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CSP Student Representatives Conference

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					                             CSP Student Representative’s Conference
                                       28-29 January 2005
                                    Hilton Hotel, Nottingham

                                       Minutes of the Motions
                                                      Adam Rose, Liverpool
Attendance                                            Abigail Doyle, Manchester Metropolitan

Angela Mercer, Birmingham
Clare Neve, Birmingham
Zoe Clare, Bradford                                   Marek Holowenko, Manchester Metropolitan
Andrea Bucknor, Bradford                              Nick Clode, Manchester Metropolitan
Gillian Keogh, Bradford                               Sam Haw, Manchester Metropolitan
Aran Pell, Brighton                                   Juliet Raine, Northumbria
Kate Clark, Brighton                                  Tracy Millar, Northumbria
Carl Holland, Brighton                                Kate Forsythe, Northumbria
Michael Tegerdine, Brighton                           Annie Davidson, Northumbria
Rebecca Wheat, Brighton                               Craig Hole, Northumbria
Elaine Newman, Brighton                               Lynsay Wyatt, Northumbria
Charlotte Meade, West of England                      Ben Ellis, Nottingham
Adam Gold, West of England                            Liz Bell, Nottingham
Amie Whittal, West of England                         Rebecca Jorgensen, Nottingham
Jamila Kassam, West of England                        Michael Lenehan, Oxford Brookes
Natasha Allan, Wales College of Medicine              Tom Barclay, Oxford Brookes
Helen Warnock, Wales College of Medicine              Jude Kelly, Plymouth
Victoria Irvine, Wales College of Medicine            Lee Cameron, Plymouth
JD Hylton, Wales College of Medicine                  Lucy Tighe, Queen Margaret
Michelle Dellar, Wales College of Medicine            Chris Seenan, Queen Margaret
Anna Walker, Wales College of Medicine                Chris Cooper, Queen Margaret
Laura Jedrzejewski, East Anglia                       Jennifer Kadgeien, Queen Margaret
Lee Massingham, East Anglia                           Adam Martin, Robert Gordon
Alison Fulcher, East Anglia                           Craig Harrington, Robert Gordon
Charlene Bentley, East Anglia                         Liam McLachlan, Robert Gordon
Mark Raven, East Anglia                               James Garret, St George's Hospital
Liam St Pierre, East London                           Maria Cattle, St Martin's College
Paul Thompson, East London                            Mark Harrison, St Martin's College
Kristi Hutton, East London                            Jennifer Cogbill, Salford
Gillian Carey, East London                            Joanne Thornton, Salford
Ruth Cheesley, Essex                                  Michelle de Carle, Sheffield Hallam
Lisa Cooper, Glasgow Caledonian                       Amy Lyon, Sheffield Hallam
Karen Dyke, Glasgow Caledonian                        Jemma Oliver, Sheffield Hallam
Terese O'Hare, Glasgow Caledonian                     Karl Rudkin, Sheffield Hallam
Lisa Casey, Glasgow Caledonian                        Mathew Unwin, Sheffield Hallam
Daloni Lucas, Hertfordshire                           Susan Coombe, Southampton
Laura Ferdinands, Hertfordshire                       Hannah West, Southampton
Laura Smith, Hertfordshire                            Teresa Turnpenny, Southampton
Jimmy Reynolds, Hertfordshire                         Baden Cashmore, Teeside
Hannah Thompson, Huddersfield                         Paul Sanderson, Central Lancashire
Nicholas Wilson, Huddersfield                         Mark Hoffman, Central Lancashire
Vicky Barry, Keele                                    Catherine Keenan, Ulster at Jordanstown
Jonathan Morris, Keele                                Nuala Doherty, Ulster at Jordanstown
Zoe Lundie, Keele                                     Ian Harbinson, Ulster at Jordanstown
Emma Field, Keele                                     Kate Wiggins, York St John College
Hannah Howard, Kings College London                   Matt White, York St John College
Saira Symonds, Kings College London                   Louise Broom, York St John College
Daniel Lawrence, Leeds Metropolitan                   Helen Lewis, York St John College
Samantha Turner, Leeds Metropolitan                   Katie Bird
Sarah Reily, Leeds Metropolitan
Apologies

Heather Linnane, Birmingham
Phillipa Whiteside, Brunel University
Steve Snelling, Brunel University
Michelle Chapman, Colchester Institute
Simon Noad, Coventry
Purdie Urquhart, Hertfordshire
Laura Drummond-Smith, Kings College London
Nicholas Collins, Kings College London
Liam McLachlan, Robert Gordon
Danielle Smith, St George's Hospital
Sarah Henry, St George's Hospital
Emma Baxter, Teeside
Nigel Wilkinson, Teeside
Dawn Church, York St John College

CSP Officers

Jamie Mackler, Students‟ Officer
Julia O‟Sulivan, Head of CPD
Elyse Fogel, Assistant Administrator
Alan Pomroy, Organising Officer
Practice Motion

This conference believes that it should be made illegal for men to wear tights

Proposer: Student Executive Committee

Motion failed


Motion 1

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the CSP to investigate the overall student benefits of
placements of less than five-week duration.

