The Town Mouse _ The Country Mouse

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The Town Mouse _ The Country Mouse Powered By Docstoc
					Education Pack for Early Years and KS1
           Devised by Nicola Sangster
   with help from Mel Roan and Tina Williams.


                                                1
                                  Contents
Page                  Activity
3–4                   Story Summary

KS1
5–6                   Drama Activities
7–9                   English: Exploring Journeys, Letter Writing, Vocabulary.
10 – 13               Science: Magical Milk
14 – 16               Science: Senses
17                    Recycling
18                    Art and Craft Activity – Mouse finger puppets.

KS1 & Early Years Music: Songs, from the show and new related songs with
19-21             actions.

Early Years

22                    Different Places
23                    Number Work Activities
24                    Template for ‘Washing Line’ Number Activity
25-6                  Templates for ‘Pairs’ Number Activity
27                    Story based activities
28                    Suggestions for role play, music and drama work
29-30                 Drama Games
31                    Puppet Template for role play activity.

32                    Sheet Music for songs.



      This pack is intended as a leaping off point for follow-on activities after your
performance of The Town Mouse and The Country Mouse. The suggested activities take
themes from the play and can be directly linked to the national curriculum and/or practice
                      guidance for the early years foundation stage.

If you find the pack useful, have questions or suggestion for improvements we welcome
and value your feedback. Please take time to fill in our evaluation sheets (handed out on
        the day of the performance) or send us an email at twpiedpiper@aol.com.

The pack begins with a summarised version of the story. Please use this only as a re-cap
for follow up work (or for the very young) – and allow the children to discover and enjoy
                   the surprises of the story through the performance.




                                                                                        2
  The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse
It was wintertime and Country Mouse had lots to do. She wanted to make
her beautiful clean home especially tidy, as she was expecting a visitor, her
cousin, Town Mouse. He was coming to stay with her in the country. He
was travelling all the way from the busy city of London. Country Mouse
thought about her cousin as she worked away, she was a very busy mouse
and hated wasting time or being lazy.

Both Mice were very excited, they hadn’t seen each other for years. They
just knew that they would be the best of friends and have a wonderful time.
After all, as cousins, they would have so much in common…

At last Town Mouse arrived. He was very surprised at Country Mouse’s
neat and tidy home – and he couldn’t get used to being a neat and tidy
mouse. He found it hard to remember to wipe his paws and put everything
back in its place. He was even more shocked to learn about the dangerous
Barn Owl who lived nearby!

Next morning both mice were looking forward to a delicious breakfast.
‘Yum!’ thought Town Mouse. ‘I fancy some cold pizza, old chips and I’d
like to lick a few chocolate wrappers.’ But Country Mouse had a very
different breakfast in mind.

First they visited the cow for some milk, then the chickens for some eggs.
Town Mouse had never thought about where food came from, he thought
milk came from the Supermarket. Town Mouse didn’t think much of
country food; it wasn’t what he was used to.

Town Mouse began to feel a bit fed up. Country Mouse always seemed to
be telling him what to do. Country Mouse made fun of his town clothes.
Country Mouse tried to make him wash and be clean. Country Mouse
shouted at him when he made a mess. He had had enough.

When he told Country Mouse how he felt she didn’t understand. The mice
got cross and argued. Town Mouse left for home wishing he’d never even
come to visit. Country Mouse felt the same way!


                   *********************

                                                                                3
A whole year passed, and over time the two mice thought about their silly
argument. Surely it was time to make friends again? It seemed so silly to
lose a friend just because they liked different things. So Town Mouse
invited his cousin to stay with him in London.

When Country Mouse arrived she was very surprised at how busy the town
was; there were so many people and cars. It was very noisy. She couldn’t
get used to Town Mouse’s messy, smelly rubbish tip– and she couldn’t get
used to being a messy, smelly mouse. She was worried about the dangerous
alley cats; she thought they might eat her up!

It was lunchtime, and both mice were very hungry. ‘Yum!’ thought Country
Mouse. ‘I’d like a nice fat hazelnut and a juicy berry.’ Town Mouse had a
very different lunch in mind, he took them to a fast food restaurant for
burgers, chips and milkshakes. Country Mouse had never eaten fast food,
and she’d certainly never eaten so quickly. Pretty soon she had a tummy
ache. Country Mouse didn’t think much of town food; it wasn’t what she
was used to.

