CHANGE MAKERS

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					TOASTMASTERS CLUB



        GUIDE TO
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
                                               TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................................2
   THE STORY OF TOASTMASTERS ........................................................................................................................2
   THE STORY OF CHANGE MAKERS TOASTMASTERS CLUB ..........................................................................3
   SOME USEFUL RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET .............................................................................................3
TOASTMASTER.........................................................................................................................................................4
   IDEAS FOR THEMES ..............................................................................................................................................5
   SAMPLE SCRIPT .....................................................................................................................................................6
GENERAL EVALUATOR .........................................................................................................................................9
   SAMPLE SCRIPT ................................................................................................................................................... 10
SPEECH EVALUATOR ........................................................................................................................................... 11
   SAMPLE SCRIPT ................................................................................................................................................... 12
TABLE TOPICS MASTER ...................................................................................................................................... 13
   SAMPLE SCRIPT ................................................................................................................................................... 14
   TABLE TOPICS IDEAS ......................................................................................................................................... 15
WORD MASTER ...................................................................................................................................................... 17
   SAMPLE SCRIPT: PRESENTATION ......................................................................................................................... 18
   SAMPLE SCRIPT: REPORT DURING GENERAL EVALUATION ................................................................................. 18
TIMER........................................................................................................................................................................ 19
   SAMPLE SCRIPT: NOTIFICATION OF SEGMENT RUNNING OVERTIME ..................................................................... 20
   SAMPLE SCRIPT: REPORT DURING GENERAL EVALUATION ................................................................................. 20
SPEAKER .................................................................................................................................................................. 21

QUIZ MASTER ......................................................................................................................................................... 22
   SAMPLE SCRIPT ................................................................................................................................................... 23
THE BUSINESS SESSION ....................................................................................................................................... 24
   SAMPLE SCRIPT: ACCEPTANCE OF THE MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING .................................................... 25
LIST OF CLUBS IN THE TORONTO AREA ....................................................................................................... 26

COMPETENT TOASTMASTER (CTM) ............................................................................................................... 27




                                                                                                                                                                              1
                                    INTRODUCTION

   In Toastmasters, you learn by doing. Each role you participate in, is a valuable learning experience.
There are three main segments to a Toastmasters Club meeting.

1. Prepared Speeches – several members present speeches from the “Communication and Leadership
   Program” manual
2. Evaluations – each prepared speech is evaluated by a fellow member and all members are invited to
   submit written comments as well
3. Table Topics – members who are not scheduled as participants on the agenda have the opportunity
   to present impromptu speeches

You will have often have the opportunity to be involved during meetings, either as a speaker, or in one of
a number of special “Head Table” roles which must be filled to make each meeting a success.

This guide describes the different roles that you might be called upon to fill at the regular club meetings.
For each role, you will find notes on what that role involves, as well as some helpful tips to keep in mind
and, often, sample scripts for any speaking that might be required in your role. Your participation in these
roles is essential to your getting the greatest possible benefit from your Toastmasters experience. This
guide will help to make it easy for you to participate.

When you are assigned a role at a meeting, you are an important part of making that meeting a success.
You have been given the responsibility for making sure the role is filled. If you find you cannot attend the
meeting, please arrange for another member to take your place. Also inform the Toastmaster and the VP
of Education, especially if you have trouble finding a replacement or are detained at the last minute.




                            THE STORY OF TOASTMASTERS
         Since Toastmasters began, more than two million men and women have benefited from the
communication and leadership programs of the organization.
         The first club was formed in October 1924. A group of men assembled by Dr. Ralph C. Smedley
met in the basement of the Santa Ana, California YMCA to form a club "to afford practice and training in
the art of public speaking and in presiding over meetings, and to promote sociability and good fellowship
among its members." The group took the name "Toastmasters."
         A year later, a second club was started in Anaheim, California, followed by a third in Los Angeles.
By 1930, it was apparent that a federation was necessary to coordinate activities of the clubs and to
provide standard methods. After formation of a club in Victoria, British Columbia, the group became
known as Toastmasters International.
         Growth was slow during the early years, but the number of clubs increased steadily. The
forerunner of today's Communication and Leadership program, Basic Training, was introduced in 1942
and has been expanded and updated many times since then to keep abreast of the times and members'
needs.
         Membership in Toastmasters International increased rapidly after the end of World War II, and by
1954 the number of Toastmasters clubs had approached 1500.
         Gavel Clubs were formed in 1958 to accommodate groups wanting Toastmasters training but not
qualified for Toastmasters membership. These clubs provide communication and leadership training in
correctional institutions, hospitals, and schools. In 1966, the Youth Leadership Program, for young people
in junior and senior high school, was added to the list of established community programs being
presented by Toastmasters.




                                                                                                             2
         In 1962, World Headquarters offices were moved to a new building in Santa Ana, California, not
far from where the first club began.
         In 1973, Toastmasters club membership was opened to women, enabling them to benefit also
from self-development in communication and leadership. In the same year, a comprehensive listening
program was introduced to further help members develop their communication skills. The following year
saw a celebration of their organization's first 50 years and the promise of an even more successful
second half-century.
         New programs, including the modular Advanced Manual Series, Success/ Leadership Series and
self-study cassette tape programs, were added to augment the Communication and Leadership program.
Growth in new clubs, especially in the corporate sector, reached new highs in the late 1980s, with more
than 7000 clubs.
         Toastmasters International is the undisputed world leader in public speaking training with the
promise that the best is yet to come.




         THE STORY OF CHANGE MAKERS TOASTMASTERS CLUB


(to be filled in)




                    SOME USEFUL RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET

www.toastmasters.org

This is the official web site of Toastmasters International’s World Headquarters. It has a variety of
information, including forms, club lists, and a much fuller history of Toastmasters. Also, information
regarding DCP standings and what-not.


www.toastmasters60.org

This is the official web site for Toastmasters District 60, which covers central Ontario. (Change Makers is
in District 60.) It has a good history of District 60, as well as information on DCP requirements and various
District-related information. The list of clubs tends to be more up-to-date than the one at
www.toastmasters.org, but only includes those in District 60.


142.43.216.48/cmtc/

This site, on the Bank of Montreal Intranet, is the official web site of Change Makers Toastmasters Club. It
is currently under construction, but watch out for interesting and useful stuff in the near future.




                                                                                                           3
                                     TOASTMASTER


         As the Toastmaster you lead the meeting and keep the agenda flowing smoothly and on time.
Your goal is to make the speakers feel as comfortable as possible, to set the stage for the speaker, and
to bridge between speakers. You also make sure that everyone in attendance, including any guests in
attendance, knows what is happening in the meeting, and does not feel left out. You are basically tying
the meeting together – the common face seen from beginning to end. The Toastmaster sets the tone and
can be the difference between an ordinary meeting and one full of energy. You are the Master of
Ceremonies.