Proposer: Saira Symonds, King College London. There have been a number of complaints by students,
as well as clinical educators, of four-week placements or less not being long enough for an effective
learning experience. Most students question their grades after two weeks of placements. They find
themselves under pressure to develop their skills which causes distress and lowers confidence levels.
Longer placements would allow students to develop core skills in physiotherapy.
Seconder: Laura Jedrzejewski, University of East Anglia. This motion points to the underlying concerns of
the clinical supervisors‟ point of view of skills developed during placements and highlights the view that
courses may be too academic, leading to more practical-based investigation.
For: Craig Harrington, Robert Gordon University. This should be investigated. RGU has one four-week
placement in the 1st year and a five-week placement in each year thereafter, which is not long enough to
practice all skills.
Against: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. Introductory placements are of no benefit at Salford.
For: Lee Massingham, University of East Anglia, Learning & Development Committee. His university
provides eight-week placements with shared teaching in two areas of work, which enables the students to
establish themselves. Four-week placements are not long enough to prove skills.
Against: Ben Ellis, University of Nottingham. Longer placements would mean less placements and less
variety of experience. Different courses provide different placements and therefore the student has the
choice to decide which is more suited to their learning experience.
Against: Samantha Turner, Leeds Metropolitan University. Longer placements would be too long
especially within 1st year when students have less skills and knowledge.
For: Hannah West, University of Southampton. Students look forward to placements as this is the reason
for training in physiotherapy.
Sheffield Hallam University. Four-week placements are not long enough to ensure all four key areas are
met due to clinical supervisors taking annual leave.
Against: Victoria Irvine, University of Wales College of Medicine. Recognised that courses are validated
by CSP and would have highlighted those with insufficient length of placements.
For: Matt White, York St John College, Professional Practice Committee. A portfolio about placements
should be produced by CSP to give to HEIs.
Against: Natasha Allan, University of Wales College of Medicine. It is draining for clinical educators to
take on students. If placements were made longer then they would be less likely to accept students into
their teams.
For: Zoe Clare, University of Bradford. It would be interesting to find out the benefits of extending the
length of placements. This motion must be lobbied for investigation.
Summation: Saira Symonds, Kings College London. The overall benefits must be investigated, not just for
1st year placements. There must be an informed choice for the length of placements to increase students‟
independence and confidence for improving skills.

Motion carried


Motion 2

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the CSP to start a campaign to appeal to all physiotherapy
departments to offer undergraduate placements.
Proposer: Juliet Raine, Student Executive Committee
As the numbers of physio students rise each year, so does the demand for placements. There are many
departments that do not offer placements for many reasons but who may consider it if they were made
aware of the needs and benefits of offering placements to students, e.g. CPD benefits.
Seconder: Adam Gold, University of the West of England. By increasing of the number of placements, the
strain on hospital staff would also lessen.
For: Kate Clark, University of Brighton. As there is an increase in students, students also must raise new
strategies and be prepared to take them to ARC.
Against: Mark Raven, University of East Anglia. There is a demand for placements but there is also the
issue of the number of Senior I & II posts available.
For: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. This motion carried would alleviate the problem of students
being told that placements were not to be found for them which puts an increased strain on them,
especially for 3rd years.
Against: Matt White, York St John College, Professional Practice Committee. A pay package to
supervisors was an incentive but this no longer applies. This motion must look towards encouraging the
trusts to accept students.
For: Kristi Hutton, University of East London. Staffing levels is an issue and hospitals should consider
offering placements as well.
For: Laura Jedrzejewski, University of East Anglia. Not having enough placements is limiting students‟
education.
For: Elaine Newman, University of Brighton. In her experience, students from her MSc course have had to
find their own placements.
Summation: Juliet Raine, Northumbria University, Student Executive Committee. This motions will not
seek just to ask all physiotherapists to offer placements but to also raise awareness of the need for more
placements, also some hospitals are not aware of the need.

Motion carried


Motion 3

This Conference mandates the SEC to urge the CSP to see if improvements can be made in the way
placements are organised and that the job of arranging placements is given to a secretarial member of
staff rather than given to a physiotherapy lecturer on top of their existing job.

