Sample Template District Wide Parental Involvement by zdf10960

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									           Title I
   Parental Involvement
   Policy/Plan Guidance

         DRAFT




Bureau of Student Assistance
        2009-2010
                     Florida Department of Education

Eric J. Smith
Commissioner

Division of Public Schools
Frances Haithcock
Chancellor

Division of Public Schools
Nikolai Vitti
Deputy Chancellor for School Improvement and Student Achievement

Bureau of Student Assistance
Lisa Bacen
Chief




                                   Page 2 of 107
                                        Overview


This document is designed by the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) to assist
local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools in developing comprehensive and high
quality parental involvement policies/plans (PIP) which will meet the requirements of
Section 1118 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Information in
this guide is organized around the following questions and parental involvement tenets
of ESEA:

Q   Why is this concept/question important for Florida?
Q   What does the law require?
Q   Where can more information be found?
Q   What should be included in the response?
Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

The format for this guidance also includes:

•   Language directly from Section 1118 of ESEA and related state statutes to provide
    the user a reference from the law;
•   A description of what the law means framed by non-regulatory guidance issued by
    the United States Department of Education (USDE) and state statutes;
•   Resources available for the development of a high-quality PIP;
•   A description of the information which should be included in the response;
•   A sample response; and
•   Examples of documents and methods an LEA may use to document compliance.

Specific requirements in the law are presented in highlighted text type. Organizing
questions are presented in italics with a “Q .” Specific questions from the LEA and/or
school-level PIPs are presented in bold text and located in a shaded text box. Items are
arranged in the same order as presented in the templates. The appendices include
review rubrics for the LEA and school PIPs, a side-by-side comparison of the PIPs, and
a crosswalk between federal and state statutes. Sections of this document that contain
information helpful for both LEAs and schools include the following symbol:




                                       Page 3 of 107
                                                 Table of Contents
Overview ......................................................................................................................... 3
Meaningful Involvement of Parents ................................................................................. 5
Adoption ........................................................................................................................ 11
Correlation to Student Achievement.............................................................................. 13
LEA Title I Parent Involvement Policy/Plan Guidance................................................... 15
Evaluation of the 2009-2010 LEA Parental Involvement Policy/Plan ............................ 45
2009-2010 School Parental involvement Policy/Plan Guidance.................................... 60
Evaluation of the 2009-2010 School Parental involvement Policy/Plan ........................ 74
Appendix A: LEA Parental Involvement Policy/Plan Template ...................................... 78
Appendix B: Review Rubric for LEA Parental Involvement Policy/Plan......................... 84
Appendix C: School Parental Involvement Policy/Plan Template.................................. 87
Appendix D: Review Rubric for School Parental Involvement Policy/Plan .................... 93
Appendix E: Sample School-Parent Compact............................................................... 97
Appendix F: LEA and School Side-by-Side Policy Components ................................... 99
Appendix G: Resources .............................................................................................. 103




                                                         Page 4 of 107
                                   Meaningful Involvement of Parents

Q    Why is this concept important for Florida?

The ESEA ensures that parents have the information they need to make well-informed
choices for their children, effectively share responsibility with their children’s schools,
and help those schools develop effective and successful academic programs. Three
decades of research provide convincing evidence that parents are an important
influence in helping their children achieve high academic standards. When parents
collaborate with schools, participate in school activities, and in decisions-making for
their child’s education, children achieve at higher levels. In short, when parents are
involved in education, children do better in school and schools improve. 1

When creating goals for Title I the parental involvement Committee utilized Joyce
Epstein’s six types of parental involvement. These strategies are effective in many
situations but should be adapted to fit the current situation of the LEAs, schools, and
families. These strategies provide a framework for LEAs and schools to create new
ideas and activities to benefit the parents they serve. A meaningful program should
implement activities in each level to ensure that all families can be involved in ways that
work for them. Epstein’s six types of involvement are:

•    Parenting: Assist families with parenting and child-rearing skills, understanding child
     and adolescent development, and setting home conditions that support children as
     students at each age and grade level. Assist schools in understanding families.
•    Communicating: Communicate with families about school programs and student
     progress through effective school-to-home and home-to-school communications.
•    Volunteering: Improve recruitment, training, work, and schedules to involve families
     as volunteers and audiences at school or in other locations to support students and
     school programs.
•    Learning at Home: Involve families with their children in learning activities at home,
     including homework and other curriculum-related activities and decisions.
•    Decision-Making: Include families as participants in school decisions, governance,
     and advocacy through Parent Teacher Association/Parent Teacher Organization
     (PTA/PTO), school councils, committees, action teams, and other parent
     organizations.
•    Collaborating with Community: Coordinate resources and services for students,
     families, and the school with businesses, agencies, and other groups, as well as
     provide services to the community. 2

Section 1118 requires that parents have meaningful input in the development,
implementation, and evaluation of parental involvement policies, plans, or programs.
Joyce Epstein stated that there are six ways LEAs can promote meaningful parental
involvement including the following:

1
 Lewis, Anne C.; Henderson, Anne T., Urgent Message: Families Crucial to School Reform, 1998
2
 Florida’s State Education Agency (SEA) Title I Parent Involvement Plan , No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 Title I, Part A,
2008-2009.


                                                         Page 5 of 107
•    Design effective communication systems from home-to-school and vice versa to
     ensure parents have information about school programs and their child’s progress;
•    Help parents establish home environments that support their child’s learning;
•    Recruit and organize parents to help and support the school;
•    Provide information to parents on how they can help their children with their school
     work;
•    Include parents in the decision making process of the school; and
•    Identify and integrate resources and services to strengthen school programs. 3

Parents must be a part of the group that develops, implements, and evaluates the
policies. While neither federal nor state statute specify the number of parents to include
on this group, the LEA should ensure that membership is balanced. The parents should
represent a cross-section of the LEA or school’s population taking into consideration
grade levels, ethnic/racial backgrounds, parents of students with disabilities and parents
of students with limited proficiency in English. Parent input may not be documented via
surveys alone; however, survey results may be used when determining the needs of an
LEA or school.

Florida Statute 1001.452(1)(b) describes a provision for LEA advisory councils which
may be used as the group that develops the policies/plans related to LEA level parental
involvement. More information may be found at
http://www.flbsi.org/schoolimprove/schadvisorycouncils.htm.

Section 1118(c)(3) allows a school to use a parent group already in place to participate
in the joint planning and design of the school’s programs, as long as the group includes
an adequate representation of parents of children participating in Title I, Part A
programs. For many of the schools in Florida, the School Advisory Council (SAC) is the
group responsible for the development, implementation and evaluation of the PIP.
Specific requirements for the composition of the SAC may be found at:
http://www.flsenate.gov/statutes/index.cfm?mode=View%20Statutes&SubMenu=1&App
_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=1001.452&URL=CH1001/Sec452.HTM.

The SAC assists in the preparation and evaluation of the School Improvement Plans
(SIP). The SAC is the sole body responsible for final decision-making at the school
relating to implementation of the provisions of sections related to school improvement
and accountability [1001.42(16), F.S., and 1008.345, F.S.]. A majority of the members
of each SAC must be persons who are not employed by the LEA. Each SAC shall be
comprised of the principal and an appropriately balanced number of teachers, education
support employees, students, parents, and business and community citizens who are
representative of the ethnic, racial, and economic community served by the school.
Career center and high school advisory councils must include students, and middle and
junior high school advisory councils may include students.


3
 Boult, B. (2006), 176 Ways to Involve Parents: Practical Strategies for Partnering with Families, Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks,
CA.


                                                        Page 6 of 107
Q   What does the law require?

Section 1118 (a)
(2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall develop
jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parent involvement
policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's plan developed under section
1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement, and describe how the agency will —
(A) involve parents in the joint development of the plan under section 1112, and the process of school
review and improvement under section 1116;

(3) RESERVATON
(B) PARENTAL INPUT- Parents of children receiving services under this part shall be involved in the
decisions regarding how funds reserved under subparagraph (A) are allotted for parental involvement
activities.

Section 1118 (c)
(c) POLICY INVOLVEMENT- Each school served under this part shall —
(3) involve parents, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement
of programs under this part, including the planning, review, and improvement of the school parental
involvement policy and the joint development of the schoolwide program plan under section 1114(b)(2),
except that if a school has in place a process for involving parents in the joint planning and design of the
school's programs, the school may use that process, if such process includes an adequate representation
of parents of participating children;
(5) if the schoolwide program plan under section 1114(b)(2) is not satisfactory to the parents of
participating children, submit any parent comments on the plan when the school makes the plan available
to the local educational agency.

Section 9101 (31 and 32) Definitions for Parent and Parent Involvement

(31) PARENT- The term “parent” includes a legal guardian or other person standing in loco parentis (such
as a grandparent or stepparent with whom the child lives, or a person who is legally responsible for the
child's welfare).

(32) PARENTAL INVOLVEMENTThe term “parental involvement” means the participation of parents in
regular, two-way, and meaningful communication involving student academic learning and other school
activities, including ensuring —
          (A) that parents play an integral role in assisting their child's learning;
          (B) that parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child's education at school;
          (C) that parents are full partners in their child's education and are included, as appropriate, in
          decision making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of their child;
          (D) the carrying out of other activities, such as those described in section 1118.

FS 1002.23
5) Each LEA school board shall adopt rules that strengthen family involvement and family empowerment.
The rules shall be developed in collaboration with parents, school administrators, teachers, and
community partners, and shall address:
        (a) Parental choices and responsibilities;
        (b) Links with community services;
        (c) Opportunities for parental involvement in the development, implementation, and evaluation of
        family involvement programs; and
        (d) Opportunities for parents to participate on school advisory councils and in school volunteer
        programs and other activities.




                                                Page 7 of 107
Q   Where can more information be found?

Ferguson, C. (2009). A Toolkit for Title I Parental Involvement. Austin, TX: SEDL.
Accessed on 04.15.09 and located at: http://www.sedl.org/connections/toolkit/toolkit-
titleI-parent-inv.pdf.
         Because school staff and parents see education from different perspectives, it is
         important for both groups to find common ground before they can become
         collaborative partners. The toolkit developed by Southwest Educational
         Development Laboratory provides activities that which can be used to build a
         foundation of strong parent–school collaborations.

Best practice in schools' engagement with parents, Qualifications and Curriculum
Authority accessed on 05.15.09 and located at:
http://www.qca.org.uk/libraryAssets/media/bEST_PRACTICE_IN_SCHOOLS.pdf.

Henderson, A. (2008), Parent Engagement Conversation Summary accessed on
05.15.09 and located at http://www.mccsc.edu/info/PECS.pdf.

Kinnaman, Daniel E. (2002, November 1). Meaningful parent involvement: School
districts should involve parents as partners and not just supporters The Free Library.
(2002). Retrieved May 19, 2009 from http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Meaningful parent
involvement: school LEAs should involve...-a097117616. This article describes parental
involvement in terms similar to Blooms Taxonomy.
D’Emilio, B. (2002). Action Research on Meaningful Family Involvement by Parents,
Teachers and Students: Using the Telling Strategically. Penn GSE Perspectives on
Urban Education, Volume 1, Issue 2 Fall 2002 accessed 05.19.09 and located at
http://www.urbanedjournal.org/archive/Issue2/notes/notes0003.pdf.

FLDOE: School Advisory Councils
http://www.flbsi.org/schoolimprove/schadvisorycouncils.htm

SAC ‘Toolbox’ – The Basics http://www.florida-family.net/SAC/

Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

The following may be used to demonstrate the involvement of parents:
• Sign-in sheets which indicate the role of those present; and
• Meeting minutes and handouts.

The following examples and non-examples of entries in minutes serve as a guide for
LEAs and schools to more clearly document compliance:




                                       Page 8 of 107
                        Example                                                Non-Example
The Parent Advisory Council (PAC) chairperson                   A draft of the PIP was distributed for review.
distributed the following:                                      The plan was approved.
     • copies of the prior year PI policy
     • data summaries of student performance                    This entry only indicates that parents were
     • parental involvement data including participation,       provided an opportunity to review a plan. It
       workshops held, etc.                                     does not indicate that the parents had an
     • parent survey results                                    opportunity for meaningful input. It is
                                                                implied since those present were provided
The chairperson opened the floor for discussion on              with a draft of the plan.
changes needed to the PI policy. After careful
deliberation and input for all participants, the parental
involvement policy was developed and is included in
the appendix of these minutes.

This entry indicates that the PAC began work on
the policy with current data and the prior year plan
as the basis. It further indicates that parents were
provided an opportunity to provide input in the
development of policies and activities. It is not
necessary to create a transcript of the discussion
or include the names of the people who made
suggestions.
The Director of Title I distributed a draft of the PI policy.   The PI policy was reviewed and approved.
The chairperson led a discussion on each of the
components of the plan. Revisions were made to the              This entry only indicates that parents were
“building capacity” sections based on the discussions.          provided an opportunity to review a plan. It
Those present made no suggestions for revisions to              does not indicate that the parents had an
the other sections. The Director of Title I will make the       opportunity for meaningful input.
updates to the on-line template as requested. Ms.
Gonzalez (parent) made a motion to approve the PI
policy with the indicated revisions. Mr. Jones (parent)
seconded. The motion carried unanimously.

This entry indicates that the PAC reviewed a draft
of the PI policy and was provided an opportunity to
give input. While it is not necessary to make all the
changes suggested by the parents; school leaders
should take their suggestions into consideration.
The Director of Title I distributed a draft of the District     The DIP was reviewed and approved.
Improvement Plan (DIP) to the PAC and provided
background information on the requirements outlined in          This entry only indicates that parents were
the law, the process, and the expectations. The                 provided an opportunity to review a plan. It
chairperson led a discussion on each of the                     does not indicate that the parents had an
components of the plan. Revisions were made based               opportunity for meaningful input.
on the input of parents to the sections concerning LEA
support. The Director will make the updates to the on-
line template as requested. Mr. Rucker made a motion
to approve the DIP with the indicated revisions. Mr.
Hussein (parent) seconded. The motion carried
unanimously.

This entry indicates that the PAC reviewed a draft
of the SIP and was provided an opportunity to give


                                                  Page 9 of 107
                     Example                                            Non-Example
input. While it is not necessary to make all the
changes suggested by the parents; school leaders
should take their suggestions into consideration.
The Principal distributed a draft of the SIP and the      The SIP was reviewed and approved.
amount of Title I funds set aside for parental
involvement to the SAC. The principal led a discussion    This entry only indicates that parents were
on each of the strategies included in the SIP and         provided an opportunity to review a plan. It
appropriate and legal uses of Title I funds. Through      does not indicate that the parents had an
careful deliberation and discussion the SAC decided on    opportunity for meaningful input.
the use of the funds. The Assistant Principal will make
the updates to the online template as requested. Ms.
Gonzalez (parent) made a motion to approve the SIP
with the indicated revisions. Mr. Jones (parent)
seconded. The motion carried unanimously.

This entry indicates that the SAC reviewed the SIP
and was provided an opportunity to give input on
how the funds would be used to support the
implementation of the SIP. While it is not necessary
to make all the changes suggested by the parents;
school leaders should take their suggestions into
consideration.

Section 9101 (32) defines the term “parental involvement” as the participation of
parents in regular, two-way, meaningful communication involving student academic
learning and other school activities, including ensuring –

    •   That parents play an integral role in assisting their child’s learning;
    •   That parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child’s education at
        school;
    •   That parents are full partners in their child’s education and are included, as
        appropriate, in decision making and on advisory committees to assist in the
        education of their child; and
    •   The carrying out of other activities, such as those described in section 1118 of
        the ESEA. [Section 9101(32), ESEA.]

Generally speaking, for the LEA to meet compliance, the parent group should meet on a
regular, ongoing basis. The LEA should establish a schedule for gathering input from
parents. It is recommended that this group meet at least quarterly to provide input into
the implementation of parental involvement and Title I program(s).

Agendas, survey results, and workshop evaluations are valuable pieces of information
to consider when evaluating and/or revising PIPs; however, these documents are not
sufficient evidence alone to demonstrate meaningful input from parents.




                                            Page 10 of 107
                                              Adoption

The end of the LEA and school-level templates include a section entitled “Adoption”.

 This LEA Parent Involvement Policy has been developed jointly with, and agreed on
 with, parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs, as evidenced by
        .
 This policy was adopted by the LEA on mm/dd/yy and will be in effect for the period
 of mm/dd/yy. The school LEA will distribute this policy to all parents of participating
 Title I, Part A children on or before mm/dd/yy.
 ___________________________________________                     ___________________
 (Signature of Title I Authorized Representative)                (Date)


Q   Why is this concept important for Florida?

Section 1118 uses the word "policy" in the context of parental involvement; however, an
LEA is not required to use the word “policy” on the document. The parental involvement
policy referred to Section 1118 should serve a dual purpose:
• Outline the LEA and schools’ expectations for parental involvement; and
• Serve as an action plan for LEAs and schools in the implementation of the parental
    involvement program.

Federal statutes do not require that PIPs are approved by local school boards unless
such approval is required by local school board rules. USDE issued a notice to State
Directors on September 10, 2008, which may be accessed at: ADD THE LINK

Q   What does the law require?

SEC. 1118. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT.
(a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-
       (2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall
       develop jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written
       parent involvement policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's
       plan developed under section 1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement,
       and describe how the agency will —
               (A) involve parents in the joint development of the plan under section 1112, and the
               process of school review and improvement under section 1116;
               (B) provide the coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist
               participating schools in planning and implementing effective parent involvement activities
               to improve student academic achievement and school performance;
               (C) build the schools' and parents' capacity for strong parental involvement as described
               in subsection (e);
               (D) coordinate and integrate parental involvement strategies under this part with parental
               involvement strategies under other programs, such as the Head Start program, Reading
               First program, Early Reading First program, Even Start program, Parents as Teachers



                                             Page 11 of 107
             program, and Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters, and State-run
             preschool programs;
             (E) conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and
             effectiveness of the parental involvement policy in improving the academic quality of the
             schools served under this part, including identifying barriers to greater participation by
             parents in activities authorized by this section (with particular attention to parents who are
             economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited
             literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background), and use the findings of such
             evaluation to design strategies for more effective parental involvement, and to revise, if
             necessary, the parental involvement policies described in this section; and
             (F) involve parents in the activities of the schools served under this part.

Q   How can an LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include a combination of the following types of items:
• Sign-in sheets
• Agendas, handouts, presentation materials, and minutes




                                           Page 12 of 107
                               Correlation to Student Achievement

Q    Why is this concept important for Florida?

While research findings show that parent involvement can result in improved student
learning, many LEA and school efforts are focused on well-meaning but more general
forms of “involvement” such as volunteering in the classroom or participating in
fundraising activities. While these efforts are helpful and even important, studies
demonstrate that:
• School, family and community connections linked to student learning are most
    effective at improving student achievement; and
• The most effective programs and interventions are those that engage families in
    supporting their children’s learning at home. 4

Many LEAs in Florida implement programs which provide information to parents on
reading/language arts, mathematics, writing, science, and help with homework. Studies
show that parents are eager for this type of information. 5 Schools also implement other
types of programs like family fun days, heritage festivals, holiday concerts, school
dances, socials, and meetings that are not as closely tied to student achievement. While
these activities may be fun and do provide opportunities for schools to build rapport with
parents, the impact these activities have on improving student achievement is not as
closely linked. With the limited availability of resources, it is important for LEAs to
ensure activities are closely correlated to student academic achievement.

This does not mean that each activity must be a test-preparation activity; however, the
LEA should ensure a balance of activities. Anne Henderson and Karen Mapp describe
the importance of the correlation of parent involvement activities to student achievement
in A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family and Community Connections
on Student Achievement. 6 They spell out the following to strengthen/impact school
parental involvement efforts on student learning:
• Present information on standards and provide exhibits of student work that
    demonstrate proficiency;
• Engage parents and students in mathematics and reading activities/games and
    explain students’ skill level;
• Communicate school level test results with parents via school newsletters and
    provide information on what students are doing to meet higher standards; and
• Use the annual school and LEA report cards to focus conversations with parents on
    the school’s strengths and weaknesses to make improvements.


4
  Family, School and Community Connections: Improving Student Learning ( 2007) Information Briefing: Iowa School Boards
Foundations accessed 05.26.09 and located at http://www.ia-sb.org/assets/6822accf01e64833a1a3f99b1fddd217.pdf.
5
  Henderson, A., & Mapp, L. K. 2002. A new wave of evidence: The impact of school, family, and community connections on student
achievement, annual synthesis 2002. Austin, TX: SEDL.
6
  Henderson, A. & Mapp, K. (2002) A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family and Community Connections on
Student Achievement, Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory accessed 05.19.09 and located at
http://www.piqe.org/Assets/Home/henderson.htm
.



                                                      Page 13 of 107
The following chart provides examples of how to modify traditional parent involvement
activities to ensure a correlation to student achievement:

                                                                                              Correlation to Student
                                                                        7
    Traditional Activity                            Modification                             Achievement for the PIP
Open House: Parents                  Each teacher provides expectations of                  Provide information to parents on
rotate through classes to            student achievement; what students                     expectations and how parents
meet their child’s teacher           need to know and be able to do.                        can help their children.
                                     Teachers will provide parents activities
                                     to help their children at home.
Reading Night                        Teachers demonstrate the specific skills               Provide information to parents on
(Mathematics Night,                  and strategies which will be taught,                   expectations and how parents
Science Night, etc.)                 provide information to parents on the                  can help their children.
                                     how and when students will be
                                     assessed and how parents can help.
PTA/PTO Meetings                     Provide parent leadership training                     Increase the level of involvement
                                                                                            of parents to become active in the
                                                                                            decisions made at the school.
Contact parents via                  Notify parents about school functions,                 Increase communication with
automated phone system               when students are absent, tardy,                       parents; provide updates on
                                     suspended, etc.                                        school functions in multiple
                                                                                            languages
Publish monthly                      Provide specific strategies for parents to             Provide information to parents on
newsletters                          use to help their children with the skills             expectations and how parents
                                     being taught in the current month.                     can help their children.
Offering parenting                   Provide specific information to parents                Provide information to parents on
classes 8                            such as how to … get into college,                     how parents can help their
                                     Internet safety, reading/mathematics/                  children.
                                     science/writing; (add specific content in
                                     areas needed by your parents)
Send home parent reports             Conduct student led conferences where                  Provide information on their
on test results or meeting           students explain their own test results to             child’s current level and develop a
to distribute report cards           their parents (with teacher support)                   plan to reach their goals.
College Night                        Provide sessions with parents to help                  Increase student participation in
                                     them complete financial aid documents,                 post secondary programs.
                                     search for scholarships, etc.
Publish information on               Provide information on the specific skills             Provide information to parents on
Next Generation Sunshine             students need. Add strategies that show                how to help their children.
State Standards (NGSSS),             parents how they can help at home.
and Grade Level
Expectations (GLE’s)
Heritage Festivals or                Tie the content of the program to the                  Provide information to parents on
concerts                             social studies curriculum and the                      the content of standards.
                                     specific standards addressed
Training for staff during            Provide grade and subject specific                     Improve the ability of staff to work
faculty meeting on parental          training for teachers on how to explain                effectively with parents.
involvement.                         the SSS to parents. Include information
                                     to help parents understand the content,
                                     assessments, proficiency, and how can
                                     support the child’s learning.