Country Mouse began to feel a bit fed up. Town Mouse always seemed to
be telling her what to do. Town Mouse made fun of her country clothes.
Town Mouse wouldn’t let her wash and be clean. Town Mouse shouted at
her when she tried to clean up the mess. She had had enough. Would the
mice argue and fall out again?

Country Mouse told Town Mouse how she felt, and he could understand.
He hadn’t liked it when Country Mouse had told him what to do. He hadn’t
liked it when Country Mouse had made fun of his clothes. He didn’t like
being told to clean up as much as Country Mouse didn’t like being told to be
messy. At last the two mice began to realise that they had hurt each others’
feelings. They lived in different places, they liked different things – but they
could still be friends. In fact, the very things that made them different were
the very things that made them interesting.

When it was time for Country Mouse to go home both mice felt sad. They
would miss each other – but they could look forward to visiting each other
again next year, and the year after that, and the year after that, and….

                                   The End.



                                                                               4
Suggestions for Drama Games
KS1 EN1 Drama –
4a) use language and actions to explore and convey situations, characters and emotions
 b) create and sustain roles individually and when working with others

Simplified versions of these games can be found in the early years section.


Begin the session with a mousey warm up.
Wiggle a mouse’s nose; imagine you have whiskers to twitch.
Wiggle your mouse ears.
Use your mouse paws to scrabble around.
Imagine you have a tail, what happens when you walk in a straight line, a
wiggly line?
Mice have to be careful when travelling around, remember the owl and the
cats? – move around the room as a mouse but look out for danger! Freeze on
the signal. (e.g. a hand clap).
(This could be taken into a game of mousey musical statues…it’s only safe
to move when the cat can’t hear you, e.g. the music plays).

Role Play scenarios – pair work
In pairs imagine that one partner is Town Mouse, the other Country Mouse.
How does this character affect the way you stand / walk / interact / talk? Is
there a visible change?
Role-play events from the play – how would the characters react – what
would they say?

Some suggested scenes:
  • Country Mouse milks the cow – Town Mouse didn’t know milk came
     from cows.
  • Town Mouse and Country Mouse argue and fall out.
  • Town Mouse proudly shows Country Mouse his home – at the rubbish
     tip.
  • Town Mouse and Country Mouse realise there is a cat following them.

Freeze a couple of scenes. Ask the ‘audience’ to look at the frozen scenes –
can they guess who is who? What led them to their decisions?

                                                                                         5
1, 2,3,4,5 Instant character and emotion game.
Ask the children to move around the room, without contact.

Establish the pattern of freezing (body and mouth) on the word ‘freeze’ and
resuming movement on the word ‘action’. Practise a few times.

Freeze the class. Ask them to assume the physicality of a sleeping Country
Mouse, curled up in her comfy bed. It should be a frozen, silent pose.
Explain that when you call the number 1 they should stop where they are
and assume that character.

Practise moving between ‘action’, number ‘1’ and ‘freeze’ a few times
before introducing any more commands. Always ‘freeze’ the class to give
further instructions. Only ever introduce one new command at a time, and
give the children plenty of attempts before introducing a further command.

Further commands could involve a sound or movement – if things are going
well! Eventually the children should be able to instantly assume each
numbered pose and move between poses, ‘action’ and ‘freeze’ at some pace.

‘1’ – you are Country Mouse, curled up in her comfy bed.

‘2’ – you are Town Mouse, petrified by the sight of an enormous horse.

‘3’ – you are the hen, laying a tasty egg for Country Mouse’s tea.

‘4’ – you are Town Mouse, upset at having been told off for being
messy.

‘5’ – join with the person nearest to you – you are Town Mouse and
Country Mouse saying goodbye at the end of the story.




                                                                              6
            Exploring Journeys.
EN2 Literature 3a) identify and describe characters, events and settings in fiction.
3b) use their knowledge of sequence and story language when they are telling stories and
predicting events.

The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse take journeys
to see each other from the town to the country and the
country to the town.

• Ask several children in the class to describe a journey that they
  have taken to a town, to the countryside or to the seaside. The
  class can then individually write down a description of their
  own journey.

