2003 Irish Times 1

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					                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003




                             Irish Times Articles


Reference:            Kieran Keane


Period:               January 2003 – December 2003


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                                     Page 1 of 101
                                      Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003




                                   Index of Articles – by title

                   (All articles are dated just below the headline on the page)
DPP gets file on alleged abduction .............................................................................. 10
Control of drugs empire at centre of families' feud ..................................................... 11
The Keane-Ryan feud: the story so far ........................................................................ 13
Five get life sentences for Keane murder .................................................................... 14
Bitterness of feud always in evidence as insults are traded ......................................... 15
Keane witness refuses to join protection programme .................................................. 16
Keane jury sent to hotel for second night .................................................................... 17
Trial told witness gave accused lift on night of Keane murder ................................... 18
Mobile phone calls traced to mast ............................................................................... 19
Fibre matches sample from victim's clothes ................................................................ 20
Keane juror assured he will receive full pay ................................................................ 21
Employer of Keane juror ordered to court ................................................................... 22
CAB 'freezes' Co Limerick house ................................................................................ 23
Keane died from gunshot to head ................................................................................ 24
Keane's nephew gave names of men who he said murdered uncle ............................. 25
Widow says accused was by her house on day of murder ........................................... 26
Defence accuses State witness of being involved in uncle's murder ........................... 27
Doctor gives jurors in Kieran Keane murder trial anti-flu vaccine in court ................ 28
Man accused of intimidating trial witness ................................................................... 29
Living in a gangster's paradise ..................................................................................... 30
Limerick witness rejected offer of protection .............................................................. 31
Keane murder trial jury to get flu vaccinations ........................................................... 32
Witness says plan was to kill four men ........................................................................ 34
The ritual stepping in and stepping out continues ....................................................... 36
Witness says he saw uncle killed ................................................................................. 37
Special protection for the main witness leads to objections ........................................ 39
Murder trial judge not happy with the media's reporting ............................................. 40
Tight security as murder trial of five Limerick men opens ......................................... 41
Limerick murder trial jury finally empanelled ............................................................. 42
Predicament created by Keane case requires more than hasty responses .................... 43
Liam Keane's family no strangers to gardai in city ..................................................... 45
Move to defer trial over media coverage fails ............................................................. 46
Judge moves murder trial from Limerick to Dublin .................................................... 47
Opposition critical of policies on crime ....................................................................... 48
Limerick murder trial to be moved to Dublin .............................................................. 49
Keane trial further delayed over jury selection ............................................................ 50
Keane murder trial starts amid tight security ............................................................... 51
Murder victim discovered in Limerick field ................................................................ 52
Five must stand trial in Limerick ................................................................................. 53
Kieran Keane murder accused in court ........................................................................ 54
Accused changes plea on Limerick killing .................................................................. 55
Limerick woman denies implicating her partner ......................................................... 56
Murder accused denies naming Ryan's killers ............................................................. 57
Victim of Limerick feud is buried ............................................................................... 59



                                               Page 2 of 101
                                       Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Murder re-ignites fear and tension ............................................................................... 60
Gardai find bike used by gunmen in killing................................................................. 62
Escalation of Limerick feud feared after latest killing................................................. 63
No end in sight to city's bloody feud ........................................................................... 64
Limerick to host Central Criminal Court ..................................................................... 65
Four are charged in murder trial .................................................................................. 66
Man held in Limerick arms haul a 'key figure' ............................................................ 67
Limerick feuds not resolved but city is calmer ............................................................ 68
Men on kidnap charges remanded ............................................................................... 69
Limerick murder accused remain in custody ............................................................... 70
Security tight as two face charges in Limerick ............................................................ 72
Men in court over Kieran Keane kidnap ...................................................................... 73
Eight quizzed over Limerick murder ........................................................................... 74
File prepared after Limerick interviews ....................................................................... 75
More time granted to question Limerick men.............................................................. 76
Three held in Limerick feud inquiry ............................................................................ 77
Members of Limerick gang held .................................................................................. 78
Mourners at funeral of murdered man told to avoid hatred ......................................... 79
House bombing believed linked to feud ...................................................................... 80
Crowds at removal of Limerick murder victim ........................................................... 81
Gardai examine house in Limerick .............................................................................. 82
Satisfactory progress in Limerick inquiry, says Byrne ................................................ 83
Mediation efforts rejected in Limerick feud ................................................................ 85
Ten days that shook Limerick ...................................................................................... 87
Limerick gardai examine 'hired gun' theory ................................................................ 89
Patrols continue for tense weekend.............................................................................. 90
Gardai to question Limerick brothers .......................................................................... 91
Reprisals feared as armed gardai brought in ................................................................ 93
Gang Wars in Limerick ................................................................................................ 94
City in a state of siege awaits the next episode ............................................................ 95
Trials may be held in Limerick to help gardai ............................................................. 96




                                               Page 3 of 101
                                         Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003




                              Index of Articles – by date
DPP gets file on alleged abduction .............................................................................. 10
  23/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 10
Control of drugs empire at centre of families' feud ..................................................... 11
The Keane-Ryan feud: the story so far ........................................................................ 13
  22/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 13
Five get life sentences for Keane murder .................................................................... 14
  22/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 14
Bitterness of feud always in evidence as insults are traded ......................................... 15
  22/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 15
Keane witness refuses to join protection programme .................................................. 16
Keane jury sent to hotel for second night .................................................................... 17
  20/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 17
Trial told witness gave accused lift on night of Keane murder ................................... 18
  12/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 18
Mobile phone calls traced to mast ............................................................................... 19
 10/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 19
Fibre matches sample from victim's clothes ................................................................ 20
  05/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 20
Keane juror assured he will receive full pay ................................................................ 21
  04/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 21
Employer of Keane juror ordered to court ................................................................... 22
  03/12/2003 ................................................................................................................... 22
CAB 'freezes' Co Limerick house ................................................................................ 23
 29/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 23
Keane died from gunshot to head ................................................................................ 24
  27/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 24
Keane's nephew gave names of men who he said murdered uncle ............................. 25
  26/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 25
Widow says accused was by her house on day of murder ........................................... 26




                                                  Page 4 of 101
                                         Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


   22/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 26
Defence accuses State witness of being involved in uncle's murder ........................... 27
  21/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 27
Doctor gives jurors in Kieran Keane murder trial anti-flu vaccine in court ................ 28
  19/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 28
Man accused of intimidating trial witness ................................................................... 29
 15/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 29
Living in a gangster's paradise ..................................................................................... 30
  15/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 30
Limerick witness rejected offer of protection .............................................................. 31
  14/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 31
Keane murder trial jury to get flu vaccinations ........................................................... 32
  13/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 32
Witness says plan was to kill four men ........................................................................ 34
 12/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 34
The ritual stepping in and stepping out continues ....................................................... 36
Witness says he saw uncle killed ................................................................................. 37
  08/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 37
Special protection for the main witness leads to objections ........................................ 39
Murder trial judge not happy with the media's reporting............................................. 40
  07/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 40
Tight security as murder trial of five Limerick men opens ......................................... 41

   06/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 41
Limerick murder trial jury finally empanelled ............................................................. 42
  05/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 42
Predicament created by Keane case requires more than hasty responses .................... 43
  05/11/2003 ................................................................................................................... 43
Liam Keane's family no strangers to gardai in city ..................................................... 45
Move to defer trial over media coverage fails ............................................................. 46
  30/10/2003 ................................................................................................................... 46
Judge moves murder trial from Limerick to Dublin .................................................... 47

   25/10/2003 ................................................................................................................... 47
Opposition critical of policies on crime ....................................................................... 48
Limerick murder trial to be moved to Dublin .............................................................. 49
Keane trial further delayed over jury selection ............................................................ 50
  23/10/2003 ................................................................................................................... 50



                                                  Page 5 of 101
                                         Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane murder trial starts amid tight security ............................................................... 51
  22/10/2003 ................................................................................................................... 51
Murder victim discovered in Limerick field ................................................................ 52
Five must stand trial in Limerick ................................................................................. 53
Kieran Keane murder accused in court ........................................................................ 54
  31/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 54
Accused changes plea on Limerick killing .................................................................. 55
  31/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 55
Limerick woman denies implicating her partner ......................................................... 56
  30/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 56
Murder accused denies naming Ryan's killers ............................................................. 57
 29/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 57
Victim of Limerick feud is buried ............................................................................... 59

   11/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 59
Murder re-ignites fear and tension ............................................................................... 60
 09/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 60
Gardai find bike used by gunmen in killing................................................................. 62
  09/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 62
Escalation of Limerick feud feared after latest killing................................................. 63

   08/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 63
No end in sight to city's bloody feud ........................................................................... 64
Limerick to host Central Criminal Court ..................................................................... 65

   07/07/2003 ................................................................................................................... 65
Four are charged in murder trial .................................................................................. 66

   26/06/2003 ................................................................................................................... 66
Man held in Limerick arms haul a 'key figure' ............................................................ 67

   05/06/2003 ................................................................................................................... 67
Limerick feuds not resolved but city is calmer ............................................................ 68
  05/05/2003 ................................................................................................................... 68
Men on kidnap charges remanded ............................................................................... 69
 17/04/2003 ................................................................................................................... 69
Limerick murder accused remain in custody ............................................................... 70



                                                  Page 6 of 101
                                         Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


   16/04/2003 ................................................................................................................... 70
Security tight as two face charges in Limerick ............................................................ 72

   01/04/2003 ................................................................................................................... 72
Men in court over Kieran Keane kidnap ...................................................................... 73
 24/03/2003 ................................................................................................................... 73
Eight quizzed over Limerick murder ........................................................................... 74

   22/03/2003 ................................................................................................................... 74
File prepared after Limerick interviews ....................................................................... 75
   12/03/2003 ................................................................................................................... 75
More time granted to question Limerick men.............................................................. 76

   11/03/2003 ................................................................................................................... 76
Three held in Limerick feud inquiry ............................................................................ 77
  10/03/2003 ................................................................................................................... 77
Members of Limerick gang held .................................................................................. 78