Proposer: Jenny Cogbill, North West Region. Departments are accepting more and more students onto
their courses; this is making the job of finding placements for students more and more difficult. Some 2 nd
and 3rd year students are not finding out about their placements till a few weeks before commencing
placement. This is limiting the time that students have to prepare for placement and is jeopardising their
chances of good grades and giving them an unfair disadvantage against students who find out about their
placements earlier. At some universities the job of arranging placements is given to a physiotherapist
lecturer. This is unnecessary as the job of arranging placements is by nature a clerical job. This is being
used as an excuse for late placements unnecessarily.
Seconder: Kate Clark, University of Brighton. It would be worthwhile finding out if the CSP can make
improvements as the increase in the number of students has exacerbated the administration problem
especially in the south.
For: Jonathan Morris, Keele University. There is a team at Keele who allocate placements and there is no
reason why this strategy cannot be implemented within all universities.
For: Laura Smith, Kings College London. Kings has a good system of designated part-time staff to
organise placements however there still remains a problem.
Against: Charlotte Meade, University of the West of England. There should be a designated organiser in
charge at all universities. The responsibility is with both PIMS and universities, communication between
them must be improved.
Against: Emma Field, Keele University. In her experience, students have a good relation with the tutors
but not the secretarial staff.
Against: Mark Raven, University of East Anglia. Should the CSP involve itself in university admin? This
system needs to be improved however the CSP cannot change it.
For: Kristi Hutton, University of East London. CSP should consider whether improvements can be made.
Summation: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. Salford do not use PIMS. Investigations must be made
to see if one system is better than another and whether improvements can be carried out.

Motion carried


Motion 4

This conference urges the CSP to lobby course leaders to ensure all physiotherapy students receive first
aid and basic life support training, as preparation for clinical placements and that this training is continually
updated.

Proposer: Hanna West, University of Southampton. First aid training is no longer included on the course
at Southampton. Students are expected to organise and complete training themselves. This requires a lot
of time, effort and finance. As this training is so vital to a clinical placement, feedback from students
reflects that all courses should provide access to this training.
Seconder: Victoria Irvine, University of Wales College of Medicine. This is in the interest of health and
safety and is deemed valid by CSP. All students should be at the same level of qualification by graduation
and currently they cannot rely on their educators for this standardisation.
For: Karen Dyke, Glasgow Caledonian University. All 1st years must have had this training as it is
important to all healthcare professionals.
Against: Lynsay Wyatt, Northumbria University. This is an individual responsibility as the time available on
the course is tight.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion carried


Motion 5

This conference mandates the SEC to work to ensure the interests of MSc pre-registration physiotherapy
students are included in the negotiations for financial incentives to encourage continued working within the
NHS (Student loan campaign).

Proposer: Mark Raven, University of East Anglia. There are now an increasing number of MSc pre-
registration courses within the UK with courses starting at many universities. These students are already
unable to receive a student loan during their training and are thus penalised for their later decision to join
the profession. The student loan campaign is designed to encourage newly qualified physiotherapists to
stay within the NHS longer than many currently do. This incentive as it stands does not include the many
MSc pre-registration students who‟s contribution to the NHS is as valuable as any other student and in fact
may bring a variety of previous skills in addition to physiotherapy. Their inclusion in a scheme to
encourage long service to the NHS would be a sensible investment in the future of the NHS and ensure
fair treatment of all opting to stay within the NHS.
Seconder: Ruth Cheesley, University of Essex. It is frustrating not to be included in the Student Loan
Campaign. Currently, MSc pre-reg students have to seek private loans and have a £20K debt. Students
on accelerated courses are more likely to stay in Physiotherapy.
For: Amie Whittal, University of West of England. MSc students are asking to be treated fairly. If they are
asking for more debt, it is obvious that they need. They can then pay it back once qualified and working.
For: Craig Hole, Northumbria University. The Newcastle course is not eligible for bursaries. A loan would
help MSc students, and it would be beneficial for the NHS to invest in all physio students instead of losing
them after the 1st year.
For: Lynsay Wyatt, Northumbria University. This is an increasing problem for MSc students. The
authorities regard them as post-graduates and therefore not eligible. However, MSc students still pre-
registration.

Motion carried
Motion 6

This conference asks the SEC to raise concerns about financial support, for students on the part time
physiotherapy course, with the CSP.

Proposer: Hannah West, University of Southampton. Part time students are not eligible for student loans,
council tax exemptions and student and postgraduate bank accounts. This puts financial strains on those
studying physiotherapy part time. There is an increase in popularity of part time courses and many part
time students find difficulty in fitting work around college hours and placements.
Seconder: Kate Wiggins, York St John College. Part time students are not able to earn a full time salary
and are prohibited form claiming benefits.
For: Samantha Turner, Leeds Metropolitan. Hours of learning for physiotherapy students is much more
than for students on other courses, therefore part time students are penalised.
Against: Adam Martin, Robert Gordon University. Part time students can get an income.
For: Amy Lyon, Sheffield Hallam University. Part time students tend to have added financial commitments
and the extra income would be of benefit.
Against: Victoria Irvine, University of Wales College of Medicine. What power to CSP have to encourage
banks to give part time students loans?
For: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. We need to make the state aware of this issue.
Summation: Hannah West, University of Southampton. Not all part time students are assistants.
Physiotherapy is a career in the public sector and therefore all students should not have to pay fees.

Motion carried


Motion 7

This conference mandates the CSP to investigate more easily accessible ways of claiming emergency
funding.

