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					(TIN 2) Cattle

Animal Welfare and Trade Branch: Trader Information Notes - Cattle

Information about the Importation of Cattle into Northern Ireland from
EU Member States and Third Countries
Important

These notes explain the conditions applicable to imports of cattle into Northern Ireland
from EU Member States and from specified third countries.

These notes should be read in conjunction with the notes describing the veterinary checks
applicable to all live animals, semen, ova and embryos imported into Northern Ireland
(Trader Information Note TIN/1).

These notes are for guidance only. They do not purport to give a comprehensive
coverage of all conditions laid down in EU and NI legislation and, as such, have no legal
force. Importers must satisfy themselves that cattle are imported in accordance with all
the relevant legislation. The authoritative legal position will be found in the appropriate
national legislation and European Community (EC) Directives and Decisions.

Specimen copies of model health certificates for particular third countries referred to in this
note will only be sent to traders or importers on request.

Personal data may be stored and processed by the Department on computer systems.
The Department complies with the standards set by the Data Protection Act.

NB:      These notes may not cover situations where emergency safeguard action
has been taken, e.g. to prohibit the importation of certain animals from certain
countries following an outbreak of serious disease in those countries. Importers
are advised to contact the Department to ascertain whether any such safeguard
action has been taken in relation to the animals/country of origin.

Introduction

The importation of cattle into Northern Ireland from EU Member States, from Norway (see
paragraph 11) and from certain specified third countries (see paragraph 12) is provided for
in the Animals and Animal Products (Import and Export) Regulations (Northern Ireland)
2005 (as amended). An import licence is not required but all cattle imported from Member
States and Norway must comply with EU animal health rules governing intra-Community
trade whilst cattle imported from the specified third countries must comply with the
conditions laid down in the relevant Council Directives and Commission Decisions
applicable to each country.

If you wish to import into Northern Ireland

animals of the bovine species, other than domestic cattle, (the definition of which includes
the species Bubalus Bubulas and bison) from any country; or


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domestic cattle from a third country not listed in paragraph 15 below,

you must apply for an import licence from the Department at the address in paragraph 34.

Conditions applicable to imports from EU Member States and Norway

All cattle must comply with the requirements of Council Directive 64/432/EEC (as
amended) on animal health problems affecting intra-Community trade in bovine animals
and swine.

The Directive requires, inter alia, that cattle for breeding or production must come from:

an officially tuberculosis-free herd (as defined) and; if 6 weeks old or over and originating
in a region which does not have officially tuberculosis-free status, to have reacted
negatively to an intradermal tuberculosis test carried out during the 30 days prior to export;
an officially brucellosis-free herd (as defined) and; if 12 months old or over and originating
in a region which does not have officially brucellosis-free status, to show a brucella count
of less than 30 international units of agglutination per millilitre in a sero-agglutination test
carried out during the 30 days prior to export;
an enzootic bovine leukosis-free herd (as defined) and; if 12 months old or over and
originating in a region which does not have EBL-free status, to have reacted negatively to
a test for EBL carried out during the 30 days prior to export.
In the case of cattle for slaughter the Directive requires, inter alia, that the animals must
come from a herd that is:

officially tuberculosis-free (as defined);
officially enzootic bovine leukosis-free (EBL) (as defined) and
either officially brucellosis-free (as defined) or the cattle have been castrated.

All consignments of cattle must be accompanied by an original health certificate signed by
an official veterinarian of the veterinary authorities of the Member State concerned, in
conformity with the models laid down in the Directive. The certificate must:

conform to the model set out in Annex F to Council Directive 64/432/EEC (as amended)
and be drawn up on the day of loading;

be in English (it can be, and usually is, also in the language of the Member State of
export);

consist of a single document in such á form that any two pages or more are part of an
integrated whole and indivisible;

be made out for a single consignee; and

be valid for a period of 10 days.

As a general rule cattle imported from a Member State and being transported in a single
vehicle will be regarded as a single consignment which must, therefore, be accompanied
by a single health certificate and be delivered to a single address. Multi-destination



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consignments are only permitted under certain circumstances (further details are available
from the Department at the appropriate address in paragraph 34).

The conditions laid down in paragraphs 24 to 33 below also apply to imports from Member
States.

Imports from Spain and Portugal

The health certification accompanying cattle imported from Spain and Portugal must state
that the cattle are in accordance with Commission Decisions 90/208/EEC and 91/52/EEC
respectively on contagious bovine pleuro-pneumonia (CBPP). These Decisions require
that the animals come from a herd in which all animals over 12 months of age have been
tested negative for CBPP within the previous 12 months and that the animals to be
exported have tested negative for CBPP within 30 days of export.