7
  Henderson, A. T., Mapp, K. L., Johnson, V. R., & Davies, D. 2007. Beyond the bake sale: The essential guide to family–school
partnerships. New York: The New Press.
8
  Use caution and sensitivity when advertising activities as “Parenting Classes.” Many parents view this as an indication that school
officials think they are “bad” parents and are trying to tell them how to rear their children.


                                                         Page 14 of 107
           LEA Title I Parent Involvement Policy/Plan Guidance




 Parent Involvement Mission Statement (Optional)


Q   Why is this concept important for Florida?

Mission statements are the foundation upon which other decisions are based. A clear
vision and a common mission set the tone and expectations for program
implementation. A mission statement is specific and should answer the questions,
“What are we working to become?” and “Why do we exist?” These statements should:

• Reflect the consensus, convictions, and beliefs of all stakeholders;
• Incorporate a concern for the success of all parents and students;
• Demonstrate a belief that all students can learn;
• Address ways to increase student academic performance; and
• Align with the strategies and activities included in the plan.

Q   Where can more information be found?

• Education World: Mission Statements with Vision
  http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin229.shtml

• North Central Regional Educational Laboratory: Critical Issue: Building a Collective
  Vision http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/educatrs/leadrshp/le100.htm

• National School Boards Foundation: Creating a Vision
  http://www.nsba.org/sbot/toolkit/cav.html

• Five Steps to Developing a Mission Statement located at:
  http://www.intracen.org/IPSMS/briefcase/worksheets/232mission.doc

• Developing a mission statement:
  http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/hpcd/chp/hpkit/pdf/build_ws2.PDF

Q   What information should be included in this response?

The mission statement should meet the following criteria:
• Explain the purpose of the parent involvement program;
• Tell what will be done;
• Include beliefs or values;

                                      Page 15 of 107
•    Be concise and free of jargon;
•    Be written in parent friendly language; and
•    Inspire stakeholders to be involved and supportive of the program.

Q     Sample Response

The Sunnydale County School Board believes that positive parent/family involvement is
essential to student achievement and thus encourages such involvement in school
educational planning and operations. In the spirit of the LEA’s school/family and
community partnerships, this policy seeks to strengthen the partnership among
parents/guardians, staff, schools, the community, the superintendent, and the LEA by
providing for parents’ involvement in decision making as members of school-based
planning teams, local parent groups, and LEA-wide committees. Expanding training
programs that help the individual parent support their child at home will further
strengthen this partnership.




    1. Describe the actions the LEA will take to involve parents in the following
       required policies/plans:
    • LEA wide parent involvement policy [Section 1118(a)(2)];
    • LEA plan [Sections 1112 (c)(H), 1112(d)(1)];
    • School review and improvement under Section 1116 [Sections 1118(a)(2)(A),
       1116(a)(1)(D), 1116(b)(3)(A)]; and
    • How the funds reserved for parent involvement will be spent [Section
       1118(a)(2)].


Q     Why is this question important for Florida?

See pages five through ten for more information on the definition and requirements for
meaningful parental involvement.

Q     What does the law require?

Section 1118(2)(E)
2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall develop
jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parent involvement
policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's plan developed under section
1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement, and describe how the agency will —
         (A) involve parents in the joint development of the plan under section 1112, and the process of
         school review and improvement under section 1116;
          (E)conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and
         effectiveness of the parental involvement policy in improving the academic quality of the schools
         served under this part, including identifying barriers to greater participation by parents in activities
         authorized by this section (with particular attention to parents who are economically


                                                Page 16 of 107
        disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any
        racial or ethnic minority background), and use the findings of such evaluation to design strategies
        for more effective parental involvement, and to revise, if necessary, the parental involvement
        policies described in this section;

SEC. 1118. (a)(3)(A-C)
(a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-
 (3) RESERVATION-
        (A) IN GENERAL- Each local educational agency shall reserve not less than 1 percent of such
        agency's allocation under subpart 2 of this part to carry out this section, including promoting
        family literacy and parenting skills, except that this paragraph shall not apply if 1 percent of such
        agency's allocation under subpart 2 of this part for the fiscal year for which the determination is
        made is $5,000 or less.
        (B) PARENTAL INPUT- Parents of children receiving services under this part shall be involved in
        the decisions regarding how funds reserved under subparagraph (A) are allotted for parental
        involvement activities.
        (C) DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS- Not less than 95 percent of the funds reserved under
        subparagraph (A) shall be distributed to schools served under this part.

Section 1116(a)(1)(D) and 1116(b)(3)(A)(viii)
(a) LOCAL REVIEW-
(1) IN GENERAL- Each local educational agency receiving funds under this part shall —
        (D) review the effectiveness of the actions and activities the schools are carrying out under this
        part with respect to parental involvement, professional development, and other activities assisted
        under this part.

(b) SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT-
(3) SCHOOL PLAN-
       (A) REVISED PLAN- After the resolution of a review under paragraph (2), each school identified
       under paragraph (1) for school improvement shall, not later than 3 months after being so
       identified, develop or revise a school plan, in consultation with parents, school staff, the local
       educational agency serving the school, and outside experts, for approval by such local
       educational agency. The school plan shall cover a 2-year period and —
                 (viii) include strategies to promote effective parental involvement in the school;

FS 1002.23 (5): Florida’s Family and School Partnership for Student Achievement Act requires LEAs to
adopt rules related to parent involvement. These rules must also be developed in collaboration with
parents.
        (5) Each LEA school board shall adopt rules that strengthen family involvement and family
        empowerment. The rules shall be developed in collaboration with parents, school administrators,
        teachers, and community partners, and shall address:
                 (a) Parental choices and responsibilities;
                 (b) Links with community services;
                 (c) Opportunities for parental involvement in the development, implementation, and
                 evaluation of family involvement programs; and
                 (d) Opportunities for parents to participate on school advisory councils and in school
                 volunteer programs and other activities.


Q   Where can more information be found?

Action Opportunities for Parent Leaders:
http://www.publiceducation.org/portals/nclb/Parent_Involvement/AO-parents.asp




                                               Page 17 of 107
Hanke, W. How To Get Parents Involved With School Activities – located at
http://www.articlerich.com/Article/How-To-Get-Parents-Involved-With-School-
Activities/18403.

Henderson, A.T., Jones, K, and Raimondo, B. The Power of Parent Partnership: Setting
a high standard for parent involvement projects will boost student achievement located
at http://cleweb.org/parent.htm.

Parent- and Community-Involvement Strategies That Work, Education World located at
http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin192.shtml.

Planning for Parent Involvement, Education World Administrators Desk Archive, located
at: http://www.education-world.com/a_admin/admin/admin421.shtml.

Seville, M. Get Parents Involved: The Foundation of Student Success, Edutopia, located
at http://www.edutopia.org/get-parents-involved.

Technical Assistance Document for Evaluating Your School Improvement Process
(2008), 11th edition includes resources, references and appendices and may be
downloaded at http://www.flbsi.org/pdf/2008guide.pdf.

Q   What information should be included in the response?

The response for this section should include the following information:
• Identification of the committee or group responsible for the development,
  implementation, and evaluation of the plans;
• Description of the LEA procedure for the selection of the members of the committee;
• Explanation of how input from parents will be documented;
• Description of the process for schools to develop SIPs; and
• Explanation of how parents assist in the preparation of the relevant plans (District
  Improvement Plan (DIP), corrective action, restructuring, Title I, Part A applications,
  PIPs, and LEA plans).

Q   Sample Response

The LEA has created a District Parent Advisory Council (D-PAC) composed of parents
from all Title I schools. The committee provides input into the development,
implementation and evaluation of all school related plans, including but not limited to
DIP, LEA Plan, PIP, the Title I, Part A application, and use of funds.

• At the LEA level, there is parent representation on the committee that oversees the
  school improvement guidelines and process in all schools;
• All schools receive training and information on ways to include parents in the school
  improvement process and the life of the school through the Office of School
  Improvement and the Office of Parent/Family and Community Involvement;


                                       Page 18 of 107
• The Office of School Improvement provides training for the SAC personnel at each
  school site. Training includes gaining a thorough understanding of the School
  Improvement Plan (SIP) template and process for developing a plan, skill and
  understanding in writing an agenda and conducting a SAC meeting, ways to build
  strong SAC team membership and increase team commitment to and involvement in
  the SIP, and strategies for monitoring the SIP goals and objectives on an ongoing
  basis. These trainings are open to all parents who are participants in the school
  improvement process; and
• Parents are invited and encouraged to become active members of the SAC and
  provide input in the development of all plans related to school improvement. Parent,
  staff, and student surveys will be distributed and the results analyzed to evaluate
  school needs. Data collected throughout the year will be shared with each SAC.

Decisions involving the use of the one percent of Title I funds reserved for parental
involvement will be made during the development of SIP by the SAC. Parents of
students in Title I schools are involved in this committee. Of this one percent, not less
than 95% will be allocated to schools. Parents will participate in the development of the
school Title I budget through participation in the D-PAC. The budget will be developed
with the involvement of the parents. The LEA will monitor SAC memberships to ensure
that parents are involved in the process.

Q      How can the LEA document compliance?

The following may be used when documenting the involvement of parents:

•    Sign-in sheets which indicate the role of those present (parent, teacher, business
     partner);
•    Agendas, handouts, presentation materials; and
•    Meeting minutes that clearly reflect the input of parents.




    2. Describe the actions the LEA will take to provide coordination, technical
       assistance, and other support necessary to assist Title I, Part A schools in
       planning and implementing effective parent involvement activities to
       improve student academic achievement and school performance [Section
       1118(a)(2)(B)]. Include a description of the process the LEA will use to review the
       school-level PIP to ensure compliance with all requirements of Section 1118 [34
       CFR 200.30(e)].


Q      Why is this question important for Florida?

It is the responsibility of the LEA to implement a system of support and strategies which
foster the relationship between schools and families. Current research indicates the

                                        Page 19 of 107
need for strong LEA leadership if schools are to move from the traditional models of
involvement to a more interactive model between families and the community.

One of the first steps an LEA may take in supporting the Title I schools is to help them
identify the quality of the parental involvement programs. Henderson and Mapp outlined
a continuum of school types in the partnership rubric as described below 9 :
• Partnership School: All families and communities have something great to offer –
   we do whatever it takes to work closely together to make sure every single student
   succeeds.
• Open-Door School: Parents can be involved at our school in many ways – we’re
   working hard to get an even bigger turnout for our activities. When we ask the
   community for help, people often respond.
• Come-if-We-Call School: Parents are welcome when we ask them, but there’s only
   so much they can offer. The most important thing they can do is help their kids at
   home. We know where to get help in the community if we need it.
• Fortress School: Parents belong at home, not at school. If students don’t do well,
   it’s because their families don’t give them enough support. We’re already doing al
   we can. Our school is an oasis in a troubled community. We want to keep it that
   way.

Research provides the following list of actions that administrators should take in order to
support parental involvement in schools:
• Foster formal school- and LEA-level policies that promote family and community
   connections with schools;
• Institute communication processes that reach out to family and community through
   multiple pathways, both informal and formal;
• Address barriers to involvement that inhibit participation because of culture or
   language; and
• Create an environment that honors families' and community members' concerns and
   needs in their support of student learning. 10

Q    What does the law require?

Section 1118(a)(2)(B)
(a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-
        (2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall
        develop jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written
        parent involvement policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's
        plan developed under section 1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement,
        and describe how the agency will —
                (B) provide the coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist
                participating schools in planning and implementing effective parent involvement activities
                to improve student academic achievement and school performance;

9
  Henderson, A. T., Mapp, K. L., Johnson, V. R., & Davies, D. 2007. Beyond the bake sale: The essential guide to family–school
partnerships. New York: The New Press.
10
   Ferguson, C. (2005) Developing a Collaborative Team Approach to Support Family and Community Connections With Schools:
What Can School Leaders Do? National Center for Family and Community: Corrections with Schools accessed 05.26.09 and
located at: http://www.sedl.org/connections/resources/rb/research-brief3.pdf.



                                                       Page 20 of 107
FS 1002.23(1): The Family and School Partnership for Student Achievement Act

Each LEA school board, school LEA superintendent, and teacher shall fully support and cooperate in
implementing a well-planned, inclusive, and comprehensive program to assist parents and families in
effectively participating in their child's education.


Q   Where can more information be found?

Florida Bureau of School Improvement, e-Library, School Improvement or Family
Involvement: http://www.flbsi.org/elib/eLibrary.aspx

Florida’s Differentiated Accountability Implementation Guide:
http://www.flbsi.org/pdf/DAMGUIDE.pdf

Three Ways Schools Can Promote Parent Involvement:
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/envrnmnt/famncomm/pa1lk38.htm

Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include the following:
• Description of the support the LEA will provide to the schools in the implementation
   of the parental involvement program;
• Persons responsible;
• Specific timelines; and
• Description of the process the LEA will use to monitor the implementation of the
   schools’ parental involvement program.

Q   Sample Response

The LEA will provide the following necessary coordination, technical assistance, and
other support to assist Title I, Part A schools in planning and implementing effective
parental involvement activities to improve student academic achievement and school
performance:
• Technical assistance meetings are provided to principals of all Title I schools to
   review student achievement data and assist in the development, implementation,
   and review of all required plans.
• The Parent Education Facilitator provides train-the-trainer opportunities for Title I
   parent contacts and school staff to enhance their abilities to present parental
   involvement information at faculty meetings and to integrate parental involvement
   into inservice training for school-based personnel.
• The LEA reviews each school-level PIP to ensure compliance and that the activities
   planned will provide meaningful opportunities for parents to become more involved
   in their child’s education.




                                            Page 21 of 107
•   Bi-monthly Title I parent contact meetings serve as the main forum for sharing
    information. The LEA Parental involvement Coordinator provides information and
    technical assistance to schools.

Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation will vary depending on the type of coordination and support provided,
but may include the following types of items:
• Meeting minutes, agenda, notices, handouts, and sign-in sheets;
• Payroll records for individuals employed to provide support with the implementation
   of the parental involvement program in Title I schools;
• Copies of purchasing records;
• Training records including sign-in sheets, presentation materials, inservice points
   records, etc.; and
• Review sheets and feedback provided to school regarding the school-level PIP.




3. Describe how the LEA will coordinate and integrate parent involvement
   strategies from Part A of Title I with other federal programs (including but
   not limited to Head Start, Early Reading First, Even Start, Parents as
   Teachers, Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY),
   Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK), Parts C and D of Title I, Title III, and Part
   A of Title IV) [Sections 1118 (a)(2)(D) and 1118(e)(4)].


Q   Why is this question important for Florida?

The coordination and integration of federal, state, and local funds reduces duplication of
services and ensures that the needs of all students are met. As required under Section
1118, the PIP must describe how funds from other ESEA programs and applicable
federal, state, and local programs will be integrated and coordinated to meet the needs
of the parents of students attending Title I schools. A number of ESEA programs require
the use of funds for parental involvement activities. Examples of such programs include
Reading First, the Even Start Family Literacy Program, Comprehensive School Reform,
and 21st Century Community Learning Centers. Subject to the rules and requirements of
the program, those funds can be coordinated with the Title I, Part A funds that an LEA
uses to meet its parental involvement responsibilities. An LEA and schools should
carefully examine the needs of all parents, as well as the programs and/or funding
currently in place to support those needs.

Direct coordination exists among programs that provide supplemental services,
especially preschool services, to children in Title I schools. Parental involvement
activities offered through preschool programs are made available to all parents with


                                      Page 22 of 107
similarly situated children. Each school and local educational agency assisted under this
part shall, to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parental
involvement programs and activities with Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First,
Even Start, Home Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), Parents as
Teachers and public preschool and other programs.

Q   What does the law require?

SEC. 1118. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT.
(a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-
 (2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall develop
jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parent involvement
policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's plan developed under section
1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement, and describe how the agency will —
(D) coordinate and integrate parental involvement strategies under this part with parental involvement
strategies under other programs, such as the Head Start program, Reading First program, Early Reading
First program, Even Start program, Parents as Teachers program, and Home Instruction Program for
Preschool Youngsters, and State-run preschool programs;

(e) BUILDING CAPACITY FOR INVOLVEMENT- To ensure effective involvement of parents and to
support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to improve student
academic achievement, each school and local educational agency assisted under this part —
        (4) shall, to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parent involvement
        programs and activities with Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, the Home
        Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program, and public
        preschool and other programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent resource centers, that
        encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education of their children;

Q   Where can more information be found?

National Head Start Association: http://www.nhsa.org/
Early Reading First: http://www.ed.gov/programs/earlyreading/index.html
Even Start: http://www.ed.gov/programs/evenstartformula/index.html
Guidance for the William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy Programs:
http://www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/guid/evenstartguidance02.doc
Home Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) [Information is located at
http://www.hippy.org.il/html/aboutus.html]
Parents as Teachers:
http://www.parentsasteachers.org/site/pp.asp?c=ekIRLcMZJxE&b=272093
Florida’s Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Program: http://www.fldoe.org/earlylearning/
IDEA: http://idea.ed.gov/explore/home




                                               Page 23 of 107
Q   What should be included in the response?

For a complete response, the LEA should include the following information:
• Identification of the specific federal program; and
• Description of how the programs were coordinated.

Q   Sample Response

 Program                                              Coordination
 VPK            The Title I office and the VPK office will work together to coordinate transition programs for
                students entering the regular public school program. Activities may include: coordinated
                meetings with parents, VPK teachers, and the kindergarten teachers to discuss the specific
                learning needs of students, joint parent meetings to discuss transitioning, etc.
 Individuals    Supplemental instructional support provided by Title I will be discussed with parents during
 with           the development of the students IEP.
 Disabilities
 Education
 Act (IDEA)
 Title II       Professional development modules will be provided to schools to support the professional
                development needs of the staff related to parental involvement. The parent liaisons will be
                trained by LEA staff in methods to effectively use the modules. LEA staff will provide
                support and monitor the implementation to ensure that training is provided as required.
 Head Start     Head State pre-kindergarten teachers will conduct at least two home-visits. The Head Start
                office will provide vicinity mileage travel reimbursements for teachers.


Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

LEAs should identify all of the federal programs that are being implemented, including
those listed above. All identified programs should be included in the schoolwide
schedule of activities for parents. The LEA should issue invitations to the appropriate
groups for the same activity, and share a common source of coordination.
Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
• Checklist which affirms representation and coordination of all existing programs;
• Schedule of activities;
• Invitation/marketing materials;
• Meeting agendas and minutes;
• Training evaluations from parents; and
• Teacher/staff surveys, which might include information pertaining to the coordination
   of resources.



 4. Describe the actions the LEA will take to conduct, with the involvement of
    parents, an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of this parent
    involvement policy in improving the quality of its Title I, Part A schools
    [Section 1118(a)(2)(E)].



                                              Page 24 of 107
Q   Why is this question important for Florida?

Section 1118(a)(2)(E) requires each LEA that receives funds under Part A of Title I to
conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and
effectiveness of the PIP and parental involvement programs in improving the academic
quality of the schools served and to use the findings to revise, if necessary, the PIPs
including the school-level PIPs. The regulations use the term “evaluation,” which has a
specific meaning in the research field. However, for Title I purposes, the intent is that
LEAs conduct an annual review of the strategies in the PIP to determine if they are
contributing to the desired outcomes either in terms of improvement in student
achievement or increases in other activities that lead to increased student achievement
as well as the identification of barriers to greater participation by parents.

An LEA is responsible for ensuring that a school's policy meets the changing needs of
the local community. The LEA can request a school to revise the PIP. Schools that are
adapting LEA parental involvement policies, which must be reviewed annually by law,
should revise and update as the LEA does in order to reflect the changing needs of the
parents and school. The annual evaluation/review may serve other valuable purposes
including the following:
• Inform internal program management and help school leaders make decisions to
    improve the quality of the program;
• Answer stakeholder questions and help further explain the current status of the
    school in meeting the goals;
• Identify barriers to greater participation by parents, especially the parents of children
    who are economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency,
    have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background [Section
    1118(a)(E)]; and
• Promote interest and support of programs or activities by illustrating certain
    strategies and the outcomes in terms of improving student achievement.

Q   What does the law require?

Section 1118(a)(2)(E):
2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall develop
jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parent involvement
policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's plan developed under section
1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement, and describe how the agency will —
         (E)conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and
         effectiveness of the parental involvement policy in improving the academic quality of the schools
         served under this part, including identifying barriers to greater participation by parents in activities
         authorized by this section (with particular attention to parents who are economically
         disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any
         racial or ethnic minority background), and use the findings of such evaluation to design strategies
         for more effective parental involvement, and to revise, if necessary, the parental involvement
         policies described in this section;




                                                Page 25 of 107
Q   Where can more information be found?

The Parental Involvement Evaluation Toolkit was created by the Florida Evaluation
Working Group in September 2006, and is designed to assist LEAs and schools in
conducting evaluations of the PIPs. The toolkit contains guidance, policy details, and
evaluation instruments. The toolkit is located at
http://www.nclbeval.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2&Itemid=33.

Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include a description of the following:
• Process the LEA will use to evaluate the PIP;
• Identification of the members of the group which will conduct the evaluation;
• Proposed timelines;
• Data which will be reviewed to complete the evaluation; and
• Description of how results will be used.
Q   Sample Response
The Sunnydale County School LEA will meet quarterly with the LEA Parent Advisory
Council (D-PAC) for input into the development, implementation, and evaluation of
existing PIP. As issues arise, the D-PAC will work with the Title I Director to resolve and
improve the program. In March, the D-PAC will begin the review of the existing PIP,
analyze participation data, and revise the PIP as needed.

The Title I Director will gather and disseminate data related to the implementation of
parent programs at the LEA and school levels. The D-PAC will use the Title I Parent
Involvement Evaluation Toolkit in the development of the specific evaluation plan. The
D-PAC will provide input into the development of parent surveys. Surveys will be
distributed in April. In early May, the D-PAC will review the results and identify common
areas of concern and barriers for greater participation by parents. The information will
be used to revise the PIP and parental involvement activities.

Q   How can the LEA document compliance?
Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following items:
•   Committee membership lists which indicate the role of those present (parent,
    teacher, business partner);
•   Minutes of the meeting, agendas, and handouts;
•   Copies of data reviews, survey results, parent participation data;
•   Summary of parent focus group meetings; and
•   Evaluation results.




                                       Page 26 of 107
    5. Describe the actions the LEA will take to assist schools to implement the
       activities described in the school-level PIPs to build the schools’ and
       parents’ capacity for strong parent involvement [Sections 1118(a)(2)(C),
       1118(e)(1-14)].

    If all activities will be conducted at the school-level, check here          . If checked
    skip to question 7.

    6. If the LEA plans to implement LEA-wide activities, describe the actions the
       LEA will take to build the schools’ and parents’ capacity for strong parent
       involvement, in order to ensure effective involvement of parents and to
       support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the
       community to improve student academic achievement [Sections
       1118(a)(2)(C), 1118(e)(1-14)].

           Content of the   Type of      Schools        Correlation   Timeline
             Session        Activity   Participating    to Student
                                                       Achievement




Q   Why is this question important for Florida?

It is the responsibility of LEAs and schools to help parents become equal partners with
educators in improving their child’s academic achievement. Schools and LEAs must
help parents understand such things as the following:
• The state’s academic content standards and student academic achievement
     standards;
• State and local academic assessments including alternative assessments;
• Parental involvement requirements of Section 1118; and
• How to monitor their child’s progress and work with educators to improve the
     achievement of their child. [Section 1118(e)(1), ESEA.]