Proposer: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. Events can occur at university which can cause funding
problems for physiotherapy students. This can involve parents removing funding, losing a job or having to
wait for a long time for reimbursement of travel and living expenses from placement. The NHS bursary
system has a process by which you can claim emergency funding (as referred to by their information
booklet) however specific information on this process is not clear. Financial problems can cause students
to drop off the course unnecessarily. How many students are aware they can apply for NHS funding?
Seconder: Zoe Clare, University of Bradford. I applied to Bradford university for reimbursement of
placement expenses and due to the length of time it took to get the money back faced financial problems.
For: Lisa Casey, Glasgow Caledonian University. I also had had a financial experience such as this.
Against: Matt White, York St John College, Professional Practice Committee. The motion relies too much
on the CSP and SEC. Students should take responsibility to seek out this funding individually.
For: Jemma Oliver, Sheffield Hallam University. I did not realise this funding was available until reading
these motions.
For: Rebecca Jorgensen, University of Nottingham. This is an emergency, we need money now!
For: Mark Harrison, St Martin‟s College. Some students have other responsibilities i.e. children, so cannot
be focused on university issues all the time and need CSP to point them in the right direction if need be.
Summation: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. She is not asking that emergency funding be over
utilised, but that students are made aware of it.

Motion carried


Motion 8

This conference mandates the SEC to campaign to the University of Ulster to provide NHS uniforms for
students free of charge.
Proposer: Nuala Doherty, University of Ulster at Jordanstown. The University of Ulster physio course is,
as far as we know, the only one that makes the students pay for uniforms. It is not really fair when all the
other students in the UK are getting them paid for.
Seconder: Chris Cooper, Queen Margaret University College. The CSP has campaigned for this in the
past, we must push this motion forward for equality.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion carried


Motion 9

This conference mandates the SEC to investigate the possibility of changing the physiotherapy degree to
a four-year course and to present its findings to the CSP.

Proposer: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. In the majority of countries, e.g. USA physiotherapy is a
four-year degree, which means we cannot get work there. At present some physiotherapy courses have a
high drop out rate due to the pressures of the course. Many students graduating from physiotherapy feel
very unprepared. An increase in placement hours may lead to students feeling more secure about moving
into employment. Less pressure on lectures will ease physiotherapy students‟ stress and financial
worries.
Seconder: Adam Rose, University of Liverpool. This would lower stress levels, drop out rate and debt,
and it would increase the electives available and skills acquired.
For: Lisa Cooper, Glasgow Caledonian University. Four-year courses increase the confidence to practice,
but it will not necessarily reduce stress level or financial debt.
Against: Lee Massingham, University of East Anglia, Learning & Development Committee. Four-year
courses used to exist and the profession has since developed with an increase in accelerated courses.
An extra year will not help financial hardship.
For: Lucy Tighe, Queen Margaret University College. An extra year would mean more research and
clinical experience and would also allow working in USA and Australia. It would compare physio students
to medical students.
Against: Natasha Allan, University of Wales College of Medicine. If courses can be reduced into
accelerated courses then why extend them? Not everyone wants to work overseas.
For: Chris Cooper, Queen Margaret University College. Students have the choice at present to do either a
three-year or four-year course and would like to increase the number of longer courses into England and
Wales for more choice.
Against: Victoria Irvine, University of Wales College of Medicine. Three years is sufficient. There is a
warning of the demands of this course on application.
Against: Karen Dyke, Glasgow Caledonian University. Four-year courses in Scotland do not have more
clinical hours.
Summation: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. It would be good to give potential students the option of
choice between courses other than having to go to Scotland.

Motion failed


Motion 10

This conference mandates the SEC to write to course leaders and the Learning and Development
Committee requesting an investigation into the way in which teaching modules covering communication
skills and interpersonal skills to first year students are structured.

Proposer: Jude Kelly, University of Plymouth. Modules teaching „communication skills‟ seem to be basic
and general. As universities tend to have rigorous entry procedures, with the majority interviewing
students on a one-to-one or group basis, and taking consideration of work and voluntary experience, the
majority of students already have advanced interpersonal skills. It may be of more benefit to students and
the profession if modules teaching communication skills were related specifically to the environment, in
which students will, in future, be working, i.e. practice.
Seconder: Samantha Turner, Leeds Metropolitan University. Students can learn only by practical
experience. To gain communication skills we must either bring patients into the university or have more
clinical hours.
For: Jamila Kassam, University of the West of England. Students need the experience with patients and
other professionals rather than writing essays.
Against: Victoria Irvine, University of Wales College of Medicine. This should be investigated but tutors
cannot assess our interpersonal skills at interview.
For: Ruth Cheesley, University of Essex. Placements at Essex include observational lessons.

Motion carried


Motion 11

This conference requests that the Learning and Development Committee and SEC continues to develop
an effective strategy to inform Physiotherapy students and course leaders of the need for students to gain
increased transferable skills during their clinical placements. Where possible, this strategy should include
emphasis on recording these transferable skills during all clinical placements in their CPD portfolio.