Imports from the Republic of Ireland

Importers should note that cattle imported from the Republic of Ireland may be subjected
to more frequent Tuberculin testing.

Conditions applicable to imports from Norway

As a signatory of the European Economic Area (EEA) Agreement, Norway has agreed to
implement EU veterinary legislation in relation to the movement of animals between States
of the European Union. Cattle imported from Norway must comply with the same
requirements applying to cattle imported from other EU Member States (see paragraph 3 -
7 and 24 - 33).

Conditions applicable to imports from specified third countries

Issue of Import Licences

An import licence is not required for imports of cattle from the third countries listed in
paragraph 15. Imports of cattle from all other approved third countries (ie those listed in
the Annex) remain prohibited except under the authority of a licence and in accordance
with the conditions of that licence. Further details of the import conditions may be
obtained from the address in paragraph 34.

Imports of cattle from Albania, Argentina, Australia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Belaraus,
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Former Yugoslavian Republic of Macedonia, Russia and
United States of America remain prohibited. If imports are permitted it will only be under
the authority of a licence and in accordance with the conditions of that licence. Further
details of the import conditions and an application form for an import licence may be
obtained from the address at paragraph 34.

The conditions laid down in paragraphs 24 to 33 below also apply to imports from the
specified third countries listed in paragraph 15.




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Imports from specified third countries

Cattle, bison and buffalo may be imported into Northern Ireland from the following
countries

Country Relevant Commission Decision or Council Directive

Canada          Commission Decision 04/212/EEC (see also paragraphs 18-25)
Iceland         Commission Decision 04/212/EEC
New Zealand     Commission Decision 04/212/EEC
Switzerland     Commission Decision 04/212/EEC

Eastern European Countries:

All Commission Decision 04/212/EC

Bulgaria
Romania
Croatia

Such cattle must comply with the animal health conditions laid down in the respective
Commission Decision, or Council Directive and be accompanied by a health certificate,
which conforms with the model laid down in the respective Decision or Directive and which
must be signed by an official veterinarian of the veterinary authority in the country of
origin.

Cattle, bison and buffalo are ungulates and should enter the European Union through a
port having a Border Inspection Post approved for carrying out veterinary checks on
ungulates.

The health certificate must:

      conform to the model set out in the relevant Commission Decision and be drawn up
       on the day of loading

      be in at least English (it can be, and usually is, also in the language of the country
       of export and the language of the Member State of entry into the EU);

      be made out for a single consignee;

      be valid for a period of 10 days (21 days in the case of Canada) from the date of
       the health examination;

      consist of a single document in such a form that any two pages or more are part of
       an integrated whole and indivisible;

      cattle imported for production must not leave the place of destination without the
       authority from the Divisional Veterinary Officer.




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Imports from Eastern European Countries

The importation into the EU of cattle from Romania and certain regions of Bulgaria and
Croatia is subject to compliance with Commission Decision 2004/212/EEC. The Decision
lays down model health certificates and sets out the conditions including:
Cattle are required to remain on a single holding within the 30 days immediately prior to
dispatch to the EU (or since birth if less than 30 days old). There must have been no foot
and mouth disease (FMD) within a 20 km radius of that holding for the past thirty days, nor
anywhere within the territory within 24 months.
Cattle must be isolated from all cloven-hooved animals not of the equivalent health status
from the time pre-export tests are begun, under conditions approved by an official
veterinarian.
The cattle have never been vaccinated against FMD.
(i)- In the case of animals for breeding, cattle must come from a herd officially declared to
be enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) free and be tested with negative results for EBL .
or
(ii)- In the case of animals for production and not more than 30 months of age, they come
from herds included in a national programme for the eradication of enzootic bovine
leukosis (EBL) which have been free from                                      EBL for the
previous 2 years and must be marked with a freezebranded “L” in accordance with Annex
VI to Decision 98/372/EC (as amended).
or
(iii)- In the case of animals for slaughter, the cattle come from herds included in a national
programme for the eradication of enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL), are consigned directly to
a slaughterhouse and are slaughtered within 5 working days after arrival there.
Supplementary guarantees: Croatia
Certain countries may be required, depending upon the animal health situation in the
territories of origin, to provide supplementary guarantees when required and as notified by
the Commission to be inserted by the exporting country. These may be one or more of the
following:

The animals have reacted negatively to a test for foot and mouth virus (probang test).

The animals have reacted negatively to a serological test carried out to detect the
presence of foot and mouth antibodies.

The animals have been isolated for at least 14 days immediately prior to loading for export
at a quarantine station in the territory of origin under the surveillance of an official
veterinarian. No animal on the premises of isolation has been vaccinated against foot and
mouth disease during the 21 days preceding exportation. No animal other than those
forming part of the consignment has been introduced to the isolation premises during the
same period.