   20/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 78
Mourners at funeral of murdered man told to avoid hatred ......................................... 79

   07/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 79
House bombing believed linked to feud ...................................................................... 80

   07/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 80
Crowds at removal of Limerick murder victim ........................................................... 81
  06/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 81
Gardai examine house in Limerick .............................................................................. 82

   05/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 82
Satisfactory progress in Limerick inquiry, says Byrne ................................................ 83

   04/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 83
Mediation efforts rejected in Limerick feud ................................................................ 85




                                                  Page 7 of 101
                                         Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003




   03/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 85
Ten days that shook Limerick ...................................................................................... 87
  01/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 87
Limerick gardai examine 'hired gun' theory ................................................................ 89

   01/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 89
Patrols continue for tense weekend.............................................................................. 90

   01/02/2003 ................................................................................................................... 90
Gardai to question Limerick brothers .......................................................................... 91
Reprisals feared as armed gardai brought in ................................................................ 93

   31/01/2003 ................................................................................................................... 93
Gang Wars in Limerick ................................................................................................ 94
  31/01/2003 ................................................................................................................... 94
City in a state of siege awaits the next episode ............................................................ 95
  31/01/2003 ................................................................................................................... 95
Trials may be held in Limerick to help gardai ............................................................. 96
  31/01/2003 ................................................................................................................... 96




                                                  Page 8 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


DPP gets file on alleged abduction
23/12/2003

Gardaí in Limerick have sent a file to the Director of Public Prosecutions in relation to
the alleged abduction of the two Ryan brothers - Kieran (19) and Eddie jnr (20) - last
January, writes Conor Lally.

They say they expect the public to be surprised when the true story emerges during
a trial.Referring to the feuding factions, Chief Supt Gerry Kelly said: "It's a handful of
thugs who are at this, they either correct their behaviour or they will face the court."
He was reviewing the crime scene in the city after the the successful conviction of
five men on Saturday for the January murder of Limerick drugs baron Kieran Keane
(36) sent out a clear and strong message to the criminals: "The evidence will be
gathered and you will suffer in the courts".
He added that three out of four murder trials conducted in Limerick this year had
resulted in prosecutions.
Not only were Limerick gardaí successful in those three cases, they had also
prevented more murders than had taken place, Mr Kelly said.
Asked on RTÉ Radio 1 yesterday if the Ryan abduction and the Keane killing were
linked he said: "Our investigation has followed the alleged abduction and that
investigation has brought the gardaí into other counties.
"We have now submitted a very substantial file to the DPP and we are awaiting a
decision on the alleged abduction and other related matters that came up in the
investigation. If the DPP decides to go with our recommendations, I think when it
unfolds the true story will come out and there will be surprises in it for the general
public". Mr Kelly said the investigation into the November 2002 murder of Mr Brian
Fitzgerald was "one of the most protracted we have carried out in Limerick". Mr
Fitzgerald was shot dead because he refused to let a gang deal drugs in the
nightclub where he worked. "We have arrested up to 28 people. The file has gone to
the DPP approximately a week and a half ago, it's a very substantial file and we
await a decision on that." Since 1997, he said, there have been 40 murders in
Limerick and 35 people have been charged in relation to them. He said the killing of
John Ryan (46) in July was feud related. Ryan was the uncle of Eddie and Kieran
Ryan.
"We interviewed people and believed we had the people we needed to get.
Unfortunately the system beat us and we couldn't progress it any further. But there
is a very substantial file just gone to the DPP in relation to people who could have
and should have supplied us with information and did not do it. We have to await a
direction there."
In relation to the collapsed trial in November of Mr Liam Keane (19) for the 2001
murder of Mr Eric Leamy, Mr Kelly said a file is being prepared for the DPP regarding
witnesses who suffered "collective amnesia" during the trial.
The investigation into the murder of Seán Poland in Clare last New Year's Eve was
ongoing and gardaí are hopeful of bringing that to a successful conclusion. The same
applied to the murder in May of Robert Fitzgerald (23) and shooting dead in the city
of Michael Campbell-McNamara (23) in October.


Control of drugs empire at centre of families' feud



                                      Page 9 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Conor Lally

22/12/2003

Background: When the guilty verdicts were returned on Saturday night against the
five Limerick men who abducted and murdered Kieran Keane (36) the energy in
Dublin's crowded Central Criminal Court was palpable. You could almost touch it.
It was as if anything could happen. The men shifted aggressively in their seats, while
gardaí and prison officers tried, unsuccessfully, to calm them.
One of the murderers, Anthony McCarthy (21), clenched his right fist, thumping it
repeatedly into his left palm, all the while fixing a menacing stare on the Keane
group in the public gallery.
"For every action there's a reaction," he told them. "You just remember that."
One of the others, James McCarthy (24), looked in the direction of Keane's nephew,
Mr Owen Treacy (31), the man he and the others tried to kill on that night in January
when Keane's life was ended violently.
It was Mr Treacy's evidence that helped secure the convictions. "You'll be looking
over your shoulder for the rest of your life boy," McCarthy told him.
The five men were convicted on all four charges of abducting Kieran Keane and
Owen Treacy, murdering Keane, and attempting to murder Treacy.
In the moments after the verdicts were read, as the men digested the news that
they would spend the best years of their lives locked up, Supt Gerard Mahon was
asked by Judge Paul Carney to outline their characters.
His evidence was a reminder that the five men in the dock had been, in no small
way, responsible for the media attention on Limerick city in the early months of this
year.
These men were part of a ruthless and well-organised crime gang, he said. They had
organised and executed the attack on Keane and Treacy. "No mercy was shown to
either victim," he told the court.
That these five men have been significant forces driving the Limerick feud is not in
doubt. The crimes for which they have been convicted can be traced back to the
bitter row between Limerick's Ryan and Keane families.
In the 1980s and 1990s Eddie Ryan Snr (41), of Hogan Avenue, Killeely, worked with
brothers Christy Keane and Kieran Keane, who were originally from St Mary's Park.
They built up a successful drugs empire. Christy was widely regarded as the brains of
the operation and ran the gang with Kieran.
Ryan was an enforcer, a hired hand. He was a tough man who, at 17, had been
convicted of manslaughter.
By the late 1990s he had become deeply unhappy with his minor role in the
operation. He decided to break away from the Keanes to begin his own drugs gang.
The parting was not bitter at first. However, two young girls in the extended families
became involved in a row at school. It soured the relationship between the two
families.
By 2000 the situation had spiralled out of control. There followed a number of
stabbing and shooting incidents and two serious fights involving women in the
families. In November of that year Eddie Ryan tried to kill Christy Keane as he sat in
his car at Hassett's Cross in Limerick city. The gun jammed and Keane escaped.
Retribution was swift. Within days Ryan was murdered in a gun attack in the Moose
Bar in the city as he sat drinking. His killing reinforced the bitterness between the
two families and their wide group of associates. Kieran Keane was suspected of
Ryan's murder.




                                   Page 10 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


In August 2001 gardaí came across Christy Keane on St Munchin's Street. He was
carrying a coal sack containing €240,000 of cannabis. He was jailed for 10 years.
There was a never-ending round of drive-by shootings, petrol bombings and other
incidents between the two groups, even before Eddie Ryan's murder. Such was their
frequency that they seldom made the national newspapers. However, in January
2003 all that changed.
On the 23rd of the month Eddie Ryan's son, Kieran (19), appeared in court over an
alleged stabbing incident dating back to March 2002. The victim was Liam Keane
(19), Christy Keane's son.
Mr Keane said he could not identify Kieran Ryan in court. Mr Ryan walked free.
Judge Carroll Moran warned that society was facing chaos and anarchy. Just hours
later Kieran Ryan and his brother, Eddie Ryan Jnr (20) were allegedly abducted at
gunpoint as they walked in the Ballynanty area of Limerick.
Kieran Keane's involvement was suspected. The Army was drafted in to assist
gardaí in searching the Limerick countryside for the missing Ryans.
The story became front-page headlines in newspapers and in radio and TV bulletins
daily.
Then, as hope was fading of the Ryans being found alive, events in Limerick took a
sensational twist.
On January 28th, Kieran Keane and his nephew, Owen Treacy, were abducted. It is
believed they went by arrangement to meet at least some of the five men who were
convicted on Saturday.
When they reached the meeting they were double-crossed.
They were tied up at gunpoint and then told to lure two brothers, Kieran and Philip
Collopy "out the road". They refused.
Mr Treacy said in court it was clear the men intended to kill the Collopys as well as
himself and Kieran Keane.
Keane and Treacy were then taken to Drombana a few miles from Limerick city.
Keane was shot in the head and tortured. Mr Treacy was stabbed 17 times but
survived. He was able to tell gardaí who had attacked him and his uncle.
The men were rounded up in March, charged with the double abduction, murder and
attempted murder, and have been in jail since.
The convicted men do not fit neatly into one grouping.
Two of them, Christopher Costelloe and David Stanners, were closely linked to the
Ryans. The other three, James and Anthony McCarthy and Dessie Dundon, were
more closely linked to a third Limerick group.
It is believed that the third group staged the kidnapping of the Ryans as an elaborate
plan to kill Kieran Keane and the Collopys. Keane may have believed he was being
"offered" the abducted Ryans, and that is why he agreed to meet the men that night
in January.
But Keane was double- crossed and murdered. The Ryans turned up safe and well
within hours. Mr Treacy, not a career criminal, broke the underworld code of silence,
securing 20 convictions against the five men. What will happen next is anybody's
guess.