• Ask several children to describe their journey to school. What
  do they see on the way? Ask them to write a list of places and
  things that they pass on their journey.

• What different things would the children see on a walk in the
  countryside and a walk in the town?

• Ask the class to draw a more complicated journey (e.g. going on
  holiday) in picture boxes, a picture for each part of the journey.

• Ask the children to think of everything that happens from the
  moment they wake up in the morning to the moment they arrive
  at school. This can include washing, getting dressed, eating
  breakfast, cleaning teeth, walking to school or getting in the car,
  the journey to school. They can then mime this, travelling from
  one side of the hall or classroom to the other. A few children
  could be chosen to mime their journeys one at a time to the rest
  of the class. Discuss the differences in the journeys with the
  class.


                                                                                      7
• Ask the children to describe their homes. How is it different to
  their friend’s home? What different sorts of buildings do people
  live in (bungalow, flats, detached, semi etc.). Ask the class to
  complete a small drawing of their house, colour it in and cut it
  out. Find out who lives the furthest and nearest to the school.
  Make a map on the wall and pin up these two homes. Then ask
  the rest of the class to work out where they live and to pin up
  their houses.




Letter Writing
EN3   1e) to vary their writing to suit the purpose and the reader

• Write a letter from Country Mouse
  to Town Mouse inviting him to
  stay. Write a letter from Town
  Mouse to Country Mouse after
  their argument – how can he
  apologise      and    repair  the
  friendship? Discuss how to layout
  a letter correctly. How will the
  letter be begun and ended?




                                                                     8
       Where do these animals live?
 Draw a joining line between the animal and its home.

Town Mouse                          sty

Horse                               sett

Rabbit                              rubbish heap

Bird                                bowl

Badger                              burrow

Gold fish                           stable

Pig                                 nest

Sheep                               field




                                                        9
KS1 Science:
SC2 Life Processes and Living Things.


                           Magical Milk
Town Mouse is very surprised when Country Mouse goes to get some milk for
their breakfast. Country Mouse gets his milk straight from a cow. Town
Mouse thought milk came from the Supermarket. He had never thought
about how it got there – have you?



        Milk, from the cow to your cereal.

Why do cows make milk?                     Cows are mammals, like humans,
                                           dogs, cats, goats, sheep,
                                           elephants and whales, so they
                                           raise their young on milk. When a
                                           cow has a baby (a calf) she
                                           produces milk – just like human
                                           mums. When the calf no longer
                                           needs his or her mother’s milk
                                           the cow still goes on producing
                                           milk.




                                           What do cows make the
                                           milk from?

To make the milk, dairy cows eat cereals and grass. They also drink a lot of
water. Grass is difficult to digest, so a cow’s stomach is divided into four
separate compartments which each help to break the grass down. We only
have one compartment in our stomachs – which is why we can’t digest grass.




                                                                           10
How do we get the milk from the cow?

The milk is stored in the cow’s udder – which is like a large bag on the
underside of the cow with four teats. These teats are like tubes, and when
you milk the cow you squeeze the teats – either by hand or with a special
milking machine and out comes the milk.
Don’t worry; it doesn’t hurt the cow at all.


Pasteurisation

Most milk is then pasteurised. This means it is quickly heated up (to about
63 degrees Celsius). Pasteurisation kills the bacteria in the milk, so it keeps
for longer.
Now the milk is ready to drink and the farmers sell it to shops, milkmen and
supermarkets all over the country, who then sell it to you.


What else is milk used for?

Did you know… yogurt, butter and cheese are all made from milk? Do you
remember Country Mouse making some cheese in the play?



                             Why drink milk?

                             Milk contains calcium. Calcium helps your strong,
                             healthy teeth and bones to grow. Calcium is
                             particularly important when you have a young
                             growing skeleton.

                             You should try to have three
                             portions of calcium every day
                             from dairy foods (milk, cheese
                             and yogurt).
                             There is more information about how to
                             get your ‘three-a-day’ at www.milk.co.uk




                                                                             11
  The big milk quiz!

• What is a baby cow called?




• How many compartments does a human
  stomach have?




• How many compartments does a cow’s stomach have?




• Where does a cow store her milk?