Proposer: Lee Massingham, Learning & Development Committee. Students have concerns over not
gaining appropriate levels of acute experience and skills in areas, such as respiratory. A working party
was set up by the L&D committee to investigate a possible shortage in students‟ clinical placements in
core areas of physiotherapy (MSS, CVR, Orthopaedics, and Neuro). The working party concluded that it
is more useful to look at key transferable skills, which can be gained in a variety of clinical environments,
not just these core areas. On discussing this matter with clinical managers I have found out that all new
graduates will be expected to have documented in their CPD files all transferable skills, such as any
respiratory skills whilst on placement. Also new graduates will complete mandatory “core competency”
training in areas such as respiratory before being expected to do on-call work. The SEC and L&D
committee need to work together to ensure students and course leaders are aware of this shift in
physiotherapy education to allow students to have well developed CPD files to enhance their
employability.
Seconder: Matt White, York St John College, Professional Practice Committee. Students must support
this motion to continue its development into the next year.
Proposal to remit to SEC to take a vote. Carried.

Remitted to SEC


Motion 12

This conference calls on the CSP to deliver Frontline to students' home address.

Proposer: Adam Gold, Student Executive Committee. Currently, student copies of Frontline are delivered
to their University, not their home address. However, as students are frequently away on placements or on
their summer break, thousands of copies of frontline are wasted as students are unable to collect them.
This is important because Frontline is our connection to what is happening in the wider world of
physiotherapy. By sending copies to students' home addresses it would allow students the opportunity to
keep up to date with current changes and issues within the society. It would also lower the demand on the
universities to find storage organise distribution.
Seconder: Lee Massingham, University of East Anglia, Learning & Development Committee. Frontline is
wasted as they are not getting to students. The issue of communication is being reviewed at present and
this would support proper Frontline distribute.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion Carried
Motion 13

This conference asks that the CSP investigate the possibility of allowing students, following physiotherapy
degree courses, to have access to NHS resources for research purposes

Proposer: Ruth Cheesley, University of Essex. The NHS has many resources available to their staff on
the World Wide Web, which is only accessible with an NHS Athens Username and Password. These
resources are not available to students except when on clinical placement, however much research is
conducted during non-placement periods where access to these resources would be advantageous.
Some of these resources which could be of use to students when conducting research for their course
include the Drugs and Therapeutics Bulletin, ZETOC, certain clinical databases and full text journals.
Some students are aware of Athens prior to placement but some are not depending on whether their
universities have a strong medical background. Students ask if it is possible to integrate access to these
resources via the CSP student interactive portal when it becomes active in order that all students may
access these resources regardless of whether they are on a clinical placement.
Seconder: Mark Raven, University of East Anglia. Athens is not a free resource. As more students have
evidence-based practice they should be better informed of this research tool.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion Carried


Motion 14

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the students’ officer to improve communication between the
CSP and all students via an electronic or paper newsletter to be sent regularly from the students’ officer to
every physiotherapy student.

Proposer: Matt White, Student Executive Committee. All students should be made aware of the current
affairs of the CSP. An electronic newsletter would allow all students to become more involved with the
CSP and promote a sense of ownership. It would also raise the profile among the student body of the
student reps and students‟ officer by raising the awareness of the work they do on behalf of their peers.
Seconder:?. Students do not attend Students‟ Representative Conference and therefore do not know the
outcomes and the issues being taken forward over the year. An e-newsletter would help to inform
students on progress undertaken by the reps and create a public arena.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion Carried


Motion 15

The conference mandates the SEC to investigate the possibilities of increasing electronic access to
journals held at the CSP Learning Resource Centre (LRC) so that students can access these resources
24 hours a day/7 days a week.

Proposer: Lee Massingham, University of East Anglia, Learning & Development Committee. At present
electronic journal access provided by the CSP is limited to a small, but recent proportion of the CSP
journal entitled „Physiotherapy‟, and also a list of „free to anyone‟ electronic journals relevant to health care
on the CSP website. None of the 180 LRC journals are enabled so members can access them
electronically off-site (due to current LRC funding levels), therefore student members wanting to use the
journal collection either have to visit the LRC and read or copy the articles they are interested in (charges
apply for photocopying), or they can request a member of staff to photocopy and post out the articles they
are interested in (again charges apply). This slows down the research process, as students either have to
make an appointment to visit the LRC, or rely on the postal service to get their articles to them promptly. It
is becoming increasingly common for membership bodies to enable some of their journals to have off-site
electronic access for the membership, to ensure there is access to online learning resources outside
library opening hours. Such a service would benefit any member with internet access, and would deliver a
truly UK wide service to the membership. However, please remember your local Workforce Development
Confederation pays your university to provide appropriate learning resources; the resources provided by
the LRC exist as a backup to those local resources. Purchasing electronic journal access for the
membership would have a significant cost implication for the CSP.
Seconder: Aran Pell, University of Brighton, Council. There may be costs but it is worth having increased
access to CSP journals. Likewise, Frontline went electronic two years ago, so it is possible.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion Carried


Motion 16

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the learning and development committee to investigate the
access to the CSP website for blind and partially blind physiotherapy students.