                                   Page 11 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


The Keane-Ryan feud: the story so far
22/12/2003
1980s and 1990s - Eddie Ryan Snr (41), works with the Keane brothers, Christy
(42) and Kieran (36), to build up a significant drugs empire in Limerick.
In the mid-1990s, Eddie Ryan falls out with the Keanes, mainly because he resents
the fact they are making more money than he is. Ryan decides to go his own way
and begins dealing drugs, in competition with the Keanes.
1998 - After a period the relationship between Ryan and the Keanes deteriorates
further. Two girls, one from each family, become involved in a schoolyard fight.
November 2000 - Eddie Ryan Snr tries to shoot Christy Keane. The gun
jams and Keane escapes with his life. Days later Ryan is
shot dead as he sits in a Limerick pub. Kieran Keane was the chief suspect in that
murder.
August 2001 - Christy Keane is caught by gardaí with €240,000 worth of cannabis.
He is later sentenced to 10 years in prison.
March 2002 - Kieran Ryan (19) allegedly stabs Liam Keane (19). Ryan is the son
of Eddie Ryan Snr, Keane the son of Christy Keane.
January 23rd, 2003 - Keane fails to identify Ryan and the case collapses. Just
hours after the case Kieran Ryan and his brother, Eddie Ryan Jnr (20), are allegedly
abducted at gun point. Their friend, Christopher Costelloe (20), escapes the scene.
He is one of the men convicted of Kieran Keane's murder.
January 27th - The Ryans mother, Mary, appeals for the return of her sons. She
says she believes Kieran Keane is behind the abduction.
January 28th - Kieran Keane and his nephew, Owen Treacy (31), are abducted by
the group of five men convicted on Saturday. They are driven to the townland of
Drombana outside Limerick. Just before 10 p.m. Keane is shot in the head and
Treacy stabbed 17 times. Treacy survives.
January 29th - Just hours after Keane's murder, the Ryan brothers turn up safe
and well in Portlaoise. They refuse to say where they have been kept, saying they
were "warned to say nothing". Gardaí keep an open mind on whether the pair were
abducted.
March 2003 - Five men arrested and charged with the abduction and murder of
Keane and the abduction and attempted murder of Treacy.
July 7th - John Ryan (47), brother of Eddie Ryan Jnr, shot dead at a house in
Limerick.
October 19th - In a suspected revenge attack, Michael Campbell-McNamara (23),
is shot dead on the south side of Limerick city.
November 2nd - Liam Keane appears in court charged with the 2001 murder of
Limerick man Eric Leamy (21). He is told he is free to go after key witnesses suffer
"collective amnesia".
November 2003 - The trial of the five men accused of killing Kieran Keane is due
to go ahead in Limerick. However, following difficulties with raising a jury it is
switched to Dublin, first to the court house at Cloverhill prison, and then to the Four
Courts.
December 20th - After a six-week trial the five men are convicted on all four
charges. They are sentenced to life in prison for Keane's murder and will be
sentenced on the other three indictments in Limerick in February. ... By Conor Lally




                                    Page 12 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Five get life sentences for Keane murder
22/12/2003
Court report: Five Limerick men have been jailed for life after being convicted of
the murder of Limerick crime boss, Kieran Keane, and the attempted murder of his
nephew, Mr Owen Treacy.
After deliberating for more than 15 hours over three days in the Central Criminal
Court, the jury of seven men and five women on Saturday returned unanimous guilty
verdicts on the five accused for the murder of Keane at Drombana, Limerick, on
January 29th last.
The jury also found them guilty of the attempted murder of Mr Treacy and of two
counts of falsely imprisoning the two men on the same date. The men are Desmond
Dundon (20), Hyde Road, Limerick; David Stanners (31), Pineview Gardens,
Moyross; James McCarthy (24), Delmege Park, Moyross; Christopher Costelloe (20),
Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg, and Anthony McCarthy (21), Fairgreen, Garryowen.
Keane (36), Garryowen, Limerick, had his hands tied behind his back and was shot
once in the head in an execution-style killing. There was evidence that he had been
tortured. Mr Treacy (31), Munchin's Street, St Mary's Park, Limerick, was stabbed 17
times.
The State's case was that the five men acted as part of a joint enterprise and, as
such, were all involved in the murder and abduction.
Mr Justice Carney paid tribute to the jurors for their courage and sacrifice. He
sentenced all five accused to the mandatory life sentence for murder and deferred
sentence on the remaining three counts until February 3rd when the court will sit in
Limerick city. Leave to appeal will be "entertained" at that sitting.
The court was told from the outset that this was a one-witness case, with the
charges depending on the evidence and credibility of Mr Treacy.
During eight days in the witness box, in which he was subjected to intense cross-
examination by five defence teams, Mr Treacy alleged that four men were to be
murdered on the night. Keane was shot dead and Mr Treacy was left fighting for his
life.
The court heard that he and Keane arrived at Anthony McCarthy's house in
Fairgreen, Limerick, at 7 p.m. on the night of the killing and were led inside by Mr X,
who was not before the court.
Dundon placed hoods over their heads and taped their hands behind their backs.
McCarthy pointed a handgun at them and ordered them to sit. Two others came in
from the kitchen: although they were wearing balaclavas he said he recognised
Stanners by his eyes and voice.
They were then told to lure brothers Kieran and Philip Collopy "out the road" but
they refused. Mr Treacy said it was clear they intended to kill the Collopys as well as
himself and Keane.
After about an hour in Fairgreen they were ordered into the boot of a silver Micra at
gunpoint. The car was driven by Anthony McCarthy, with Mr X in the passenger seat.
They were taken to another house in Roundwood where they were again asked to
make a call to the Collopys to get them "out the road" to the Sandmall Bank.
McCarthy then walked them at gunpoint to a waiting Hiace van. Stanners drove,
James McCarthy sat in front and Costelloe sat in the back with a gun. When the van
stopped at a lonely road at Drombana, Stanners pulled Keane out while Costelloe
held the gun.
Mr Treacy had told how he watched his uncle "being pushed to the ground like a dog
and shot like a dog with his hands tied behind his back".



                                    Page 13 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Costelloe then came at him with a knife and stabbed him in the neck at which point
Stanners grabbed it and began stabbing him "almost to death".
Mr Treacy claimed that as he stabbed him, Stanners looked him in the eye and said:
"This is the last face you're going to see." He told the court he heard James
McCarthy saying, "Come on, he's dead", and the three left the scene.
Mr Treacy said he heard his uncle moaning and he ran for help. While in the van, he
had managed to loosen his hands.
State Pathologist Dr Marie Cassidy told the court that Keane died from a single
gunshot wound to the head. He also sustained six stab "torture-type wounds" to the
left ear.
Evidence in the 31-day trial was heard in Cloverhill Courthouse, attached to Cloverhill
remand prison, for security reasons. It was the first time in the history of the State
that the Central Criminal Court has heard a trial in Dublin outside the Four Courts or
the Special Criminal Court.
Each day the jurors were given an armed Garda escort as they were driven to and
from court in a minibus with blacked-out windows.




                                    Page 14 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Bitterness of feud always in evidence as insults are traded
Conor Lally

22/12/2003

Anybody who was in the round hall of Dublin's Four Courts just before 7 p.m. on
Saturday received a glimpse of the hatred which has fuelled the vicious feud in
Limerick city in recent years.
After the five men were taken from the court, having been convicted on four counts
- two for abduction, and one for murder and attempted murder - they were held in
an underground cell. Before they were led out of the building to a waiting prison
van, family and supporters of the Keane group were coralled into the locked porch
of the Four Courts. Gardaí were anxious that the prisoners would have no contact
with the crowd.
The five, all chained to prison officers, were then taken across the hall, in front of
dozens of gardaí.
Dessie Dundon led the way. He had discarded his shirt in favour of a sleeveless vest
and spat on the ground of the courthouse close to where the detectives stood. David
Stanners, a father of five, turned to gardaí and shouted: "I hope you're happy now
boys."
Anthony McCarthy was last. "This ain't going to stop the shooting, you know."
Minutes earlier, McCarthy, just after he had been sentenced to life for Keane's
murder, jumped up and stood on the defendants' bench in the court. He was having
difficulty making eye contact with Owen Treacy and Keane's widow, Sophie.
As prison officers and gardaí told him to sit back down, he stared at Treacy and
repeated time and again: "For every action there's a reaction."
The most vocal outburst was reserved for Sophie Keane. Judge Paul Carney asked
her to take the witness box so he could hear what effect her husband's murder has
had on her and her two sons, aged 13 and 15. "Our lives have stopped moving
forward," she said. "These men are animals. They took my husband's life for no
reason, he never did anybody any harm."
She was then asked what Kieran Keane, a drug dealer, had worked at. Before she
said anything, the five men shouted: "Selling drugs, killing people. He killed the
McCarthys, he killed Eddie Ryan." After the shouting stopped, she told the court her
husband "sold coal", to laughs from the defendants' bench.
Outside she refused to talk to the media. When Owen Treacy was asked b how he
felt now that the trial was over, he said: "They got what they deserved."




                                    Page 15 of 101
                                Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane witness refuses to join protection programme
Conor Lally and Carol Coulter

22/12/2003
Gardaí have been unable to convince Limerick murder trial witness, Mr Owen Treacy,
to join the State's witness protection programme, even though his life is now under
threat.
Mr Treacy (31) was the State's key witness in the trial of the five men convicted on
Saturday of the murder of his uncle, Kieran Keane (36). They were given life
sentences.
Despite the fact almost 30 of Limerick's feuding criminals are now in prison, sources
say further bloodshed is expected in the city as those close to the convicted men
seek revenge.
The Minister for Justice, Mr McDowell, tol yesterday that while Mr Treacy was
eligible to join the witness protection programme, no one could be forced to join it.
The programme entails the protected witness and his family being uprooted from
their community and being relocated, normally outside the State.
Mr McDowell stressed a life sentence would involve the five convicted men serving a
considerable period in jail and there would be no question of being eligible for parole
after seven or eight years.
He welcomed the conviction which, he said, vindicated the jury system. He said it
proved that juries could and did convict people accused of gang-related crime.
Limerick's most senior garda, Chief Supt Gerry Kelly, said yesterday he feared for the
safety of gardaí because long-range weapons had fallen into the hands of Limerick's
gangs. "Whatever degree of control you have over short [-range weapons] you have
none over those," he said.
The Limerick East TD and Minister of State for Justice, Mr Willie O'Dea, said
yesterday criminal activity in Limerick had had a negative impact on inward
investment and tourism in the city. He said good work carried out in Limerick was
being undone by negative perceptions associated with media publicity around
criminal incidents.
Meanwhile, Mr Treacy broke down outside the Central Criminal Court following the
guilty verdicts on Saturday night. "They got what they deserved, justice has been
done," he tol . He was stabbed 17 times during the attack in January which claimed
his uncle's life.
As he was taken from the court, one of the five murderers, James McCarthy (24) of
Delmege Rd, Moyross, told him: "You will be looking over your shoulder for the rest
of your life." Anthony McCarthy (21), Fairgreen, Garryowen, warned Treacy and his
supporters: "For every action there's a reaction."
The McCarthys; Desmond Dundon (20), Hyde Road; David Stanners (31) Pineview
Gardens, Moyross; and Christopher Costelloe (20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty, were
sentenced to life for Keane's murder. They will be sentenced on the other three
indictments on February 3rd in Limerick before Mr Justice Carney. Leave to appeal
will be considered at that stage.
The case was transferred from Limerick to Dublin following difficulties in empanelling
a jury. The jury deliberated for more than 15 hours before finally delivering its guilty
verdicts.