BEFORE THE MEETING

   Consult with the Vice President of Education and prepare an agenda
   Choose the theme. You may also want to compose your own short introduction to Toastmasters,
    especially if you want to tailor it to a particular occasion or theme, or if there will be a large number of
    guests attending.
   Photocopy the agenda for distribution at the meeting
   Obtain information from the participants for the purposes of introduction – prepare lively, colorful and
    complimentary introductions
   Obtain the titles and manual project number of the speeches from the speakers


AT THE MEETING

   Arrive early, greet everyone and say hello – the key is to loosen up, sit near the front of the room
   Check to make sure all participants are present – if not, get back-ups
   Give the agendas and evaluation forms to the Sergeant-at-Arms for distribution
   Find out if there are any guests in attendance, welcome them, and establish who will be introducing
    them (often a club member who invited them along)
   Make sure that the Sergeant-at-Arms knows about guests, especially if they came on their own and
    the Sergeant-at-Arms will need to do their introductions (If the guests are members of other
    Toastmasters clubs, they may be happy to introduce themselves instead)
   Call the meeting to order if no Executive officers are present – make sure it starts on time
   Open the meeting by introducing the Head Table, and make sure the guests (if any) are introduced to
    the assembly
   Introduce the Toastmaster Club, its functions and purposes (or call upon someone to do so)
   Introduce the theme for the meeting
   Inform everyone of their duties and the timing of each participant
   Introduce speakers to make it easier for them to do their best and get audience attention
   Give general comments and make announcements at the end of the meeting
   Request guests’ comments
   Adjourn the meeting


AFTER THE MEETING

   Make sure you thank all those who showed up and helped out




                                                                                                               4
TIPS

   When confirming attendance, make sure you speak to the person, do not simply rely on voice mail
   Be well prepared – if not, the audience senses it. Your performance can dampen or enhance the
    presentation of the speakers
   Prepare notes – one small sheet for each time you are at the podium - try eliminating your notes. You
    might want to make outlines on queue cards, based on the sample script.
   When preparing introductions, think of one on your own first then run it by the speaker and ask for
    suggestions. Good introductions are the most important part of your role
   Your introduction for project speakers should mention the manual, speech number and speech title.
    Also, it is a good idea to get the evaluator to read out the objectives and timing before the main part
    of your introduction, so that your introduction of the speaker will have more impact
   Refer to page 82 in your C&L manual for proper introduction preparation
   When introducing speakers, remain standing until speaker arrives at lectern and has acknowledged
    you and greet him/her with a handshake, then be seated. Never leave the podium unattended.
    Introduce the General Evaluator, Table Topics Master and Word Master as you would any speaker
   Always lead the applause after making an introduction and continue until the speaker has reached
    the podium. Clapping is for welcoming and thanking the participant. You set the supportive tone
   This is an opportunity to learn the skills necessary to run an effective meeting
   YOU are in charge! You can re-arrange the agenda, try something different, etc.
   A theme provides the framework for introductory remarks for each participant – for example, for a
    Christmas theme, you may introduce participants by mentioning what they will be doing for Christmas
   Podium = you stand on it               Lectern = you put your notes on it
   Preside with sincerity, energy and decisiveness – take your audience on a pleasant journey


                                     IDEAS FOR THEMES

Antiques                              Kindergarten Teachers                  Share your Success
Apologies                             Kiss and Tell                          Sorrow
Apoplexy                              Laughter                               Success
Asleep at the Switch                  Millionaires                           Summer
Awkward Age                           Nudists                                Take Action
Bankers                               Obstacles                              Taxes
Birthdays                             Optimism                               Teenagers
Braggarts                             Passion                                Time Wasters
Class Reunions                        Patriotism                             Tomorrow
Co-operation                          Perceptions                            Traditions
Emotional Maturity                    Proverbs                               Used Cars
Enemies                               Public Relations                       Usefulness
Etiquette                             Pulp Fiction                           Vacation
Evolution                             Reach for a Star                       Virtue
Focus on your Dream                   Reflect the Possibilities              Virus
Freckles                              Revenge                                Wine
Games                                 School of Hard Knocks                  Winter
Home Cooking                          Scientific Minds                       Zeal




                                                                                                          5
                                        SAMPLE SCRIPT

12:00 (President will call meeting to order, banging the gavel. He will announce any changes to the
agenda, make sure a secretary is appointed if the Club Secretary is not present, and then introduce you,
the Toastmaster.)

12:01 Introduction of the Toastmaster:
(Accept the gavel from the President)
“Thank you, Mr. President. Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to the Change Makers
Toastmasters meeting of August 18. I will introduce our Head Table for today and ask them to stand up.
Please withhold your applause until I have presented all persons.
Our General Evaluator is …..
Our WordMaster is …..
Our Table Topics Master is …..
Our Timer is …..
In the Hot Seat is …..
And I am your Toastmaster, …... Ladies and gentlemen, this is your head table.” (lead people into the
applause)
“Please be seated.” (gesture to recognize the Head Table)

If there are any guests:
“We have a guest today. I will now call upon our Sergeant-at-Arms to introduce him. Cyndy, would you
please introduce our guest?
(Sergeant-at-Arms introduces guests)
“Thank you Cyndy and welcome [guest name].”

“To begin our program today, for the benefit of our guests and new members, I will give an introduction of
the Toastmaster Club.
The first club was formed in October 1924 by Dr. Ralph Smedley in Santa Ana, California. He assembled
a group of men in the basement of a YMCA to practice the art of public speaking and to train in presiding
over meetings. At the time, one of the main types of public speaking that a member of society would
engage in was after-dinner speaking, a.k.a. toastmastering. Thus, the group took the name
„Toastmasters‟. When a club formed in Victoria, B.C., the group became known as „Toastmasters
International.‟ Today, there are over 8,000 clubs around the world.”
(Or, you can compose your own introduction to Toastmasters or to the Club, as appropriate)

Introduce the Theme
“The theme of this meeting is LEARNING.”
“Learning occurs in many different settings, for example in school, in training rooms, during informal
gatherings or through individual every day experiences.”
“Learning should be a lifelong process. Here at Toastmasters, we have the opportunity to master new
skills, meet new challenges and gain new knowledge.”

12:05 Word of the Week:
“We will now proceed with the next item on the agenda which is the Word of the Week. Helen Jones will
present to us the Word of the Week. Helen is a programmer with the bank and she is a fairly new
member to our group. She is enthusiastic and always willing to participate.
Please help me welcome Helen Jones.”
(initiate applause as Helen walks to the lectern and greet her with a handshake)
(Helen conducts the Word of the Week)
“Helen, thank you for your interesting word. I am sure that we will adopt it during our meeting.”
(give some comments on that word)

12:07   Table Topics:




                                                                                                           6
“Let‟s move on to the most imaginative and carefree part of our session, our Table Topics. Danny Pringle
will be our Table Topics Master for today. Danny has been with the bank for 12 years in the accounting
department. He enjoys sports, music and his motorcycle. Please help me welcome Danny Pringle.”
(Danny conducts Table Topics)
“Danny, thank you for your creative topics and thank you all for your enthusiastic participation. It was a
lot of fun.”

12:20 Prepared Speeches: (state the purpose)
“We are now at the part of the agenda where we speak to obtain our CTM, that is, our Competent
Toastmaster recognition. The purpose of this formal speech session is to learn how to successfully
formulate and express our ideas and get rid of that nervousness we may feel when called upon to speak.”
“You have been given 3 evaluation forms, one for each speaker. I would ask you to kindly write your
feedback for the benefit of the speakers.”

“Our first speaker today is Lucy Smith, who will be giving her Speech#1 from the Communication and
Leadership Program. Lucy‟s evaluator is Jean Flannigan. Jean, would you please read out the objectives
and timing of the speech.”
(Jean reads the objectives)

“Thank you Jean. Remember to keep these objectives in mind when evaluating Lucy‟s speech.”
(If the evaluator did not give timing instructions to the timer, do that now.)

