Docstoc

The Importance of Team Participa

Document Sample
The Importance of Team Participa Powered By Docstoc
					 Workplace Communication: The
Importance of Team Participation
         and Soft Skills

          Karen Bridges, Instructor, CST
         Ken Leighton, Professor of English
         Judy Montague, Professor of ESL
Coordinated by Sally Kurz, Professor of IT-Computers



                        Funded by:Business
                 Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   1
                           July 16, 2003
     Project Background

“To Break Another Ceiling: Building
Stronger Workplace Communication
Skills for Students Whose Primary
Language is Other than English,” was
initially funded by an FII (Fund for
Instructional Improvement) grant from
the CCCCO.
                   Funded by:Business
            Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   2
                      July 16, 2003
This Project Was Designed to:
 1. Help students establish the connection
    between communication skills in the
    classroom and promotability in the
    workplace
 2. Address students’ reluctance to
    participate actively in the classroom
 3. Provide faculty with strategies to
    incorporate workplace communication
    activities in their courses



                    Funded by:Business
             Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   3
                       July 16, 2003
   How Did We Begin? (Step 1)



We surveyed local employers
regarding communication skills they
expect employees to have.




                 Funded by:Business
          Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   4
                    July 16, 2003
How Did We Begin? (Step 1) contd

We asked them this question:
“Aside from technical proficiency and
 exemplary on-the-job performance,
 what communication skills must an
 employee possess/demonstrate to be
 considered for promotion to
 supervisory or management
 positions?”
                  Funded by:Business
           Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   5
                     July 16, 2003
Responses to Employer Surveys (Step 2)

    These were culled from conversations
    with human resources personnel,
    managers, and supervisors.

   Handout for on-site audience
   Available online for off-site participants at:



                             Funded by:Business
                      Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   6
                                July 16, 2003
 Highlights of Employer Expectations



12. Employees should strive to be
  positively recognized by being friendly
  and helpful to everyone at all levels.




                   Funded by:Business
            Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   7
                      July 16, 2003
  Highlights of Employer Expectations
                  contd

18. Must interact with others in a positive
  way. “How an employee gets along
  with peers and bosses is always
  measured.”

25. Teamwork is the most important
  “dimension” of employment.
                     Funded by:Business
              Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   8
                        July 16, 2003
     Faculty Involvement (Step 3)

Eight faculty members from a variety of
  disciplines were recruited to
  – Develop two Workplace Communication
    assignments for their classes (online and
    traditional)
  – Pilot the assignments; revise as needed
  – Explore ways that instructors from other
    subject areas might use/adapt the
    assignments
  – Prepare assignments for Best Practices
    notebook and web site for faculty use
                       Funded by:Business
                Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   9
                          July 16, 2003
        Sample Assignment #1
Professor Judy Montague

“Sharpening Listening Skills for the Workplace
  through a Team-building Role Play”

   Handout for audience
   Available online for off-site participants at:



                          Funded by:Business
                   Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   10
                             July 16, 2003
 Listening: Why is this skill so
         challenging?
“There are several obvious reasons why we
  misunderstand one another in our daily
  communication. Consider the following:
    We speak at a rate of about 100 to 110
     words per minute.
    We can actually hear at a rate of about
     400 words per minute.
    We can think at a rate of about 800
           words per minute.
                     Funded by:Business
              Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   11
                        July 16, 2003
This means that we are listening only
 about 15 to 20 percent of the time
 because our minds are capable of
 racing around and about, thinking
 about other things, and still piecing
 together what is being said at the
 snail-paced 110 words a minute.”

         -Roger E. Axtell, author
         Do’s and Taboos Around the World

                   Funded by:Business
            Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   12
                      July 16, 2003
        Sample Assignment #2
Karen Bridges, Instructor, CST

“Help Desk Communications Role Play”

   Handout for audience
   Available online for off-site participants at:




                          Funded by:Business
                   Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   13
                             July 16, 2003
 Need for Help Desk Assignment

 Computer technicians are notoriously
  uncomfortable communicating
 Technicians often want to “hide” behind
  a computer
 Technicians would rather supply a
  hardware solution than train a user


                     Funded by:Business
              Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   14
                        July 16, 2003
        Sample Assignment #3
Professor Sally Kurz

“Safe Driving: Research & Presentation Task”

   Handout for audience
   Available online for off-site participants at:




                          Funded by:Business
                   Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   15
                             July 16, 2003
    Observations from the Pilot
             Project

 Students were apprehensive at the start
  of the project, but opinions changed
  after the first presentation.
 Students began to develop cohesive
  and trusting relationships with their
  group members.
                    Funded by:Business
             Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   16
                       July 16, 2003
    Observations from the Pilot
         Project (contd)
   Students were more open to sharing
    information with one another. It was
    the team’s success not individual effort
    that counted.
   Students that were reluctant to speak
    during the initial phases of the project,
    were some of the most vocal at the
    end of the semester.
                      Funded by:Business
               Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   17
                         July 16, 2003
    Observations from the Pilot
         Project (contd)
   Students gained self-confidence and
    learned to be better listeners.
   Students that participated in the pilot
    program said that they would
    recommend this activity to other
    students.


                      Funded by:Business
               Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   18
                         July 16, 2003
  How Can I Implement Team
 Building into a Course that is
Already Bursting at the Seams?

 Keep the activities short and simple
  – Set a time limit of not to exceed x minutes




                      Funded by:Business
               Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   19
                         July 16, 2003
 How Can I Implement Team
Building into a Course (contd)
Make the activities part of something
 that you are already doing.
  – Customer Service
  – Internet Research
  – English writing
  – Basic skills


                     Funded by:Business
              Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   20
                        July 16, 2003
 How Can I Implement Team
Building into a Course (contd)
   Make team projects (learning
    communities) a regular part of your
    classroom activities.

   Start out with a small project and
    expand incrementally.


                      Funded by:Business
               Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   21
                         July 16, 2003
           Summary, Part 1
   Students must be cognizant of the
    strong connection between
    communication skills and success in the
    workplace.

   Students need to be taught
    communications strategies; they aren’t
    innate.
                       Funded by:Business
                Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   22
                          July 16, 2003
       Summary, Part 1 contd
   Students need to be provided with
    multiple and ongoing opportunities to
    practice communication skills.




                       Funded by:Business
                Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   23
                          July 16, 2003
           Summary, Part 2
   Faculty need to stress communication
    skills in their classes.

   Faculty need training to develop
    strategies to incorporate communication
    skills training and in their classes.


                      Funded by:Business
               Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   24
                         July 16, 2003
                  How can you help your
                   students to prepare
                   for the
                   communication
                   demands of the
                   workplace?




       Funded by:Business
Curriculum/Industry Collaborative    25
          July 16, 2003
  Thank you for participating!
         Please feel free to contact us:
 Karen Bridges: kbridges@mail.ccc.cccd.edu
     Sally Kurz: skurz@mail.ccc.cccd.edu
  Ken Leighton: kleighton@mail.ccc.cccd.edu
Judy Montague: jmontague@mail.ccc.cccd.edu
         Coastline Community College
            11460 Warner Avenue
          Fountain Valley, CA 92708
                     Funded by:Business
              Curriculum/Industry Collaborative   26
                        July 16, 2003

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:6
posted:4/7/2010
language:English
pages:26