                                     Page 16 of 101
                            Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane jury sent to hotel for second night
20/12/2003
The jury in the trial of five Limerick men accused, murdering fellow Limerick man
Kieran Keane has been sent to a hotel for a second night after failing to reach a
verdict.
The jury retired shortly before 4 p.m. on Thursday and has been deliberating
through yesterday for more than nine hours so far.
The 30-day trial has been moved from Cloverhill to the Four Courts for the
duration of the jury's deliberations.
It will resume deliberations at 10 a.m. today.
The five accused men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane (36),
Garryowen House, Garryowen, Limerick on
29th January last at Drombana, Bushy Island, Limerick , and to falsely
imprisoning Mr Keane on the same date.
They also deny the attempted murder of Mr Owen Treacy (31), Mr Keane's nephew,
St Munchin's Street, St Mary's Park, Limerick, on January 29th, 2003, at Drombana
and to falsely imprisoning him on the same date.
They are: Mr David Stanners (31), Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr Desmond Dundon
(20), Hyde Road, Limerick; Mr Anthony McCarthy ( 21), Fairgreen, Garryowen; Mr
Christopher Costelloe ( 20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg and Mr James McCarthy
( 24), Delmege Park, Moyross.




                                  Page 17 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Trial told witness gave accused lift on night of Keane murder
12/12/2003
A defence witness told the Kieran Keane murder trial yesterday that he gave a lift to
one of the accused on the night of the murder.
Mr Barry Fitzgerald, with an address in the UK, told the Central Criminal Court that
he gave a lift to the accused Mr Anthony McCarthy.
He said he picked him up at a garage near Fairgreen in Limerick in a white van.
The jury has seen video footage of the garage's CCTV which shows a white van
pulling up and a man getting into it at approximately 8.50 p.m. on the night of the
murder.
Mr Anthony McCarthy had told gardaí that he was in his house in Fairgreen earlier
that night but had always maintained he then got a lift from a man in a white van
and was dropped off at the Weston area of the city.
Questioned by Mr Roddy O'Hanlon SC, for Mr McCarthy, Mr Fitzgerald agreed he
gave the accused a lift and said he also picked up two other men, whom he did not
name.
Five men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane (36), of Garryowen
House, Garryowen, Limerick, on January 29th last at Drombana, Bushy Island,
Limerick, and to falsely imprisoning Mr Keane on the same date.
They also deny the attempted murder and false imprisonment of Mr Owen Treacy
(31), of St Munchin's Street, St Mary's Park, Limerick, on the same date, also at
Drombana.
They are: Mr David Stanners (31), of Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr Desmond
Dundon (20), of Hyde Road, Limerick; Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), of Fairgreen,
Garryowen; Mr Christopher Costelloe (20), of Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg; and
Mr James McCarthy (24), of Delmege Park, Moyross.
The defence's case before Mr Justice Carney and the jury is expected to close at
Cloverhill court today.




                                   Page 18 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Mobile phone calls traced to mast
10/12/2003
Seven mobile phone calls made around the time Limerick man Kieran Keane was
being held in a house in Roundwood, Rossbrien, were traced to Vodafone's mast at
Rossbrien, the Central Criminal Court was told yesterday.
The jury has heard evidence from the chief prosecution witness, Mr Owen Treacy,
that he and Mr Keane were held at Roundwood, Rossbrien, before being driven to
Drombana, where Mr Keane was shot dead. Yesterday the court heard that eight
calls from 087 123 4853 were made between 8.17 p.m. and 9.32 p.m. on January
29th.
In evidence yesterday, Mr Kevin Dowling of Vodafone's technical support staff said
the calls lasted between nine and 42 seconds. Six were made to the same mobile
phone number - 087 625 3237.
Cross-examined by Mr Michael Bowman, for one of the accused, Mr David Stanners,
Mr Dowling said he carried out a series of tests last May. Asked if he had tested any
calls from Mr Stanners' home, he replied that he could not recall having done so.
Five men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane (36), Garryowen
House, Garryowen, Limerick, on January 29th at Drombana, Bushy Island, Limerick,
and to falsely imprisoning him on the same date. They also deny the attempted
murder of Mr Treacy (31), St Munchin's Street, St Mary's Park, Limerick, and to
falsely imprisoning him on the same date.
They are Mr David Stanners (31), Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr Desmond Dundon
(20), Hyde Road, Limerick; Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), Fairgreen, Garryowen; Mr
Christopher Costelloe (20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg; and Mr James McCarthy
(24), Delmege Park, Moyross.
The trial continues today.




                                   Page 19 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Fibre matches sample from victim's clothes
05/12/2003
Fibres taken from the clothing of Mr Kieran Keane, the Limerick man murdered
earlier this year, matched a fibre recovered from a house in Limerick where he was
allegedly held before being shot dead.
Dr Annette Forde of the State Forensic Science Laboratory told the Central Criminal
Court yesterday that she examined fibres taken from the dead man's jeans and
compared them with fibres recovered from cushion covers from a couch at
Fairgreen, Limerick.
Questioned by Mr John O'Sullivan SC, prosecuting, Dr Forde said she found that a
single fibre found on the jeans matched those taken from a cushion cover. She also
compared fibres from the cushion cover with a sample taken from the inside of a lilac
pillowcase recovered from 79, Roundwood, and found some similarities.
The court has heard allegations that Mr Keane and his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy,
were taken from Fairgreen to the house at Roundwood on the night of the murder.
Dr Forde said she also examined a number of other items, including fibres taken
from a car, and compared them with items of clothing from Mr Keane and Mr
Treacy.
In conclusion, she said her findings showed support for the allegation that Mr Keane
was in contact with the couch in Fairgreen and the boot of the car. There was no
support for the theory that Mr Treacy was in contact with the couch but there was
contact between Mr Treacy and the car.
Dr Forde said there was only slight support for the theory that the pillowcase from
Roundwood came into contact with the couch in Fairgreen, and there was nothing to
suggest that it came in contact with the boot of the car.
In other evidence, Dr Thomas Hannigan, also from the State Forensic Laboratory,
said he examined duct tape taken from the hands of Mr Keane and Mr Treacy.
He said the tape used to bind Mr Keane was was "in the shape of a handcuff". The
hands were taped separately and the tape then bound around the wrist and upper
arms.
The tape recovered from Mr Treacy had one loose end, he said.
Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC, defending Mr Desmond Dundon, suggested this was indicative
of Mr Treacy's evidence that his hands were bound differently to Kieran Keane's.
"Yes, that seems to be the case," Dr Hannigan replied.
Five men have pleaded not guilty to the murder and false imprisonment of Mr
Keane (36), of Garryowen House, Garryowen, Limerick, on January 29th last at
Drombana, Bushy Island, Limerick. They also deny the attempted murder and false
imprisonment of Mr Treacy (31), of St Munchin's Street, St Mary's Park, Limerick, on
the same date.
They are: Mr David Stanners (31), of Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr Dundon (20),
of Hyde Road, Limerick; Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), of Fairgreen, Garryowen; Mr
Christopher Costelloe (20), of Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg; and Mr James
McCarthy (24), of Delmege Park, Moyross.
The trial continues today.




                                   Page 20 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane juror assured he will receive full pay
04/12/2003
The financial controller of a company employing a juror who is on the Kieran Keane
murder trial has assured the Central Criminal Court the juror will receive full pay and
entitlements for the duration of his jury service.
Mr Justice Carney summoned the employer to appear before him amid concerns that
the juror may have suffered discrimination in his employment. Yesterday, the
financial controller gave evidence on behalf of the company in the absence of the
jury.
When the jury returned, Mr Justice Carney told the juror: "We have had the financial
controller of your employer in the witness box and he says your job was coming to
an end. That's a matter I'll have to leave to you if you wish to take issue with it, but
I have an undertaking that your full remuneration, of all descriptions, will be paid."
He said it was made clear to the employer that "the matter will be re-entered at a
moment's notice" should there be any problem.
When evidence resumed, the jury heard from a crime scene expert that Mr Keane's
body was discovered lying face down with his hands tied behind his back. He was
shot through the head and appeared to have a number of stab wounds to the side of
his head.
Questioned by Mr Denis Vaughan Buckley SC, prosecuting, Det Garda Thomas Carey
said he examined two houses, one at Fairgreen and another in Roundwood. He took
samples of three shoe prints from Roundwood, indicating the presence of three
different people.
Cross-examined by Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC, defending Mr Desmond Dundon, Det
Garda Carey agreed that gunshot could leave residue or "trace evidence" on the
person firing the gun. Mr O'Carroll then asked if it was suggested that swabs be
taken from Mr Owen Treacy, Mr Keane's nephew and the chief prosecution witness
in the trial.
Det Garda Carey said he was not aware if that was suggested.
Not even, Mr O'Carroll continued, when Mr Treacy gave an account which did not
give any explanation for the stab wounds, described as "torture wounds"? Was that
known to the investigating gardaí? "Stab wounds, yes," Det Garda Carey replied.
Mr O'Carroll put it to him that despite this, no one went back to Mr Treacy. "I would
not be privy to that," the detective responded.
Mr John Edwards SC, for Mr James McCarthy, asked him to examine duct tape
similar to that used to bind Mr Keane and Mr Treacy. Mr Edwards said if Mr Treacy
was bound by this tape, one would expect to find hair and skin cells adhering to the
surface.
"Yes," Det Garda Carey replied. Asked if he was aware that any was recovered, the
detective replied that he did not know.
Five men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane (36) last January 29th
at Bushy Island, Limerick, and to falsely imprisoning him. They also deny the
attempted murder of Mr Treacy (31) and to falsely imprisoning him. They are Mr
David Stanners (31), Mr Desmond Dundon (20), Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), Mr
Christopher Costelloe (20), and Mr James McCarthy (24).