“Lucy is originally from Quebec. She has been with the bank for 2 years and is currently working in
Human Resources. Her speech is titled, “‟Til Now”.

“Please help me welcome Lucy Smith, „Till Now‟. „Till Now‟, Lucy Smith.”

(applaud speaker to the lectern and greet with handshake)
(Lucy speaks)
“Thank you, Lucy. Your speech was quite uplifting.” (shake her hand, applaud until she is seated)
“Will the audience please take one minute to complete the evaluation form for Lucy.”

(Be quiet for one minute to give people time to fill out the evaluation form)

“Our next speaker is …..” (proceed in the same manner as above for all speakers)

“Thank you to all of our speakers today.” (general comments)

12:45 General Evaluation:
“The General Evaluator will now evaluate the meeting as a whole. Our General Evaluator has been a
Toastmaster for 15 years and is an ATM Silver.
Please help me welcome Karl Manny.”
(initiate applause, handshake)
(Karl conducts the General Evaluation)

“Thank you Mr. General Evaluator. I am sure we will all benefit from your constructive feedback.”

12:55 Business Session:
“It is now time for today‟s business session, and for that, I will hand the meeting over to our Club
President. Please help me welcome our President, Jeff Smith.”
(initiate applause, handshake)
(President conducts business session)
“Thank Mr. President.”

If there are guests:




                                                                                                         7
“We always like to know how our guests feel about our meeting. If you wish, you can give a few
comments. [Guest], may I have your comments on how you enjoyed the meeting?”
(guest gives comments)
“Thank you very much for your comments. Thank you again for coming out to our meeting. You are
always welcome back to our future meetings.”

13:00 Adjourn:
“This was an enjoyable luncheon and I will see you all next week. This meeting is now adjourned.”
(Bang the gavel)




                                                                                                    8
                           GENERAL EVALUATOR
         As the General Evaluator, you will be providing feedback on the overall quality of the meeting and
offer your opinions on the strengths of the club and the areas where it can improve. Your guidance of the
speech evaluators and fair summation of the meeting will have a great influence on the members’
attitudes. You are the critic of anything and everything that took place throughout the meeting.


BEFORE THE MEETING

   Discuss with the Speech Evaluators the manual project they will be working from
   Make sure that the Speech Evaluators have read the objectives from the manual and clearly
    understand its purpose
   Brief the Speech Evaluators on their goal – to help their fellow Toastmasters develop their skills
   Prepare a brief and thorough talk on the purpose, techniques and benefits of evaluation
   Create a checklist from which you can follow the meeting
   Make sure that you have an updated copy of the agenda, as well as a General Evaluator’s worksheet.
    Some people prefer using the worksheet, some mark up a copy of the agenda, but you should have
    both for reference.


AT THE MEETING

   Briefly explain any special evaluation guidelines you are using
   Make sure that the Speech Evaluators have the speaker’s manual
   Sit near the back of the room to allow yourself full view of the meeting and its participant
   Take notes on everything that happens or doesn’t but should – cover each participant
   Call for the Timer’s report, then the individual Speech Evaluations, and then the Word Master’s report
   Call on the Quiz Master, if one has been assigned for the meeting
   If anyone is evaluating a speech evaluation, call on that evaluator now
   Give an overall evaluation of the meeting including business sessions, the general quality of
    speeches and evaluations, the Toastmaster, Table Topics Master, WordMaster, Timer and general
    conduct of the meeting
   Suggest improvements and end on a positive note


TIPS

   This is an ideal time for you to speak your mind on some subjects concerning the conduction of
    meetings, even though they may not be pertinent to that meeting
   Your role is to be an active observer of the meeting so you need to listen carefully
   Keep your comments short and to the point
   Do not re-evaluate the speakers, though you may wish to add something that the evaluators missed
   You may wish to comment on the quality of the Speech Evaluations
   Remember that evaluations are a very important part of making progress in anything
   Guide but don’t dominate. Your opinion is just one person’s opinion and others may disagree with you
   Your general evaluation should cover 3 broad areas: (1) an overall evaluation of the meeting; (2) an
    evaluation of the table topics session; and (3) an evaluation of the speech evaluators
   Evaluation is a positive experience designed to help people overcome weak habits and add power to
    good ones
   When finished, wait at the podium for the Toastmaster to arrive and greet him with a handshake
    before taking your seat. Never leave the podium unattended.



                                                                                                          9
                                          SAMPLE SCRIPT

“Thank you Madam Toastmaster.” (accept control of the meeting and the gavel from the Toastmaster)
“Fellow toastmasters and guests.”
“This part of the meeting is used to evaluate anything and everything that takes place through the
meeting. The evaluation process helps us learn and improve.”
“Would the Timer please announce the timing of the speakers.”
 “The Speech Evaluators will now evaluate the speakers. Remember that as an evaluator, you should
evaluate the speech based on the speech objectives. Give the speakers the deserved praise and tactful
suggestions in the manner you would like to receive them when you are speaking.”
“You will have 2 minutes to speak. Would the Timer please time the evaluators showing the green folder
at 1 minute, the yellow folder at 1½ minutes and the red one at 2 minutes.”
“The first evaluator will be Tony Brown who will evaluate Lucy Smith.”
(Tony evaluates Lucy’s speech.)
“Thank you Tony. The next evaluator will be ………”
“Would the WordMaster please give her report? The timing will be green at 1 minute, yellow at 1½
minutes and red on at 2 minutes.”
(the WordMaster gives the report)
“Thank you. And now it‟s Quiz time, and for that, I call upon today‟s Quiz Master, .........”
(the Quiz Master conducts the quiz)
“Thank you.”
 “Now I will comment on the meeting as a whole. I felt that the Toastmaster Sherry Kline did an excellent
job. She started the meeting on time, kept the meeting moving at a good pace and added her own humor
to keep the meeting interesting. Sherry, occasionally when you were speaking quickly, you started to use
„UM‟ while you collected your thoughts. Instead, I suggest you try to slow down a bit and just pause. You
will find that you will be able to reduce your „UMs‟ to a minimum. I was impressed with how comfortable
you seemed speaking in front of the group.”
 “The Table Topics were well-prepared and enjoyable. Choosing the speakers instead of passing the
envelope around the table was a new and refreshing approach. The only suggestion I have, Thomas, is
to maybe control the session by starting to applaud the members that have exceeded the allowed
timeframe. This will reinforce to the members that timing is important. You certainly appeared to enjoy
directing the session. Good job!”
 “The „Word of the Week‟ was extremely well-chosen. It was an excellent fit for the theme of the meeting.
I‟d like to commend you, Susie, for a job well done.”
 “The Speech Evaluators seemed to have gained insight into evaluating because I noticed that you all
tended to give several good points and also offered suggestions for improvements. I would have to say
this was one of the best evaluation sessions I have seen.”
 “The meeting overall was fun, educational and very well run. I‟d like to thank all involved for their
commitment and effort. Keep up the fabulous work and keep the creativity flowing.”
“Madam Toastmaster.” (return control of the meeting and the gavel back to the Toastmaster)




                                                                                                         10
                             SPEECH EVALUATOR


         The evaluation is to help the speaker become less self-conscious and a better speaker. You will
be giving the speaker both an oral and a written evaluation. The evaluation you present can make the
difference between a worthwhile experience and a wasted speech for your speaker. Your goal is to offer
feedback on the strengths of the speech and provide information that will assist the speaker to improve.