Proposer: Rebecca Wheat, University of Brighton. (Rebecca lead the students through a short exercise
with closed eyes to sense the difficulty of being blind or partially sighted). At the University of Brighton,
there is currently a 1st year physiotherapy student who is partially blind. This student has found difficulty in
accessing the current CSP website. As this is an important website to physiotherapy students it should be
available to every student regardless of a disability or not.
Seconder: Charlene Bently, University of East Anglia. Clinicians are also urging the CSP to make these
changes to their website.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion Carried


Motion 17

This conference mandates the SEC to contact all physiotherapy course leaders about the student body’s
concern regarding potential conflicts of interest that may arise for certain tutors who visit students on
clinical placements, (e.g. the visiting tutor recently worked closely with the clinical educator); and that any
conflict of interest can cause a student to feel that they are left with no support should any problems arise.

Proposer: Aran Pell, University of Brighton. It is not uncommon that problems arise for students during
clinical placements. When this happens, the visiting tutor becomes very important to the student as a
contact with their university and, more importantly, as someone who can give support and advice on how
to deal with the problem. In some cases it can mean the difference between passing and failing a clinical
placement. If the visiting tutor has recently worked with the clinical educator or, has any other close
connection with them, then a conflict of interest clearly exists. This can cause students to lose all trust and
confidence in the visiting tutor and their abilities to look at any problem objectively. As a result the student
will be made to feel isolated and unsupported in their time of need, especially is they are placed far away.
Once course leaders are made aware of this, any potential conflicts of interest can be easily avoided.
Seconder: Adam Gold, University of West of England. At UWE peers failed their practical examination
and required support from their tutor but the tutor‟s interests were not with the students and then left the
post leaving the issue unresolved.
For: Zoe Clare, University of Bradford. The tutor at Bradford visited my placement to „catch up‟ with the
manager which was very unprofessional.
For: Natasha Allan, University of Wales College of Medicine. A peer clashed with their clinical educator
and received a lower grade than his peer students. There was no chance for the student as the clinical
tutor was the sister of his tutor.
For: Lee Massingham, University of East Anglia, Learning & Development Committee. This refers to back
to the motions on placements. Tutors‟ support is very important.
Summation: Aran Pell, University of Brighton, Council. The universities must be aware that this is an
important issue to students.

Motion carried
Motion 18

This conference mandates the SEC to investigate means of screening by the universities in order to
ensure students not being reimbursed for placement expenses are given the choice to opt out
of placements, which require extensive travel.

Proposer: Tracy Millar, Northumbria University. Students not receiving bursaries should be entitled to opt
out of being sent on placements outside of the university city. The amount spent on travel and
accommodation for a student in Newcastle to attend a placement in Berwick or Whitehaven, which are
miles away, can be hundreds of pounds, which they will not be reimbursed although the placements are
mandatory.
Seconder: Craig Hole, Northumbria University. Not having bursaries dampens the positive learning
experience for students on placements. Students‟ placements must be investigated and this motion
strongly supported.
For: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. Lecturers at Salford assume that students receive bursaries but
they do not have experience travelling long distances which includes a financial burden.
Against: Hannah Howard, Kings College London. Students with bursaries can travel to distant
placements and those without bursaries can stay in their university town.
Against: Lisa Cooper, Glasgow Caledonian University. Lecturers are stressed with the increased pressure
of finding placements. Students that have bursaries should not necessarily be made to take on
placements further away.
For: Zoe Clare, University of Bradford. The motions is just asking for an investigation. The universities
should be deciding how and who they send away on placements.
Summation: Tracy Millar, Northumbria University. There is a need to look at the pros and cons of sending
students away on placements, which students take on the distant placements, the feasibility of giving
students the choice and the administration of organising this.

Motion carried


Motion 19

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the CSP to investigate alternative indemnity insurance
arrangements for elective placements in Australia.

Proposer: Karen Dyke, Glasgow Caledonian University. As of 30th June 2005, indemnity insurance cover
provided by the CSP will cease for all students wishing to go to Australia on their elective placement.
Clearly, Australia has been a very popular destination for overseas electives. Since students are told that
their membership includes insurance for overseas electives it would be very beneficial to a lot of students
in the future if alternative insurance arrangements are made by the CSP.
Seconder: Lucy Tighe, Queen Margaret University College. By enabling students to gain experience in
Australia, it would increase students‟ perspective and opportunities.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion Carried


Motion 20

This conference mandates the CSP to investigate the possibility of the full student loan being made
available to students with no external means of support.