                                    Page 21 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Employer of Keane juror ordered to court
03/12/2003
The employer of a juror serving in the Kieran Keane murder trial has been
summoned before the Central Criminal Court today.
At Cloverhill Courthouse yesterday Mr Justice Carney directed the employer to
appear before him after concerns that a juror may be suffering discrimination.
In an implicit threat to jail employers who did not comply with the law requiring
citizens to do jury duty, Mr Justice Carney said: "If an employer is being any way
recalcitrant, I can keep him where we are over Christmas."
He said that under the 1976 Juries Act, employers had a statutory obligation to
support employees serving on juries. He had information that could indicate a juror
was being discriminated against. He warned that employers were required to ensure
that no employee suffered loss of income because of jury service.
In evidence, the jury heard that one of the five accused, Mr Christopher Costelloe,
told gardaí he was in a house watching a soccer match on the night of the murder.
Det Garda Gerard Healy, Mayorstone Garda station, said he questioned Mr Costelloe
on March 21st last about his movements on January 29th, the night Mr Keane was
shot dead and his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, was stabbed.
Det Garda Healy told the court that Mr Costelloe claimed that on the night of the
murder he was in Mr Pa McCarthy's house on College Road watching a match with
Mr James McCarthy and Mr Pa McCarthy's girlfriend.
Five men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane and the attempted
murder of Mr Owen Treacy (31) last January 29th.




                                   Page 22 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


CAB 'freezes' Co Limerick house
29/11/2003
An 18-month investigation into Limerick's feuding factions by the Criminal Assets
Bureau has paved the way for the seizure of a house worth up to €300,000. Conor
Lally reports.
Last week CAB officers went to the High Court where they were granted permission
to "freeze" a property at the village of Fedamore, Co Limerick. The house belongs to
a 31-year-old Limerick man, Mr Brian Collopy.
He was not in court at the time of the hearing and it is understood he did not know
about it. The case is expected to come before the courts again next year, when CAB
will seek to begin taking possession of it.
If the bureau is successful the house will then be sold on the open market and the
proceeds returned to the State.
CAB has identified a number of other targets in Limerick against whom it is planning
to take action in the near future. It is understood that the bureau's investigation in
respect of those targets is centred on houses and other assets.
In its action against Mr Collopy, CAB made its case to the High Court by arguing it
believes he is a drug dealer. The bureau is applying the proceeds of crime legislation
in respect of the house.
Mr Collopy had strong links with the drug dealer Kieran Keane who was found shot
dead in Drombana, Bushy Island, Co Limerick, on January 29th. Mr Collopy is also a
horse dealer and is the former owner of at least one business.
In September the Food Safety Authority served a closure order on Mr Collopy in
respect of a food stall he operated. Closure orders are served when it is deemed that
there is, or is likely to be, a grave and immediate danger to public health.
He bought the house for around £60,000 in the 1990s. It is understood it was a cash
transaction and there is no mortgage outstanding on it.
While CAB has had officers working in Limerick for the last 18 months, many of those
involved in the feud in the city do not have significant assets. Some of the bigger
players in the region's drugs scene also owned reputable businesses before they
became known as drug dealers.
That means it is harder for CAB to prove their assets resulted from their criminal
activity rather than from their legal businesses.
The drug dealer Christy Keane is one such criminal. He is serving a 10-year jail term
in Portlaoise prison for drugs offences. While he acquired a property at Singland
Gardens, Limerick, some years ago, he did so at a time when he ran a coal business.
Christy Keane is the father of Liam Keane (19) whose trial for the 2001 murder of
Eric Leamy collapsed last month. He is also the brother of murdered man Kieran
Keane. Five men are currently before the courts charged with the abduction of
Keane and his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy.




                                   Page 23 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane died from gunshot to head
27/11/2003
Kieran Keane, the Limerick man shot dead last January, died from a single gunshot
wound to the head fired at close range, the deputy State pathologist told the Central
Criminal Court yesterday.
Dr Marie Cassidy said she carried out a post-mortem on the body of Kieran Keane
on January 30th last and found the deceased man had sustained a gunshot wound
to the head. The deceased also had six knife wounds around the left ear, which Dr
Cassidy described as "torture-type wounds".
Questioned by Mr Denis Vaughan Buckley SC, prosecuting, the deputy State
pathologist said she visited the scene at Drombana, Limerick, and found Mr Keane
lying face down. "His hands were tied behind his back" and he was bleeding from a
wound to the head.
Dr Cassidy said she noted heavy blood-staining around the neck of the deceased's
clothing and there was no indication that he had been upright for any length of time.
This suggested the victim could have been in a sitting or kneeling position when he
was shot. Depending on the position of the head, the gunman could have been
above the victim when he was shot, she said.
Dr Cassidy told the jury that Mr Keane sustained six stab wounds to the left side of
the head; three in front of the left ear and three behind. All six were "shallow"
wounds "associated with soft tissue damage only".
Dr Cassidy told the jury that the stab wounds "occurred at or about the time of
death" but she could not say conclusively whether they were inflicted before or after
death.
Five men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Kieran Keane.
The trial continues at Cloverhill Courthouse today.




                                   Page 24 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane's nephew gave names of men who he said murdered
uncle
26/11/2003
The nephew of murdered Limerick man Mr Kieran Keane named three men who he
said had stabbed him numerous times and shot his uncle dead, a detective garda
told the Central Criminal Court yesterday.
Det Garda John Nagle, Roxboro Garda station, said he spoke to Mr Owen Treacy
some three hours after his uncle was shot and he himself was stabbed at Drombana,
Limerick, last January 29th.
He said although Mr Treacy was very ill he was "quite coherent".
Det Garda Nagle told the jury that he asked Mr Treacy, "Who stabbed you and who
shot Kieran Keane?
"He said slowly 'a green Hiace', then he said 'David Frogs Eyes Fats Stanners, James
McCarthy, Moyross, and Smokie Costelloe'," he added.
The detective garda told the jury that Mr Treacy also mentioned "Quilligan's Yard".
In direct examination, the detective told Mr John O'Sullivan, prosecuting, that Mr
Treacy spoke about a "corner" house in a housing estate where he and Kieran
Keane were held before being driven to Drombana.
Cross-examined by Mr Michael Moloney, defending Mr Desmond Dundon, Det Garda
Nagle said Owen Treacy gave him no further details, but from other information he
received he believed the house was in Roundwood, Rossbrien.
"When we came across this house we did not know it was the house Owen Treacy
was held in." Asked about the source of this information, Det Garda Nagle replied:
"the incident room".
In other evidence, a local woman, Ms Rosita Penny, said she was passing 79
Roundwood at around 9.10 p.m. on the night of the killing. She noticed a green van
reversed into the garage. Its interior light was on and the engine was running.
Asked if there was anyone inside the van, she said no.
The court also heard that a man named as Mr X - and who was implicated by Owen
Treacy - had access to the house in Roundwood.
It had been idle for some months before the abduction of Mr Keane and Mr Treacy.
Five men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane and the attempted
murder of Mr Treacy, and to falsely imprisoning both men.
They are: Mr David Stanners; Mr Desmond Dundon; Mr Anthony McCarthy; Mr
Christopher Costelloeand Mr James McCarthy.
The trial continues at Cloverhill Courthouse.




                                   Page 25 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Widow says accused was by her house on day of murder
22/11/2003
The widow of Kieran Keane, the Limerick man shot dead last January, has said she
saw one of the accused men outside her home a few hours before her late husband
went missing.
In the Central Criminal Court yesterday Ms Sophie Keane identified Mr Desmond
Dundon as the man who was waiting outside the grocery shop attached to her
home, Garryowen House. She told the jury that she and Mr Keane had just returned
home at 3.45 p.m. after collecting their two sons from school.
Questioned by Mr John O'Sullivan, prosecuting, Ms Keane said:
"Kieran walked up to Dessie Dundon and Dessie Dundon walked towards Kieran.
Myself and the children went inside the house. They spoke for a minute, at most two
minutes, and Kieran came back inside the house. She said he ate his dinner, stayed
a few minutes and then left in his 02 registered Passat car.
"Did you see him again after that time?" Mr O'Sullivan asked.
"No," the witness replied.
She told the court she phoned her husband later and he called her back at around 7
p.m. From 8 p.m. until 9.15 p.m. she attempted to call him 10 to 15 times, and sent
him text messages, but his phone was turned off.
During that time she drove to the home of Owen Treacy and spoke to his wife,
Donna, and then began telephoning the Garda station in Limerick city. She and Ms
Treacy went looking for Mr Keane and Mr Treacy.
She told the jury that later she went out looking for her husband with Mr Keane's
brother, Anthony. Asked where they looked, she replied: "Up by the Fair Green."
Ms Keane told the jury she later identified her husband's body in the morgue at
Limerick Regional Hospital.
Cross-examined by Mr Michael Moloney, for Mr Dundon, counsel put it to her that his
client was not present outside her home on the day of the killing.
"I know Desmond Dundon and Desmond Dundon was there at that time," she
replied.
Mr Moloney then put it to the witness that Mr Dundon did not speak to Kieran
Keane.
She said she saw him, her son saw him and her husband's nephew saw him. "I saw
Dessie Dundon as clear as I can see him today in court.
"Desmond Dundon was outside my house that day," she said. "He was eating a
burger."
The five accused have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Kieran Keane (36), of
Garryowen, Limerick, on January 29th last and to falsely imprisoning him. They also
deny the attempted murder of Mr Owen Treacy (31), of St Mary's Park, Limerick, on
the same date.They are: Mr David Stanners (31); Mr Desmond Dundon (20); Mr
Anthony McCarthy (21); Mr Christopher Costelloe (20); and Mr James McCarthy (24).