This provision means that LEAs and schools must provide assistance to parents in
understanding the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (NG-SSS), Florida’s
academic achievement standards (FCAT Levels), and the assessments administered by
the LEA. LEAs and schools are required to help parents monitor their child’s progress
and to understand ways they can work with educators to improve their child’s
achievement.



                                        Page 27 of 107
The following factors are considered by Ferguson (2005) 11 as key to promoting family
interactions and may serve as a needs assessment tool to help LEAs assist schools in
identifying barriers to effective parental involvement:

Creating a family-friendly school:
• Is there a language barrier between school and family?
• Are parents able to attend meetings at the times they are scheduled?
• Do parents have transportation to attend events/meetings?
• Do parents feel welcome at the school?

Networking through community organizations:
• What community organizations actively support the school through service projects
   that impact learning?
• How can these organizations help support student learning?
• How can these organizations help communicate school needs?
• How can these organizations help eliminate barriers to participation for family and
   community members?

Listening actively to the concerns of individuals:
• Does staff have the skills needed to be active listeners?
• Are the concerns of individual parents reflective of the needs of a larger issue the
    school should address?

Influencing the creation of policies to encourage family and community involvement:
• Does the LEA or school have policies in place that foster and promote family and
    community connections with schools?
• What mechanisms are in place to keep policymakers aware of involvement project
    progress and needs?
• How can school staff reach out to those who make policy in order to develop
    supportive policies?

Information may be provided in different formats to meet the specific needs of parents
and students, such as the following examples:
• Provide print materials, web-based resources, student handbooks and newsletters to
    assist parents in understanding the NG-SSS, Florida student academic achievement
    standards, and local academic assessments;
• Provide information on assessment and academic achievement standards through
    meetings, workshops and multimedia;
• Provide reports explaining achievement test results;
• Schedule opportunities for parents and teachers to discuss ways parents can work
    to improve their child’s academic achievement;
• Facilitate opportunities for frequent and regular communication between parents and
    school staff based on student needs;

11
  Ferguson, C. (2005) Developing a Collaborative Team Approach to Support Family and Community Connections With Schools:
What Can School Leaders Do? National Center for Family and Community: Corrections with Schools accessed 05.26.09 and
located at: http://www.sedl.org/connections/resources/rb/research-brief3.pdf.


                                                    Page 28 of 107
•   Provide trainings/workshops at various locations and times to maximize participation
    and assist parents in understanding the NG-SSS, Florida student academic
    achievement standards, and State and local academic assessments;
•   Scheduled regular opportunities for parents to be involved in supplemental learning
    experiences with their children, such as family literacy night and Parents as
    Teachers;
•   Offer literacy programs that bond families around reading and using the public
    library;
•   Provide information about the essential components of reading instruction to enable
    parents to support the instructional practices used by the teacher;
•   Train parents in the use of the Internet to enable them to access their children’s
    homework; communicate with teachers; and review information posted about
    schools in need of improvement, supplemental educational services, public school
    choice and other opportunities to promote student achievement [Section 1118(e),
    ESEA];
•   Conduct in-home conferences between teachers or other educators who work
    directly with participating children and the children’s parents;
•   Provide training to parents in how to enhance the involvement of other parents; and
•   Provide opportunities for parents to volunteer and observe in their child’s classroom
    [Section 1118(d)(1), ESEA].

LEAs and schools should arrange school trainings/meetings at a variety of times and in
various places in an effort to reduce the barriers to greater participation by parents.
LEAs and schools may wish to consider hosting parental involvement activities in
partnership with local faith-based organizations, community groups, and/or civic
organizations.

Q   What does the law require?

SEC. 1118(a)(2)(C)
(a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-
       (2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall
       develop jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written
       parent involvement policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's
       plan developed under section 1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement,
       and describe how the agency will —
                (C) build the schools' and parents' capacity for strong parental involvement as described
               in subsection (e);

(e) BUILDING CAPACITY FOR INVOLVEMENT- To ensure effective involvement of parents and to
support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to improve student
academic achievement, each school and local educational agency assisted under this part —
        (1) shall provide assistance to parents of children served by the school or local educational
        agency, as appropriate, in understanding such topics as the State's academic content standards
        and State student academic achievement standards, State and local academic assessments, the
        requirements of this part, and how to monitor a child's progress and work with educators to
        improve the achievement of their children;
        (2) shall provide materials and training to help parents to work with their children to improve their
        children's achievement, such as literacy training and using technology, as appropriate, to foster
        parental involvement;

                                              Page 29 of 107
        (7) may provide necessary literacy training from funds received under this part if the local
        educational agency has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for such
        training;

SEC. 1111(c)(14)
c) OTHER PROVISIONS TO SUPPORT TEACHING AND LEARNING- Each State plan shall contain
assurances that—
        (14) the State educational agency will encourage local educational agencies and individual
       schools participating in a program assisted under this part to offer family literacy services (using
       funds under this part), if the agency or school determines that a substantial number of students
       served under this part by the agency or school have parents who do not have a secondary school
       diploma or its recognized equivalent or who have low levels of literacy.

Florida’s Family and School Partnership for Student Achievement Act [FS 1002.23 (7 and 8)] also
requires LEAs to develop and disseminate a parent guide which describes specific information on how
parents can help their children succeed. The requirements in Florida statute is similar to those
requirements outlined in the federal statute.

(7) Each school LEA shall develop and disseminate a parent guide to successful student achievement,
consistent with the guidelines of the Department of Education, which addresses what parents need to
know about their child's educational progress and how parents can help their child to succeed in school.
The guide must:

        (a) Be understandable to students and parents;
        (b) Be distributed to all parents, students, and school personnel at the beginning of each school
        year;
        (c) Be discussed at the beginning of each school year in meetings of students, parents, and
        teachers;
        (d) Include information concerning services, opportunities, choices, academic standards, and
        student assessment; and
        (e) Provide information on the importance of student health and available immunizations and
        vaccinations, including, but not limited to:
                1. A recommended immunization schedule in accordance with United States Centers for
                Disease Control and Prevention recommendations.
                2. Detailed information regarding the causes, symptoms, and transmission of
                meningococcal disease and the availability, effectiveness, known contraindications, and
                appropriate age for the administration of any required or recommended vaccine against
                meningococcal disease, in accordance with the recommendations of the Advisory
                Committee on Immunization Practices of the United States Centers for Disease Control
                and Prevention.

The parent guide may be included as a part of the code of student conduct that is required in s.
1006.07(2).

(8) Each school LEA shall develop and disseminate a checklist of parental actions that can strengthen
parental involvement in their child's educational progress, consistent with the requirements in subsection
(3). The checklist shall be provided each school year to all parents of students in kindergarten through
grade 12 and shall focus on academics, especially reading, high expectations for students, citizenship,
and communication.


Q   Where can more information be found?

92 Ways to Involve Families and the Community in Education:
http://www.k12.hi.us/~konawahs/92_ways_to_involve_families.htm


                                              Page 30 of 107
Beyond the Bake Sale: Parents Can Make the Difference in Countless Ways
Kevin Walker, the founder of Project Appleseed, has created a list of 37 different ways
parents can help. Included: The Project Appleseed Parental Involvement Pledge.

Q   What should be included in the response?

The response for questions five and six should include a specific description of the
support the LEA will provide to assist schools in building the schools’ and parents’
capacity for strong parental involvement to improve student academic achievement. A
complete response will include the following specific information:
• Description of the support system, including timelines;
• Process the LEA will use to monitor activities; and
• If personnel will be provided, how those individuals will be supported.

If the LEA plans to provide LEA-wide activities, the response for question six should
include the following elements:
• The sessions should include activities in each of the following content:
          o The state’s academic content standards and state student academic
              achievement standards,
          o State and local academic assessments including alternative assessments,
          o Parental involvement requirements of section 1118, and
          o How to monitor their child’s progress and work with educators to improve
              the achievement of their child [Section 1118(e)(1), ESEA];
• Type of activities;
• Schools participating;
• Specific correlation to student achievement; and
• Proposed timeline.

Q   Sample Response for Question Five

The LEA will provide a parent liaison to serve each Title I school. These individuals will
meet monthly with the Title I Coordinator and the Parent Involvement Coordinator.
These joint meetings will serve as an avenue to facilitate communication and training.
The LEA will provide train-the-trainer sessions to assist parent liaisons with parent
training sessions in the following areas:
• The state’s academic content standards and State student academic achievement
    standards;
• State and local academic assessments, including alternative assessments;
• The parental involvement requirements of Section 1118; and
• How to monitor their child’s progress and work with educators to improve the
    achievement of their child.

The Parent Involvement Coordinator will provide to school leaders a train-the trainer
session for staff in August to include topics identified in Section 1118(e)(3).The Parent


                                       Page 31 of 107
Involvement Coordinator and the Title I Director will visit each site on a monthly basis to
monitor the implementation of the parental involvement program as outlined in the LEA
PIP and will provide support to schools as needed.

All of the activities will be structured to ensure a specific correlation to student
achievement. Specifically, the LEA will, to the extent possible, ensure that parental
involvement activities:
• Include information on the NG-SSS and student achievement expectations;
• Support the involvement of parents in the decision making process;
• Engage parents and students in activities to help their child academically;
• Provide information to parents on where their child’s skills need to improve; and
• Provide a method of communicating with parents.

Q   Sample Response for Question Six

Content of the       Type of            Schools           Correlation to Student        Timeline
   Session           Activity       Participating              Achievement
Sunshine State    Hard copy         All Schools         Parents will be provided       August
Standards/Next    dissemination                         with grade specific
Generation        of materials                          brochures outlining and
Standards                                               identifying the SSS and
                                                        strategies they can use to
                                                        help their child at home.
                                                        Information will also be
                                                        posted on the LEAs
                                                        website at [add link].
Assessments       Individual        All Title I         Teachers will conduct          August
                  conferences       schools             individual conferences to      through
                                                        discuss each child’s           October
                                                        assessment results,
                                                        expectations, and goals
                                                        for the school year
Reading           Face-to-face      All Title I         Content specific sessions      September
                  meetings          elementary          will be provided for
                                    schools             parents. Information will
                                                        include grade level
                                                        proficiency, strategies
                                                        parents can use at home,
                                                        and assessment methods.
College           Small group       All Title I High    Parents will gain               January
Readiness         conferences       schools             knowledge of college
                                                        readiness, scholarship
                                                        information, availability of
                                                        financial aid, etc.
GED               Small group       All Title I         Parents will be offered the    Through
Preparation       classes           schools             opportunity to participate     out the

                                       Page 32 of 107
Content of the       Type of          Schools            Correlation to Student        Timeline
  Session            Activity       Participating             Achievement
                                                       in GED prep classes            year
                                                       offered at the technical
                                                       school.
Technology        Individual       All Title I         Parent liaisons will provide   Initiate in
                  conferences      schools             individual help to parents     August at
                                                       in how to log-in and           the annual
                                                       access the Parent Portal       meeting
                                                                                      and then
                                                                                      as needed
                                                                                      basis
Family Literacy   Small group      All schools         Adult Education Center         Throughout
                  classes                              will host classes to help      the year
                                                       parents improve reading
                                                       skills
Family Literacy   Small group      All schools         English for speakers of        Throughout
                  classes                              other languages will be        the year
                                                       provided for parents           with a new
                                                                                      group
                                                                                      beginning
                                                                                      at the first
                                                                                      of each
                                                                                      month

Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include, but is not limited, to the following types of items:
• Documents/checklists
         o Sample materials/technology;
         o Training schedule;
         o Sign-in sheets and agendas;
         o Marketing materials; and
         o Parent contact record.
• Sample products/publications
• Training materials
         o Attendance at training;
         o Evaluation of training;
         o Awareness of availability of materials/resources/training; and
         o Use of materials.




                                      Page 33 of 107
7. Describe the professional development activities the LEA will, with the
   assistance of its schools and parents, provide to educate staff on the value
   and utility of contributions of parents; how to reach out to, communicate
   with, and work with parents as equal partners; the implementation and
   coordination of parent programs; and how to build ties between parents and
   the school [Section 1118 (e)(3)].

    Content of the   Type of Activity     Schools              Correlation to Student   Timeline
      Session                           participating              Achievement




Q    Why is this question important for Florida?

Schools and LEAs must educate their staff (including teachers, pupil services
personnel, principals, and other staff) on how to work with parents as equal partners.
Schools and LEAs may involve parents in developing this training in order to improve its
effectiveness.

Specifically, the content of the training should include the following topics:
• The value and utility of the contributions of parents;
• How to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents;
• Implementation and coordination of the LEAs and/or schools parental involvement;
  policy/plan and the parent programs with the LEA; and
• How to build ties between parents and the school [Section 1118(e)(3) and (6),
  ESEA].

The staff development activities could be delivered by any or all of the following
methods:
• Providing research articles that highlight the contribution of parents towards student
   achievement;
• Providing train-the-trainer modules for schools to use during staff training sessions;
   Providing information via newsletters, LEA-wide communications, etc. with examples
   of positive things that parents can do to further student achievement and anecdotes
   about things that parents in the LEA have done to make a difference in the academic
   success of their own or other students; and
• Providing LEA-wide or school level face-to-face training sessions.

To meet this requirement LEAs and schools may want to consider the following
suggestions:
• An ongoing staff development program that includes research-based training
   modules emphasizing strategies to reach out to, communicate with, and work with
   parents such as: developing school-parent compacts; parent-teacher conferencing;
   planning the annual meeting; etc.;



                                              Page 34 of 107
•   Staff training sessions on “Understanding the Affects of Poverty on Children” and
    “How to Make the School Parent-Friendly”;
•   Comprehensive staff development that enhances communication skills between
    LEA/school staff and parents that includes:
    • Providing parent access to staff,
    • Providing opportunities for parents to volunteer,
    • Providing opportunities for parents to participate in class, and
    • Varying venues/modes for communicating student progress to parents;
•   A PowerPoint presentation put together with the assistance of parents containing
    information about the positive contributions of parents that could be shown at staff
    meetings; and
•   Live presentations by teams of LEA staff and parents that feature the positive
    contributions of parents in improving student achievement.

An LEA may coordinate the Title I, Part A activities with the Title II program to provide
this professional development to teachers and principals, and, if appropriate, to parents
and other staff. [Section 1112(b)(1)(D), ESEA.]

Q   What does the law require?

Section 1118 (e)(3)
(e) BUILDING CAPACITY FOR INVOLVEMENT- To ensure effective involvement of parents and to
support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to improve student
academic achievement, each school and local educational agency assisted under this part —
        (3) shall educate teachers, pupil services personnel, principals, and other staff, with the
        assistance of parents, in the value and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to reach out
        to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, implement and coordinate parent
        programs, and build ties between parents and the school;


Q   Where can more information be found?

A Syllabus and Resource Package for Educating Teachers and Administrators in Parent
Involvement. Bulletin 1836. State of Louisiana, located at:
http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1
f/88/9a.pdf

Critical Issue: Supporting Ways Parents and Families Can Become Involved in Schools:
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/envrnmnt/famncomm/pa100.htm.

Family Involvement in Children's Education: Successful Local Approaches:
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/FamInvolve/index.html

Safran, D. Preparing Teachers for Parent Involvement located at
http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/3
5/43/fe.pdf.




                                              Page 35 of 107
Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include specific information on the activities the LEA will
provide to train staff on parental involvement. The response will include information on
the method or type of activity the LEA will provide in all of the required areas but may
also include areas identified as a need by the LEA:
• Value of parental involvement;
• Communicating and working with parents;
• Implementation and coordination of parental involvement program;
• Building ties between home and school; and
• Cultural sensitivity.

The response should include the following specific information:
• Content of the session;
• Type of Activities;
• Schools participating (may be school groups);
• Specific correlation to student achievement; and
• Timeline.

Q   Sample Response

 Content of the          Type of         Schools        Correlation to                      Timeline
   Session               Activity      Participating Student Achievement
 Value of parental      Distribution   All Title I       Improve the ability of staff      Monthly
 involvement: A         of Materials   schools           to work effectively with          throughout the
 monthly                                                 parents by providing              year
 newsletter will be                                      examples of best practices
 distributed to                                          for parental involvement.
 teachers that
 includes
 information on the
 value of parental
 involvement.
 Communicating          Train the      All Title I       Parent liaisons will be           August
 and working with       Trainer        schools           provided with a training
 parents                                                 module to take back to
                                                         schools in an effort to
                                                         improve the ability of staff to
                                                         work effectively with
                                                         parents.
 Implementation         Train the      All Title I       Improve the ability of staff      September
 and coordination       Trainer        schools           to work effectively with
 of parental                                             parents.
 involvement
 program
 Building ties          Train the      All Title I       Improve the ability of staff      October
 between home           Trainer        schools           to work effectively with
 and school                                              parents.
 Cultural sensitivity   Train the      All Title I       Provide information to staff      November
                        Trainer        schools           on the various cultures


                                              Page 36 of 107
 Content of the      Type of       Schools        Correlation to             Timeline
   Session           Activity    Participating Student Achievement
                                                 represented in the LEA or
                                                 school to increase
                                                 awareness of the various
                                                 cultures of the students
                                                 enrolled.


Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following:
• Staff development calendars;
• Sign-in sheets;
• Training evaluations;
• LEA staff development inservice point records;
• Study group agendas, sign-in sheets, notes, etc.;
• Action research reports; and
• Sample products and publications: e.g. PowerPoint presentations and/or handouts.




8. Describe how the LEA will provide full opportunities for participation in
   parental involvement activities for all parents (including parents of children
   with limited English proficiency, disabilities, and migratory children).
   Include how the LEA plans to share information related to school and
   parent programs, meetings, school reports, and other activities in an
   understandable and uniform format and to the extent practical, in a
   language parents can understand [Section 1118(e)(5) and 1118(f)].

Q   Why is this question important for Florida?

Because regular communication is the foundation of effective parental involvement,
LEAs and schools must provide parents of participating children information in an
understandable and uniform format, including alternative formats upon request.
Providing information to parents, “to the extent practicable,” in a language parents can
understand means that, written translations of printed information should be provided to
parents with limited English proficiency in a language they understand. Written
translations are preferred; however, it is permissible to provide oral translations to
limited English proficient parents in the language they understand. LEAs have flexibility
in determining what mix of oral and written translation services may be necessary and
reasonable for communicating the required information to parents [Title I, Part A Final
Regulations, 67 Fed. Reg. 71749 – 50, Comments and Discussion on Section 200.36;
available at USDE website at: http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/finrule/2002-
4/120202a.html].


                                      Page 37 of 107
This requirement is consistent with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VI), as
amended, and the related implementing regulations. Under those regulations,
recipients of federal financial assistance have a responsibility to ensure meaningful
access to their programs and activities by persons with limited English proficiency. It is
also consistent with USDE policy under Title VI and Executive Order 13166 (Improving
Access to Services for Persons with Limited English Proficiency). The Department of
Justice’s Guidance on Title VI and E.O. 13166, which provides clarification on how to
determine an appropriate mix of language services, may be found in the Federal
Register, 67 Fed. Reg. 41455-41472 (June 18, 2002), or online at http://www.lep.gov.

This requirement is also consistent with Florida’s Consent Decree regarding the
education of English language learner students. Florida's authority for the
implementation of the Consent Decree is found in Section 1003.56, F.S, English
Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient Students and Rules 6A-6.0900 to
6A-6.0909, F.A.C., Programs for Limited English Proficient Students. The Consent
Decree addresses the civil rights of English Language Learners (ELL) students,
foremost among those their right to equal access to all education programs. In
addressing these rights, the Consent Decree provides a structure that ensures the
delivery of the comprehensible instruction to which ELL students are entitled.

LEAs and schools must take the necessary steps to ensure that communications
involving parents with disabilities are as effective as communications with other parents.
LEAs and schools must furnish appropriate auxiliary aids and services when necessary
to allow a parent with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the
benefits of programs authorized under Title I, Part A including the parental involvement
provisions.

LEAs and schools must provide an opportunity to parents with disabilities to request the
auxiliary aids and services of their choice (such as sign language interpreters and large
print or materials in Braille) to ensure meaningful participation in the different types of
programs or activities carried out to implement the Part A provisions. The LEA or
school must give primary consideration to the expressed choice of a parent with
disabilities by honoring that choice, unless the LEA or school can demonstrate that
another effective means of communication exists, or that use of the means chosen by
the parent would result in a fundamental alteration in the service, program, or activity or
in an undue financial and administrative burden [28 CFR Sections 35.104 and 35.160-
164, and Appendix A to Part 35 of Title 28T of the Code of Federal Regulations
implementing subtitle A of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990)].

Q   What does the law require?

SEC. 1118. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT.
(a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-
       (2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall
       develop jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written
       parent involvement policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's



                                              Page 38 of 107
        plan developed under section 1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement,
        and describe how the agency will —

(b) SCHOOL PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT POLICY-
       (1) IN GENERAL- Each school served under this part shall jointly develop with, and distribute to,
       parents of participating children a written parental involvement policy, agreed on by such parents,
       that shall describe the means for carrying out the requirements of subsections (c) through (f).
       Parents shall be notified of the policy in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent
       practicable, provided in a language the parents can understand. Such policy shall be made
       available to the local community and updated periodically to meet the changing needs of parents
       and the school.
       (e) BUILDING CAPACITY FOR INVOLVEMENT- To ensure effective involvement of parents and
       to support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to improve
       student academic achievement, each school and local educational agency assisted under this
       part —
               (5) shall ensure that information related to school and parent programs, meetings, and
               other activities is sent to the parents of participating children in a format and, to the extent
               practicable, in a language the parents can understand;

(f) ACCESSIBILITY– In carrying out the parental involvement requirements of this part, local educational
agencies and schools, to the extent practicable, shall provide full opportunities for the participation of
parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory children,
including providing information and school reports required under section 1111 in a format and, to the
extent practicable, in a language such parents understand.

Q   Where can more information be found?

How to Inform and Involve Parents located at:
http://www.inspiringteachers.com/classroom_resources/tips/parent_communication/infor
m_and_involve_parents.html

The Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resources System (FDLRS) provides FDLRS
Parent Services provides information, training, and support to LEAs and families, in
order to promote effective parent participation in the education of children who are
exceptional and/or have special needs. More information is located at:
http://www.paec.org/fdlrsweb/parentservices.htm.

More information on the Consent Degree may be found at:
http://www.fldoe.org/aala/cdpage2.asp.

Q What should be included in the response?

A complete response for this item includes the following information:
• Description of the process for ensuring that schools provide information to parents in
   a language they can understand, if feasible;
• Description of how the LEA will ensure that parents with disabilities will have access
   to parental involvement activities and/or services;
• Process the LEA will use for translating information into a parent’s native language;
• Description of how the LEA will ensure that information is available to parents
   considering the fluctuating student populations; and
• Specific languages that information will be provided.

                                               Page 39 of 107
Q   Sample Response

The PIP will be summarized into a brochure that will be printed in English, Spanish, and
Haitian Creole and provided to all parents in the “Beginning of School Packet.” The
brochure will outline the major components of the policy and will offer to provide a hard
copy upon request. In addition, hard copies will be available in the office and the parent
resource room at each Title I school. The complete PIP will be posted on the LEA’s
website and linked from each Title I school’s website.