BEFORE THE MEETING

   Talk with the speaker to find out the manual project he/she will be presenting
   Review the goals of the speech and what the speaker hopes to achieve
   Find out exactly which skills or techniques the speaker wants to strengthen through the speech


AT THE MEETING

   Look for the speaker and get his/her manual, and confirm any points he wants you to watch for
   Meet briefly with the General Evaluator to confirm the evaluation session format
   Record your impressions of the speech in the speaker’s manual. Be as objective as possible
   When introduced, stand at your seat and give your oral evaluation – begin and end on a positive note


AFTER THE MEETING

   Return the manual to the speaker
   Add a verbal word of encouragement – something not mentioned in the evaluation


TIPS

   If the speaker uses a technique or some gesture that receives a good response from the audience,
    tell the speaker so he/she will be encouraged to use it later
   If the speaker does not bring his manual to the meeting, talk to the VP of Education or Sergeant-at-
    Arms for a copy of the evaluation page.
   Be aware that some older issues of the Communication and Leadership manual have the wrong
    objectives shown on the starting page for project 3. The timing for that speech should be 5 to 7
    minutes. If the manual doesn’t say that, ask to see a set of correct objectives.
   Use a critique sheet as a guide – arrange your material under Content, Delivery, Voice, Body
    Language, Effectiveness, etc.
   Do not read out your written responses to the evaluation questions
   Avoid whitewash, i.e. “great speech, nothing to improve”. We can all improve on something
   Keep your oral evaluation short: give one point on organization, one on delivery and one on
    attainment of purpose – give a suggestion for improvement and state the speaker’s greatest asset
   Don’t allow the speaker to remain ignorant of a serious fault or mannerism – you can write it down if
    you would prefer not to mention it in front of the group
   Praise a successful speech and specifically tell why it was successful
   Remember that you are a member of Toastmasters to learn, and most people have to learn the art
    and craft of evaluating a speech. As such, it is possible to have a more senior club member evaluate
    the evaluation you give. If you would like to have someone evaluate your evaluation, talk to the Vice
    President of Education before the start of the meeting to make arrangements.


                                                                                                        11
                                         SAMPLE SCRIPT

(Speech evaluations are usually given standing at your seat. When prompted by the General Evaluator:)

“Mr. General Evaluator, fellow toastmasters, guests and Cathy.

“I really enjoyed your speech. You certainly met your objectives of providing vocal variety, especially
when you imitated the disgruntled employee. I loved your humor throughout the speech and I certainly
enjoyed your message: Thank Goodness I Have a Job.

“There were many good examples of vocal variety throughout your speech. I thought that the variation in
the loudness of your voice really added to the speech. Most of us can relate to the feeling created when
we hear a disgruntled employee whispering away. Immediately, we think about the worst. I also thought
your imitation of the disgruntled employee talking to the keen motivated staff member really illustrated the
point that you can really cause de-motivation in other members. Your voice is very easy to listen to
because you tend to talk in a storytelling manner.

“In future speeches, may I suggest you try to concentrate on your enunciation for „ing‟ words to add that
extra polish to your speech. For example, I hear you say „I was gonna finish it on time‟ and „My co-
workers are always talkin‟ behind my back.‟ Perhaps, you could tape your next speech to see if you can
recognize and avoid these problems.

“Overall, I found your speech extremely interesting and effective. Your research on the topic was very
thorough and your humor was worthy of imitation. Concentrate on your pronunciation and you will be well
on your way to being a very proficient speaker. Well done Cathy.

“Mr. General Evaluator.”




                                                                                                          12
                           TABLE TOPICS MASTER


        As the Table Topics Master, you will be leading the Table Topics portion of the club meeting,
which can be the liveliest and the most enjoyable part of the meeting if it is handled right. This exercise
provides an opportunity for everyone to think fast, stand up and speak.


BEFORE THE MEETING

   Check with the Toastmaster to find out which members have roles for that meeting
   Prepare interesting Table Topics
   Keep your them, preferably on a single theme and based on the meeting’s theme


AT THE MEETING

   Explain the functions and procedures of the Table Topics exercise
   Encourage guests to participate so as to gain the most from the meeting but explain that participation
    is optional - never embarrass anyone
   Explain the timing procedures to the Timer - request that the timer “commence the applause to thank
    the speaker” at the one-minute mark
   Encourage speakers to use the Word of the Week
   Keep the program rolling and keep your comments short


TIPS

   Originality is desirable as much as possible – this is an excellent opportunity to be creative
   Choose topics from common knowledge or current events
   Each speaker may be given an individual subject or a choice of subjects may be presented from
    which the members can draw at random
   When choosing your specific questions, select ones that will inspire the speakers to expound on them
    and give their opinions
   Don’t make the questions too long or too complicated – questions that are longer than the answers
    are not recommended
   Phrase your questions in such a way that the speaker clearly understands what you are asking
   Calling on speakers at random serves 2 purposes: first, it holds everyone’s attention – each one is
    thinking of a response should he/she be called on to speak and second, it adds to the value of the
    impromptu element by giving everyone an opportunity to improve his/her “better listening and
    thinking” skills
   Call on a respondent that does not have a role on the agenda
   When finished, wait for the Toastmaster to arrive and greet him with a handshake before taking your
    seat. Never leave the podium unattended.




                                                                                                              13
                                         SAMPLE SCRIPT

“Thank you Madam Toastmaster. Fellow toastmasters and guests.

“Toastmasters has a tradition - every member speaks at a meeting.
“Table Topics is the part of the meeting where we practice our impromptu speaking skills. It serves 2
purposes:
1 - to give everyone an opportunity to speak
2 - to get people to practice thinking fast on their feet
Everyone will have one minute to think of the topic and one minute to speak. Mr. Timer, would you
please show the green folder at 30 seconds, the yellow at 45 seconds, the red at 1 minute and start
clapping to thank the speaker.

“It seems that some people find this part of the meeting slightly challenging so I figured I would make the
topics for today very, very easy and comfortable. Favorite Things. What is your favorite………and why?

“However, for that reason, I will pick the speakers out of this envelope. I will pick the next name before
each speaker starts to ensure that everyone has one minute to think. Anyone whose name is on the
Agenda is not in the envelope. We will continue in this manner until 12:25 p.m.

“Remember to use the Word of the Week, which is ………..”

(pick a name out of the “names” envelope)

“The first name is ……………. Pick your topic.” (pass the “topics” envelope to the person chosen)
“In order to provide the first speaker with one minute to think, I will try one now.”

(pick a topic and speak – when finished, pick the next name and let the person chosen prior speak)

“Thank you Anna.” (thank each participant)

(wrap up)
“Thank you all for the enthusiastic and involved participation. I‟m sure this exercise brought us both
training and enjoyment. Madam Toastmaster.”




                                                                                                             14
                                    TABLE TOPICS IDEAS


THEME
Write up questions on a single theme, such as communication, and have members pick one at random
from an envelope.


KEY ORGANIZER
Display a wall-hanging key organizer (one that can hold a dozen keys) with keys of all types and sizes.
Ask participants to speak about the thoughts or memories that the keys evoke.