                                  Page 26 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Defence accuses State witness of being involved in uncle's
murder
21/11/2003
The State's chief witness in the Kieran Keane murder trial was yesterday accused of
being involved in his uncle's murder and of suppressing information about an alleged
accomplice.
Five men are on trial for the murder of Kieran Keane and the attempted murder of
the chief witness, Mr Owen Treacy, the victim's nephew.
In a heated exchange between Mr Treacy and Mr Anthony Sammon SC, the
defending counsel claimed the witness sustained "phoney" wounds as part of a cover
up and that his version of events was not worth a "donkey's fart" .
Mr Treacy denied involvement in the murder and pointed repeatedly to Mr Sammon's
client, Mr David Stanners as the man who shot Mr Keane in the back of the head
and who inflicted multiple stab wounds on himself.
"You Mr Treacy were party to the murder of your uncle," counsel alleged, "so you
can take your pointing back".
The jury at the Central Criminal Court heard that the deceased suffered six "torture"
wounds to his head, comprising of three stab wounds to the front of his left ear and
three to the back. The witness gave evidence of having seen Mr Keane being shot
dead but that he did not see the stabbing, or hear him screaming. Could you explain,
Mr Sammon inquired, "how Kieran Keane got the torture marks in his ear"? "I can't
explain" the witness replied. "I can explain how he got shot in the head." No, said Mr
Sammon, because "the truth of your involvement in his killing would come out"
something, counsel added, "you were desperately trying to hide". "The truth is
coming out," Mr Treacy replied, "the truth."
Counsel then put it to the witness that the stab wounds he sustained at the time of
the killing were "phoney and contrived". The witness replied that he had not got the
wounds until January 29th. "They got put there by an accomplice of yours that
you're not prepared to reveal," Mr Sammon said.
"Your beloved uncle, your silent uncle was in your presence from the moment you
left your house." He was shot "by David Stanners, my lord" Mr Treacy replied.
Counsel then referred to another uncle, Christy Keane, a brother of the dead man
who was convicted of drug pushing. Keane, counsel continued, is "enjoying the
pleasure of the people of Ireland" in Portlaoise Prison.
"He deserves to be in jail my lord," Mr Treacy said. The trial continues at Cloverhill
Courthouse.




                                    Page 27 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Doctor gives jurors in Kieran Keane murder trial anti-flu
vaccine in court
19/11/2003
Jurors in the trial of five Limerick men accused of murdering fellow Limerick man
Kieran Keane were given free anti-flu vaccine yesterday to prevent them falling ill
during the high-profile trial.
A doctor attended the Central Criminal Court at Cloverhill at 2 p.m. to immunise
jurors and also the trial judge and the registrar.
The offer of the free vaccination in advance of a flu epidemic was made last week
when Mr Justice Carney said the court must "nurture and cherish" the jury. It must,
he warned, not fall below a certain number.
When the trial resumed, the chief prosecution witness, Mr Owen Treacy, continued
his cross-examination by Mr Roddy O'Hanlon SC, for the accused, Mr Anthony
McCarthy.
Mr O'Hanlon referred to Mr Treacy's statement to gardaí about a house in
Roundwood, where Mr Treacy alleges he and Keane were held before being bundled
into a van and driven to Drombana, where Keane was shot dead and the witness
stabbed.
Mr Treacy alleged that a man identified in court as Mr X led them downstairs at
gunpoint to the garage, where a green Hiace van was waiting. Counsel put it to the
witness that he had told gardaí in previous statements that it was Mr McCarthy who
had the gun.
The witness replied that he did not know whether the gun changed hands on the
way downstairs. Mr Treacy said the internal light was on in the van and he could see
clearly that there were three men inside.
He identified the two men in the front seats as Mr David Stanners and Mr McCarthy
and put the time at approximately 9.10 p.m. Counsel put it to Mr Treacy that a
passer by, Ms Penny, would give evidence that she saw the van parked outside the
house at that time and there was no one inside. Counsel said Ms Penny would say
she could see inside the van as the internal light was on. Counsel further suggested
that the reason why his evidence differed from his statement and from the
independent witness "is because your account is not in accordance with what
occurred on the evening in question".
"I witnessed it my lord," Mr Treacy replied, "and I'll never forget it." Mr Treacy told
the jury that he watched his uncle being shot dead and he himself was stabbed 17
times. "I was screaming, I was being stabbed rapidly." Mr O'Hanlon, reading from
the witnesses's medical report, suggested that 16 wounds were "superficial" and
one, described as "serious" partly punctured his lung.
"I classed them all serious" the witness replied, "they were all stab wounds." Mr
Treacy agreed with counsel that after the men had left in the van he jumped a ditch.
"Your condition did not prevent or hamper that movement" Mr O'Hanlon inquired.
"No, my lord," Mr Treacy replied. He explained that he could see car lights coming
towards him and he thought the men were returning "to finish me off".
The five accused have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Kieran Keane (36) of
Garryowen, Limerick, on January 29th last and to falsely imprisoning him on the
same date.
They also deny the attempted murder of Mr Treacy and to falsely imprisoning him.
The trial continues today.




                                    Page 28 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Man accused of intimidating trial witness
15/11/2003
A Limerick man has been charged with intimidating a witness during the Kieran
Keane murder trial at the Central Criminal Court at Cloverhill two days ago.
Mr John Dundon (21), Mayorstone Court, Old Cratloe Road, Limerick, is charged with
intimidating a witness, Ms Donna Treacy, contrary to Section 41 of the Criminal
Justice Act at Cloverhill Court on Thursday last.
He was refused bail and remanded in custody yesterday at Kilmainham District
Court.
Giving evidence of arrest, charge and caution, Det Sgt Michael Doyle said he arrested
Mr Dundon at Cloverhill at 3.55 p.m. on November 13th.
He was later released but was charged at 12.13 a.m. yesterday by Sgt Michael
McCann.
Det Sgt Doyle said he was objecting to bail because the charge was very serious.
"The charge is of a very serious nature. It will be alleged that a witness was
intimidated while giving evidence."
He added that he was also objecting to bail because Mr Dundon had previously
escaped from lawful custody last year.
Ms Anita Warren, for Mr Dundon, asked Det Sgt Doyle if the witness allegedly
intimidated by her client was sitting in the court flanked by armed gardaí and was
subject to 24-hour armed Garda protection.
Det Sgt Doyle replied "That's not correct" to both questions.
Ms Warren added that her instructions were that her client was sitting two rows
behind the alleged injured party.
Det Sgt Doyle told the court that the injured party is the wife of one of the
witnesses.
Ms Warren appealed to Judge Patrick Brady to set bail. She added that her client
would reside at his home in Limerick with his girlfriend.
Refusing bail, Judge Brady said that it was a very serious charge of intimidating a
witness.
He said: "The fact that it involves the intimidation of a witness during a trial in court
makes it more serious."
He added he was also refusing bail as Mr Dundon had previously escaped custody.
Judge Brady remanded Mr Dundon in custody to Cloverhill District Court on
November 21st next for mention.




                                     Page 29 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Living in a gangster's paradise
15/11/2003
The number of gangland killings has doubled in the past year, but none of the
perpetrators have been brought to justice, writes Conor Lally
Within hours of almost every gangland killing this year, detectives knew why the
victim was killed and who had pulled the trigger. Yet charges have been brought in
respect of only three of those 17 gangland murders.
Meanwhile, the figure for all gun homicides in 2003 has reached 20, exactly double
that of last year. And when the figures for the year's drug seizures are published,
they will most likely show a quadrupling in their estimated street value. 2003 may
well be seen as the year in which Irish gangland crime moved up a gear.
It has been a bad year for the Minister for Justice, Michael McDowell. Serious crime
has thrived at a time when a law has been introduced to criminalise people who are
drunk in pubs. Gardaí who speak to journalists have also become targets of new
legislation.
Detectives say the escalating rate of gun murders reflects how an entire generation
of young criminals are flexing their muscles for the first time. With the drug-user
market expanding massively in the last decade, the young pretenders are anxious to
mark out their territory. A significant number are cocaine users or fitness fanatics
who dabble in steroids - a major contributory factor to the paranoia levels which
currently prevail in criminal circles.
Gardaí on the front line say their efforts to target suspects are being undermined by
budgetary constraints. The Minister says the force has never had it so good. All the
while the blood-letting continues, with those responsible doing everything they can
to avoid detection.
One Garda source said criminals often wear rain gear during attacks to ensure no
DNA or clothing fibres are left at a scene. Murder weapons are usually disposed of.
Getaway cars are stolen and burned out after an attack to be sure any forensic
evidence is destroyed. Some criminals have even covered their hands with sellotape
to make sure no fingerprints or palm prints are left at the scene of a crime. In some
cases where DNA evidence has been gathered from a crime scene, convictions have
not been secured because of a lack of corroborating evidence. The public is terrified
to make statements against those involved.
So what can be done? Many gardaí believe allowing them to tap phones would be a
huge advantage in smashing the gangs. They say the tactic worked well in targeting
the IRA during the Troubles. And tapping has been used with considerable success in
the Netherlands where the police have secured conspiracy convictions against many
criminals based on telephone evidence.
Telephone taps are only approved in Ireland by special Ministerial order, and few are
sanctioned. When Tony Gregory TD spoke to Dutch police some years ago in the
course of his work with the Dáil Committee on European affairs, the officers
identified phone-tapping as a vital tool in the fight against organised criminals,
particularly drug dealers.
In the wake of the collapse of the Liam Keane trial, the Association of Garda
Sergeants and Inspectors urged the Minister to introduce legislation to make gang
membership a criminal offence. The Minister dismissed the suggestion. But some
senior officers believe he should reconsider. They point to the success of similar
legislation in Austria and Canada, where anti-gang laws have smashed serious crime
gangs that have eluded the police for decades. In Quebec, where gang membership
has been a federal offence for three years, dozens of members of the notorious



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                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Hell's Angels and Rock Machine have been imprisoned since the beginning of 2001.
Gang membership carries a sentence of up to 14 years.In Austria the police are
using similar legislation against those involved in organised gang crime and are
enjoying comparable success.
"The Minister went on TV and said the gangs are not like terrorists who swear an
oath of allegiance, so how do you define gang membership," said one senior Garda
source. "But the gangs in Austria and in Canada don't swear an allegiance either, but
it hasn't stopped the police in catching them under these new laws. They couldn't
catch the guys for murders and massive drug dealing but they got them on the gang
membership.
"A lot of them have got lengthy prison sentences and assets have been seized. Once
you can prove these guys are involved in crime and that they are working with a
common purpose, then you can prove they are in a gang.
"I don't now why the Oireachtas has shied away from introducing it here. It's a
mystery to me."