At present these supplementary guarantees are only required for cattle originating from
the territories of Croatia.
Additional guarantees:
Certain Member States may require additional guarantees, depending upon the health
status of the territory of destination. For example at present Denmark requires additional
guarantees for infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR). Northern Ireland does not require
additional guarantees for cattle imports.


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Imports from Canada

As a general rule all cattle for breeding or production must:

have been conceived, born and reared in Canada;

originate from herds which have been in existence for at least three years;

originate from herds in which there has been no evidence of EBL during the previous
three years and the animals to be exported have either been born and reared in the herd
or been an integral part of it for at least 12 months;

originate from herds in which, during the 12 months prior to export, all bovine animals over
24 months of age and forming part of the herd have reacted negatively to an agar gel test
for EBL;

be isolated for at least 21 days prior to export from Canada and tested (agar gel) within
isolation for EBL with negative results;

undergo a period of pre-embarkation and quarantine and tested (agar gel) again for EBL
with negative results after at least 21 days in that quarantine;

All animals must be accompanied on import by official certification in conformity with the
model laid down in Decision 04/212/EEC. The health certification must state that the
animals do not originate from herds in the geographic region of the Okanagan Valley in
British Columbia.

Animals which originate from registered Canadian Health Accredited Herds (CHAH) must,
in addition, be accompanied by official certification confirming their CHAH accredited
status. CHAH animals will be eligible for direct entry into EBL accredited herds in Northern
Ireland provided they do not come into contact with or travel in the same aircraft as cattle
of a lower health status. If this requirement is not met the CHAH animals will lose their
status and be required to undergo post-import isolation and testing.

With the exception of CHAH animals, all cattle will be required to undergo a period of a
least 6 months post-import isolation and be tested at least once, with negative results, for
EBL at the end of the isolation period.

Decision 04/212/EEC provides a derogation for bulls (other than those for direct entry to
semen collection centres) and non-pregnant females which originate from herds in which
NOT all the cattle (over 24 months of age) have passed tests for EBL within the 12
months prior to the date of export. Animals imported under the derogation must be
accompanied on import by official certification in conformity with the model laid down in
the Decision certifying that the animals to be exported are at least 18 months of age at the
time of loading and females are non-pregnant immediately prior to entry into the pre-
export isolation and at the time of loading.

The pre-export isolation period for such animals must be 2 months and the tests in pre-
export quarantine will be conducted after the animals have been resident for at least 30


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days. All animals imported under this derogation must be isolated for 6 months after
import and tested for EBL after 2 months and again 4 months later with negative results.
(There is a special derogation for bulls imported directly to an AI centre. Details are
available on request.)

These three categories of animals must be quarantined and isolated separately in
Canada, and must not be permitted to come into contact with animals of a different health
status. However, travel in the same aircraft may be permitted subject to special
arrangements. (Details available on request).

With the exception of animals from CHAH herds, animals must proceed directly into post-
import isolation at the premises of destination after passing veterinary checks at an EC
approved Border Inspection Post for ungulates. They may not leave these premises until
they have passed the final EBL test. Any animal which reacts positively to the EBL test will
be slaughtered without compensation to the importer. If an animal reacts positively to an
EBL test all other animals sharing the same isolation premises will be required to undergo
further testing after the EBL reactor has been slaughtered. The conditions for post-import
isolation are laid down in Schedule 2 of the Animals (Post-Import Control) Order (Northern
Ireland) 1993. It is the responsibility of the importer and the occupier of the isolation
premises to ensure that they are familiar with the legislation and that the premises comply
with the requirements. After the period of isolation and testing, movement of cattle from
isolation is authorised by a licence issued by the Divisional Veterinary Officer. Cattle may
not leave the premises unless a licence has been issued.

Conditions applicable to imports from EU Member States and third countries

Warble Fly

All cattle imported into Northern Ireland (other than those for immediate slaughter) must
comply with the following requirements in respect of warble fly:

the animals must be treated with an approved specified warble fly preparation within 24
hours of arrival at the place of destination; and
the importer must send to the Divisional Veterinary Office, within 5 working days, a written
declaration that the cattle have been treated as above.
unless an avermectin (Ivermectin, Alamectin, Moxidectin) or eprinomectin is used the
animal may be required to be detained until treatment with one of these medicinal
products has been carried out or the animals have tested negative for warble fly by blood
samples taken. (The option for a blood test is only available between 15 October and 15
July.)