LIMERICK
Give everyone a limerick but leave out the last line. The speaker has to make it up.


IRRELEVANT WORD
Give each speaker a very, very simple question, for example, “Your Day at the Beach” or “Your Day at the
Zoo.” While a person is speaking, the Table Topics Master yells out a single irrelevant word that the
speaker must include in his/her topic. You can do about 4 words per speaker. Here’s a sample:
Speaker:       “I was walking along the sand and admiring the blue sky…”
TT Master:     “TIGER!”
Speaker:       “and I felt so good in my bathing suit with its cute tiger picture.”


FORTUNE COOKIES
Have a big bowl full of Chinese fortune cookies and have each speaker pick a cookie. When it is time to
speak, the person will read his/her fortune and give an interpretation of that fortune for his/her life.


LIFE AS AN OBJECT
Describe what your life would be if you were an object. In the envelope, have words such as a mirror, a
table, a chair, a briefcase, a door, etc.


STORYTELLING
The Table Topics Master starts a story and calls upon a speaker to continue that story. After 30 to 50
seconds, he/she interrupts and calls upon another speaker to carry on the story from that point. You may
determine who will be the 10-12 speakers beforehand.


JEOPARDY
Come up with 6 question categories and 5 questions for each category. Take a poster board and make
pockets for each question. Label the categories at the top of each column. This gives people a chance
to choose a category they feel comfortable with.


THE SMALL BOX
Put an item in a small box and ask a speaker to describe what is in the box without giving the word away.
What is in the box? A mirror.




                                                                                                          15
WEIRD WORDS
Give the speaker a word from the dictionary. This is usually a word which almost nobody has ever heard
before. The speaker stands up and tells everyone what he/she thinks this word means. Because the
words are strange and unheard of, there is a great potential for people to use their imaginations and
come up with just about anything as a definition.


LICENSE PLATES
Make personalized “license plates” and have each speaker pick one out of the envelope. Ask, “What type
of vehicle are you and who owns you?”
ERNDIT
SLO4X4
RRWIDO
MYCAR
TRAVLNY


SONG WRITER
Take the first line from a song and ask the speaker to explain what inspired them to begin this song with
this phrase.


BOOK TOUR
You have just authored a book and are on a promotional tour for your book. Explain to us why we should
all rush out and buy this wonderful book. You obtain the title from the table topics envelope.


CABINET MINISTERS
What would you do if you were the Minister of ………? Each ministry is picked from the envelope, for
example, Minister of Transportation, Minister of Education, Minister of Agriculture, etc.


FAVORITES
The question is, “What is your favorite…………and why?” The speakers pick a subject out of the
envelope. Examples are music, dessert, color, singer, actor, TV show, activity, sport, books, etc….


MISCELLANEOUS
You arrive at the airport ON time after having dodged all that traffic – BUT – you forgot the tickets! What
do you do?
If you were Princess Diana and you have the chance to turn back time, would you marry Prince Charles
again. Why?
You are a fly on the tail fin of a Boeing 747 that has fallen asleep. You awaken and the plane is going
400 miles per hour! Tell us how you feel!
Some people say a little white lie is sometimes okay. What do you think?


WHAT IF...?




                                                                                                          16
                                     WORD MASTER

         As the Word Master, you will be introducing a new word in order to enrich the members’
vocabulary and challenging them to use the word during any speaking opportunity. Normally, you would
select a word which relates to the theme set by the Toastmaster, and research its meaning. It has been
known for people to be assigned the Word Master role at the last minute, however, so if you do not have
time to find an appropriate word, notify the Sergeant-at-Arms or the VP of Education. They will have some
pre-printed cards of words with definitions that can be used in a pinch.

         Some clubs also assign Grammarians, who watch for instances of faulty grammar, and “Ah-
counters” who count filler words. In our club, you, as Word Master, will also be counting filler words along
with the Word of the Week usage. We do not normally have anyone filling a Grammarian role as yet.


BEFORE THE MEETING

   Consult with the Toastmaster to find out what the Theme is
   Select a “Word of the Week” that supports that theme and helps members increase their vocabulary
   Print your word, its part of speech and a brief definition in large letters so it can be seen from the back
   Prepare a sentence showing how the word used
   Prepare a brief explanation of the purpose of the “Word of the Week” for the benefit of new members


AT THE MEETING

   When introduced, briefly explain the role of the Word Master. Then, announce the “Word of the
    Week”, state its part of speech, define it, use it in a sentence and ask that anyone speaking during
    the meeting use it
   When finished your presentation of the word, wait for the Toastmaster to arrive and greet him with a
    handshake before taking your seat. Never leave the podium unattended.
   Throughout the meeting, write down who used the “Word of the Week” or a derivative of it and note
    those who used it correctly or incorrectly
   Also write down how many filler words, such as “uhm”, “uh”, “ah”, “er”, and the like, were used by
    each speaker.
   Please do NOT count Word of the Week usage or filler words for those giving prepared speeches,
    unless they have asked you to count for them.
   When called upon by the General Evaluator, give your report


AFTER THE MEETING

   Allow people to see their own counts if they are interested.
   Give your report to the Secretary


TIPS

   The word selected should be one that can easily be incorporated into everyday conversation but is
    different from the way people usually express themselves and so is not heard often in speech
   Adjectives or adverbs are usually more adaptable than nouns or verbs but any form can be used




                                                                                                            17
                                  SAMPLE SCRIPT: Presentation

“Madam Toastmaster, fellow toastmasters and guests.

“The purpose of the „Word of the Week‟ is to expand our vocabulary list. It helps refresh our memories
even if we already know this word. It helps to expand our vocabulary if we do not.

“The „Word of the Week‟ is   WINNOW” (pronounce it correctly)
“WINNOW is a verb and can also be used as a noun. The meaning is to remove (as chaff) by a current of
air; to get rid of something undesirable or unwanted. It is often used with the preposition „out‟. For
example, „It is the best chance to winnow out the inefficient MPs during an election‟, or, „It is now time
that I winnow myself out from the lectern.‟

“Madam Toastmaster.”
(Return control of the meeting to the Toastmaster with a handshake)




              SAMPLE SCRIPT: Report during General Evaluation

(This report is usually given standing up at your seat. When prompted by General Evaluator:)

“Mr. General Evaluator, the Word of the Week was used 9 times during the meeting. It was used most
often by Richard, who managed to use it 5 times.

“I also counted 6 filler words.

“If anyone wants to see their own counts, please see me after the meeting.

“Mr. General Evaluator.”




                                                                                                         18
                                              TIMER

         Time is an essential part of anything we do. Speakers often have time limits on their
presentations because of scheduled events and other reasons. At large meetings, items on the agenda
might be prepared for by committees which need to know when they will have to be at the meeting for
their presentations. Some of the attendees may also have other commitments and so will have to be
selective about what parts of the meeting they can attend, and when.

        As the Timer, you are responsible for monitoring and recording the time taken by any speaker
and evaluator. This allows the members to practice expressing a thought within a specific time. You will
also note the starting time of each meeting segment against the time specified in the agenda, to make
sure that the meeting stays running on time. You will then be asked to give a report during the General
Evaluation. Being the Timer gives you an excellent opportunity to practice communicating instructions.