Written communication will be provided for parents in English, Spanish, and Haitian
Creole. Translators will be available at all parent meetings and in school offices to
provide translation services to ensure that parents are able to fully participate in parent
meetings. The LEA will ensure that an individual will be available to provide translation
services in Spanish and Haitian Creole at each Title I school. If other languages are
needed, schools will send the material to the Title I office where local companies will be
contracted to provide the translations. The English Language Survey results will be
used to determine the number and specific needs for translations into a language other
than English. LEA and school personnel will run the Language Survey report at least
monthly to determine any changes based on fluctuations in student populations.

American Sign Language translation services will be available at Sunshine Middle
School since there are several parents which would benefit from the services. The
newsletter (LEA wide and school level) will be transcribed into Braille by the Exceptional
Student Education (ESE) department for several families of students attending
Sunshine Middle School.

Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
• Meeting notices in multiple languages;
• Notice of availability of translator;
• Compacts/policies available and distributed in multiple languages;
• Other information translated;
• Sample phone call scripts, newsletters;
• Notices/emails/letters to schools on policy or procedures for requesting and/or
  purchasing translation services;
• Identification of the number and language for translations; and
• Availability of large print, Braille or American Sign Language services, if applicable.




                                       Page 40 of 107
Discretionary LEA Parent Involvement Policy Components

The LEA parent involvement policy may include additional paragraphs listing
and describing other discretionary activities that the LEA, in consultation with
its parents, choose to undertake to build parents’ capacity for involvement in
the school and school system to support their children’s academic
achievement [Section 1118(e)].

   Check here if the LEA does not plan to implement the discretionary parent
involvement activities listed below and skip to the Adoption section.

Check all activities the LEA plans to implement:
   Involving parents in the development of training for teachers, principals, and other
educators to improve the effectiveness of that training [Section 1118(e)(6)].
   Providing necessary literacy training for parents from Title I, Part A funds, if the
LEA has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for that training
[Section 1118(e)(7)].
   Paying reasonable and necessary expenses associated with parent involvement
activities, including transportation and child care costs, to enable parents to
participate in school-related meetings and training sessions [Section 1118(e)(8)].
   Training parents to enhance the involvement of other parents [Section 1118(e)(9).]
   Maximizing parent involvement and participation in their children’s education by
arranging school meetings at a variety of times, or conducting in-home conferences
between teachers or other educators, who work directly with participating children,
with parents who are unable to attend those conferences at school [Section
1118(e)(10)].
   Adopting and implementing model approaches to improving parent involvement
[Section 1118(e)(11)].
   Establishing a LEA wide parent advisory council to provide advice on all matters
related to parent involvement in Title I, Part A programs [Section 1118(e)(12)].
   Developing appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses,
including faith-based organizations, in parent involvement activities [Section
1118(e)(13)].
   Providing other reasonable support for parent involvement activities under section
1118 as parents may request [Section 1118(e)(14)].

8.      Describe how the discretionary activities checked above will be
       implemented.
     Content of the Session          Type of Activity        Correlation to   Timeline
                                                               Student
                                                             Achievement




                                     Page 41 of 107
Q    Why is this question important for Florida?

Daniel E. Kinnaman suggests that LEAs and schools consider modeling parental
involvement after Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives; from lower order to
higher order with the idea that, involvement with the subject matter (in this case a
parent’s involvement with their child’s education) deepens as we progress from the
lower-level to higher-level activities. The taxonomy of parental involvement includes the
following roles:
• Supporter: Attends athletic and arts events, open house, monitors homework;
• Advocate: Participate in PTO/PTA, serves on SAC, chaperones field trips and other
    school events;
• Partner: Review curriculum objectives, occasionally sits in on child's class,
    participates in teacher/parent conferences; and
• Developer: Plan and conduct home activities that support the school curriculum,
    helps to construct a neighborhood learning center staffed by volunteer parents. 12

LEAs and schools should consider ways to support parents as they move through these
levels of involvement with their child’s education. The LEA may want to consider
providing training sessions to assist parents in becoming effective leaders. Few parents
are ready to become a leader without some encouragement and support, and even
those who are can be more effective if they receive some training. In focus groups with
parents who have gone through such training, the common message is that parents
emerged feeling able to participate more fully in the individual education of their
children, the schools, and LEA.

Schools and LEAs may use Title I, Part A funds to pay reasonable and necessary
expenses associated with parental involvement activities, including transportation and
childcare costs, to enable parents to participate in school-related meetings and training
sessions. Schools and LEAs should also arrange school meetings at a variety of times
and in various places. Schools may wish to consider taking parental involvement
activities to the parents rather than requiring that parents always come to the school.
LEAs and schools may consider partnerships with local faith-based organizations,
community groups, and civic organizations. In addition, for parents who are unable to
attend conferences at school, schools may arrange for and conduct in-home
conferences between teachers or other educators who work directly with participating
children and the children’s parents. Schools also may provide training to parents in how
to enhance the involvement of other parents [Section 1118(e)(8), (9), and (10), ESEA].

USDE encourages parents to attend local or regionally-based training opportunities,
such as workshops or conferences. Upon return from any workshop or conference that
is not available to all other interested parents, attendees should provide information
and, if possible, training on the conference topics to other parents. Title I funds may be
used for costs that are reasonable and necessary to support the attendance of parents

12
  Kinnaman, D.E. (2002) Meaningful Parent Involvement, Professional Media Group LLC, accessed 05.19.09 and located at:
http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Meaningful+parent+involvement:+school+LEAs+should+involve...-a097117616.



                                                     Page 42 of 107
of participating children at these workshops and conferences to enable them to
participate more effectively in the local program or to conduct home-based educational
activities. Paying travel and other costs associated with attendance at out-of-state
conferences and workshops may be allowable in some special cases.

Q   What does the law require?

Section 1118 – Parent Involvement

(2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall develop
jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parent involvement
policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's plan developed under section
1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement, and describe how the agency will —
         (C) build the schools' and parents' capacity for strong parental involvement as described in
         subsection (e);

         (e) BUILDING CAPACITY FOR INVOLVEMENT- To ensure effective involvement of parents and
        to support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to improve
        student academic achievement, each school and local educational agency assisted under this
        part
                (6) may involve parents in the development of training for teachers, principals, and other
                educators to improve the effectiveness of such training;
                (7) may provide necessary literacy training from funds received under this part if the local
                educational agency has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for
                such training;
                (8) may pay reasonable and necessary expenses associated with local parental
                involvement activities, including transportation and child care costs, to enable parents to
                participate in school-related meetings and training sessions;
                (9) may train parents to enhance the involvement of other parents;
                (10) may arrange school meetings at a variety of times, or conduct in-home conferences
                between teachers or other educators, who work directly with participating children, with
                parents who are unable to attend such conferences at school, in order to maximize
                parental involvement and participation;
                (11) may adopt and implement model approaches to improving parental involvement;
                (12) may establish a LEA wide parent advisory council to provide advice on all matters
                related to parental involvement in programs supported under this section;
                (13) may develop appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses
                in parent involvement activities


Q   Where can more information be found?

Elam, Colleen, What Makes a Parent Group Successful? Accessed on 06.11.09 and
located at:
http://www.txgifted.org/files/pdf/What%20Makes%20a%20Parent%20Group%20Succes
sful.pdf.

Parent Leadership Training Database: http://parentleadership.org/

Parents as Collaborative Leaders: http://www.uvm.edu/~pcl/modules.php




                                               Page 43 of 107
Parent Training Programs:
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/envrnmnt/famncomm/pa1lk21.htm

Training Parents for Leadership accessed 05.15.09 and located at
http://www.ed.gov/admins/comm/parents/parentinvolve/report_pg20.html

Q    What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include specific information on the discretionary activities the
LEA plans to conduct. The response should include the following specific information:
• Content of the session including the following:
         o Involve parents in the development of staff training,
         o Literacy training,
         o Pay reasonable and necessary expenses to conduct parental involvement
             activities ,
         o Train parents to help other parents,
         o Adopt and implement model parental involvement programs,
         o Organize a LEA PAC, and
         o Develop roles for community organizations and/or business in parental
             involvement activities;
• Type of activity;
• Specific correlation to student achievement; and
• Timeline.

Q    Sample Response

 Discretionary Activity              Type of Activity                Correlation          Timeline
                                                                     to Student
                                                                    Achievement
Pay reasonable and         Provide daycare services for parent      Provide              Monthly
necessary expenses to      nights                                   information to
conduct activities                                                  parents
Establish LEA Parent       The LEA will create a DPAC composed      Involve parents      Established
Advisory Council           of members of all Title I schools. The   in their child’s     by
                           committee will be composed of a          education            September;
                           representative sample of parents                              meets
                           including parents of ELL and ESE                              quarterly
                           students
Train parents as leaders   Provide face-to-face training sessions   Improve the          Quarterly
                           with parents who serve as members of     ability of parents
                           the SAC to become help them become       to participation
                           effective parent leaders                 in school and
                                                                    LEA decision
                                                                    making
                                                                    activities.




                                        Page 44 of 107
Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation needed to demonstrate compliance will vary depending on the type of
services planned but may include the following types of items:
• Purchase orders;
• Meeting minutes, sign-in sheets and related documents;
• Staff development calendars;
• Training evaluations; and
• Sample products and publications.




    Evaluation of the 2009-2010 LEA Parental Involvement Policy/Plan
The format for the guidance on the evaluation only includes information that is different
from the guidance provided in the development of the policy/plan. Information will be
organized around the guiding questions in areas for which the questions are new;
otherwise, the reader will be referred back to the previous section. Guidance for all
questions will include a description of the information to include in a complete response
as well as a sample response.


Q   Why is this concept important for Florida?

LEAs are required to evaluate the effectiveness of the PIPs described in Section 1118
including the school-level policies/plans described in Section 1118(b), and to revise as
necessary, to meet the needs of the parents of participating children. Further, an LEA is
responsible for ensuring that each Title I school’s policy meets the changing needs of
the local community. An LEA is required to include the information and/or results of
school level actions and activities in the evaluation of the LEA parental involvement
policy to accurately inform the LEA, schools and parents of the effectiveness of the
parental involvement program within the LEA.

Schools that are adapting LEA-level PIPs, which must be reviewed annually, should
revise and update as the LEA does in order to reflect the changing needs of the parents
and school. Each school should involve parents of participating children, in an
organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of
programs under ESEA, including the PIP.

Q   What does the law require?

Section 1118(a)(2)(E) requires LEAs to conduct an evaluation of the LEA policy and to revise as
necessary the policies in this section. Section 1118(b)(1) requires a periodic updates to the school-level
parent involvement policy, if necessary. Section 1118(c)(3) requires parents to be involved in the
planning, review, and improvement of the school level parent involvement policies. Section 1116 also


                                              Page 45 of 107
requires the LEA to review the effectiveness of the actions and activities of the schools with respect to
parent involvement.

a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-
        (2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall
        develop jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written
        parent involvement policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's
        plan developed under section 1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement,
        and describe how the agency will —
                (A) involve parents in the joint development of the plan under section 1112, and the
                process of school review and improvement under section 1116;
                (E) conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and
                effectiveness of the parental involvement policy in improving the academic quality of the
                schools served under this part, including identifying barriers to greater participation by
                parents in activities authorized by this section (with particular attention to parents who are
                economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited
                literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background), and use the findings of such
                evaluation to design strategies for more effective parental involvement, and to revise, if
                necessary, the parental involvement policies described in this section;


(b) SCHOOL PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT POLICY-
        (1) IN GENERAL- Each school served under this part shall jointly develop with, and distribute to,
        parents of participating children a written parental involvement policy, agreed on by such parents,
        that shall describe the means for carrying out the requirements of subsections (c) through (f).
        Parents shall be notified of the policy in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent
        practicable, provided in a language the parents can understand. Such policy shall be made
        available to the local community and updated periodically to meet the changing needs of parents
        and the school.


(c) POLICY INVOLVEMENT- Each school served under this part shall —
        (1) convene an annual meeting, at a convenient time, to which all parents of participating children
        shall be invited and encouraged to attend, to inform parents of their school's participation under
        this part and to explain the requirements of this part, and the right of the parents to be involved;
        (2) offer a flexible number of meetings, such as meetings in the morning or evening, and may
        provide, with funds provided under this part, transportation, child care, or home visits, as such
        services relate to parental involvement;
        (3) involve parents, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and
        improvement of programs under this part, including the planning, review, and improvement of the
        school parental involvement policy and the joint development of the schoolwide program plan
        under section 1114(b)(2), except that if a school has in place a process for involving parents in
        the joint planning and design of the school's programs, the school may use that process, if such
        process includes an adequate representation of parents of participating children;


Section 1116 (a) LOCAL REVIEW-
        (1) IN GENERAL- Each local educational agency receiving funds under this part shall —
                (D) review the effectiveness of the actions and activities the schools are carrying out
                under this part with respect to parental involvement, professional development, and other
                activities assisted under this part.




                                              Page 46 of 107
    3. Provide a summary of the activities provided that were designed to build
       the capacity of parents to help their children [Section 1118 (e)(1-2)].

Q   Where can more information be found?

Coleman, M. (1991) Planning for Parent Participation in Schools for Young Children
ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education Urbana IL. located
at: http://www.ericdigests.org/1992-4/parent.htm.

Involving Parents to Impact Student Achievement (2007), National Center for Family
Literacy accessed 05.19.09 and located at:
http://literacynetwork.verizon.org/fileadmin/popups/parent_involvement.html. This article
contains an online survey (or paper version) which may be used to access the parent-
friendly atmosphere of schools.

O’Brien T and Boland, T (2005) NCLB: Title I, Part A, Section 1118: Parental
Involvement: Policy Compliance and Evaluation Guidance, Center for Education Policy
Analysis accessed on 05.15.09 and located at:
http://www.cde.state.co.us/FedPrograms/nclb/downloads/pi_compAndEvalGd.pdf

Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include the following information:
• Content of the Session from the list of required areas:
      o The State’s academic content standards and State student academic
           achievement standards,
      o State and local academic assessments, including alternative assessments,
      o The parental involvement requirements of Section 1118, and
      o How to monitor their child’s progress and work with educators to improve the
           achievement of their child [Section 1118(e)(1), ESEA];
• Type of Activity:
      o Face-to-face meeting/training session,
      o Individual conferences,
      o Online meeting,
      o Hard copy dissemination of material,
      o Web-based dissemination of material, or
      o Other: Describe;
• Number of Activities provided by the LEA;
• Number of LEA-wide activities;
• Schools Participating (may be school specific or school groups); and
• Description of how the activity is Correlated to Student Achievement (see pages ## for
  more information on the correlation to student achievement).

                                      Page 47 of 107
Q    Sample Response

Content of the         Type of Activity              Number of             Schools     Correlation to
  Session                                            LEA-Wide            Participating   Student
                                                     Activities                        Achievement
State’s academic      Distribution of material    One booklet for        All Title I   Provide
standards                                         each grade level       schools       information to
                                                  was provided for all                 parents on the
                                                  parents. Schools                     content of
                                                  distributed the                      standards.
                                                  booklets with the
                                                  “Beginning of
                                                  School” packet
State and local       Provide “parental           Available to all       All Title I   Provide
assessments           portal” so parents can      parents; accessed      schools       information to
                      access information on       by 89% of parents.                   parents on the
                      their child’s progress,                                          progress of their
                      grades, attendance                                               child.
State and local       Distribute hard copy        One booklet for        All Title I   Provide
assessments           documents related to        each grade level       schools       information to
                      FCAT                        was provided for all                 parents on the
                                                  parents. Schools                     state
                                                  distributed the                      assessments.
                                                  booklets in January
                                                  FCAT Nights.
Parent Notification   District-wide NCLB          10 monthly issues      All Title I   Increase
requirements          Newsletter                  posted on website;     schools       communication
                                                  parents notified by                  with parents;
                                                  schools of                           provide updates
                                                  availability                         to parents on
                                                                                       school functions,
                                                                                       parent
                                                                                       notifications, etc.
                                                                                       in multiple
                                                                                       languages


Q    How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
• Agendas, sign-in sheets and handouts for meetings/training/workshops for parents;
• Evidence of conferences with parents related to student achievement;
• Copies of reports and/or information related to assessments;
• Parental involvement calendars;
• Training evaluations; and
• Sample products and publications: e.g. brochures, booklets, PowerPoint
  presentations and/or handouts.




                                                 Page 48 of 107
  2. Provide a summary of the professional development activities provided to
     educate staff on the value and utility of contributions of parents; how to
     reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners;
     the implementation and coordination of parent programs; and how to build
     ties between parents and the school [Section 1118 (e)(3)].


Q   Where can more information be found?

See pages 45 through 47 of this guidance for more information on the evaluation of
parental involvement policies.

Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include the following information:
• Content of the session:
         o The value and utility of the contributions of parents,
         o How to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents,
         o Implementation and coordination of the LEAs and/or schools parental
             involvement; policy/plan and the parent programs with the LEA, and
         o How to build ties between parents and the school [Section 1118(e)(3) and
             (6), ESEA];
• Type of activity:
         o Face-to-face meeting/training session,
         o Individual conferences,
         o Online meeting,
         o Hard copy dissemination of material,
         o Web-based dissemination of material, or
         o Other: Describe;
• Number of activities provided by the LEA;
• Number of total participants;
• Schools participating (individual school names or groups of schools); and
• Description of how the activity is correlated to student achievement

Q   Sample Response

 Content of     Type of      Number    Number of     Schools      Correlation
the Session     Activity     of LEA-     Total     Participating  to Student
                               Wide   Participants               Achievement
                             Sessions
Communicating   Train-the-   1         16               All Title I   Provide training
and working     Trainer                                 schools       modules for
with Parents                                                          schools


                                       Page 49 of 107
Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
1. Agendas, sign-in sheets and handouts for meetings/training/workshops for staff
   which provided information on parental involvement;
2. Evidence of conferences with staff on the implementation of parental involvement
   activities. The conferences/meeting may be between the teacher and the parent
   liaison/educator or the school leaders;
3. Staff development calendars;
4. Training evaluations;
5. Inservice point records;
6. Study group agendas, books, handouts, sign-in sheets; and
7. Sample products and publications: e.g. PowerPoint presentations and/or handouts.

    3. Provide a summary of the parental involvement activities provided for
       private schools implementing a Title I program [Section 1120(a)(1)]?

Q   Why is this question important for Florida?

Under the equitable participation provisions of Title I, Part A, an LEA must provide
eligible children enrolled in private elementary and secondary schools, on an equitable
basis, services and benefits under Title I, Part A, including parental involvement
services and activities, that are comparable to the services and benefits provided to
their public school counterparts. The LEA must provide parental involvement activities
designed to meet the needs of the parents of participating children. The activities must
be designed in consultation with private school officials. The LEA may not just invite
parents to participate in activities designed for the families of public school children.

Parent or family involvement is more than just surveying parents or bringing them
together for a meeting to listen; they also must be given opportunities for meaningful
participation and active involvement. Parental involvement activities must be designed
and implemented to meet the needs of the parents of Title I participants; not the needs
of either the LEA or the private school. Parents of Title I participants should receive
training and materials to help them work with their children to improve their children’s
achievement. It is important that the LEA officials, along with the private school officials,
discuss with the parents of private school participants what training and materials would
help them support their children’s academic achievement. Parents should be asked
what they want and need to help their children achieve. LEAs may develop a written
agreement between the LEA and parents of private school participants regarding the
responsibilities of the LEA and parents in the Title I program, parent meetings,
communication between the Title I teachers and parents on students’ academic
progress, parent-teacher conferences, and parent education similar to a school-parent
compact [Section 200.65(a)(2) of the Title I Regulations and Section 1120, ESEA].




                                        Page 50 of 107
A meeting with parents early in the school year is a traditional way for the parents to
become acquainted with the Title I program offered at the private school. Parent
meetings also should be scheduled throughout the year. When hosting a Title I meeting,
the invitation should convey the purpose and importance of the meeting. A flexible
number of meetings at a time and place that is convenient to the parents should be
offered. Equally important is to advertise the meeting in a format and, to the extent
practicable, in a language the parents can understand.

Activities for parents of Title I children attending private schools are an important part of
the Title I program and should give parents the tools to support their child’s learning
activities. Ideally, the Title I program should be seen by parents as an integral part of
their child’s education, not as only an “add on” to the regular classroom.

Q   What does the law require?

SEC. 1120 (a)(1). PARTICIPATION OF CHILDREN ENROLLED IN PRIVATE SCHOOLS.
(a) GENERAL REQUIREMENT-
       (1) IN GENERAL- To the extent consistent with the number of eligible children identified under
       section 1115(b) in the school LEA served by a local educational agency who are enrolled in
       private elementary schools and secondary schools, a local educational agency shall, after timely
       and meaningful consultation with appropriate private school officials, provide such children, on an
       equitable basis, special educational services or other benefits under this part (such as dual
       enrollment, educational radio and television, computer equipment and materials, other
       technology, and mobile educational services and equipment) that address their needs, and shall
       ensure that teachers and families of the children participate, on an equitable basis, in services
       and activities developed pursuant to sections 1118 and 1119.


Q   Where can more information be found?

Ensuring Equitable Services to Private School Children: A Title I Resource Tool Kit,
http://www.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/ps/titleitoolkit.pdf.

Ferguson, C. (2009). A Toolkit for Title I Parental Involvement. Austin, TX: SEDL.
Accessed on 04.15.09 and located at: http://www.sedl.org/connections/toolkit/toolkit-
titleI-parent-inv.pdf.

Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response includes the following information:
• Name of the activity;
• Type of Activity such as:
      o Face-to-face meeting/training session,
      o Individual conferences,
      o Online meetings,
      o Hard copy dissemination of material,
      o Web-based dissemination of material, or
      o Other: Describe;


                                             Page 51 of 107
      • Number of total participants;
      • Name of private schools participating; and
      • Description of how the activity is correlated to student achievement (see pages ## for
        more information on the correlation to student achievement).
      Q   Sample Response


Name of the Type of Activity Number of Schools Participating Correlation to Student
  Activity                   Participants                        Achievement
Families Building Face-to-face meeting   36         Sunshine Christian School   Parents will be able to
Better Readers                                      Sunnydale Academy           support their child’s reading.


      Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

      Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
      • Copies of printed materials, web-based resources, student handbooks and
        newsletters provided to assist parents of participating private school students in
        understanding the Title I program;
      • Agendas, sign-in sheets, and handouts for meetings/training/workshops for parents
        of participating private school students which provided information on how parents
        can help their children as identified of part of the consultation process with the
        private schools;
      • Evidence of the consultation process when the needs of the parents are discussed
        and plans developed; and
      • Evidence of phone or face-to-face contact between the private school and the LEA
        concerning the development or implementation of the parental involvement activities
        for the parents of participating private school students.




          4. Describe the identified barriers which hindered participation by parents in
             parental involvement activities and the steps the LEA will take to overcome
             the identified barriers and design more effective parental involvement
             policies (with particular attention to parents who are economically
             disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited
             literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background) [Section
             1118(a)(E)].

      Q   Why is this question important for Florida?