Enzootic Bovine Leukosis (EBL)

As a general rule all cattle imported from EU Member States and third countries must
comply with strict conditions in respect of EBL. There are derogations, however, in
respect of cattle under 30 months of age imported for meat production or for immediate
slaughter. Importers of such cattle taking advantage of the special EBL provisions must
comply with the requirements of the Animals (Post-Import) Control Order (NI) 1993 and
ensure that the imported cattle do not come into contact with other cattle either during
transportation or after arrival at the premises of destination. In addition, all cattle for


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immediate slaughter must be slaughtered within 72 hours of landing and cattle for meat
production may only leave the premises of destination if they are consigned directly either
to a slaughterhouse for immediate slaughter, and only under the authority of, and subject
to the conditions of, a licence issued in advance by the DVO.

Welfare of Animals during Transport

Consignments of cattle must comply with national animal welfare legislation when
imported into, or in transit in or through Northern Ireland, including The Welfare of Animals
(Transport) Order (Northern Ireland) 1997(as amended). This Order implements Council
Directive 05/01/EEC, by Council Directive 95/29, on the protection of animals during
transport.

The 1997 Order makes general provision for the welfare of animals in transport. It
includes provisions as to the means of transport or receptacles used, the amount of space
available to each animal and the fitness of animals to travel. It requires animals that fall ill
or are injured in the course of transport to be treated.

The Order contains requirements on the feeding and watering of animals before and
during a journey and on journey times and rest periods. It requires persons who transport
animals in the course of business to ensure that they are accompanied by a person
possessing appropriate knowledge and the ability to safeguard their welfare. It also
requires that each consignment be accompanied by either a route plan (if the journey
exceeds 8 hours) or an animal transport certificate. Plans and certificates must
accompany the consignment. Route plans must be certified at the point of departure by a
veterinary inspector.

For imports of cattle from outside the European Union, the 1997 Order requires that
importers give a prior written undertaking that they will comply with the requirements of
Directive 05/01/EEC and that they have made arrangements to comply with them.

Further advice on animal welfare requirements can be obtained from local Divisional
Veterinary Offices.

Death of animals in transit

If an imported animal dies in transit to, or at, a port or airport in Northern Ireland, the
person in charge of the animal must report its death, together with any other relevant
information, to the Divisional Veterinary Office. The carcass of the animal must be
removed as soon as possible from the presence of live animals in the container and must
be disposed of in accordance with any directions given by a veterinary inspector.
Rabies risks

Importers and owners of imported animals are warned of rabies risks and are asked to
pay special attention to the health of any imported animal during its first six months in
Northern Ireland. Symptoms of the disease in cattle are an abnormal change of behaviour
and development of any of the following:




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anxiety, aggressiveness, frequent bellowing, excessive saliva with choking, difficulty in
eating, grinding of the teeth, constipation or diarrhoea with severe straining and tail
swishing; progressive paralysis develops, with death occurring on the third to seventh day.

If importers see symptoms of abnormal behaviour or ill health, details should be reported
forthwith to the Divisional Veterinary Manager or to the importer's veterinary surgeon.
Rabies is also compulsorily notifiable by law.

CONTACT NUMBER

For information about imports and licences and additional copies of information notes:

Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
Animal Welfare and Trade Branch
Dundonald House
Upper Newtownards Road
BELFAST BT4 3SB

Tel: 02890 520832/524404       Fax: 02890 525472




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ANNEX TO TIN/2

CATTLE MAY ONLY BE IMPORTED INTO THE COMMUNITY FROM THE FOLLOWING
THIRD COUNTRIES :

Argentina (²)                                  Malta (²)
Australia (²)                                  Norway
Bulgaria (4)                                   New Zealand
Belarus (¹)                                    Romania
Bosnia-Herzegovina                             Russia (¹)                   (¹)
Canada                                         Switzerland
Croatia (³)                                    United States of America (²)
Iceland                                        Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (1)


Notes

(¹)       Imports of cattle (and other animals susceptible to Foot and Mouth Disease)
prohibited until further notice.

(²)       Harmonised EC animal health import conditions not yet laid down; imports into
Northern Ireland remain subject to an import licence.

(³)       Imports are only permitted from the following provinces of Croatia:

Zagrebacka,Krapinsko-Zagorska,Varazdinska,     Koprivnicko-Krizevacka, Bjelovarsko-
Bilogorska, Primorsko-Goranska,Viroviticko-Podravska, Pozesko-Slavonska, Istarska,
Medimurska and Grad Zagreb

(4 )      Imports are only permitted from the following provinces of Bulgaria:

Varna, Dobrich, Silistra, Choumen, Targovichte, Razgrad, Rousse, V. Tarnovo, Gabrovo,
Pleven, Lovetch, Plovdiv, Smolian, Pasardjik, Sofia district, Sofia city, Pernik, Kustendil,
Blagoevgrad, Vratza, Montana and Vidin




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