BEFORE THE MEETING

   Confirm scheduled program participants with the Toastmaster and General Evaluator
   Confirm time required for each prepared speech with the speakers


AT THE MEETING

   Get timing equipment and a copy of the Timer’s Worksheet from the Sergeant at Arms. Ask for
    instructions if you are not familiar with the equipment
   Make sure you have an updated copy of the agenda, and record the intended starting time for each
    meeting segment on the Timer’s Worksheet
   Sit where the signal device can be seen easily by all
   When introduced, explain the timing rules and demonstrate the signal device. (Explaining and
    demonstrating is not normally part of your introduction at regular club meetings. This is more likely at
    contests, or at special meetings such as Open Houses and demo meetings for new clubs.)
   Throughout the meeting, signal each program participant using cards or lights to indicate the time
    used. The Worksheet says when to show the green, yellow and red lights or cards for each Table
    Topics speaker and evaluator. If there is a Viewpoint session, use the same timing as for Table
    Topics unless told otherwise. When to show green, yellow and red for prepared speeches depends
    on the projects being presented, and will generally be given to you as each speaker is introduced
   Record the name and time used for each speaker, evaluator and Table Topics participant
   Also notify the Toastmaster, Table Topics Master and General Evaluator when they have reached
    their allotted time and the next segment should begin
   Note the time that the meeting started as well as the starting time for the different segments of the
    meeting
   When prompted by the General Evaluator, give your report standing at your seat. You should report
    on the times for the prepared speeches, a general summary of the times during the Table Topics or
    Viewpoint session, and the general timing of the meeting such as starting time and any segments that
    ran past the allotted time.


AFTER THE MEETING

   Return the timing signal device to the Sergeant at Arms
   Give the completed Timer’s Worksheet to the Secretary for recording speech times in the minutes



                                                                                                         19
        SAMPLE SCRIPT: Notification of segment running overtime

The Timer’s Worksheet says that “If any section runs more than 5 minutes past the agenda time for the
next section, notify the person conducting the section (not when someone is in the middle of a speech)
that the section is running late and should be ended”. The formal way to give notice is to “Call for order of
the day”. Here is an example: If the Table Topics session is still going at 12:24, when the agenda says it
should have been finished by 12:15, and if nobody else has done it yet, you stand up before the next
speaker can begin and say,

“I call for order of the day, Mr. Table Topics Master. It is now 12:24, and the prepared speeches were due
to start at 12:15.”




              SAMPLE SCRIPT: Report during General Evaluation

(This report is usually given standing at your seat. When prompted by the General Evaluator:)

“Mr. General Evaluator, the meeting today began on time, at 12:00. We stayed on time until the Table
Topics, which ran overtime so the prepared speeches started 4 minutes behind schedule. We managed
to pick up some time though, and we are currently only 2 minutes late.

“During the Table Topics, all speakers except one stayed less than a minute. The times ranged from 35
seconds to 1 minute and 14 seconds.

“As for the prepared speeches, Lynn‟s speech was 6:12, and George‟s was 8 minutes exactly.

(If the speech evaluators have already spoken, you can announce their times as well. Our club normally
announces the times first, so the evaluators will not have spoken yet when you give your report.)

“Mr. General Evaluator.”




                                                                                                           20
                                          SPEAKER
         As a speaker, you will be delivering prepared speeches based on project objectives from the
Communication and Leadership Program manual. Preparation is essential to your success. The purpose
of giving speeches is fairly obvious. We give a speech, we receive feedback, we decide what advice is
valid and worthwhile, we incorporate what we learned in the next speech. This is a never ending cycle
that leads to a gradual building up of skill sets that make us a better speaker.


BEFORE THE MEETING

   Prepare your speech using the manual as a guideline
   Practice and rehearse! This is a crucial step!
   Find out who your evaluator will be
   Discuss your speech goals and personal concerns with your evaluator
   Prepare an introduction of yourself for the Toastmaster – refer to page 82 in C&L manual


AT THE MEETING

   Arrive early – sit near the front for easy access to the lectern
   Give your manual to your evaluator before the meeting starts, and let him know if there is anything in
    particular you want him to watch while he is evaluating your presentation
   Make sure the Toastmaster has your introduction
   When it is your turn to speak, take a few deep breaths and give your best


AFTER THE MEETING

   Get your manual from your evaluator and discuss any questions you may have
   Have the VP Education initial the Project Completion Record (page 56 of your C&L Manual or at the
    back of each advanced manual). You will need this when you apply for your CTM or ATM award!
   Also update the Member Achievement Record at the back of your C&L Manual. This form records
    everything you do in Toastmasters, right up to the highest levels. It will be a handy reference if you
    apply for a Competent Leader award or join a new club. If you have lost your C&L Manual, see the
    VP of education for a copy of this form.


TIPS

   As you begin your speech, acknowledge the Toastmaster and the audience. Examples of proper
    address are:
         “Madam Toastmaster, fellow members, and honoured Guests.”
         “Thank you, Mr. Toastmaster. Fellow members and Guests.”
   When speaking during the Table Topics session, the proper address is, “Mr. Table Topics Master,
    fellow members, and Guests.”
   If you are speaking at a contest or other special meeting, there will often be a Chairman in charge,
    rather than a Toastmaster. So in these cases, the usual address is something like, “Mr. Chairman,
    fellow Toastmasters, and honoured guests.”
   When you finish your speech, never thank your audience – simply return control to the Toastmaster
   Always wait for the Toastmaster to return to the lectern, shake hands then return to your seat
   Read pages 80-82 in your Communication and Leadership manual
   For tips on using visual aids, refer to pages 83-84 in your C&L manual


                                                                                                         21
                                     QUIZ MASTER

Successful communication requires competence in two skills: speaking, and listening. As Quiz Master,
you are acting to reinforce the importance of listening and observation during the meeting.

During the meeting, you will listen and observe, and come up with 3 or 4 questions about things that were
said, done, or not done properly during the meeting. You will then ask your questions to the meeting
attendees when prompted by the General Evaluator. Anyone can answer the questions, without having to
raise their hands or speak in turn. The quiz should not take more than a minute or two in total.


BEFORE THE MEETING

   Make sure you have an updated copy of the agenda for the meeting.


AT THE MEETING

   Watch and listen. Take note of things that are said or done which anyone paying reasonable attention
    should have caught. Also watch out for things which are not done properly, such as items on the
    agenda which are missed or done out of order. Devise questions for each of these, along with the
    answers you would expect for them.
   Select three of your questions (no more than 4 questions) to ask during the quiz.
   When prompted by the General Evaluator, explain the purpose of the quiz, and how it is conducted.
    Then give your quiz
   Ask your questions one at a time, waiting for answers to each.
   Finish on an upbeat note.


TIPS

   There are often many things at a meeting which would be ideal for asking questions, but you will only
    need 3 questions. You will probably find yourself devising questions throughout the meeting, and
    crossing some off as you come up with better ones.
   Write down your questions and answers as they come to you. Don’t wait until the last minute, or you
    might have trouble thinking of any questions in time for the quiz.
   The idea of the exercise is listening and observation. Try to come up with questions which are easy to
    answer, but which require those answering them to have paid attention to the proceedings. You will
    probably find yourself having to listen and observe carefully to be able to devise these questions. You
    may want to take notes throughout the meeting.
   Don’t make your questions too difficult or involved. You are testing listening and observation skills,
    not ability to handle complexity, and you do not have much time to complete the quiz in. Your
    objective is not to trick anyone, but to allow them to prove they were paying attention during the
    meeting.
   The quiz is not formal. Keep things moving, both to keep everyone interested (you may find them
    actually getting excited sometimes) and to avoid taking too much time.