      When evaluating the effectiveness of the PIP and parental involvement activities, the
      LEA and school, with input from parents, should assess the current status and identify



                                              Page 52 of 107
any barriers to greater parent participation and involvement. Some questions which may
help identify areas of concern are listed below:
• What time of day seems to have the greatest participation? Are meetings offered at
   a variety of times?
• Do teachers routinely communicate with parents (formally and informally) about the
   academic progress of their children?
• How are parents and the community involved in activities that support student
   learning?
• Are health and human services personnel and/or agencies available to support
   students and their families?
• Are translators and written communications available for families who speak
   languages other than English?
• Does the school or LEA offer adult education programs?
• Does the school partner with local businesses to enhance its educational program?
• What types of programs have the highest number of parents participating?
• Are parents of students from all subgroups participating in activities? If not, which
   groups have the lowest participation?
• Why are some parents not participating in activities?
• Do mothers/grandmothers or fathers/grandfathers participate more often? How can
   the other group be encouraged to participate?
• Are there ways for parents to participate without physically coming to the school?
• Are parent leaders involved in school activities and encouraging other parents?

Many parents face obstacles in becoming involved with their child’s school. In
developing parental involvement programs, schools, parent and community leaders
need to take these barriers into consideration:
• Differing ideas among parents and teachers on what constitutes involvement;
• A less than welcoming atmosphere toward parents and other visitors in schools and
   classrooms;
• Negative or neutral communication from schools;
• Insufficient training for teachers on how to reach out to both mothers and fathers;
• Lack of parental education and parenting skills;
• Time and job pressures; and
• Language barriers.

When identifying barriers, LEAs and schools should keep in mind the literacy levels of
the parents. Section 9101(20) defines family literacy services as services provided to
participants on a voluntary basis that are of sufficient intensity in terms of hours, and of
sufficient duration, to make sustainable changes in a family, and that integrate all of the
following activities:
A. Interactive literacy activities between parents and their children.
B. Training for parents regarding how to be the primary teacher for their children and
    full partners in the education of their children.
C. Parent literacy training that leads to economic self-sufficiency.
D. An age-appropriate education to prepare children for success in school and life
    experiences.

                                       Page 53 of 107
Effective program evaluations should do more than collect and analyze data. Program
evaluations should lead to improvements in the design and implementation of the
parental involvement program and policy/plan. The evaluation provides valuable
information about how the program is affecting participants, in this case, parents,
children, school personnel and the community. An evaluation is not conducted merely to
prove what was done or if it is working, but it should also lead to ways to make the
program/policy work better for all stakeholders.

Q   What does the law require?

SEC. 1118. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT.
(a) LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY POLICY-
       (2) WRITTEN POLICY- Each local educational agency that receives funds under this part shall
       develop jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written
       parent involvement policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local educational agency's
       plan developed under section 1112, establish the agency's expectations for parent involvement,
       and describe how the agency will —
                (E) conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content and
               effectiveness of the parental involvement policy in improving the academic quality of the
               schools served under this part, including identifying barriers to greater participation by
               parents in activities authorized by this section (with particular attention to parents who are
               economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited
               literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background), and use the findings of such
               evaluation to design strategies for more effective parental involvement, and to revise, if
               necessary, the parental involvement policies described in this section

Q   Where can more information be found?

Barriers to Parent Involvement: Roadblocks and Detours. National PTA/Building
Successful Partnerships located at:
http://www.njpirc.org/documents/resourcesEducatorsParentInvolvement/Roadblocks%2
0and%20Detours.pdf

Perceived Barriers to Parent Involvement in School Programs( 1998) National Center
for Educational Statistics. located at:
http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/frss/publications/98032/index.asp?sectionid=7.

Wherry, J.H. (2009). The Barriers to Parental Involvement—And What Can be Done: A
Research Analysis. The Parent Institute located at http://www.parent-
institute.com/articles/obstacles.php.

Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response for this item should include the following information:
• Process the LEA used to identify the barriers;
• Summary of significant findings;
• Specific barriers identified;


                                              Page 54 of 107
• How the results of the evaluation will be used to revise the plan for the coming year;
• Specific examples of areas that will be revised; and
• Description of the data used to make the determination that changes were needed.

Q   Sample Response

The District-PAC met quarterly for input into the development, implementation, and
evaluation of PIPs and activities. The PAC met in March to review the existing policy
and practices and revise the PIP as needed. The Title I Coordinator gathered and
disseminated the following information:
• Current parental involvement policy;
• Data on parent participation; and
• Parent survey result.

The following common areas of concern were identified based on the data:
• Presentations conducted at 6:00 pm had greater participation than those beginning
   at 4:00 pm. If a meal was served, there was even greater participation;
• 80% of parents work between 7:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.;
• 15% of the surveys indicate that parents did not think school officials needed them;
• 45% of parents reported they were unable to come to school due to work schedules;
• 80% of students live in a home with a single parent; and
• 40% of parents speak a language other than English.

Based on the analysis if the surveys, participation data, and school demographics the
LEA determined that the major barriers to greater parent participation could be
summarized into four major areas outlined below:
• Parents lack of time for involvement;
• Parents do not know how to help their child;
• Parents do not feel welcomed at school; and
• Language barriers limit parents ability to get involved.

The LEA will revise the PIP for the coming school year to address the barriers.
Specifically, the LEA will take the following steps:

• Ensure that parental involvement activities are offered at multiple times (for example,
  conducting the same session in the morning and in the evening, offering sessions for
  mother and fathers, and providing hard copy information for those parents who are
  unable to attend);
• Collaborate with the Parent Information Resource Center (PIRC) to conduct Family
  Friendly evaluations and training with staff;
• Ensure that each Title I school has sufficient staff available to provide translation
  services to ensure that parents who speak Spanish or Haitian Creole can participate
  fully in parental involvement activities. In addition, the LEA will contract with an outside
  contractor to provide services for language other than Spanish or Haitian Creole as
  needed.


                                        Page 55 of 107
Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
• Survey results, climate surveys, and interview with parents;
• Analysis of participation data comparing times of meetings, participation and
  subgroups represented;
• Evidence of phone or face-to-face contact between parents and the school concerning
  participation in parental involvement activities;
• Agendas, sign-in sheets, minutes, and handouts for meetings with the parents on the
  evaluation/review of the parental involvement program;
• Comparison with the prior year PIP; and
• Revisions to the PIP.




    5. Describe how the results of the evaluation of the parental involvement
       policy/plan will be shared with parents.

Q   Where can more information be found?

See 45 through 47of this guidance for more information on the evaluation of parental
involvement policies.

Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response for this item should include the specific method the LEA will use to
inform parents of the results of the evaluation. The response should include the
following information:
• Method for disseminating the results;
• Method the LEA will use to notify parents of the availability of the evaluation, if not
  directly disseminated;
• Languages the evaluation will be available;
• The specific web address, if the evaluation will be posted on the LEA’s website; and
• Description of the methods the LEA will use to ensure that schools provide the
  information to parents.

Q   Sample Response

The results of the evaluation of the PIP and activities will be shared with parents by
posting the results on the LEAs website. The availability of the results will be publicized
by the schools through the monthly newsletters. The Title I office will provide specific
information for schools to include in the newsletters and will monitor schools to ensure



                                       Page 56 of 107
that appropriate information is shared with parents. The evaluation will be available in
English, Spanish, and Haitian Creole.

Q   How can the LEA document compliance?

The LEA may document compliance by maintaining evidence of distribution through
flyers, newsletters, or notices. Documentation should include the following:
• Copy of the materials;
• Date of distribution; and
• Method of distribution (such as backpack, US mail).

If the LEA uses an automated telephone system, a copy of the message, date of calls,
and evidence of contact should be maintained.




    6. Describe the parental involvement activity/strategy the LEA considers the
       most effective. This information may be shared with other LEAs as a best
       practice.

Q   Why is this question important for Florida?

As part of the annual progress review of each LEA, FLDOE must determine if LEAs are
carrying out the responsibilities for parental involvement [Section 1116(c)(1)(A), ESEA.]
FLDOE accomplishes this task through two methods, annual monitoring of LEAs; and
review of the LEA evaluations of the PIPs. FLDOE will publicize and disseminate the
results of this review as part of the evaluation of the Title I, Part A program [Section
1116(c)(1)(B), ESEA.]. LEA PIPs will also be available on the Title I website located at:
http://www.fldoe.org/flbpso/pi.asp.

Q   What does the law require?

Section 1111 (d)
(d) PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT- Each State plan shall describe how the State educational agency will
support the collection and dissemination to local educational agencies and schools of effective parental
involvement practices. Such practices shall—
        (1) be based on the most current research that meets the highest professional and technical
        standards, on effective parental involvement that fosters achievement to high standards for all
        children; and
        (2) be geared toward lowering barriers to greater participation by parents in school planning,
        review, and improvement experienced.


Q   Where can more information be found?



                                             Page 57 of 107
The Bureau of Student Assistance posts information about parental involvement
programs and practices on the website located at: http://www.fldoe.org/flbpso/pi.asp

The Bureau of Family and Community Outreach provides a wealth of information on
parental involvement programs and best practices at:
http://www.fldoe.org/family/faminov.asp.

The Florida PTA recognizes the winning programs at a luncheon during the annual
summer leadership conference. Over 1000 PTA members honor the ten regional
program winners and attend workshops featuring the exemplary programs. The booklet,
Sparkplugs is produced annually with a summary of model family involvement programs
from participating LEAs. More information is located at
http://www.fldoe.org/family/pdf/sparkplg.pdf

Q   What should be included in the response?

A complete response for this item should include a description of the specific program,
practices or activities the LEA implemented that the LEA believes were effective. The
LEA may provide as many or few “best practices” as desired. Responses should be
organized around the following heading:
• Effective communication;
• Building the capacity of schools;
• Building capacity for parents to help their children;
• Increasing parent participation;
• Professional development for staff;
• Maintaining data and ensuring accountability; or
• Other: Describe

Provide a description of how the activity is correlated to student achievement.

Q   Sample Response

Content/Purpose                                  Description of the Activity
Building parent’s        During the 2008-2009 school year, all first-grade teachers at ABC Elementary
capacity to help their   School received training from the local college to improve parental involvement.
children                 First-grade teachers, college trainers, and parents first met to discuss how the
                         school should and could involve parents. Then, all first-grade teachers met with
                         college trainers to discuss priorities, chief among them being how to get parents
                         to support learning at home and reinforce what students learn at school. Two of
                         the first-grade teachers, along with college staff, then offered parents a series of
                         five two-hour workshops on how to help children with reading and mathematics at
                         home. Parents learned, for example, how to use a list of common words to help
                         children make sentences, learn grammar, and sharpen their reading skills. They
                         also learned how to use a "number line" manipulative to help children practice
                         adding and subtracting. Each year, parents who have completed this training
                         help train the parents of new first-grade students.
Professional             During the 2008-2009, mentor parents who are trained at the LEA's Parent
development for staff    Resource Center spent 5,000 hours in the schools providing professional


                                              Page 58 of 107
Content/Purpose                                 Description of the Activity
                        development to school staff on parental involvement and home school
                        communication. Among other activities, mentor parents conducted four
                        workshops on obstacles to parental involvement in schools, including parents'
                        negative prior experiences with school that may discourage them from
                        participating, and teacher bias that may result from a parent's different socio-
                        economic status, race, gender, physical appearance, or language ability.
Building the capacity   The Sunshine County Public Schools' Mobile Parent Resource Center offers a
of schools to           model for making parent resource centers more accessible to rural parents. The
implement successful    mobile parent resource center is a 34-foot customized bus that serves parents of
parental involvement    students receiving Title I services and travels to four sites a day remaining at
programs                least two hours at each site. It houses two classrooms equipped with adjustable
                        tables, chairs, bulletin boards, chalkboards, televisions, a video-cassette
                        recorder, cassette players, and laptop computers. Instructional materials include
                        parenting videos and kits, books, newspapers, magazines, computer software,
                        models, and samples of instructional materials that parents can check out to use
                        with their children. Both reading and non-reading parents are trained onsite as
                        tutors to work with their children. Parents receive help in selecting appropriate
                        books to read with their children, and see videos of families reading and learning
                        together. The Parent Resource Center serves 12-18 parents at a time.




                                             Page 59 of 107
     2009-2010 School Parental Involvement Policy/Plan Guidance




Parental involvement Mission Statement (Optional)

Q   Where can more information be found?

• See page 15 and 16 for more information on developing a mission statement for
  parental involvement.

Q   What information should be included in this response?

The mission statement should meet the following criteria:
• Explain the purpose of the parental involvement program;
• Describe what will be done;
• Include beliefs or values;
• Be concise and free of jargon;
• Be written in parent friendly language; and
• Inspire stakeholders to be involved and supportive of the program

Q   Sample Response

The Sunshine Elementary School believes that positive parent/family involvement is
essential to student achievement and thus encourages such involvement in all school
activities.




1. Describe the specific steps the school will take to conduct an annual
   meeting designed to inform parents of participating children about the
   school’s Title I program, the nature of the Title I program (schoolwide or
   targeted assistance), Adequately Yearly Progress, school choice,
   supplemental education services, and the rights of parents. Include
   timeline, persons responsible, documentation to be maintained, and the
   steps to ensure that all parents are invited and encouraged to attend
   [Section 1118(c)(1)] .

            Activity/Task          Person      Timeline     Evaluations
                                 Responsible




                                    Page 60 of 107
Q Why is this question important for Florida?

Each school served under Title I, Part A must host a meeting for parents to explain what
the Title I program is and how parents can become involved in the Title I program. At
this meeting, the following issues must be addressed:
• Explain their school’s participation in Title I (whether they are schoolwide or targeted
    assistance).
• Explain the Title I requirements (schoolwide or targeted assistance, whichever is
    applicable);
• Explain what participation in Title I programs means, including:
            o A description and explanation of the school’s curriculum,
            o Information on the forms of academic assessment used to measure
               student progress, and
            o Information on the proficiency levels students are expected to meet;
• Explain the LEA PIP, school PIP, and school-parent compact;
• Explain the right of parents to become involved in the school’s programs and ways
    to do so;
• Explain the availability of the supplemental educational services and the opportunity
    to transfer to another school, if applicable; and
• Explain that parents have the right to request opportunities for regular meetings for
    parents to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions
    regarding the education of their children. The school must respond to any such
    suggestions as soon as practicably possible.

In order to keep parents informed, schools must invite parents of children participating
in Title I, Part A programs to this meeting and encourage them to attend. In a
schoolwide program, this means all parents should be invited. In a targeted assistance
program, just those parents of children participating in Title I should be invited.

Q What does the law require?

(c) POLICY INVOLVEMENT- Each school served under this part shall —
        (1) convene an annual meeting, at a convenient time, to which all parents of participating children
        shall be invited and encouraged to attend, to inform parents of their school's participation under
        this part and to explain the requirements of this part, and the right of the parents to be involved;

Q Where can more information be found?

The link below is a sample agenda that demonstrates how some schools increase
parent attendance by combining the meeting with a display of student work. Also
provided is a sample invitation which outlines the importance of the meeting and
parent’s involvement in their children’s education:

•   Sample Annual Parent Meeting Agenda:
    http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/title1/targeted/require/parent/agenda.pdf



                                              Page 61 of 107
•   Sample Invitation to Participate: Title I Parental Involvement and Annual Parent
    Meeting: http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/title1/targeted/require/parent/invite.pdf

A toolkit for Title I Parent Involvement, Southwest Educational Development Laboratory
(SEDL): http://www.sedl.org/connections/toolkit/toolkit-titleI-parent-inv.pdf

Q What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include information on specific steps and activities the school
will conduct to prepare for, advertise, and host the annual meeting for parents. The
response should include the following specific information:
• Identification of specific activities or tasks;
• Identification of the person(s) responsible for completing the task;
• Timeline; and
• Description of the method the school will use to document completion of the
    activity/task.

Q Sample response

            Activity/Task                    Person    Timeline                Evaluations
                                           Responsible
 Develop agenda, handouts, and/or          Assistant          August   Copies of agendas,
 presentation materials that address the   Principal                   PowerPoint presentation and
 required components                                                   handouts
 Develop and disseminate invitations       Parent Liaison     August   Flyer with date of
                                                                       dissemination
                                                                       posting on school Web site
 Advertise/publicize event                 Parent Liaison     August   Posting on school Web site
                                                                       announcement sent to WFLA
                                                                       111.8
 Develop sign-in sheets                    Parent Liaison     August   Sign-in sheets for meeting and
                                                                       individual classrooms
 Maintain documentation                    Assistant          August   Title I documentation box
                                           Principal and               housed in Assistant Principal’s
                                           Parent Liaison              office
                                                                       Documentation will be shared
                                                                       with LEA Title I office for
                                                                       monitoring purposes.

Q How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
• Sign-in sheets and agendas;
• Marketing materials, flyers, notices, newsletter announcements;
• Parent contact record;
• Presentation materials (handouts, PowerPoint presentations, etc.); and
• Evaluation of annual meeting.



                                             Page 62 of 107
2. Describe how the school will offer a flexible number of meetings, such as
   meetings in the morning or evening, and may provide with Title I funds,
   transportation, child care, or home visits, as such services related to parental
   involvement [Section 1118(c)(2)].

Q Why is this question important for Florida?

Schools implementing a Title I program must offer a flexible number of parental
involvement meetings at times that encourage as many parents as possible to attend.
Schools should give careful consideration to family schedules and outside commitments
when determining the days and times of meetings. Depending on the circumstances of
individual parents/families, any of the following times may work well for a
meeting/workshop:

    •   After school in the afternoon or evening;
    •   Before school in the morning (possibly combined with a breakfast);
    •   During the school day;
    •   During the day on a weekend; and
    •   During the day on a teacher inservice day.

Schools may want to consider varying the times of workshops/meetings to determine
which time works best and allows for greater participation by parents. This is particularly
helpful if the same workshop is offered at multiple times for different groups of parents.
On the other hand, if the school plans to have the same group of parents attend a series
of workshops on the same topic, the group may want to settle on a fixed time – for
example, the first Thursday of each month. Providing childcare and food may also
increase participation.

Q What does the law require?

Section 1118(c)(2):
(c) POLICY INVOLVEMENT- Each school served under this part shall —
        (2) offer a flexible number of meetings, such as meetings in the morning or evening, and may
        provide, with funds provided under this part, transportation, child care, or home visits, as such
        services relate to parental involvement;

Q Where can more information be found?

Overcoming Time and Resource Constraints:
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/FamInvolve/local2.html

Working Families Plan Ahead:
http://www.childcareaware.org/en/subscriptions/dailyparent/volume.php?id=10



                                              Page 63 of 107
Q What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include the following information:
• Description of the process the school will use to ensure that workshops/meetings are
   offered at a flexible times; and
• Specific examples of the flexible schedule offered to parents.

Q Sample response

The leadership and staff of Sunnydale Middle School have a strong belief in the
importance of parental involvement and therefore have put measures in place to offer
parent meetings on a flexible schedule. Our annual meeting for parents of participating
children will be offered three times during the third week of school—once during the
school day and twice in the evenings. Many of the parents are employed by the local
hospitals and work the 3:00-11:00p.m. shift; therefore, the school will schedule all
parent meetings twice (1:00 p.m. and again at 6:00 p.m.) with meals provided at both
times.

In addition, our parent center will offer its parenting classes at varying times to include
morning and evening sessions. The parent center will be open every school day from
8:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. for parents to pick up materials and/or meet with the parent
facilitator. On the first Thursday of every month, the center will be open until 8:00 p.m.
The center will also be open in the mornings on the first Saturday of each month. The
principal will work with the parent liaison to create a flexible schedule to ensure that the
center is open at times convenient for parents. The parent liaison will maintain records
of parent participation. The schedule may be modified as needed based on parents’
participation.

Q How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
• Parental involvement calendars;
• Sign-in sheets;
• Agendas with multiple times; and
• Marketing materials, flyers, notices, and newsletter announcements.




3. Describe how the school will involve parents in an organized, ongoing, and
   timely manner, in the planning, review, and improvement of Title I programs
   including involvement in the decisions regarding how funds for parental
   involvement will be used [Sections1118(c)(3), 1114(b)(2), and 1118(a)(2)(B)].




                                       Page 64 of 107
Q Where can more information be found?

See pages five through ten for more information on the involvement of parents in the
development, implementation, and evaluation of policies and plans including decisions
on how Title I funds are used.

Q Sample response

Sunnyside Elementary School believes in involving parents in all aspects of its Title I
programs. The SAC has the responsibility for developing, implementing, and evaluating
the various school level plans, including the SIP and PIP. More than 50 percent of the
members of the SAC are parent (non-employee) representatives. In addition, all parents
were given the opportunity to review the plan and offer their input prior to approval. For
the PIP, all parents were given surveys at the end of the school year seeking their input
on activities, training, and materials they needed to help their child. Results of parent
surveys are reviewed by the SAC to determine needed changes. During the SAC
meeting when the PIP and/or SIP are developed, the committee will decide, with the
input from parents how the parental involvement funds will be used.

Q How can the LEA document compliance?

The following types of documents may be used when documenting the involvement of
parents:
• Sign-in sheets for meetings which indicate the role of those attending;
• Agendas, handouts, and presentation materials; and
• Meeting minutes that clearly reflect the input of the parents.



3. Describe how the school will provide parents of participating children the
   following [Section 1118(c)(4)]:
• Timely information about the Title I programs [Section 1118(c)(4)(A)];
• Description and explanation of the curriculum at the school, the forms of
   academic assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency
   levels students are expected to meet [Section 1118(c)(4)(B)];
• If requested by parents, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate
   suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the
   education of their children[Section 1118(c)(4)(C)]; and
• Note: If the school-wide program plan under Section 1114 (b)(2) is not
   satisfactory to the parents of participating children, the school will also submit
   the parents’ comments on the plan that will be available to the local education
   agency [Section 1118(c)(5)].




                                      Page 65 of 107
Q Why is this question important for Florida?

Schools served under Title I, Part A must provide to parents of participating children, in
a timely manner, information about the programs funded by Title I, Part A. That
information must include—
    • Description and explanation of the school’s curriculum;
    • Information on the forms of academic assessment used to measure student
      progress;
    • Information on the proficiency levels students are expected to meet; and
    • Information on their child’s level of achievement on the State’s assessments in at
      least reading/language arts and mathematics [Section 1111(h)(6)(B)(i), ESEA].

Upon the request of parents, schools must provide opportunities for regular meetings for
parents to formulate suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions about
the education of their children. The school must respond to any such suggestions as
soon as practicably possible [Section 1118(c)(4), ESEA].

Q What does the law require?

(c) POLICY INVOLVEMENT- Each school served under this part shall —
 (4) provide parents of participating children -
         (A) timely information about programs under this part;
         (B) a description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of academic
         assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected
         to meet; and
         (C) if requested by parents, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions and to
         participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children, and respond to
         any such suggestions as soon as practicably possible;

Q Where can more information be found?

No Child Left Behind: A Toolkit for Teachers:
http://www.ed.gov/teachers/nclbguide/toolkit_pg8.html

Q What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include the following information:
• Process for providing information to parents;
• Dissemination methods;
• Timelines for specific parent notifications; and
• Description of how the school will monitor that the information was provided.