Seventeen killings: a year of deadly feuding
January 23rd Niall Mulvihill (57) The father of two was shot as he sat in his taxi
at Spencer Dock Bridge, Dublin. A passenger on a motorcycle fired shots into the car
and fled. Mulvihill drove towards the Mater Hospital but passed out on the North
Circular Road and died a short time later. He was a well-known gangland figure and
a former associate of Martin "The General" Cahill. No charges.
January 28th Ray Salinger (40) He was shot as he drank with friends in Farrell's
pub on New Street, in Dublin's south inner city. Two masked men, one carrying a
handgun, shot him a number of times in the chest. Salinger was involved in the
drugs trade. No charges.
January 29th Kieran Keane (36) The father of two was shot dead at around 9.30
p.m. in the gateway of a house in the townland of Drombanna, about three miles
east of Limerick. Keane was a drug-dealer and was involved in the feud in the city.
Five men are currently on trial for his murder.
March 23rd Charles Merriman (27) A band manager, he was found dead at St
Margaret's Road, Ballymun. He had been shot in the head with a shotgun. Merriman,
from Dublin's inner city, had worked as a bouncer. He was not a known drug-dealer
but detectives suspect he may have been the victim of a turf war. No charges.
April 5th Declan Griffin (34) He was shot at the Horse and Jockey pub in
Inchicore, Dublin. He died later in St James's Hospital. He was carrying a gun and
wearing a bulletproof vest at the time of his death. He was involved in the drugs
trade and was a Garda informant. A man has been charged with his murder.
April 12th Paul Ryan (27) The remains of the Raheny man were found at the side
of a road at Coolderry village close to Birr, Co Offaly. His hands were tied behind his
back and he had been shot in the head.
Detectives believe he may have been killed over a drugs seizure last year connected
to Dublin's Westies gang. No charges.
April 19th Michael Scott (25) Two men armed with a sword and a gun burst into
his Sillogue Road flat in Ballymun, Dublin at around 3 a.m. The victim, whose partner
was in the flat at the time, was shot in the upper body. Gardaí believe his death may
have been linked to a row at a cider party in nearby Finglas in the hours before the
fatal attack. No charges.
May 6th Robert Fitzgerald (23) The Limerick man was shot in the head and
chest after leaving a party in the Moyross area. His murder has not been linked to
the Limerick feud. He was a second cousin of Brian Fitzgerald, the Limerick bouncer




                                    Page 31 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


who was shot dead near his home in Corbally in November 2002. No charges.
June 14th Ronald Draper (25) He was shot dead at 10 p.m. while working as a
doorman at Charlie P's pub in Eden Quay, Dublin. He was a member of a Dublin
criminal gang that was involved in a high-profile gang fight with the INLA at the
Ballymount Industrial Estate in west Dublin in 1999, during which a man with links to
the INLA was killed. No charges.
June 19th Willie O'Regan (34) He was shot dead at his home on Old Cabra Road,
Finglas. This week Declan Curran (23), of Cardiffsbridge Ave, Finglas, was
charged at Dublin District Court with O'Regan's murder. Curran appears
before Cloverhill District Court next Wednesday.
July 7th John Ryan (47) The father of six was gunned down as he worked on a
patio at a house in Thomondgate, Limerick. He was the uncle of Eddie Ryan Jnr and
Kieran Ryan, the two men who were allegedly kidnapped in Limerick in January as
part of the feud in the city. John Ryan's murder was also linked to the feud. No
charges.
July 8th David McGuinness (35) McGuinness was at home on the Balrothery
Estate in Tallaght in the early hours when a caller came to his door. McGuinness was
shot three times in the head and upper body. The victim was not a major criminal
figure and gardaí believe his murder may be linked to his work as a nightclub
bouncer. No charges.
August 4th Thomas Canavan (36) A resident of Inchicore, Dublin, he was
gunned down at 9.15 p.m. as he sat in Cleary's pub on Sarsfield Road. The father of
nine had been involved in a number of minor disputes in recent times, which gardaí
believe could be linked to his murder. No charges
August 17th Bernard Sugg (23) A leading member of Dublin's notorious Westies
drugs gang, Sugg died after being shot in the chest as he sat in the Brookwood Inn
in Corduff, Blanchardstown. He had no convictions but was a major player in Dublin's
heroin scene. Gardaí believe he was killed by a rival gang. No charges.
October 9th Peter Sheridan (27) The father of three's remains were found
dumped at Scribblestown Lane in Finglas, Dublin. He had been shot in the head and
was hooded. He is believed to have been murdered by a known drug dealer who
feared Sheridan might have information to pass on to gardaí. His suspected killer has
been linked to other violent gun crime. No charges.
October 20th Michael Campbell- McNamara (23) His remains were found
dumped near Limerick's Southill Estate. He had been stabbed and shot in the head,
his hands and legs tied. Gardaí believe his death may be linked to the city feud. He
was a hardened criminal recently released from prison. No charges.
November 11th Jason Tolan (24) A so-called joyrider, he died after he was shot
in the leg on waste ground near his home in Mulhuddart, Co Dublin. He was
associated with the notorious Westies gang. Gardaí do not believe he was a drug
dealer. Thomas Murphy (24), of Wellview Avenue, Mulhuddart, has been
charged with the murder.




                                   Page 32 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003



Limerick witness rejected offer of protection
14/11/2003
The chief prosecution witness in the trial of five Limerick men accused of murdering
Mr Kieran Keane rejected the opportunity to enter the State Witness Protection
Programme, the Central Criminal Court has heard.
Mr Owen Treacy, a breadman and father of two, from St Mary's Park, Limerick, told
the court yesterday that he felt he would be safer at home than in the programme.
The court heard that Mr Treacy's wife, Donna, and their two children would also
have entered the programme, had he accepted.
Mr Treacy, who has been in the witness box for four days, said: "I turned that offer
down straight away, my lord. I considered it with my family and considered to stay in
my own home. I felt that would be the safest."
Mr Roderick O'Hanlon SC, for the accused, Mr Anthony McCarthy, asked Mr Treacy
who was in the house at Fairgreen when he and Kieran Keane arrived. "[Mr X], Mr
Dundon, and Mr \ McCarthy, me and Kieran," the witness replied.
Mr Treacy said he and his uncle, Kieran Keane, were held against their will at
Fairgreen before being put into a car at gunpoint and taken to a second house at
Roundwood.
Counsel suggested that Mr Dundon was not present when they arrived at Fairgreen.
Mr Dundon and Mr Anthony McCarthy were in the sitting-room, the witness replied.
Mr O'Hanlon further suggested that Kieran Keane was involved in "negotiations of
sorts" to borrow Mr X's car for the journey to Roundwood and that "that journey was
undertaken without Mr Dundon, Mr McCarthy or Mr \ being present at all."
"That is not correct", the witness replied. "These men were in that house."
Later Mr O'Hanlon put it to the witness that he knew his life was not in danger. "On
that night it was life or death in that house, it was life or death on January 29th," Mr
Treacy replied.
The five accused have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane (36),
Garryowen House, Garryowen, Limerick, on January 29th last at Drombana, Bushy
Island, Limerick, and to falsely imprisoning Mr Keane on the same date. They also
deny the attempted murder of Mr Treacy (31), St Munchin's Street, St Mary's Park,
Limerick, at Drombana and to falsely imprisoning him on the same date.
They are: Mr David Stanners (31), Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr Desmond Dundon
(20), Hyde Road; Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), Fairgreen, Garryowen; Mr Christopher
Costelloe (20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg; and Mr James McCarthy (24),
Delmege Park, Moyross.




                                    Page 33 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane murder trial jury to get flu vaccinations
13/11/2003
The jury in the trial of five Limerick men accused of murdering Kieran Keane have
been offered free flu vaccinations in the event of a flu epidemic during the high-
profile trial.
Mr Justice Carney said yesterday that the Central Criminal Court must "nurture and
cherish" the jury and it cannot be allowed to fall below a certain number. A doctor
will attend at Cloverhill courthouse on Tuesday to vaccinate the judge, the registrar
and the jurors, should they decide to accept the vaccination, the uptake of which is
voluntary.
The court heard that one juror had suffered a bereavement and could not attend
court on Friday. The judge said he was not going to discharge the jury and to
facilitate the juror, the court will not sit on Friday.
The chief witness, Mr Owen Treacy, continued his cross-examination yesterday. He
told the jury he watched his uncle, Kieran Keane, "being pushed to the ground like
a dog and shot like a dog with his hands tied behind his back".
He alleged that Mr Christopher Costelloe cut his throat with a knife before Mr David
Stanners "grabbed the knife" and began stabbing Mr Treacy. Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC,
representing Mr Desmond Dundon, said Mr Keane suffered six stab wounds to the
left side of the head. He said the pathologist's evidence would be that these wounds
suggested they were inflicted for reasons of torture and were not intended to be
fatal.
He asked Mr Treacy why he made no mention of the stabbing. "Can you explain?" Mr
O'Carroll asked. "I cannot, my lord," Mr Treacy replied. He repeated that he saw his
uncle being dragged in front of the headlights of a van and shot dead, but he did not
see him being stabbed.
Earlier, counsel for Mr Stanners objected to Mr Treacy's use of the nickname "Frogs
Eyes". Mr Anthony Sammon SC, complained that the term was a "continuing insult"
to his client.