• When a cow is being milked, does it hurt?




• Why does your body need calcium?




• How many portions of dairy foods should you try and have a
  day?




                                                           12
WORKSHEET

Can you cut out these pictures of ‘The Story of Milk’ and put them in the correct order?




                                                                                     13
KS1 Science:
SC2 Life Processes and Living Things.
2g) the senses that enable humans and other animals to be aware of the world around
them.


                                      Senses
  Here is an extract from the play to read aloud or act out in pairs.



              Country:       I think I can smell something.

              They stand very still and smell.

              Town:          I think I can hear something. Shhh!

              They stand very still and silent.

              Country:       I think I can see something!

              Two eyes light up in the windows of a building.

              Country:       Look there!

              Town:          It’s a cat!

              Country:       A cat!

              Town:          RUN!



                               Questions to discuss:
  Town Mouse and Country Mouse use their senses to protect them from danger.

                             What are the five senses?
                             Which senses do they use?
                              What would they smell?
                            What noise would they hear?
                              What would they see?


                                                                                      14
Further Sense Work
Can you use your knowledge of the senses, and your memory of the play to
guess where the mice are now?


Smell        Touch           Taste           Sound          Sight        ANSWER
Rotten old   You             A nasty taste Trucks           Bags of      Town Mouse’s
food         wouldn’t        in the air.   emptying         rubbish      rubbish tip.
             want to!                      their loads.     piled
             Smooth                        Flies            high.
             plastic,                      buzzing.
             sharp glass,
             soft squishy
             old food.
Warm hay     Soft feathers   None yet –      Clucking       Hens         The chicken
                             eggs later!                    sitting on   shed.
                                                            nests.
Cooking      Warm            Strong          Munching,      A            The fast food
smells.      squidgy         flavours.       slurping,      counter, a   restaurant.
             bread. Cold,    Salty, tasty,   busy people    waitress,
             smooth cup.     fruity,         giving their   a menu
                             meaty…          orders




   • Use your senses to describe different places in school (e.g.
     dining hall, playground, library).

   • Can the rest of the class guess where you are using sense
     clues?

   • How many clues do they need? -Smell, sound, taste, touch,
     and (lastly) sight.

   • Can the class take the game further, describing other
     environments?



                                                                                       15
                         Senses
Draw a connecting line between the sense and its matching body part.




       Taste


       Touch

       See


       Hear


       Smell

                                                                   16
                 Recycling

Town Mouse lives in a rubbish dump.
Although we don’t want to make him
homeless what will happen if we keep on
producing more and more rubbish.

Discuss what children do at home and at
school to try and reduce waste. What materials can be
recycled?
Recycling is an excellent way of saving energy and conserving the
environment. Did you know that:

   •   1 recycled tin can would save enough energy to power a television for 3
       hours.
   •   1 recycled glass bottle would save enough energy to power a computer
       for 25 minutes.
   •   1 recycled plastic bottle would save enough energy to power a 60-watt
       light bulb for 3 hours.
   •   Up to 60% of the rubbish that ends up in the dustbin could be
       recycled.
   •   The unreleased energy contained in the average dustbin each year
       could power a television for 5,000 hours.
   •   The largest lake in the Britain could be filled with rubbish from the
       UK in 8 months.


Comprehensive information about recycling in
schools, at home, lesson plans and activity sheets
can all be found at:

www.recycling-guide.org.uk/schools.html

                                                                           17
Make Mice Finger Puppets

1. Cut a large circle, a smaller circle and a tiny circle out of different
   coloured felt or light card. The largest circle should be around the size of
   a cd, the middle sized a glass or cup and the smallest a 2p piece.
2. Cut the circles in half and roll into cone shapes. Sew or staple or glue the
   edge to make the cones. Trim the bottoms if necessary.
3. The largest cone will make the body, the medium the head, and the small
   the ears of the puppets.
4. Sew, staple or glue together the four cones to make the finger puppets.
5. Stick on sequin eyes and wool whiskers and a pipe cleaner tail.




Why not use your puppets to act out the story?
A simple set can be created using building blocks, boxes or Lego to make
buildings for the town, and why not collect some flowers, leaves and foliage
from outdoors to represent the countryside.

Decide on the key events of the story with your fellow puppeteer before you
begin!