Q Sample response

At the annual meeting of parents in August, Sunshine High School will hold a general
meeting where information will be presented about the Title I programs, the curriculum,
and academic assessments. Parents will learn about the schoolwide program, how to


                                               Page 66 of 107
   schedule parent-teacher conferences, and opportunities for participation in decisions
   related to the education of their child. Parents will be given a copy of the parent
   handbook, which includes more detailed information on these topics and a copy of the
   PIP. Upon conclusion of the general meeting, parents will be invited to visit their child’s
   classrooms and meet staff. During the classroom visits, teachers will provide additional
   information on the subjects they teach, assessment plans, and how parents can help at
   home. The same information will be provided in an informational packet distributed the
   following day for all parents unable to attend. Teachers will maintain sign-in sheets and
   provide a copy to the assistant principal who will also maintain documentation on the
   dissemination of information, distribution methods, and timelines.

   Q How can the LEA document compliance?

   Documentation may include, but is not limited to the following types of items:
   • Sign-in sheets and agendas;
   • Marketing materials, flyers, notices, newsletter announcements;
   • Sample products/publications;
   • Presentation materials (handouts, PowerPoint presentations); and
   • Meeting evaluations.




5. Describe how the school will implement activities which will build the capacity
   for strong parent involvement, in order to ensure effective involvement of
   parents and to support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and
   the community to improve student academic achievement [Section 1118(e)].
   Describe the actions the school will take to provide materials and training to
   help parents work with their children to improve their children’s academic
   achievement [Section 1118(e)(2)].

       Content    Type of Activity     Person       Correlation   Timeline   Evaluation
                                     Responsible    to Student
                                                   Achievement




   Q Where can more information be found?

   See pages 27 through 33 for more information on the how LEAs and schools can build
   the capacity for strong parental involvement.




                                           Page 67 of 107
6. Describe the training for staff the school will provide to educate its teachers,
   pupil services personnel, principals, and other staff in how to reach out to,
   communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners, in the value and
   utility of contributions of parents, and in how to implement and coordinate
   parent programs and build ties between parents and schools [Section
   1118(e)(3)].

         Content of the     Person            Timeline       Correlation to   Evaluation
           Session        Responsible                          Student
                                                             Achievement




Q Where can more information be found?

See pages 34 through 37 for more information on the training provided to staff.




 7. Describe how the school will coordinate and integrate parental involvement
    programs and activities that teach parents how to help their children at
    home to the extent feasible and appropriate (including but not limited to
    other federal programs such as: Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading
    First, Even Start, Home Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the
    Parents as Teachers Program, public preschool, Title I, Part C, Title II, Title
    III, Title IV, and Title VI) [Section 1118(e)(4)].

          Program                             Coordination




Q Where can more information be found?

See pages 22 through 24 for more information on integration of programs.



8. Describe the other activities, such as parent resource centers, the school will
   conduct to encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the
   education of their children [Section 1118 (e)(4)].




                                        Page 68 of 107
Q Why is this question important for Florida?

Ideas and activities for encouraging and supporting parents to participate in their child’s
education are as varied and numerous as there are schools and parents. Schools may
consider the following ideas:
• Developing and staffing parent resource centers;
• Ensuring family-friendly schools;
• Encouraging teachers to help parents become involved in ways that don’t require the
   parent to come to the school;
• Creating and maintaining classroom or grade level website;
• Developing support groups for parents and families; and
• Providing parent leadership training sessions.

Q What does the law require?

Section 1118(e)(4)
(e) BUILDING CAPACITY FOR INVOLVEMENT- To ensure effective involvement of parents and to
support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to improve student
academic achievement, each school and local educational agency assisted under this part —
        (4) shall, to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate and integrate parent involvement
        programs and activities with Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, the Home
        Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program, and public
        preschool and other programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent resource centers, that
        encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education of their children;

Q Where can more information be found?

Checklist for Setting Up a School or Community-Based Parent Center:
http://www.buildingchoice.org/cs/bc/download/bc_res/1075/PChecklist_for_Setting_Up_
a_School_Based_Parent_Center-Rev_5-1.doc?x-r=pcfile_d

School Parent Center: A tool to open school doors for increased parental involvement.
Center for Effective Parenting: http://www.parenting-
ed.org/School%20Parent%20Center%20-%20REVISED.pdf

Q What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include a description on the process the school will use to
encourage and support parents in participating in the education of their children.
Information should be specific and provide the following:
• Identification of the type of activity:
• Specific steps necessary to implement this activity;
• Person(s) responsible;
• Timeline; and
• Method to determine the success and document completion.



                                             Page 69 of 107
Q Sample response

 Activity      Specific steps          Person             Timeline             Evaluation
                                     Responsible
Expand and    Expand the             Parent Liaison    August to May   Review of inventory
enhance the   resources available
parent        for parents
information
centers       Expand the hours of                                      Documentation of hours and
              operation to include                                     parent use will be maintained.
              weekends and                                             The hours will be announced
              evenings                                                 in the newsletter and through
                                                                       the automated phone system.
Create a      Contact the PIRC       Assistant         September       Pre-Post evaluation
family-       for assistance in      Principal and                     Activity logs
friendly      making                 PIRC                              Staff development log (if
school        improvement            representatives                   identified as a need)

              Research the family
              friendly school
              correlates
              Conduct evaluation
              of current status of
              school

Q How can the LEA document compliance?

Documentation will vary depending on the additional activities implemented but may
include the following types of documents:
• Sign-in sheets;
• Parent center attendance logs;
• Flyers, notices, and announcements; and
• Collaborative efforts with partners.



9. Describe how the LEA will provide full opportunities for participation in
   parental involvement activities for all parents (including parents of children
   with limited English proficiency, disabilities, and migratory children). Include
   how the LEA plans to share information related to school and parent
   programs, meetings, school reports, and other activities in an understandable
   and uniform format and to the extent practical, in a language parents can
   understand [Section 1118(e)(5) and 1118(f)].

Q Where can more information be found?

See pages 37 through 40 for more information on building the capacity to help their
children.



                                            Page 70 of 107
Discretionary School Parental Involvement Policy Components

   Check if the school does not plan to implement the discretionary parental
involvement activities.

Check all activities the school plans to implement:

  Involving parents in the development of training for teachers, principals, and
other educators to improve the effectiveness of that training [Section 1118(e)(6)]
  Providing necessary literacy training for parents from Title I, Part A funds, if the
school LEA has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for
that training [Section 1118(e)(7)]
  Paying reasonable and necessary expenses associated with parental
involvement activities, including transportation and child care costs, to enable
parents to participate in school-related meetings and training sessions [Section
1118(e)(8)]
  Training parents to enhance the involvement of other parents [Section
1118(e)(9)]
  Maximizing parental involvement and participation in their children’s education
by arranging school meetings at a variety of times, or conducting in-home
conferences between teachers or other educators, who work directly with
participating children, with parents who are unable to attend those conferences at
school [Section 1118(e)(10)]
  Adopting and implementing model approaches to improving parental
involvement [Section 1118(e)(11)]
  Establishing a LEA wide parent advisory council to provide advice on all
matters related to parental involvement in Title I, Part A programs [Section
1118(e)(12)]
  Developing appropriate roles for community-based organizations and
businesses, including faith-based organizations, in parental involvement
activities [Section 1118(e)(13)]
  Providing other reasonable support for parental involvement activities under
section 1118 as parents may request [Section 1118(e)(14)]

10. Describe how the discretionary activities checked above will be implemented.


Q Where can more information be found?

See pages 42 through 45 for more information on the discretionary parental involvement
activities.



                                    Page 71 of 107
School-Parent Compact
As a component of the school-level parental involvement policy/plan, each school shall
jointly develop, with parents for all children served under this part, a school-parent
compact that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the
responsibility for improved student academic achievement Section 1118(d)].

Provide the LEA an electronic copy of the School-Parent Compact and evidence of
parent input in the review and development.

Q Why is this question important for Florida?

Each school implementing a Title I program must jointly develop, with the parents of
children served under Title I, Part A, a school-parent compact as a component of its
written parental involvement policy. A school-parent compact is a written agreement
that identifies the activities that the parents, the entire school staff, and the students will
undertake to share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement. In
addition, the compact outlines the activities that the parents, school staff, and students
will undertake to build and develop a partnership to help the children achieve to the
State’s high academic standards [Section 1118(d)], ESEA].

The school-parent compact must include the following information:
• Describe the school’s responsibility to provide high-quality curriculum and instruction
   in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables children to meet the
   State’s student academic achievement standards;
• Identify ways in which parents will be responsible for supporting their children’s
   learning (for example, monitoring attendance, homework completion, or television
   watching; volunteering in their child’s classroom; and participating as appropriate in
   decisions relating to the education of their children and positive use of extracurricular
   time); and
• Highlight the importance of communication between teachers and parents on an
   ongoing basis through, at a minimum—
          o Parent-teacher conferences in elementary schools, at least annually,
              during which the compact will be discussed as it relates to the individual
              child’s achievement;
          o Frequent reports to parents on their child’s progress; and
          o Reasonable access to staff, opportunities to volunteer and participate in
              their child’s class, and observation of classroom activities [Section
              1118(d), ESEA].




                                         Page 72 of 107
Q What does the law require?

Section 1118(d):
(d) SHARED RESPONSIBILITIES FOR HIGH STUDENT ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT- As a component
of the school-level parental involvement policy developed under subsection (b), each school served under
this part shall jointly develop with parents for all children served under this part a school-parent compact
that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved
student academic achievement and the means by which the school and parents will build and develop a
partnership to help children achieve the State's high standards. Such compact shall —
         (1) describe the school's responsibility to provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a
         supportive and effective learning environment that enables the children served under this part to
         meet the State's student academic achievement standards, and the ways in which each parent
         will be responsible for supporting their children's learning, such as monitoring attendance,
         homework completion, and television watching; volunteering in their child's classroom; and
         participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children and positive
         use of extracurricular time; and
         (2) address the importance of communication between teachers and parents on an ongoing basis
         through, at a minimum —
                   (A) parent-teacher conferences in elementary schools, at least annually, during which the
                   compact shall be discussed as the compact relates to the individual child's achievement;
                   (B) frequent reports to parents on their children's progress; and
                   (C) reasonable access to staff, opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child's
                   class, and observation of classroom activities.

Q Where can more information be found?

School-Parent Compact: Action Guide for Parent and Community Leaders:
http://www.publiceducation.org/pdf/NCLB/Action_Briefs/SchoolParent_Compact.pdf

A Compact for Learning: An Action Handbook for Family-School-Community
Partnerships: http://www.ed.gov/pubs/Compact/index.html

Q What should be included in the response?

The school should provide the LEA with a copy of the school-parent compact and
evidence of the input of parents in the development. The compact should:
• Contain specific information and strategies;
• Be individualized per school based on the characteristics and needs of the school,
   parents and/or students;
• Be written in parent friendly language; and
• Be available in multiple languages if needed.

It is not necessary for the compact to be signed by parents; however, the LEA and
school must ensure that parents are provided a copy of the compact and understand
the contents.



Q Sample response


                                               Page 73 of 107
See Appendix E for a sample school-parent compact.
Q How can the LEA document compliance?

Schools must maintain copies of the school-parent compact, evidence of the input of
parents in the development, evidence of the method and timeline for dissemination to
parents, and evidence of implementation of the elements described in the compact. At
the elementary level, schools must maintain evidence that the school-parent compact
was discussed with parents.

Evaluation of the 2009-2010 School Parental involvement Policy/Plan




 1. Provide a summary of activities which were designed to build the capacity
    of parents to help their children [Section 1118 (e)(1-2)]. Include participation
    data on the Title I annual meeting.

   Content of the   Type of Activity    Number of       Total Number of   Correlation to
     Session                            activities        Participants      student
                                                                          achievement




Q Where can more information be found?

See pages 45 through 48 for more information on the summary and types of activities.

Q What should be included in the response?

A complete response should include information arranged based on the required
content:
• Content of the session:
         o Annual meeting, and
         o Building parents capacity;
• Type of activity:
         o Face-to-face meeting/training session,
         o Individual conference,
         o Online meeting,
         o Hard copy dissemination of material,
         o Web-based dissemination of material, or
         o Other: Describe;
• Number of sessions;
• Number of participants; and


                                       Page 74 of 107
•    Description of how the activity is correlated to student achievement.




    3. Provide a summary of the professional development activities provided by
       the school to educate staff on the value and utility of contributions of
       parents; how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as
       equal partners; the implementation and coordination of parent programs;
       and how to build ties between parents and the school [Section 1118 (e)(3)].
        Content of the      Number of sessions       Number of Total    Correlation to
          Session                                     Participants        Student
                                                                        Achievement




Q Where can more information be found?

See pages 34 through 37 on the professional development activities to educate staff
regarding parental involvement.

Q What should be included in the response?

A complete response will include the following information:
• Content of the session:
         o The value and utility of the contributions of parents,
         o How to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents,
         o Implementation and coordination of the LEAs and/or schools parental
             involvement; policy/plan and the parent programs with the LEA, and
         o How to build ties between parents and the school [Section 1118(e)(3) and
             (6), ESEA];
• Type of activity:
         o Face-to-face meeting/training session,
         o Individual conference,
         o Online meeting,
         o Hard copy dissemination of material,
         o Web-based dissemination of material, or
         o Other: Describe;
• Number of activities provided by the LEA;
• Number of total participants;
• Schools participating (individual school names or groups of schools); and
• Description of how the activity is correlated to student achievement




                                        Page 75 of 107
 4. Describe the barriers identified which hindered participation by parents in
    parent involvement activities and the steps the school will take to overcome
    the identified barriers (with particular attention to parents who are
    economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency,
    have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background)
    [Section 1118(a)(E)].

    Barrier (including the specific subgroup)             Steps the School will take to Overcome




Q Where can more information be found?

See pages 52 through 56 for more information on the identification of barriers to greater
participation by parents.




4. Describe the parental involvement activity/strategy the school considers the
   most effective. This information may be shared with other LEAs and schools
   as a best practice.

Q Where can more information be found?

See pages 57 through 59 for more information on the identification of best practices.




                                         Page 76 of 107
                                   Appendices

Appendix A: LEA Parental involvement Template

Appendix B: Review Rubric for LEA Parental involvement Policy/Plan

Appendix C: School Parental involvement Policy/Plan Template

Appendix D: Review Rubric for School Parental involvement Policy/Plan

Appendix E: Sample School-Parent Compact

Appendix F: LEA and School Side-by-Side Required Policy Components

Appendix G: Resources




                                    Page 77 of 107
            Appendix A: LEA Parental Involvement Policy/Plan Template

                                         2009-2010

In support of strengthening student academic achievement, each local educational
agency (LEA) that receives Title I, Part A funds must develop jointly with, agree on with,
and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parental involvement policy
that contains information required by section 1118(a)(2) of the Elementary and
Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The policy establishes the LEA’s expectations for
parental involvement and describes how the LEA will implement a number of specific
parental involvement activities, and is incorporated into the LEA’s plan submitted to the
Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) as required in Section 1112(b)(P) of ESEA.

Assurances

By my signature on this policy, I hereby certify that the LEA will comply with the
requirements of the ESEA and agrees to implement the following statutory
requirements:

   The LEA will put into operation programs, activities, and procedures for the
involvement of parents in all of its schools with Title I, Part A programs consistent with
Section 1118 of the ESEA. Those programs, activities, and procedures will be planned
and operated with meaningful consultation with parents of participating children;

  Consistent with Section 1118, the LEA will work with its schools to ensure that the
required school-level parental involvement policies meet the requirements of Section
1118(b) of the ESEA, and each includes, as a component, a school-parent compact
consistent with Section 1118(d) of the ESEA;

  The LEA will incorporate this LEA wide parental involvement policy into its LEA plan
developed under Section 1112 of the ESEA;

   In carrying out the Title I, Part A, parental involvement requirements to the extent
practicable, the LEA and its schools will provide full opportunities for the participation of
parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of
migratory children, including providing information and school reports required under
Section 1111 of the ESEA in an understandable and uniform format and, including
alternative formats upon request, and to the extent practicable, in a language parents
understand [Section 1118(f)];

  If the LEA plan for Title I, Part A, developed under Section 1112 of the ESEA is not
satisfactory to the parents of participating children, the LEA will submit any parent
comments with the plan when the LEA submits the plan to FLDOE [Section 1118(b)(4)];

   The LEA will involve the parents of children served in Title I, Part A schools in
decisions about how the one percent of Title I, Part A funds reserved for parental
involvement is spent, and will ensure that not less than 95 percent of the one percent


                                        Page 78 of 107
reserved goes directly to the schools, after equitable provisions have been provided to
participating private schools [Section 1118(a)(3)(A)];

   The LEA will be governed by the statutory definition of “parents” and “parental
involvement” defined in Section 9101 (31-32), and expects that it’s Title I schools will
carry out programs, activities, and procedures in accordance with this definition; and

  The LEA will inform parents and parent organizations of the purpose and existence of
both Parent Information and Resource Center(s) (PIRC) in the state [Section 1118(g)].

                     2009-2010 LEA Parental Involvement Policy

Parental Involvement Mission Statement (Optional)



1. Describe the actions the LEA will take to involve parents in the following required
   policies/plans:
• LEA-wide parental involvement policy [Section 1118(a)(2)];
• LEA plan [Sections 1112 (c)(H), 1112(d)(1)];
• School review and improvement under Section 1116 [Sections 1118(a)(2)(A),
   1116(a)(1)(D), 1116(b)(3)(A)]; and
• How the funds reserved for parental involvement will be spent [Section 1118(a)(2)].



2. Describe the actions the LEA will take to provide coordination, technical assistance,
   and other support necessary to assist Title I, Part A schools in planning and
   implementing effective parental involvement activities to improve student academic
   achievement and school performance [Section 1118(a)(2)(B)]. Include a description
   of the process the LEA will use to review the school-level PIP to ensure compliance
   with all requirements of Section 1118 [34 CFR 200.30(e)].



3. Describe how the LEA will coordinate and integrate parental involvement strategies
   from Part A of Title I with other federal programs (including but not limited to Head
   Start, Early Reading First, Even Start, Parents as Teachers, Home Instruction
   Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten, Parts C
   and D of Title I, Title III, and Part A of Title IV) [Sections 1118 (a)(2)(D) and
   1118(e)(4)].

             Program                                    Coordination




                                       Page 79 of 107
4. Describe the actions the LEA will take to conduct, with the involvement of parents,
   an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of this parental involvement
   policy in improving the quality of its Title I, Part A schools [Section 1118(a)(2)(E)].



5. Describe the actions the LEA will take to assist schools to build the schools’ and
   parents’ capacity for strong parental involvement, in order to ensure effective
   involvement of parents and to support a partnership among the school involved,
   parents, and the community to improve student academic achievement [Sections
   1118(a)(2)(C), 1118(e)(1-14)].



   If all activities will be conducted at the school level, check here   . If checked skip to
   question 7.

6. If the LEA plans to implement LEA-wide activities, describe the actions the LEA will
   take to build the schools’ and parents’ capacity for strong parental involvement, in
   order to ensure effective involvement of parents and to support a partnership among
   the school involved, parents, and the community to improve student academic
   achievement [Sections 1118(a)(2)(C), 1118(e)(1-14)].

Content of the     Type of Activity         Schools              Correlation to        Timeline
  Session                                 Participating            Student
                                                                 Achievement




7. Describe the professional development activities the LEA will, with the assistance of
   its schools and parents, provide to educate staff on the value and utility of
   contributions of parents; how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with
   parents as equal partners; the implementation and coordination of parent programs;
   and how to build ties between parents and the school [Section 1118 (e)(3)].

          Content of the        Target       Expected       Person(s)  Timeline
            Session            Audience      Outcome       Responsible




8. Describe how the LEA will provide full opportunities for participation in parental
   involvement activities for all parents (including parents of children with limited
   English proficiency, disabilities, and migratory children). Include how the LEA plans


                                       Page 80 of 107
   to share information related to school and parent programs, meetings, school
   reports, and other activities in an understandable and uniform format and to the
   extent practical, in a language parents can understand [Section 1118(e)(5) and
   1118(f)].



Discretionary LEA Parental Involvement Policy Components

The LEA parental involvement policy may include additional paragraphs listing and
describing other discretionary activities that the LEA, in consultation with its parents,
chooses to undertake to build parents’ capacity for involvement in the school and school
system to support their children’s academic achievement [Section 1118(e)].

   Check here if the LEA does not plan to implement the discretionary parental
involvement activities listed below and skip to the Adoption section.

Check all activities the LEA plans to implement:

  Involving parents in the development of training for teachers, principals, and other
educators to improve the effectiveness of that training [Section 1118(e)(6)];
   Providing necessary literacy training for parents from Title I, Part A funds, if the
school LEA has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for that
training [Section 1118(e)(7)];
   Paying reasonable and necessary expenses associated with parental involvement
activities, including transportation and child care costs, to enable parents to participate
in school-related meetings and training sessions [Section 1118(e)(8)];
  Training parents to enhance the involvement of other parents [Section 1118(e)(9)];
   Maximizing parental involvement and participation in their children’s education by
arranging school meetings at a variety of times, or conducting in-home conferences
between teachers or other educators, who work directly with participating children, with
parents who are unable to attend those conferences at school [Section 1118(e)(10)];
  Adopting and implementing model approaches to improving parental involvement
[Section 1118(e)(11)];
   Establishing a LEA-wide parent advisory council to provide advice on all matters
related to parental involvement in Title I, Part A programs [Section 1118(e)(12)];
   Developing appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses,
including faith-based organizations, in parental involvement activities [Section
1118(e)(13)]; and
  Providing other reasonable support for parental involvement activities under Section
1118 as parents may request [Section 1118(e)(14)].




                                       Page 81 of 107
9. Describe how the discretionary activities checked above will be implemented.

     Activity            Schools         Correlation to        Person         Timeline
                       Participating       Student           Responsible
                                         Achievement


School-Parent Compact
As a component of the school-level parental involvement policy/plan, each school shall
jointly develop, with parents for all children served under this part, a school-parent
compact that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the
responsibility for improved student academic achievement Section 1118(d)].

Provide the LEA an electronic copy of the School-Parent Compact and evidence of
parent input in the review and development.


Adoption

This LEA Parental involvement Policy has been developed jointly and in agreement
with, parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs, as evidenced by
____________________.

This policy was adopted by the LEA on mm/dd/yy and will be in effect for the period of
mm/dd/yy. The school LEA will distribute this policy to all parents of participating Title I,
Part A children on or before mm/dd/yy.

___________________________________________                 _______________________
(Signature of Title I Authorized Representative)            (Date)




                                        Page 82 of 107
        Evaluation of the 2009-2010 LEA Parental Involvement Policy/Plan

1. Provide a summary of the activities designed to build the capacity of parents to help
   their children [Section 1118 (e)(1-2)].

  Content of     Type of Activity      Number of            Schools           Correlation to
 the Session                           LEA-Wide           Participating         Student
                                       Activities                             Achievement



2. Provide a summary of the professional development activities provided to educate
   staff on the value and utility of contributions of parents; how to reach out to,
   communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners; the implementation and
   coordination of parent programs; and how to build ties between parents and the
   school [Section 1118 (e)(3)].

Content of the Session         Number of            Schools               Correlation to
                               LEA-Wide           Participating             Student
                               Sessions                                   Achievement



3. Provide a summary of the parental involvement activities provided for private
   schools implementing a Title I program [Section 1120(a)(1)].

Name of the Activity    Number of Total            Schools                Correlation to
                         Participants            Participating              Student
                                                                          Achievement



4. Describe the barriers identified which hindered participation by parents in parental
   involvement activities and the steps the LEA will take to overcome the identified
   barriers and design more effective parental involvement policies (with particular
   attention to parents who are economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited
   English proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority
   background) [Section 1118(a)(E)].



