect of §§ 362(c)(3) and (c)(4) in later case

   b. Dismissal v. Stay Relief (from creditor’s standpoint)

Session 10: Software Training; Individual Chapter 11 Plans (3/22)

   Reading: *Individual Chapter 11s (PWB)

   Assignment: 1) Chapter 13 filing is due on 3/29; 2) Moot court argument is 4/12.

1. Introduction to use of software for filing bankruptcy cases.

2. Lecture on individual chapter 11 cases.

   Happy Spring Break! No class on 3/29, but Chapter 13 filing is due on 3/29.

Session 11: Critique of Chapter 13 Plans (4/5)

   Assignment: Attorneys who work for Chapter 13 Trustees will prepare objections to your Chapter
   13 filing and plan. Be prepared to address the objections.

Session 12: Moot Court Argument (4/12)

   Assignment: You will be given instructions for preparation of an argument to a bankruptcy judge
   on a consumer bankruptcy topic. You will appear and present your case in the Bankruptcy Court
   in Macon.



                          Mercer Syllabus (2010) 1-5-10 Page 21 of 22
Session 13: Additional topics TBA, wrap-up and conclusion




                        Mercer Syllabus (2010) 1-5-10 Page 22 of 22

				
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