                                                                            18
A song from the show:

This is the way…
(To the tune of ‘Here we go round the Mulberry Bush’- add in actions for: scrub the
floor, lie down and snore etc.)

Country: This is the way I scrub the floor, scrub the floor, scrub
         the floor.
         This is the way I scrub the floor on a cold and frosty
         morning.

Town:        This is the way I lie down and snore, lie down and
             snore, lie down and snore
             This is the way I lie down and snore on a cold and
             frosty morning.

Country: This is the way I sweep the rugs, sweep the rugs, sweep
         the rugs
         This is the way I sweep the rugs on a cold and frosty
         morning.

Town:        This is the way I swat the bugs, swat the bugs, swat the
             bugs
             This is the way I swat the bugs on a cold and frosty
             morning.



  Can you think of any new verses for the song?




                                                                                19
New songs with Actions:
Crossing the road song –
Do you remember how scared Country Mouse was by all the cars in the town?



 To find out more about crossing the road, including lesson plans
 visit:http://www.databases.dft.gov.uk/lessonplans/
 http://www.thinkroadsafety.gov.uk/arrivealive/greencross.htm
 http://www.hedgehogs.gov.uk/main/main.html



There are many actions to act out in this song – try…
Stop – still with arms folded
Look – looking around with your hand above your eyes (as if
looking out to sea)
Listen – hands behind ears
Live - Two thumbs up


Stop, look, listen, live.
Stop, look, listen, live.

First you look around for a safe place to cross
Then you stand on the pavement and you stop!
Use your eyes and ears to check all around
If a car is coming, we go back to the top…

Stop, look, listen, live.
Stop, look, listen, live.




                                                                       20
Opposites Song

Actions:
verse 1: polishing and sweeping,
verse 2: throwing rubbish and yawning (for ‘bore’),
verse 3: alarm clock ringing and waking up,
verse 4: snoozing and stretching out.

Country Mouse is tidy,
She polishes all day
She sweeps the dust up with her broom
And cleans the dirt away.

Town Mouse is messy,
His clothes live on the floor
He likes collecting rubbish
And thinks cleaning is a bore.

Country Mouse is busy
She wakes up at dawn
She never stops the whole day through
From early in the morn.

Town Mouse is lazy
He snoozes through the day
He likes to sit and watch TV
The lazy town-mouse way!




                                                      21
Early Years : Different Places.

Practice guidance for the early years foundation stage
Knowledge and                  Age range
Understanding of the           (months)
World.
Place                          30-50        Show an interest in the world in which they
                                            live.
                                            Comment and ask questions about the world
                                            in which they live and the natural world.
                               40-60+       Find out about their environment and talk
                                            about those features they like and dislike.



Discussions:
As a group, can you remember where Town Mouse and Country Mouse
live? What was different about their homes? Where were they?

What about where you all live? What is the same / different from each
other? What do you like / dislike about where you live?


Suggested Activities:

•      Painting / Drawing / Junk model

Can you paint your house? How about your dream house? – what features
might it have? E.g. a slide instead of stairs, and ice cream fountain etc.

•     Adult led activity –Collect items or pictures of items from the town
and the country. Establish a ‘town corner’ and a ‘country corner’ in the
room. Hold up an item and let the children decide which corner it comes
from – they should stand in that corner. If a group consensus is reached the
item can be placed there.

•      Make a display of Town and Country items on a table for children to
sort on their own.



                                                                                     22
Early Years: Number Work

Problem solving,
Reasoning and Numeracy
Numbers as labels for
counting
                         30-50       Sometimes match number and quantity
                                     correctly.
                                     Recognise groups with one, two or three
                                     objects.
                         40-60+      Count up to three of four objects by saying
                                     one number for each item.
                                     Count up to six objects from a larger group.
                                     Recognise numerals 1-5.




Suggested Activities:

1)    Photocopy the mouse shape five times and write the numbers 1-5 in
      the empty boxes.

      Put up a washing line with pegs, for the children to order and hang up
      the shapes. You can decide whether to hang him on the washing line
      by his nose or his tail!


2)    Photocopy pictures of town and country objects and animals, making
      two copies. (Some pictures to get you started are given on the
      following sheets) Cut out. Objects can then be sorted and hung in
      pairs on the washing line.    .