Proposer: Jenny Cogbill, University of Salford. At present any student receiving an NHS bursary is only
entitled to £2,005, roughly half of the available student loan. Many students feel the need to get a job at
university to support them. For physiotherapy students this can be difficult due to the pressures of long
hours and placement. This can lead to financial problems and can lead to students having to drop off the
course unnecessarily.
Seconder: Aran Pell, University of Brighton, Council. Student debt is a problem. Physios are becoming
more worthy and need more access to funds. Physios need to make a noise.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion Carried


Motion 21

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the learning and development to include a section/page
within the CSP students’ website, with a table outlining the membership costs for all types of students.

Proposer: Lucy Tighe, Queen Margaret University College. As of 2003 entry, BSc students in Scotland
have their membership costs covered by the university. However, there are many students that entered
prior to 2003 that have not joined but wish to for the last few years of the degree. MSc students, self-
funded and international students on the other hand have to pay £120 towards full student membership.
As this is a huge chunk of our role as student representatives I feel it would be useful to present a simple
table within the website clarifying this and for all students to access, like for all the CSP members on the
website.
Seconder: Chris Cooper, Queen Margaret University College. Information should be available to
everyone.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion carried


Motion 22

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the CSP Learning & Development Committee to explore the
possibility of universities creating formal written anatomy examinations.

Proposer: Angela Mercer, University of Birmingham. Students at birmingham are disadvantaged in never
having had anatomy thoroughly assessed in written form. Clinical educators have noted the difference
between universities that do and do not assess anatomy knowledge thoroughly.
Seconder: Jonathan Morris, Keele University. Students need to have a level of knowledge of anatomy
and physiology.
For: Hannah Howard, Kings College London. There needs to be written examinations, dissections, vibers
and demonstrations to increase quality and standards of education.
Against: Aran Pell, University of Brighton, Council. Universities get a proforma of what to include in the
course. It is the universities‟ responsibility decide on their ways of teaching. Students must lobby the
course leaders.
For: Michelle de Carle, Sheffield Hallam University. At Sheffield the emphasis is on practical
experimentation and assessment which is benefiting the 3rd years.
Against: Jenny Cogbill, Salford University. Firstly, a large number of courses to not have anatomy exams
as it is not appropriate. Secondly, all courses are accredited by CSP. Thirdly, anatomy knowledge
develops with research and study.
For: Zoe Lundie, Keele University. For students with dyslexia, it is necessary to have the option of both
written or practical examinations.
Against: Jemma Oliver, Sheffield Hallam University. Learning through practical examinations is better.
For: Hannah West, University of Southampton. Examinations are better for learning as it creates a
deadline.
Against: Ruth Cheesley, University of Essex. There are no formal classes at Essex but students were
informed of this prior to starting the course. Students must take on this responsibility to find the course
that best suits them.
Summation: Angela Mercer, University of Birmingham. This debate has highlighted that this issue must be
investigated and to look at universities individually later down the line.

Motion carried
Motion 23

This conference mandates the SEC and the CSP Learning and Development Group to continue to lobby
Hospital managers to be aware of students’ transferable skills learnt from experiences on a variety of
placements.

Proposer: Matt White, York St John College. A manager gave a talk on interview skills at York and she
mentioned that if students do not gain experience in one particular area they are not to apply to other
areas. With the current shortage of placements it is clear not all students will get to go on placements in
all of the core subject areas during their undergraduate study. Employers need to be aware of this and
instead of looking for students with these exact and very direct experiences, they should be looking for
records of transferable skills gained from the experiences the student has had. Acknowledging the
potential discrimination of students applying for posts, who were unable to obtain placements in all core
areas will ensure equal opportunities for all undergraduates who record their experiences and complete
their CPD portfolios.
Seconder: Lee Massingham, University of East Anglia, Learning & Development Commitee. In the past,
criteria were used to distinguish skills, managers cannot use this anymore.
For: Jenny Cogbil, Salford University. Students at Salford could not go straight into jobs as they did not
have the skills. Managers need to realise skills gained in other areas.
Summation: Matt White, York St John College. The CSP has already made great strides to with this
issue.

Motion carried


Motion 24

The conference mandates the SEC to investigate the possibilities of increasing the Learning Resource
Centre (LRC) opening hours at CSP Headquarters to include late nights, and/or weekends.

Proposer: Lee Massingham, Learning & Devlopment Committee. The CSP LRC is currently open during
official CSP office hours, and closed bank holidays. During LRC opening hours a member of staff is
available to answer queries from visitors, or from telephone or email enquirers. Physical access to the
LRC is via appointment only. Students have often commented that it would be useful to have late night
and weekend opening so they can gain access to the learning resources and computing facilities available
within the LRC, as during current opening hours they are often in class or on placement and cannot get to
the CSP. Also, at present many of the resources held within the LRC are still paper based/ not available
via the Internet so physical access is still important. Extended opening hours would potentially benefit
those students based in London, or those students prepared to travel to London to use the LRC outside of
CSP normal office hours. If a member of staff was on duty on late nights and/or weekends there would be
someone at the end of a telephone/email to answer enquiries during these hours, which could benefit
student members regardless of geographical location.
Seconder: Laura Jedrzejewski, University of East Anglia. There must be support for students across the
board of resources. If web resources are not developed in the near future then increased accessibility to
CSP LRC would provide good support.
Against: Hannah Howard, Kings College London. There would be a cost implication for extending opening
times.
Against: Lynsay Wyatt, Northumbria University. There are concerns that this motion will take priority over
Motion 15.
For: Matt White, York St John College, Professional Practice Committee. This suggestion has also been
put forward by CSP staff. If both motions get passed, SEC can investigate the issue as a whole.