                                                                                                        22
                                          SAMPLE SCRIPT


“Mr. General Evaluator, fellow members, and guests.

“Good communication involves not only speaking, but also listening and observing on the part of those
being spoken to. This short quiz is intended to emphasize that point, and to provide a quick evaluation of
our listening and observational skills. It will only take a minute.

“I am going to ask you three questions based on things that were said or done during this meeting.
Anyone who knows the answer, please answer. Don‟t worry about raising your hands or speaking in turn.
If you know the answer, sing it out.

“For my first question, the first project speaker today told us about the phenomenon of the mid-life crisis.
After the speech, our Toastmaster said she was going to tell her husband something. What was she
going to tell him?”

(Attendees give the answer)

“That‟s right. Second question: During the introduction of the second speaker, our Toastmaster neglected
to do something that should normally be done when introducing any project speech. What didn‟t she do?”

(Attendees give the answer)

“Good. Now, the third question: During the Table Topics session, we heard about a dog that belonged to
one of the speakers, and we heard that the speaker shared a certain hobby with the dog. What was that
hobby?”

(Attendees give the answer)

“Excellent! I‟m satisfied that we were all paying attention during the meeting. This is an important skill, so
keep up the good work.

“Mr. General Evaluator.”




                                                                                                            23
                          THE BUSINESS SESSION
At some point in the meeting (usually at the end in our club), there will be a business session. This part of
the meeting is where the Club Officers can make announcements and handle other items of business as
required.

The business session will be presided over by the most senior Club Officer present at the meeting, that
being:
 the Club President, if present; or if not,
 the VP of Education; or if not,
 the VP of Membership; or if not,
 the VP or Public Relations; or if not,
 the Treasurer; or if not,
 the Secretary; or if not,
 the Sergeant-at-Arms; or if not,
 the Past President..

Common items handled during the business session are (in order):

1. Induction of any new members, generally handled by the VP of Membership.
2. Presentations or announcements from visiting dignitaries, such as the Area or Division Governor
   when they visit our club.
3. Any club award presentations, such as certificates, ribbons or CTM badges.
4. Acceptance of the minutes of the previous club meeting, generally handled by the Secretary.
5. Confirmation of the role assignments for the next club meeting, generally handled by the VP of
   Education.
6. Any general announcements, concerning current club standing, upcoming events, or the like.
7. Any other items of business which need to be handled by the club as a whole.

Most items will be matter-of-fact announcements and presentations, but some will require voting. At
Change Makers, we try to follow proper parliamentary procedure as far as possible for handling votes. A
vote requires:
 Someone to present the item to be decided as a motion.
 Someone else to second the motion, confirming that more than one person sees the motion as being
    worth dealing with.
 Any required discussion.
 The presiding officer then re-stating the motion, calling for the vote, and announcing the result.


An example of this, which happens at each meeting, is the acceptance of the minutes of the previous
meeting. The minutes are our record of what happened at the meeting, and need to be accurate and
reasonably complete. The secretary will normally type up the meeting minutes and distribute them by e-
mail, normally by the end of the week of the meeting, and may need to re-distribute them if errors or
omissions are found in them. Then, at the next meeting, the minutes will need to be accepted, so as to
confirm that they were correct. This occurs during the business meeting. There is normally little or no
discussion required before voting on acceptance. If there is, it will be allowed before the vote is called.




                                                                                                           24
SAMPLE SCRIPT: Acceptance of the Minutes of the Previous Meeting

(Technically, anyone can raise the motion to accept the minutes. Practically, we find less time is taken if
the Secretary makes the motion. Here is the usual procedure in our club:)

(President:) “The next item of business is acceptance of the minutes from our last meeting, and for that, I
call on our Club Secretary, Grace Kelly.”

(Secretary) “Thank you, Mr. President. I sent out the minutes of the last meeting by e-mail last Thursday.
It was brought to my attention that the date shown for the next meeting was wrong, and so I corrected it to
today‟s date, and sent the revised minutes out yesterday morning. No other problems have been brought
to my attention. So, Mr. President, I move that the minutes of last week‟s meeting be accepted as
amended.”

(President) “Do we have a seconder?”

(Some other member in attendance) “I second it.”

(President) “Thank you.” (If discussion of more changes is required, they will be dealt with now, followed
by re-announcing the motion to be voted on.)

(President) “All those agreed, say „Aye‟.”

(Members in agreement) “Aye”.

(President) “All those opposed, say „No‟.”

(Any members who do not agree) “No.”

(President, if majority agrees) “The Ayes have it, and motion carried. Would the secretary please record
that the minutes of last week‟s meeting have been accepted as amended.”

(President, if majority disagrees) “The No‟s have it, and motion denied. I would ask the secretary to
please revise the minutes as necessary, and we will try for acceptance again at the next meeting.”




                                                                                                          25
                    LIST OF CLUBS IN THE TORONTO AREA
                                                            As at October 27, 2000

No.    NAME                     FREQUENCY TIME              DAY    BUILDING                        ADDRESS                    PHONE          SINCE