5. Describe the parental involvement activity/strategy the LEA considers the most
   effective. This information may be shared with other LEAs as a best practice.

            Content/Purpose                            Description of the Activity




                                      Page 83 of 107
 Appendix B: Review Rubric for LEA Parental Involvement Policy/Plan

LEA Name: ___________________________________                              Policy Year:                        ____
Reviewer Name: _______________________                            Review Date: ______________________

 Appendix B: Review Rubric for LEA Parental Involvement Policy/Plan
LEA Name: ___________________________________                              Policy Year:                        ____
Reviewer Name: _______________________                            Review Date: ______________________
                             Policy/Plan Components                                             YES             NO
                                                                                              (Page #)
2009-2010 PIP Review
LEA Policy Mission Statement (optional)
Does the mission statement meet the following criteria:
• Explains the purpose of the parental involvement program;
• Tells what will be done;
• Includes beliefs or values;
• Is concise, free of jargon, and parent-friendly; and
• Inspires stakeholders to be involved and supportive of the program.
1. Describe the actions the LEA will take to involve parents in the following required policies/plans:
•    LEA-wide parental involvement policy [Section 1118(a)(2)];
•    LEA plan [Sections 1112 (c)(H), 1112(d)(1)];
•    School review and improvement under Section 1116 [Sections 1118(a)(2)(A), 1116(a)(1)(D), 1116(b)(3)(A)]; and
•    How the funds reserved for parental involvement will be spent [Section 1118(a)(2)].
Was evidence adequate to demonstrate that the PIP was developed jointly
with and agreed upon by parents of children participating in Title I programs?
Is the PIP written in an understandable format and provided in a language
parents can understand?
Were revisions/updates to the plan made based upon the evaluation of the
prior year plan? Did the LEA address the barriers identified in the evaluation?
Strong Responses Include:
• Identification of the group responsible for the development,
     implementation and evaluation of the plans;
• Description of the procedures for selecting members of the group;
• Explanation of how the input from parents will be documented; and
• Description of the process and involvement of parents in the development
     of required plans.
2.   Describe the actions the LEA will take to provide coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary
     to assist Title I, Part A schools in planning and implementing effective parental involvement activities to improve
     student academic achievement and school performance [Section 1118(a)(2)(B)]. Include a description of the
     process the LEA will use to review the school-level PIP to ensure compliance with all requirements of Section
     1118 [34 CFR 200.30(e)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Description of the support the LEA will provide to schools on the planning
    and implementation of the parental involvement activities;
• Identification of persons responsible and timelines;
• Description of the process the LEA will use to monitor the implementation
    of the schools’ parental involvement program; and
• Description of an adequate and timely process the LEA will use to review
    the school-level PIP to ensure compliance with all requirements of


                                                    Page 84 of 107
     Section 1118.

3.   Describe how the LEA will coordinate and integrate parental involvement strategies from Part A of Title I with
     other federal programs (including but not limited to Head Start, Early Reading First, Even Start, Parents as
     Teachers, Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten, Parts C
     and D of Title I, Title III, and Part A of Title IV) [Sections 1118 (a)(2)(D) and 1118(e)(4)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Identification of the specific federal programs; and
• Description of how the programs will be coordinated.
4.   Describe the actions the LEA will take to conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the
     content and effectiveness of this parental involvement policy in improving the quality of its Title I, Part A schools
     [Section 1118(a)(2)(E)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Process the LEA used to evaluate the PIP;
• Identification of members of the group which will conduct the evaluation;
• Realistic and reasonable proposed timelines;
• Data that will be reviewed to complete the evaluation; and
• Description of how the results will be used.
5.   Describe the actions the LEA will take to assist schools to implement the activities described in the school-level
     PIPs to build the schools’ and parents’ capacity for strong parental involvement [Sections 1118(a)(2)(C),
     1118(e)(1-14)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Description of the support system including timelines;
• Process the LEA will use to monitor activities; and
• If personnel will be provided, how those individuals will be supported.
6.   If the LEA plans to implement LEA-wide activities, describe the actions the LEA will take to build the schools’ and
     parents’ capacity for strong parental involvement, in order to ensure effective involvement of parents and to
     support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to improve student academic
     achievement [Sections 1118(a)(2)(C), 1118(e)(1-14)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Content of the session including each of the following:
        o The state’s academic content standards and state student
            academic achievement standards,
        o State and local assessments including alternative assessments,
        o Parental involvement requirements of Section 1118, and
        o How to monitor their child’s progress and work with educators to
            improve the achievement of their child;
• Type of activities;
• Schools participating (may be groups of schools);
• Correlation to student achievement; and
• Reasonable and realistic proposed timelines.
7.   Describe the professional development activities the LEA will, with the assistance of its schools and parents,
     provide to educate staff on the value and utility of contributions of parents; how to reach out to, communicate
     with, and work with parents as equal partners; the implementation and coordination of parent programs; and how
     to build ties between parents and the school [Section 1118 (e)(3)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Content of the session including the following:
          o Value of parental involvement,
          o Communicating and working with parents,
          o Implementation and coordination of parental involvement
               program,
          o Building ties between home and school, and
          o Cultural sensitivity;
• Type of activities;
• Schools participating (may be school groups);
• Correlation to student achievement; and

                                                     Page 85 of 107
•    Reasonable and realistic timelines.
8.   Describe how the LEA will provide full opportunities for participation in parental involvement activities for all
     parents (including parents of children with limited English proficiency, disabilities, and migratory children). Include
     how the LEA plans to share information related to school and parent programs, meetings, school reports, and
     other activities in an understandable and uniform format and to the extent practical, in a language parents can
     understand [Section 1118(e)(5) and 1118(f)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Process the LEA will use for translating information into a parent’s native
    language;
• Description of how the LEA will ensure that parents with disabilities will
    have access to parental involvement activities and/or services;
• Description of how the LEA will ensure that information is available to
    parents considering the fluctuating student populations;
• Specific languages that information will be provided; and
• Process the LEA will use to monitor that schools provide information to
    parents in a language they can understand, if feasible.
9. Describe how the discretionary activities will be implemented.
Strong Responses Include:
• Content of the session which may include the following types of activities:
        o Involving parents in the development of staff training,
        o Providing literacy training,
        o Paying reasonable and necessary expenses to conduct parental
             involvement activities,
        o Training parents to help other parents,
        o Adopting and implementing model parental involvement
             programs,
        o Organize a local education agency parent advisory council, or
        o Developing roles for community organizations and/or business in
             parental involvement activities;
• Type of activity;
• Specific correlation to student achievement; and
• Reasonable and realistic timelines.
Evaluation of the 2008-2009 Policy/Plan
Did the LEA include a copy of the evaluation of the 2008-2009 policy/plan?
Did the evaluation include all required components?
• Identification of barrier which hindered participation by parents in parental
    involvement activities (with particular attention to parents who are
    economically disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English
    proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority
    background); and
• Description of how the LEA will use the information gathered from the
    evaluation to design strategies for more effective parental involvement
    policies described in Section 1118.

Additional Comments or Concerns:
___________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________




                                                     Page 86 of 107
Appendix C: School Parental Involvement Policy/Plan Template

ASSURANCES

Name of School agrees to:

  Be governed by the statutory definition of parental involvement, and will carry out
programs, activities, and procedures in accordance with the definition outlined in
Section 9101(32), ESEA;

  Involve the parents of children served in Title I, Part A in decisions about how Title I,
Part A funds reserved for parental involvement are spent [Section 1118(a)(3)(B)];

   Jointly develop/revise with parents the school parental involvement policy and
distribute it to parents of participating children and make available the parental
involvement plan to the local community [Section 1118(a)(2)];

  Jointly conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the content
and effectiveness of the school’s parental involvement policy [Section 1118(a)(E)];

   Use the findings of the parental involvement policy evaluation to design strategies for
more effective parental involvement, and to revise, if necessary, the school’s parental
involvement policy [Section 1118(a)(E)];

  Inform parents and parental organizations of the purpose and existence of the
Parental Information and Resource Centers (PIRC) in Florida, i.e., PIRC of Family
Network on Disabilities in Florida (FND) and PIRC at University of South Florida (USF)
[Section 1118(g)];

  If the plan for Title I, Part A, developed under Section 1112, is not satisfactory to the
parents of participating children, the school will submit parent comments with the plan
when the school submits the plan to the local educational agency [Section 1118(b)(4)];

  Provide to each parent an individual student report about the performance of their
child on the State assessment in at least mathematics, language arts, and reading
[Section 1111(h)(6)(B)(i)];

   Provide each parent timely notice when their child has been assigned or has been
taught for four (4) or more consecutive weeks by a teacher who is not highly qualified
within the meaning of the term in section 200.56 of the Title I Final Regulations (67 Fed.
Reg. 71710, December 2, 2002) [Section 1111(h)(6)(B)(ii)]; and

   Provide each parent timely notice information regarding their right to request
information on the professional qualifications of the student's classroom teachers and
paraprofessionals, as described in Section 1111(h)(6)(A) [Section (h)(2)(6)(A)].




                                       Page 87 of 107
            2009-2010 School Parental Involvement Policy/Plan

Parental Involvement Mission Statement (Optional)



1. Describe the specific steps the school will take to conduct an annual meeting
   designed to inform parents of participating children about the school’s Title I
   program, the nature of the Title I program (schoolwide or targeted assistance),
   Adequately Yearly Progress, school choice, supplemental education services, and
   the rights of parents. Include timeline, persons responsible, documentation to be
   maintained, and the steps to ensure that all parents are invited and encouraged to
   attend [Section 1118(c)(1)] .

          Activity/Task                   Person           Timeline       Evaluations
                                        Responsible



2. Describe how the school will offer a flexible number of meetings, such as meetings
   in the morning or evening, and may provide with Title I funds, transportation, child
   care, or home visits, as such services related to parental involvement [Section
   1118(c)(2)].



3. Describe how the school will involve parents in an organized, ongoing, and timely
   manner, in the planning, review, and improvement of Title I programs including
   involvement in the decisions regarding how funds for parental involvement will be
   used [Sections1118(c)(3), 1114(b)(2), and 1118(a)(2)(B)].



4. Describe how the school will provide parents of participating children the following
   [Section 1118(c)(4)]:
   • Timely information about the Title I programs [Section 1118(c)(4)(A)];
   • Description and explanation of the curriculum at the school, the forms of
      academic assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency
      levels students are expected to meet [Section 1118(c)(4)(B)];
   • If requested by parents, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate
      suggestions and to participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the
      education of their children[Section 1118(c)(4)(C)]; and
   • Note: If the schoolwide program plan under Section 1114 (b)(2) is not satisfactory
      to the parents of participating children, the school will also submit the parents’
      comments on the plan that will be available to the local education agency
      [Section 1118(c)(5)].

                                      Page 88 of 107
5. Describe how the school will implement activities which will build the capacity for
   strong parental involvement, in order to ensure effective involvement of parents and
   to support a partnership among the school involved, parents, and the community to
   improve student academic achievement [Section 1118(e)]. Describe the actions the
   school will take to provide materials and training to help parents work with their
   children to improve their children’s academic achievement [Section 1118(e)(2)].

Content              Type of           Person            Correlation     Timeline     Evaluation
                     Activity        Responsible         to Student
                                                        Achievement




6. Describe the training for staff the school will provide to educate its teachers, pupil
   services personnel, principals, and other staff in how to reach out to, communicate
   with, and work with parents as equal partners, in the value and utility of contributions
   of parents, and in how to implement and coordinate parent programs and build ties
   between parents and schools [Section 1118(e)(3)].

 Content of the         Person          Timeline        Correlation to       Evaluation
   Session            Responsible                         Student
                                                        Achievement




7. Describe how the school will coordinate and integrate parental involvement
   programs and activities that teach parents how to help their children at home to the
   extent feasible and appropriate (including but not limited to other federal programs
   such as: Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, Home
   Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program,
   public preschool, Title I, Part C, Title II, Title III, Title IV, and Title VI) [Section
   1118(e)(4)].

             Program                                     Coordination



8. Describe the other activities, such as parent resource centers, the school will
   conduct to encourage and support parents in more fully participating in the education
   of their children [Section 1118 (e)(4)].


                                       Page 89 of 107
Activity     Specific steps        Person             Timeline            Evaluation
                                 Responsible



9. Describe how the school will provide full opportunities for participation in parental
   involvement activities for all parents (including parents of children with limited
   English proficiency, disabilities, and migratory children). Include how the school
   plans to share information related to school and parent programs, meetings, school
   reports, and other activities in an understandable and uniform format and to the
   extent practical, in a language parents can understand [Section 1118(e)(5) and
   1118(f)].



Discretionary School Level Parental Involvement Policy Components

   Check if the school does not plan to implement any discretionary parental
involvement activities.

Check all activities the school plans to implement:

   Involving parents in the development of training for teachers, principals, and other
educators to improve the effectiveness of that training [Section 1118(e)(6)]
   Providing necessary literacy training for parents from Title I, Part A funds, if the
school LEA has exhausted all other reasonably available sources of funding for that
training [Section 1118(e)(7)]
   Paying reasonable and necessary expenses associated with parental involvement
activities, including transportation and child care costs, to enable parents to participate
in school-related meetings and training sessions [Section 1118(e)(8)]
   Training parents to enhance the involvement of other parents [Section 1118(e)(9)]
   Maximizing parental involvement and participation in their children’s education by
arranging school meetings at a variety of times, or conducting in-home conferences
between teachers or other educators, who work directly with participating children, with
parents who are unable to attend those conferences at school [Section 1118(e)(10)]
   Adopting and implementing model approaches to improving parental involvement
[Section 1118(e)(11)]
   Establishing an LEA-wide parent advisory council to provide advice on all matters
related to parental involvement in Title I, Part A programs [Section 1118(e)(12)]
   Developing appropriate roles for community-based organizations and businesses,
including faith-based organizations, in parental involvement activities [Section
1118(e)(13)]
   Providing other reasonable support for parental involvement activities under section
1118 as parents may request [Section 1118(e)(14)]

10. Describe how each discretionary activity checked above will be implemented.

                                       Page 90 of 107
Activity       Description of           Correlation to         Person            Timeline
              Implementation              Student            Responsible
                 Strategy               Achievement


School-Parent Compact:

As a component of the school-level parental involvement policy/plan, each school shall
jointly develop, with parents for all children served under this part, a school-parent
compact that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the
responsibility for improved student academic achievement Section 1118(d)].

Provide the LEA electronically the School-Parent Compact and evidence of parent input
in the development of the compact.

Adoption

This School Parental involvement Policy has been developed jointly with, and in
agreement with, parents of children participating in Title I, Part A programs, as
evidenced by ____________________.

This policy was adopted by the school on mm/dd/yy and will be in effect for the period of
mm/dd/yy. The school will distribute this policy to all parents of participating Title I, Part
A children on or before mm/dd/yy.

___________________________________________ _______________________
(Signature of Authorized Representative) (Date)




                                        Page 91 of 107
               Review of the School Parental Involvement Policy/Plan

1. Provide a summary of activities provided which were designed to build the capacity
   of parents to help their children [Section 1118 (e)(1-2)]. Include participation data on
   the Title I annual meeting.

Content of the         Type of         Number of        Number of Total     Correlation to
  Session              Activity        Activities        Participants         Student
                                                                            Achievement



2. Provide a summary of the professional development activities provided by the school
   to educate staff on the value and utility of contributions of parents; how to reach out
   to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal partners; the implementation
   and coordination of parent programs; and how to build ties between parents and the
   school [Section 1118 (e)(3)].

 Content of the         Number of Sessions               Number of        Correlation to
   Session                                                 Total            Student
                                                        Participants      Achievement



3. Describe the identified barriers which hindered participation by parents in parental
   involvement activities and the steps the school will take to overcome the identified
   barriers (with particular attention to parents who are economically disadvantaged,
   are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited literacy, or are of any
   racial or ethnic minority background) [Section 1118(a)(E)].

     Barrier (Including the Specific           Steps the School will Take to Overcome
                Subgroup)


4. Describe the parental involvement activity/strategy the school considers the most
   effective. This information may be shared with other LEAs and schools as a best
   practice.

            Content/Purpose                             Description of the Activity




                                       Page 92 of 107
        Appendix D: Review Rubric for School Parental Involvement Policy/Plan

  School Name: _______________________________LEA Name: ______________________
  Policy Year: 2009-2010         Reviewer Name: __________________ Review Date:___________
                             Policy/Plan Components                                          YES            NO
                                                                                           (Page #)
                                              2009-2010 Plan Review
Was evidence adequate to demonstrate that the PIP as developed jointly with and
agreed upon by parents of children participating in Title I programs?
Is the PIP written in an understandable format and provided in a language parents
can understand?
Were revisions/updates to the plan made based upon the review of the 2008-2009
plan? Did the school address the barriers identified in the review?
LEA Policy Mission Statement (optional)
The mission statement should meet the following criteria:
• Explains the purpose of the parental involvement program;
• Tells what will be done;
• Includes beliefs or values;
• Is concise, free of jargon, and parent-friendly; and
• Inspires stakeholders to be involved and supportive of the program.
1. Describe the specific steps the school will take to conduct an annual meeting designed to inform parents
     of participating children about the school’s Title I program, the nature of the Title I program (schoolwide or
     targeted assistance), Adequately Yearly Progress, school choice, supplemental education services, and
     the rights of parents. Include timeline, persons responsible, documentation to be maintained, and the
     steps to ensure that all parents are invited and encouraged to attend [Section 1118(c)(1)] .
Strong Responses Include:
• Identification of specific activities or tasks;
• Identification of the person(s) responsible for completing the task;
• Timeline; and
• Description of the method the school will use to document completion of the
     activity/task.
2. Describe how the school will offer a flexible number of meetings, such as meetings in the morning or
     evening, and may provide with Title I funds, transportation, child care, or home visits, as such services
     related to parental involvement [Section 1118(c)(2)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Description of the process the school will use to ensure that workshops/meetings
  are offered at a flexible times; and
• Specific examples of the flexible schedule offered to parents.
Describe how the school will involve parents in an organized, ongoing, and timely manner, in the planning,
review, and improvement of Title I programs including involvement in the decisions regarding how funds for
parental involvement will be used [Sections1118(c)(3), 1114(b)(2), and 1118(a)(2)(B)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Identification of the group responsible for the planning, review, and improvement
  of the Title I program;
• Description of the procedures selecting members of the group;
• Explanation of how input from parents will be documented; and
• Description of the process for schools to involve parents in the development of
  the required plans.
3. Describe how the school will provide parents of participating children the following [Section 1118(c)(4)]:
•    Timely information about the Title I programs [Section 1118(c)(4)(A)]:
•    Description and explanation of the curriculum at the school, the forms of academic assessment used to
     measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet [Section
     1118(c)(4)(B)]:


                                                 Page 93 of 107
•    If requested by parents, opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions and to participate, as
     appropriate, in decisions relating to the education of their children[Section 1118(c)(4)(C)]:
Note: If the schoolwide program plan under Section 1114 (b)(2) is not satisfactory to the parents of
participating children, the school will also submit the parents’ comments on the plan that will be available to
the local education agency [Section 1118(c)(5)]:
Strong Responses Include:
• Process for providing information to parents;
• Dissemination methods;
• Reasonable and realistic timelines for specific parent notifications; and
• Description of how the school will monitor that the information was provided.
4. Describe how the school will implement activities which will build the capacity for strong parental
     involvement, in order to ensure effective involvement of parents and to support a partnership among the
     school involved, parents, and the community to improve student academic achievement [Section
     1118(e)]. Describe the actions the school will take to provide materials and training to help parents work
     with their children to improve their children’s academic achievement [Section 1118(e)(2)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Content of the session including each of the following:
          • The state’s academic content standards and State student academic
            achievement standards,
          • State and local academic assessments including alternative
            assessments,
          • Parental involvement requirements of Section 1118, and
          • How to monitor their child’s progress and work with educators to improve
            the achievement of their child.
• Type of activities;
• Correlation to student achievement; and
• Reasonable and realistic proposed timelines.
5. Describe the training for staff the school will provide to educate its teachers, pupil services personnel,
     principals, and other staff in how to reach out to, communicate with, and work with parents as equal
     partners, in the value and utility of contributions of parents, and in how to implement and coordinate
     parent programs and build ties between parents and schools [Section 1118(e)(3)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Content of the session;
          o Value of parental involvement,
          o Communicating and working with parents,
          o Implementation and coordination of parental involvement program,
          o Building ties between home and school, and
          o Cultural sensitivity;
• Type of Activities;
• Specific correlation to student achievement;
• Reasonable and realistic timelines; and
• Method to determine the success and document completion.
6. Describe how the school will coordinate and integrate parental involvement programs and activities that
     teach parents how to help their children at home to the extent feasible and appropriate (including but not
     limited to other federal programs such as: Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start,
     Home Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents as Teachers Program, public
     preschool, Title I, Part C, Title II, Title III, Title IV, and Title VI) [Section 1118(e)(4)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Identification of the specific federal program; and
• Description of how the programs were coordinated.
7. Describe the other activities, such as parent resource centers, the school will conduct to encourage and
     support parents in more fully participating in the education of their children [Section 1118 (e)(4)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Identification of the type of activity;
• Specific steps necessary to implement this activity;


                                                Page 94 of 107
• Person(s) responsible;
• Timeline; and
• Method to determine the success and document completion.
8. Describe how the LEA will provide full opportunities for participation in parental involvement activities for
    all parents (including parents of children with limited English proficiency, disabilities, and migratory
    children). Include how the LEA plans to share information related to school and parent programs,
    meetings, school reports, and other activities in an understandable and uniform format and to the extent
    practical, in a language parents can understand [Section 1118(e)(5) and 1118(f)].
Strong Responses Include:
• Process for translating information into a parent’s native language;
• Description of how the school will ensure that parents with disabilities have
  access to parental involvement activities and/or services;
• Description of how the school will ensure that information is available to parents
  considering the fluctuating student populations;
• Specific languages that information will be routinely provided; and
• Process the school will use to monitor the dissemination of information to parents.
10. Describe how the discretionary activities will be implemented.
Strong Responses Include:
• Content of the session including the following:
         o Involve parents in the development of staff training,
         o Offer literacy training,
         o Pay reasonable and necessary expenses to conduct parental
             involvement activities,
         o Train parents to help other parents,
         o Adopt and implement model parental involvement programs, or
         o Develop roles for community organizations and/or businesses in
             parental involvement activities;
• Type of activity;
• Specific correlation to student achievement; and
• Reasonable and realistic timelines.
                                               School-Parent Compact
Does the School-Parent Compact include all required components:
• Description of the school’s responsibility to provide high-quality curriculum and
    instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables
    children to meet the State’s student academic achievement standards;
• Identification of ways parents will be responsible for supporting their children’s
    learning (for example, monitoring attendance, homework completion, or
    television watching; volunteering in their child’s classroom; and participating as
    appropriate in decisions relating to the education of their children and positive
    use of extracurricular time); and
• Highlight the importance of communication between teachers and parents on
    an ongoing basis through, at a minimum—
             o Parent-teacher conferences in elementary schools, at least
                  annually, during which the compact will be discussed as it relates
                  to the individual child’s achievement;
             o Frequent reports to parents on their child’s progress; and
             o Reasonable access to staff, opportunities to volunteer and
                  participate in their child’s class, and observation of classroom
                  activities [Section 1118(d), ESEA].
                                        Review of the 2008-2009 Policy/Plan
Did the school include a copy of the review of the 2008-2009 policy/plan?
Did the review include all required components?
• A summary of the results of the activities conducted;
• Parent survey results;

                                                 Page 95 of 107
•    Identification of barrier which hindered participation by parents in parental
     involvement activities (with particular attention to parents who are economically
     disadvantaged, are disabled, have limited English proficiency, have limited
     literacy, or are of any racial or ethnic minority background); and
•    Description of how the school will use the information gathered from the review
     to design strategies for more effective parental involvement policies.