Motion carried


Motion 25

This conference mandates the SEC to improve the way students receive information regarding new
government policy.
Proposer: Adam Gold, University of West of England. Students are aware about Agenda for Change but
are not informed about what is happening. Students have a lot to read anyway, but would also read
information that may affect them in the future. This information could either come in a supplement in
Frontline, in a Newsletter or bulleted on iCSP.
Seconder: Charlotte Meade, University of West of England. This is important for all students as well as
final years students applying for jobs.
For: Zoe Clare, University of Bradford. There was a talk at Bradford about how Agenda for Change would
affect students. The students seemed to be unaware of this change even after having received
information about it.
Against: Natasha Allan, University of Wales College of Medicine. This will not be of benefit as there are
leaflets inside Frontline already that do not get read.
Summation: Adam Gold, University of West of England. The access of information to students can be
improved.

Motion carried


Motion 26

This conference requests that the CSP aims to ensure that all students receive membership cards, CSP
membership no’s, student handbooks and CPD CD-ROMs within their first term of their physiotherapy
course.

Proposer: Lee Massingham, Learning & Development Committee. A number of 1st year CSP student
reps reported at Rep training in December that they were experiencing long delays in receiving these
items. In the past, the CSP has waited for the university course leaders to request these items, although
this system means students often have to wait months. If they were sent out as standard to all universities
within a set time period there would be no feeling of inequality amongst universities. Also, without
handbooks and CSP membership numbers there is a delayed awareness amongst students of the CSP
and gaining access to the CSP website. Finally, it is important we all receive CPD CD-ROMS early on to
begin this important process.
Seconder: Annie Davidson, Northumbria University. Students are not getting all the CSP items. This
motion will help students gain a sense of ownership.
For: Mark Raven, University of East Anglia. UEA did not receive student handbooks until December 2004
and have just received the CD-ROMS. Students need them earlier than this.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion carried


Motion 27

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the Course Leaders to standardise and clarify the teaching of
Continuing Professional Development to ensure that first year students of all physiotherapy programmes
possess and efficiently comprehend both the Continuing Professional Development CD-ROM and portfolio
within their first year of their course.

Proposer: Annie Davidson, Northumbria University. Students across the UK are currently given the
Continuing Professional Development CD-ROM and portfolio at different times of the course and therefore
are at a disadvantage if given later, especially if not received before their first clinical placement. Students
given the information early do not completely understand how to utilise their portfolio until they are out in
work placements. Specific learning concepts are needed that are clear and standardised for all
universities.
Seconder: Hannah Howard, Kings College London. Third year students at Kings were not informed earlier
on the importance of CPD and how to complete the portfolio.
For: Zoe Clare, University of Bradford. 3rd year student at Bradford received their CDs in the 3rd year and
had teaching on using their portfolios very recently. The importance of CPD was not stress in the 1st year
at Bradford and it is shocking to find how different universities teach CPD.
Proposal to suspend standing orders to go to a vote. Carried

Motion carried


Motion 28

This conference mandates the SEC to lobby the CSP to request that all institutions who deliver
physiotherapy pre-registration, undergraduate or postgraduate courses, be taught management
techniques for dealing with inappropriate sexual behaviour from patients to physiotherapists.

Proposer: Lisa Casey, Glasgow Caledonian University. With the increase in Inappropriate Patient Sexual
Behaviour (IPSB) within the health services both NHS and Private (Weekaroon, 1998). nursing staff and
medical students are taught self-defence and conflict avoidance techniques as a mandatory component of
the course programme. Physiotherapists both qualified and students are vulnerable to IPSB due to
isolated spaces they are sometimes required to work in. As such, the incidence of IPSB has been
reported to be on the increase across all professions allied to medicine (PAM). Undergraduate and pre-
registration courses should be taught how to handle the incidence of such behaviours and apply
avoidance techniques when required.
Seconder: Lucy Tighe, Queen Margaret University College. Physios need to be confident professions in a
comfortable situation. Students need the awareness of this issue and the skills to deal with patients‟
behaviours.
For: Aran Pell, University of Brighton, Council. We are in an age of suing with professionals being
misconstrued.
For: Terese Turnpenny, University of Southampton. Physios are also vulnerable in the community, i.e. in
patients‟ homes.
Summation: Lisa Casey, Glasgow Caledonian University. Studies on this issue provide evidence that is
outstanding.

Motion carried