406    Royal Toasters           bi-weekly        12:00pm    Tues   Royal Bank of Canada    180 Wellington St. W, 6th Floor    416-974-3773   09/92
806    E-Talk                                    12:00pm    Wed    AT&T                    905King St. W, 4th floor           416-341-5359   06/00
1220   Meridian                                  12:00pm    Tues   Ontario Power Generation700 University Ave                 416-592-3380   04/76
1322   Le Cercle                2x monthly           9:30   Sat    Bibliotheque Locke / CP Yonge & Lawrence or                905-273-3316   06/95
                                                                   Tower (alternate)       downtown
1610   IOL                      2nd & 4th         6:15pm Mon       Imperial Oil            111 St. Clair Ave W Rm 1950        416-598-0842   01/82
1651   The Grosvenor            1st & 3rd         6:00pm Wed       Grosvenor YMCA          20 Grosvenor Street                416-864-9911   04/67
1693   Gavel & Glass                              7:00pm Thurs     St. Marks Presb. Church 1 Greenland Rd                     416-494-5349   05/55
1744   Toronto Downtown                          12:15pm Wed       Thompson Gallery Rest   The Bay, 176 Yonge St. 9th fl.     416-410-2635   06/55
1830   W.C.B.                                     5:30pm Mon       YMCA 4th Floor Conf Room42 Charles Street East             416-480-0555   03/79
2198   Talk of Mackenzie                          1:00pm Thurs     Mackenzie Financial     150 Bloor St. W, 9th floor         416-922-7641   05/97
2303   Podium                                     6:30pm Tues      Latvian Cultural Centre 4 Credit Union Drive               416-883-5500   01/57
2710   Speakeasy PWGSC                           12:00pm Wed       PWGSC                   4900 Yonge St.                     416-590-8274   06/00
3032   Forward Speakers                          12:00pm Thurs     Royal Bank of Canada    20 King St. W                                     05/99
3057   West Toronto             wkly exc. 1st     6:15pm Mon       St. Lawrence Com Rec    230 The Esplanade                  416-789-4394   02/61
3234   Queens Park                                5:30pm Wed                               14 Carlton Street, Mezz Floor
                                                                   Toronto Hydro Bldg, Cafeteria                              416-778-9842   04/73
3568   Toronto Business Club                     12:15pm Tues                              Bay & Bloor, 9th Floor
                                                                   Arcadian Court Rest., the Bay                              416-410-4604   01/63
3597   Mohawk                                    12:05pm Wed       2 Bloor Street West     Boardroom 24a, 24th Floor          416-314-6939   02/73
4100   Rainbow                                    7:00pm Mon       Metropolitan Community  115 Simpson Ave (Church)           416-225-2232   10/97
4116   ICeek to Speak           2nd & 4th        12:00pm Thurs     Industry Canada         151 Yonge St., 4th floor           416-954-2106   12/98
4618   Vocal Exchange                            12:10pm Wed       Toronto Stock Exchange  130 King St. W, 3rd floor          416-367-9991   06/81
5183   Mercury Eloqui                            12:00pm Wed       Northern Telecom        522 University, Quetico rm.        416-597-7265   06/83
5771   Toast of the Town        biweekly         12:10pm Thurs     HSBC Bank Canada        70 York St.                        416-868-8167   06/94
6047   Naturopathic                               6:30pm Wed                               1255 Sheppard E (at Leslie)        416-969-9181   12/98
6328   LCBO                     biweekly         12:15pm Wed LCBO, Finance Boardroom       1 Yonge St., 13th floor            416-365-5762   03/99
6598   Sun Life Speakers Cor                     12:05pm Tues Sun Life Centre              150 King Street West               416-408-7380   07/96
6602   Bay Street Blabbers                        7:45am Wed First Canadian Place          1 First Canadian Place, 24th fl.   416-359-5136   06/99
6650   Toronto Central Toaste                                  Royal Bank (Yonge & Bloor)  (charter cancelled, Oct 2000)                     06/99
6716   Toast of CIBC                             12:00pm Thurs CIBC Commerce Court East    (Wellington & Yonge) 24th fl.      416-980-4499   04/94
6723   toasters@lunch.cibc                       12:00pm Tues CIBC                         750 Lawrence Ave. W                               04/96
6859   Deer Park                2nd, 3rd & 4th    6:30pm Thurs Deer Park Public School     23 Ferndale, room 200              416-429-7147   03/88
7065   Ecommunicators                            12:00pm Wed Bk of Mtl MGC, Clarica Centre 3300 Bloor W, W twr, rm 11F        416-232-8780   06/99
7099   Granite                  2nd & 4th         7:30pm Tues Granite Club LTE             2350 Bayview Ave                   416-446-4456   04/98
7102   King Street Speakers                      12:00pm Tues Royal Trust Tower            77 King Street West, 36th floor    416-955-2263   04/96
7154   St. Michael's                              7:30am Thurs St. Michael’s Hospital      30 Bond Street, room 6-02V         416-864-5186   03/95
7282   Front Street Speakers                     12:00pm Wed Royal Bank of Canada          315 Front Street West              416-348-5204   02/89
7297   Royal Class                               12:00pm Tues Royal Bank of Canada         315 Front St West, 15th Floor      416-348-4464   03/89
7749   RSI                      2nd & 4th         6:00pm Wed RSI Realtime Group            4100 Yonge St, suite 502           416-226-4505   01/00
7994   Plaza Speakers                            12:00pm Tues Scotia Plaza                 40 King Street West @ Bay          416-365-5198   12/90
8047   Bay Street Breakfast                       7:30am Wed Bank of Nova Scotia           44 King Street West, 4th Floor     416-955-5313   01/91
8088   Mrs Speaks                                 6:00pm Wed Mrs. Ins                      777 Bay Street, Ste 2100           416-964-0660   03/98
8529   Metro Hall                                 1:00pm Tues Metro Hall                   55 John St, 3rd floor              416-392-4363   06/97
8568   Downsview                1st & 3rd        12:00pm Wed                               1201 Wilson Ave                                   06/00
8624   Drew                                      12:00pm Thurs Eaton Tower                 250 Yonge Street, 32nd floor       416-326-8399   03/92
8630   X                        3rd               6:30pm Fri   Metro Hall                  55 John Street                     905-568-0871   03/92
8643   Just Do It               2nd               7:45am Thurs BCE Place                   181 Bay St Ste 3500 Box 827        416-777-6112   03/92
9058   Transitmasters                            12:00pm Wed Toronto Transit Comm          1900 Yonge Street, 6th floor       416-484-3817   09/92
9059   Manulife Financial                        12:15pm Tues Manulife Financial           200 Bloor Street East              416-926-3000   09/92
9204   St. Vladimir                               7:00pm Wed St. Vladimir Institute        620 Spadina Ave                    416-406-3850   02/93
9523   Speakeasy                                 12:00pm Fri   Canada Post Corporation     1 Dundas St West, suite 700        416-204-4045   06/93




                                                                                                                                       26
              COMPETENT TOASTMASTER (CTM)
How do I earn my CTM?
       Simple! In order to achieve the designation of CTM you must complete all ten speeches in the
Communication and Leadership Program manual. A brief description of these speeches is outlined
below.


1. "THE ICE BREAKER"
       The general subject of this talk is you. You must narrow the subject by selecting three or four
       interesting aspects of your life that will give your fellow members insight and understanding of you
       as an individual. TIME: 4 to 6 minutes

2. "SPEAK WITH SINCERITY"
       The purpose is to advocate a point of view on which you feel strongly. Your primary goal is to
       learn how to convey your true feelings to the audience. TIME: 5 to 7 minutes

3. "ORGANIZE YOUR SPEECH"
      You must clearly identify the key point of your subject for the audience and then lead them
      logically toward that point. TIME: 5 to 7 minutes

4. "SHOW WHAT YOU MEAN"
       The Purpose is to learn the value of gestures and body movements as part of a speech, explore
       the different ways of using body language, and to develop a sense of timing and natural, smooth
       body movement. TIME: 5 to 7 minutes

5. "VOCAL VARIETY"
       You are to explore the use of voice volume, pitch, rate, and quality as assets to your speaking.
       Strive to achieve a pleasing natural voice quality when speaking. TIME: 5 to 7 minutes

6. "WORK WITH WORDS"
      The purpose is to select precisely the right words required to communicate your ideas clearly and
      vividly. Avoid lengthy words, sentences, and jargon. TIME: 5 to 7 minutes

7. "APPLY YOUR SKILLS"
       Bring together and apply the communication skills you have learned in the preceding projects.
       Organize your speech in a logical manner, following one of the suggested outlines. Make a
       personal evaluation of your progress. TIME: 5 to 7 minutes

8. "ADD IMPACT TO YOUR SPEECH"
       Learn the value of props in speaking. Learn how to use props effectively in your presentations.
       TIME: 5 to 7 minutes

9. "PERSUADE WITH POWER"
       Present a talk that persuades the audience to accept your proposal or viewpoint. Appeal to the
       audience's self-interest, building a logical foundation for agreement, and arousing emotional
       commitment to your cause. TIME: 5 to 7 minutes

10. "INSPIRE YOUR AUDIENCE"
       Understand the mood and feelings of your audience on a particular occasion. Put those feelings
       into words and inspire the audience, using all the techniques you have learned so far.
       TIME: 8 to 10 minutes




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