    Additional Comments or Concerns:
    ______________________________________________________________________
    ______________________________________________________________________




                                                 Page 96 of 107
                Appendix E: Sample School-Parent Compact
                             SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT


The Happyville Elementary School, and the parents and students participating in
activities, services, and programs funded by Title I, Part A of the Elementary and
Secondary Education Act (ESEA) (participating children), agree that this compact
outlines how the parents, the entire school staff, and the students will share the
responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the means by which the
school and parents will build and develop a partnership that will help children achieve
the State’s high standards.

This school-parent compact is in effect during the 2009-2010 school year.

School Responsibilities

The Happyville Elementary School will:

1. Provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning
   environment that enables the participating children to meet the State’s student
   academic achievement standards as follows:

          [Describe how the school will provide high-quality curriculum and instruction,
          and do so in a supportive and effective learning environment.]


2. Hold parent-teacher conferences (at least annually in elementary schools) during
   which this compact will be discussed as it relates to the individual child’s
   achievement. Specifically, those conferences will be held:

          [Describe when the parent-teacher conferences will be held.]

3. Provide parents with frequent reports on their children’s progress. Specifically, the
   school will provide reports as follows:

          [Describe when and how the school will provide reports to parents.]

4. Provide parents reasonable access to staff. Specifically, staff will be available for
   consultation with parents as follows:

          [Describe when, where, and how staff will be available for consultation with
          parents.]

5. Provide parents opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child’s class, and
   to observe classroom activities, as follows:



                                       Page 97 of 107
              [Describe when and how parents may volunteer, participate, and observe
              classroom activities.]

Parent Responsibilities

We, as parents, will support our children’s learning in the following ways:
• Make sure my child has the necessary school supplies and is ready for school each
  morning;
• Monitor my child’s on-time attendance;
• Make sure that homework is completed;
• Monitor the amount of television my children watch;
• Volunteer in my child’s classroom;
• Participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to my children’s education;
• Promote positive use of my child’s extracurricular time;
• Stay informed about my child’s education and communicate with the school by
  promptly reading all notices from the school or the school district either received by
  my child or by mail and responding, as appropriate;
• Serve, to the extent possible, on policy advisory groups, such as being the Title I,
  Part A parent representative on the school’s School Improvement Team, the Title I
  Policy Advisory Committee, the LEA-wide Policy Advisory Council, the State’s
  Committee of Practitioners, the School Support Team or other school advisory or
  policy groups.

Student Responsibilities

I, _____________, as a student, will share the responsibility to improve my academic
achievement and achieve the State’s high standards. Specifically, I will:

•   Do my homework every day and ask for help when I need to.
•   Read at least 30 minutes every day outside of school time.
•   Give to my parents or the adult who is responsible for my welfare all notices and
    information received by me from my school every day.]

       __________________         __________________          _______________
       School                          Parent(s)                   Student


       __________________         __________________          _______________
       Date                       Date                        Date




                                      Page 98 of 107
      Appendix F: LEA and School Side-by-Side Policy Components

     LEA Parental Involvement Policy                          School Parental Involvement Policy
Parental involvement Mission Statement                     Parental involvement Mission Statement
                                 Meaningful Involvement of Parents
Describe the actions the LEA will take to involve          Describe how the school will involve parents in an
parents in the following required policies/plans:          organized, ongoing, and timely manner, in the
• LEA-wide parental involvement policy [Section            planning, review, and improvement of Title I
    1118(a)(2)];                                           programs including involvement in the decisions
                                                           regarding how funds for parental involvement will
• LEA plan [Sections 1112 (c)(H), 1112(d)(1)];
                                                           be used [Sections1118(c)(3), 1114(b)(2), and
• School review and improvement under Section              1118(a)(2)(B)].
    1116 [Sections 1118(a)(2)(A), 1116(a)(1)(D);
    1116(b)(3)(A)]; and
• How the funds reserved for parental
    involvement will be spent [Section 1118(a)(2)].

Describe the actions the LEA will take to conduct,
with the involvement of parents, an annual
evaluation of the content and effectiveness of this
parental involvement policy in improving the quality
of its Title I, Part A schools [Section 1118(a)(2)(E)].
                                Coordination and Integration of Programs
Describe how the LEA will coordinate and integrate         Describe how the school will coordinate and
parental involvement strategies from Title I, Part A       integrate parental involvement programs and
with other federal programs (including but not             activities that teach parents how to help their
limited to Head Start, Reading First, Early Reading        children at home to the extent feasible and
First, Even Start, Parents as Teachers, Home               appropriate (including but not limited to other
Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters               federal programs such as: Head Start, Reading
(HIPPY), Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten, Title I, Part         First, Early Reading First, Even Start, Home
C, Title I, Part D, Title III, Title IV, Title VI, etc.)   Instruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the
[Sections 1118 (a)(2)(D) and 1118(e)(4)].                  Parents as Teachers Program, public preschool,
                                                           Title I, Part C, Title II, Title III, Title IV, and Title VI)
                                                           [Section 1118(e)(4)].
           Activities to Build the Capacity of Parents to Help Their Child(ren)
If the LEA plans to implement LEA-wide activities,         Describe how the school will implement activities
describe the actions the LEA will take to build the        which will build the capacity for strong parental
schools’ and parents’ capacity for strong parental         involvement, in order to ensure effective
involvement, in order to ensure effective                  involvement of parents and to support a partnership
involvement of parents and to support a partnership        among the school involved, parents, and the
among the school involved, parents, and the                community to improve student academic
community to improve student academic                      achievement [Section 1118(e)]. Describe the
achievement [Sections 1118(a)(2)(C), 1118(e)(1-            actions the school will take to provide materials and
14)].                                                      training to help parents work with their children to
                                                           improve their children’s academic achievement
Describe the actions the LEA will take to assist           [Section 1118(e)(2)].
schools to build the schools’ and parents’ capacity
for strong parental involvement, in order to ensure        Describe the other activities, such as parent
effective involvement of parents and to support a          resource centers, the school will conduct to
partnership among the school involved, parents,            encourage and support parents in more fully
and the community to improve student academic              participating in the education of their children
achievement [Sections 1118(a)(2)(C), 1118(e)(1-            [Section 1118 (e)(4)].
14)].



                                                 Page 99 of 107
    LEA Parental Involvement Policy            School Parental Involvement Policy
                 Activities to Train Staff in Parental involvement
Describe the professional development activities        Describe the training for staff the school will provide
the LEA will, with the assistance of its schools and    to educate its teachers, pupil services personnel,
parents, provide to educate staff on the value and      principals, and other staff in how to reach out to,
utility of contributions of parents; how to reach out   communicate with, and work with parents as equal
to, communicate with, and work with parents as          partners, in the value and utility of contributions of
equal partners; the implementation and                  parents, and in how to implement and coordinate
coordination of parent programs; and how to build       parent programs and build ties between parents
ties between parents and the school [Section 1118       and schools [Section 1118(e)(3)].
(e)(3)].
                                Communication and Accessibility
Describe how the LEA will provide full opportunities    Describe how the LEA will provide full opportunities
for the participation of parents with children with     for the participation of parents with children with
limited English proficiency, parents of children with   limited English proficiency, parents of children with
disabilities, and parents of migratory children.        disabilities, and parents of migratory children.
Include how the LEA plans to share information          Include how the LEA plans to share information
related to school and parent programs, meetings,        related to school and parent programs, meetings,
school reports, and other activities with parents of    school reports, and other activities with parents of
participating children in an understandable and         participating children in an understandable and
uniform format and to the extent practical, in a        uniform format and to the extent practical, in a
language parents can understand. Include a list of      language parents can understand. Include a list of
the languages in which information will be routinely    the languages in which information will be routinely
provided. Describe how the LEA will ensure that         provided. Describe how the LEA will ensure that
information is available to parents considering         information is available to parents considering
fluctuations in populations [Section 1118(e)(5) and     fluctuations in populations [Section 1118(e)(5) and
1118(f)].                                               1118(f)].
                      Discretionary Parental Involvement Components
•   Involving parents in the development of training • Involving parents in the development of training
    for teachers, principals, and other educators to        for teachers, principals, and other educators to
    improve the effectiveness of that training              improve the effectiveness of that training
    [Section 1118(e)(6)].;                                  [Section 1118(e)(6)] ;
•   Providing necessary literacy training for           •   Providing necessary literacy training for
    parents from Title I, Part A funds, if the school       parents from Title I, Part A funds, if the school
    LEA has exhausted all other reasonably                  LEA has exhausted all other reasonably
    available sources of funding for that training          available sources of funding for that training
    [Section 1118(e)(7)];                                   [Section 1118(e)(7)] ;
•   Paying reasonable and necessary expenses            •   Paying reasonable and necessary expenses
    associated with parental involvement activities,        associated with parental involvement activities,
    including transportation and childcare costs, to        including transportation and child carecosts, to
    enable parents to participate in school-related         enable parents to participate in school-related
    meetings and training sessions [Section                 meetings and training sessions [Section
    1118(e)(8)];                                            1118(e)(8)] ;
•   Training parents to enhance the involvement of      •   Training parents to enhance the involvement of
    other parents [Section 1118(e)(9)];                     other parents [Section 1118(e)(9)] ;
•   Maximizing parental involvement and                 •   Maximizing parental involvement and
    participation in their children’s education by          participation in their children’s education by
    arranging school meetings at a variety of times,        arranging school meetings at a variety of times,
    or conducting in-home conferences between               or conducting in-home conferences between
    teachers or other educators, who work directly          teachers or other educators, who work directly
    with participating children, with parents who are       with participating children, with parents who are
    unable to attend those conferences at school            unable to attend those conferences at school
    [Section 1118(e)(10)];                                  [Section 1118(e)(10)] ;
•   Adopting and implementing model approaches          •   Adopting and implementing model approaches


                                              Page 100 of 107
    LEA Parental Involvement Policy                         School Parental Involvement Policy
    to improving parental involvement [Section              to improving parental involvement [Section
    1118(e)(11)].;                                          1118(e)(11)] ;
•   Establishing a LEA-wide parent advisory             •   Establishing a LEA-wide parent advisory
    council to provide advice on all matters related        council to provide advice on all matters related
    to parental involvement in Title I, Part A              to parental involvement in Title I, Part A
    programs [Section 1118(e)(12)];                         programs [Section 1118(e)(12)] ;
•   Developing appropriate roles for community-         •   Developing appropriate roles for community-
    based organizations and businesses, including           based organizations and businesses, including
    faith-based organizations, in parental                  faith-based organizations, in parental
    involvement activities [Section 1118(e)(13)];           involvement activities [Section 1118(e)(13)] ;
    and                                                     and
•   Providing other reasonable support for parental     •   Providing other reasonable support for parental
    involvement activities under Section 1118 as            involvement activities under section 1118 as
    parents may request [Section 1118(e)(14)].              parents may request [Section 1118(e)(14)].
                                                        •   Describe how the discretionary activities
•   Describe how the discretionary activities               checked above will be implemented.
    checked above will be implemented.
                             Elements Specific to One Policy/Plan
Describe the actions the LEA will take to provide       Describe the specific steps the school will take to
coordination, technical assistance, and other           conduct an annual meeting designed to inform
support necessary to assist Title I, Part A schools     parents of participating children about the following:
in planning and implementing effective parental         • school’s Title I program,
involvement activities to improve student academic      • the nature of the Title I program (schoolwide or
achievement and school performance [Section               targeted assistance),
1118(a)(2)(B)]. Include a description of the            • adequately yearly progress,
process the LEA will use to review the school-level     • school choice,
PIP to ensure compliance with all requirements of       • supplemental education services, and
Section 1118 [34 CFR 200.30(e)].                        • the rights of parents;
                                                        Include timeline, persons responsible,
                                                        documentation to be maintained, and the steps to
                                                        ensure that all parents are invited and encouraged
                                                        to attend [Section 1118(c)(1)] .

                                                        Describe how the school will offer a flexible number
                                                        of meetings, such as meetings in the morning or
                                                        evening, and may provide with Title I funds,
                                                        transportation, child care, or home visits, as such
                                                        services related to parental involvement [Section
                                                        1118(c)(2)].

                                                        Describe how the school will provide parents of
                                                        participating children the following [Section
                                                        1118(c)(4)]:
                                                        • Timely information about the Title I programs
                                                          [Section 1118(c)(4)(A)];
                                                        • Description and explanation of the curriculum at
                                                          the school, the forms of academic assessment
                                                          used to measure student progress, and the
                                                          proficiency levels students are expected to meet
                                                          [Section 1118(c)(4)(B)];
                                                        • If requested by parents, opportunities for regular
                                                          meetings to formulate suggestions and to
                                                          participate, as appropriate, in decisions relating to


                                                Page 101 of 107
LEA Parental Involvement Policy         School Parental Involvement Policy
                                       the education of their children[Section
                                       1118(c)(4)(C)]; and

                                     Note: If the schoolwide program plan under section
                                     1114 (b)(2) is not satisfactory to the parents of
                                     participating children, the school will also submit
                                     the parents’ comments on the plan that will be
                                     available to the local education agency [Section
                                     1118(c)(5)].

                                     As a component of the school-level
                                     parental involvement policy/plan, each school shall
                                     jointly develop, with parents for all children served
                                     under this part, a school-parent compact that
                                     outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and
                                     students will share the responsibility for improved
                                     student academic achievement Section 1118(d)].

                                     Provide FLDOE electronically the School-Parent
                                     Compact and evidence of parent input in the
                                     development of the compact




                             Page 102 of 107
                             Appendix G: Resources

A Syllabus and Resource Package for Educating Teachers and Administrators in Parent
Involvement. Bulletin 1836. State of Louisiana, located at:
http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1
f/88/9a.pdf

Armbruster, B., Lehr, F., & Osburn, M. B. 2003. Proven ideas from research for parents:
A child becomes a reader (K–3). Second Edition. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research
Corporation.

Best practice in schools' engagement with parents, Qualifications and Curriculum
Authority accessed on 05.15.09 and located at:
http://www.qca.org.uk/libraryAssets/media/bEST_PRACTICE_IN_SCHOOLS.pdf.

Beyond the Bake Sale: Parents Can Make the Difference in Countless Ways

Kevin Walker, the founder of Project Appleseed, has created a list of 37 different ways
parents can help. Included: The Project Appleseed Parental Involvement Pledge.

Boult, B. (2006), 176 Ways to Involve Parents: Practical Strategies for Partnering with
Families, Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA.

D’Emilio, B. (2002). Action Research on Meaningful Family Involvement by Parents,
Teachers and Students: Using the Telling Strategically. Penn GSE Perspectives on
Urban Education, Volume 1, Issue 2 Fall 2002 accessed 05.19.09 and located at

http://www.urbanedjournal.org/archive/Issue2/notes/notes0003.pdf.

Developing a mission statement:
http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/hpcd/chp/hpkit/pdf/build_ws2.PDF

Developing a Team Approach for Family and Community Connections With Schools:
http://www.sedl.org/connections/resources/rb/research-brief3.pdf

Education World: Mission Statements with Vision:
http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin229.shtml

Family Involvement in Children's Education: Successful Local Approaches

Ferguson, C. (2005) http://www.ed.gov/pubs/FamInvolve/execsumm.html

Developing a Collaborative Team Approach to Support Family and Community
Connections With Schools: What Can School Leaders Do? National Center for Family
and Community: Corrections with Schools accessed 05.26.09 and located at:
http://www.sedl.org/connections/resources/rb/research-brief3.pdf.



                                     Page 103 of 107
Ferguson, C. (2009). A Toolkit for Title I Parental Involvement. Austin, TX: SEDL.
Accessed on 04.15.09 and located at: http://www.sedl.org/connections/toolkit/toolkit-
titleI-parent-inv.pdf.

Five Steps to Developing a Mission Statement located at:
http://www.intracen.org/IPSMS/briefcase/worksheets/232mission.doc

Florida Bureau of School Improvement, e-Library, Family Involvement or School
Improvement: http://www.flbsi.org/elib/eLibrary.aspx

Florida DOE: School Advisory Councils
http://www.flbsi.org/schoolimprove/schadvisorycouncils.htm

Florida’s Differentiated Accountability Implementation Guide:
http://www.flbsi.org/pdf/DAMGUIDE.pdf

Hanke, W. How To Get Parents Involved With School Activities – located at
http://www.articlerich.com/Article/How-To-Get-Parents-Involved-With-School-
Activities/18403.

Henderson, A. (2008), Parent Engagement Conversation Summary accessed on
05.15.09 and located at http://www.mccsc.edu/info/PECS.pdf.

Henderson, A.T and Mapp, K.L. (2002) A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of
School, Family and Community Connections on Student Achievement, Southwest
Educational Development Laboratory, Austin, TX accessed on 05.20.09 and located at
http://www.piqe.org/Assets/Home/henderson.htm.

Henderson, A.T., Jones, K, and Raimondo, B. The Power of Parent Partnership: Setting
a high standard for parent involvement projects will boost student achievement located
at http://cleweb.org/parent.htm.

Family Involvement in Children's Education: Successful Local Approaches
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/FamInvolve/index.html

Kinnaman, Daniel E. (2002, November 1). Meaningful parent involvement: school LEAs
should involve parents as partners and not just supporters The Free Library. (2002).
Retrieved May 19, 2009 from http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Meaningful parent
involvement: school LEAs should involve...-a097117616.

Learning Outside of the School Classroom: What Teachers Can Do to Involve Family in

Supporting Classroom Instruction:
http://www.sedl.org/connections/resources/rb/research-brief2.pdf

Lewis, A. C., & Henderson, A. T. 1997. Urgent message: Families crucial to school
reform. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Education [ERIC Document No ED418480
accessed 05.19.09 and located at:


                                     Page 104 of 107
http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1
5/63/5c.pdf.

National School Boards Foundation: Creating a Vision:
http://www.nsba.org/sbot/toolkit/cav.html

National Standards for Family-School Partnerships: A new way of leading: Building
family-school partnerships for student success (2008). Georgia PTA accessed 05.19.09
and located at: http://www.georgiapta.org/resources-parent-involvement.html.

North Central Regional Educational Laboratory: Critical Issue: Building a Collective
Vision: http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/educatrs/leadrshp/le100.htm

Parent- and Community-Involvement Strategies That Work, Education World located at
http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin/admin192.shtml.

Parent Involvement Toolkit:
http://www.k12.hi.us/~konawahs/parent_involvement_tool_kit.htm

Parent Leadership Training Database: http://www.uvm.edu/~pcl/modules.php

Parents as Collaborative Leaders: http://www.uvm.edu/~pcl/modules.php

Planning for Parent Involvement, Education World Administrators Desk Archive, located
at: http://www.education-world.com/a_admin/admin/admin421.shtml

SAC ‘Toolbox’ – The Basics http://www.florida-family.net/SAC/

Safran, D. Preparing Teachers for Parent Involvement located at
http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/3
5/43/fe.pdf.

Seville, M. Get Parents Involved: The Foundation of Student Success, Edutopia, located
at http://www.edutopia.org/get-parents-involved.

Starkey, P., & Klein, A. 2000. Fostering parental support for children’s mathematical
development: An intervention with Head Start families. Early Education and
Development, 11, no. 5: 659–680.

Training Parents for Leadership accessed 05.15.09 and located at
http://www.ed.gov/admins/comm/parents/parentinvolve/report_pg20.html

USDE Parent Information: http://www.ed.gov/parents/landing.jhtml

Wherry, J. H. (2009) 10 Things Any School Can Do to Build Parent Involvement . . .Plus
Five Great Ways to Fail! The Parent Institute accessed ib 05.22.09 and located at
http://www.parent-institute.com/educator/resources/10things/10things.php.




                                     Page 105 of 107
                    Title I, Parent Involvement Policy/Plan Guidance
                                           Index

Adoption ............................................................................................................ 11, 82, 91
Annual Title I Parent Meeting ........................................................................................ 61
Appendices ................................................................................................................... 77
Assurances ............................................................................................................. 78, 87
Barriers.......................................................................................................................... 53
Best Practices ............................................................................................................... 57
Building Capacity .......................................................................................................... 67
Childcare Costs ............................................................................................................. 42
Communication with Parents......................................................................................... 37
Compact........................................................................................................................ 97
Components.................................................................................................................. 99
Continuum of School Types .......................................................................................... 20
Coordination with other Federal Programs.................................................................... 22
Correlation to Student Achievement.............................................................................. 13
Discretionary Parental Involvement Components ............................................. 71, 81, 90
Documenting Compliance .................................................................................................
   .............. 8, 12, 19, 22, 24, 26, 33, 37, 40, 45, 48, 50, 52, 56, 57, 62, 64, 65, 67, 70, 74
Early Reading First........................................................................................................ 23
Equitable Participation for Private Schools.................................................................... 50
Evaluation ............................................................................................. 25, 45, 52, 74, 83
Even Start ..................................................................................................................... 23
Expenses for Parental Involvement............................................................................... 42
Flexible Number of Meetings......................................................................................... 63
Florida’s Consent Decree.............................................................................................. 38
Head Start ..................................................................................................................... 23
HIPPY ........................................................................................................................... 23
Improving Parental Involvement Programs ................................................................... 54
Integration of funds ....................................................................................................... 22
Joyce Epstein.................................................................................................................. 5
Meaningful Involvement of Parents ................................................................................. 5
Mission Statement................................................................................................... 15, 60
Parent (Definition) ........................................................................................................... 7
Parental Involvement (Definition) .............................................................................. 7, 10
Parental Involvement Evaluation Toolkit ....................................................................... 26
Parents as Teachers ..................................................................................................... 23
Policy or Plan ................................................................................................................ 11
Private Schools ............................................................................................................. 50
Professional development ............................................................................................. 34
Professional Development ............................................................................................ 75
Resources ................................................................................................................... 103
Review of the School Parental Involvement .................................................................. 92
Review Rubric ......................................................................................................... 84, 93
School Advisory Council.................................................................................................. 6
School Parental Involvement Policy .............................................................................. 88

                                                        Page 106 of 107
School-Parent Compact .......................................................................................... 72, 82
Six Types of Involvement ................................................................................................ 5
Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL) ............................................... 8
Statute..............................7, 11, 16, 20, 23, 25, 29, 35, 38, 43, 45, 51, 54, 61, 63, 66, 73
Table of Contents ............................................................................................................ 4
Taxonomy of Parental Involvement ............................................................................... 42
Template ................................................................................................................. 78, 87
Timely Information......................................................................................................... 66
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act ........................................................................................ 38
Toolkit.............................................................................................................................. 8
Transportation ............................................................................................................... 42
Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten........................................................................................... 23




                                                        Page 107 of 107

								
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