                                                                                23
24
  Photocopy
two copies
to sort into
pairs.




          25
26
Early Years: Story Work

Communication,
Language and literacy
Language for            30-50      Join in with repeated refrains and anticipate
communication           months     key events and phrases in rhymes and stories.
                                   Describe main story settings, events and
                                   principal characters
                        40-60+     Listen with enjoyment and respond to stories
                        months
                                   Planning and resourcing…
                                   Set up collaborative tasks. Help children to
                                   talk about and plan how they will begin,
                                   what parts each will play and what materials
                                   they will need.
                                   Resource role play areas
Language for thinking   40-60+     Use language to imagine and recreate roles
                                   and experience.
                                   Use talk to organise, sequence and clarify
                                   thinking, ideas, feelings and events.
Reading                 30-50      Suggest how the story might end.
                        40-60+     Retell narratives in the correct sequence,
                                   drawing on language patterns of stories.



Discussions:
How much of the story can the group remember together – use the story
summary on pages 3-4 to help.

What can the group remember about the experiences of each mouse?

What did Town Mouse dislike about the country?

What scared Country Mouse in the town?

Can you remember the sequence of events?




                                                                             27
Early Years: Role Play, Music and Drama Work
Communication,
Language and literacy
Language for             30-50       Join in with repeated refrains and anticipate
communication            months      key events and phrases in rhymes and stories.
                                     Describe main story settings, events and
                                     principal characters
                         40-60+      Listen with enjoyment and respond to stories,
                         months      songs and other music, rhymes and poems.

                                     Planning and resourcing…
                                     Set up collaborative tasks. Help children to
                                     talk about and plan how they will begin,
                                     what parts each will play and what materials
                                     they will need.
                                     Resource role play areas



Music
Song lyrics and actions on pages 19-21, piano sheet music at the end of the
pack.


Role Play
Set up a role play area with a country part and a town part.
Country Part could include toy farm animals, picnic blanket and set, foliage
collected from outdoors etc.
Town Part could include skyscrapers or buildings made of empty boxes, toy
cars etc.

Make simple puppets of the mice for children to act out the story – or make
country and town mouse hats / costumes for the children to be the characters
themselves.

Templates for puppets follow on page 31.




                                                                               28
Drama Games
More complicated versions of these games can be found in the key stage one
pages.


Mousey warm-up.

Wiggle a mouse’s nose; imagine you have whiskers to twitch.
Wiggle your mouse ears.
Use your mouse paws to scrabble around.
Imagine you have a tail, what happens when you walk in a straight line, a
wiggly line?
Mice have to be careful when travelling around, remember the owl and the
cats? – move around the room as a mouse but look out for danger!


Mousey Musical Statues.

When the music is playing move around the room as a mouse. But be
careful. There is a cat on the prowl. It’s only safe to move when the cat
can’t hear you, e.g. the music plays. When the music stops you must stay
perfectly still and quiet, or the cat might catch you!
(Children could be eliminated for moving, until a winner remains).


Instant character and emotion game.

Ask the children to move around the room, without contact.

Establish the pattern of freezing (body and mouth) on the word ‘freeze’ and
resuming movement on the word ‘action’. Practise a few times.

Freeze the class. Ask them to assume the physicality of a sleeping Country
Mouse, curled up in her comfy bed. It should be a frozen, silent pose.
Explain that when you call out ‘Sleepy Mouse’ they should stop where they
are and assume that character.



                                                                            29
Practise moving between ‘action’, ‘Sleepy Mouse’ and ‘freeze a few times
before introducing any more commands. Always ‘freeze’ the class to give
further instructions. Only ever introduce one new command at a time, and
give the children plenty of attempts before introducing a further command.

Further commands could involve a sound or movement – if things are going
well! Eventually the children should be able to instantly assume each pose
and move between poses, ‘action’ and ‘freeze’ at some pace.


‘Sleepy Mouse’ – you are Country Mouse, curled up in her comfy bed.


‘Little Red Hen’ – you are the hen, laying a tasty egg for Country
Mouse’s tea.


‘Prowling Cat’ – You are a town cat looking for a tasty mouse supper.
Etc.




                                                                             30
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