                                   Page 34 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Witness says plan was to kill four men
12/11/2003
The chief witness in the trial of five men accused of murder has alleged that four
men were to be murdered on the night Kieran Keane was shot dead in Limerick and
he himself was left fighting for his life.
Mr Owen Treacy told the Central Criminal Court jury yesterday that when he and
Kieran Keane arrived at a house in Fairgreen, Limerick, on the night of the killing,
one accused, Mr Desmond Dundon, placed hoods over their heads and taped their
hands behind their backs.
Another accused, Mr Anthony McCarthy, pointed a handgun at them and ordered
them to sit. The witness told the jury that he and Mr Keane were then asked to
make a phone call to lure two brothers, Kieran and Phillip Collopy, "out the road" but
refused to do so. Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC, for Mr Dundon, put it to the witness that he
and Mr Keane were told they would be subsequently returned safely to their homes.
"My lord, what these men had in their heads was to kill the four of us on the 29th of
January. The four of us were going to be killed," he replied.
"If me or my uncle Kieran made that call, there was four of us going to be killed." He
added that the men "wanted us to get the Collopy brothers out on the Sandwell
bank".
The witness told the jury they were in the house in Fairgreen for almost one hour
during which time the men "went on" about getting the Collopys. "At no time were
we going to lure the Collopys out the road - at no time."
Counsel asked if he was wrong in alleging that Mr Dundon tied their hands. "My lord,
members of the jury, the man that taped my hands is Dessie Dundon," adding that
he also "taped Kiernan's."
"I remember him twisting our hands," he said, putting his arms behind his back for
the benefit of the jury.
The witness alleged that they were led out of the house by a Mr X, bundled into the
boot of a silver Micra car and taken to another house in Roundwood.
They were then taken to a lonely road at Drombana where Keane was shot dead -
allegedly by the accused, Mr David Stanners - and where the witness was stabbed 17
times.
Counsel put it to the witness that he "magically did a Houdini act" by getting out of
his binds. "I had no other choice, my lord," he replied. It was either "life or death on
the 29th of January," he added. Counsel then put it to him that Mr Dundon was
never in Fairgreen.
"That's not correct, my lord. Desmond Dundon was in Fairgreen on the 29th of
January."
How did you manage to escape and Kieran did not, counsel asked. "That's correct,
my lord, he did not," Mr Treacy replied.
You did not go to any classes of Houdini or escapology? counsel inquired. No, the
witness replied. "I was just lucky to get out."
"Do you know who Houdini was?" Mr Justice Carney interjected. No, the witness
said. When it was explained that Houdini was a man who escaped from bonds and
chains, he responded: "My lord, if you want to call me Houdini you can. I was just a
bit luckier than Kieran on the 29th of January - that's the way I put it."
Mr Treacy identified the accused, Mr Stanners, as the third man in Fairgreen. He
claimed he was one of two men wearing balaclavas who came from the kitchen area
while he and Keane were held at gunpoint in the sitting room.
The witness said: "Frogs Eyes [Mr Stanners's nickname] spoke just one word -



                                    Page 35 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


'Well'."
Mr O'Carroll suggested to the witness that not only could he escape from his bonds,
but he could also identify men in balaclavas. Mr Treacy replied that he identified Mr
Stanners by his eyes and his voice: "He's a man I know all my life. No doubt
whatsoever, my lord. I could identify David 'Frogs Eyes' Stanners."
Wearing a balaclava? Mr O'Carroll continued.
"That's right, my lord."
When pressed on why he could not identify the second man in the balaclava, the
witness explained that he did not have a clear view of him because he stood directly
behind Mr Stanners.
Earlier, Mr Justice Carney had rejected a defence application to discharge himself
following defence claims that he had given the media "carte blanche" to say and
write what they wished.
When the jury returned after legal applications, the judge told them he had heard
certain matters in their absence relating to ongoing publicity. There was a "raging
debate going on at various levels", including the Dáil.
Mr Justice Carney told the jury: "It would be idle of me to think I could put a lid on
any national debate," adding that he had "no power to interfere with what's going on
in National Parliament".
"I am satisfied," he continued "that we have a rapport between us that you are
going to try this case on the evidence and the evidence alone."
This trial, he added, was going to proceed to a jury verdict, but he warned counsel
that the case could not proceed on the basis that everyone was being "too precious".
Mr Justice Carney also warned the media that a major trial was in progress and it
must not be prejudiced. He also said that in "calmer waters" when the trial was over
he might refer certain media coverage to the Attorney General.




                                    Page 36 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


The ritual stepping in and stepping out continues
Kathy Sheridan

12/11/2003
Day four in Cloverhill courthouse and, as is now the ritual, it began with legal
argument. That kept the jury out until around 11.20.
Once in, they got their third warning from Mr Justice Carney, that they should reach
a verdict on the evidence they had heard in the court and have no regard to any
media whatever.
"No matter what appears in the newspapers," he added, "this case is going to
proceed to a jury verdict", upon which defence counsel, John Edwards, applied to
have the jury whisked out again. They had lasted about six minutes.
Four minutes later they were back, to be informed by the judge that he had been
asked to discharge himself from the case. His last statement, he explained, had been
interpreted as giving the media "carte blanche" to do what they wanted.
But he had made it clear to them, he said, that he would act if the press behaved in
a manner "contrary to the law". He finished: "This is a case that cannot be dealt with
on the basis of everybody being too precious all the time".
The State's chief witness, Owen Treacy, entered the witness box at 11.35 a.m. and
remained there until 4 p.m., with only the 80-minute break for lunch to interfere with
his cross-examination by Blaise O'Carroll SC, representing one of the accused, 20-
year-old Desmond Dundon.
A little more was learned about Treacy, a 31-year-old breadman and father of two.
His "great passion" was horses, he said, with the emphasis on "was". He owns 14 of
them; his uncle Kieran had approximately seven or eight.
Beyond admitting that he knew of his uncle's "falling out" with the Ryan family, he
knew nothing else, he claimed. All he knew about guns was learned from television
and the Discovery channel. He was not a member of any "camp" - "My camp is 96 St
Munchin's Street, St Mary's Park, that's my house, my camp" - nor was he involved
in any feud: "If I was involved in a feud I wouldn't be here today, looking for justice
for my uncle".
In a relatively relaxed courtroom, where the five accused have taken to resting their
feet against the wood panel separating the public benches from the barristers, the
witness spoke clearly and confidently, frequently addressing "my lord" and "members
of the jury".
He put Mr O'Carroll straight on the difference between a jacket - which was still
missing, with his BMW car keys and house keys in it - and a hoodie, which was not.
"My lord, a jacket is a jacket, a hoodie is a hoodie".
While being urged to locate a particular sentence in a statement, he looked to the
judge: "My lord, if this man [Mr O'Carroll] could take his time . . . " To which the
judge triggered some hilarity by responding: "Well, Mr O'Carroll is well known for
taking his time". It was not the only judicial comment about Mr O'Carroll's
examination style. After a lengthy phase, repeatedly teasing out the reasons behind
Mr Treacy's advice to his alleged abductors not to take Kieran Keane's car, the
judge interjected: "I think I heard that about half an hour ago".
Mr O'Carroll continues today.




                                    Page 37 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Witness says he saw uncle killed
08/11/2003
The chief witness against five Limerick men on trial for murder has told a jury that
he witnessed one of the accused push his uncle to the ground and shoot him in the
head.
When he appeared in the Central Criminal Court amid tight security yesterday, Mr
Owen Treacy (31), gave a detailed account of the night Mr Kieran Keane was shot
dead and he was left fighting for his life after being stabbed numerous times.
Mr Treacy, a Limerick bread man, arrived in court flanked by two Special Branch
detectives wearing ear-pieces who took up position on either side of the jury.
Mr Treacy identified one of the accused, Mr David Stanners, as the man who shot Mr
Keane dead at Drombana, Limerick, on January 29th last. He also identified Mr
Stanners as the man who stabbed him numerous times, leaving him for dead.
In a clear voice, the witness told Mr Denis Vaughan Buckley SC, prosecuting, that
they had been abducted, hooded and had their hands tied behind their backs with
duct tape.
He said that at around 7 p.m. that night he accompanied Mr Keane to a house in
Fairgreen, Limerick. When they arrived they were met by a man identified as Mr X,
who told Mr Keane "the lads were inside".
He went into the sitting room and Mr Desmond Dundon and Mr Anthony McCarthy
were inside. "Noddy McCarthy had a handgun in his hand," he said.
"Did you know Desmond Dundon?" counsel inquired. "I know him all my life, my
lord," Mr Treacy replied. Turning to the row of accused men, he pointed directly at
Mr Dundon: "The second man on the right."
We were told to sit there, "play along and we would be okay," the witness said. He
claimed the men wanted them to get Kieran and Philip Collopy "out the road for
them" to kill them. "There was no way we could do that."
He alleged that Mr Dundon ordered them to stand while he tied their hands behind
their backs. Two men then appeared from the kitchen wearing balaclavas.
He knew one of them to be "David 'Frog's Eyes' Stanners. I knew his voice all my
life." He alleged that Mr Dundon placed hoods over their heads, which he taped
down.
They were led out and placed in the boot of a silver Micra. "Mr X was in the
passenger seat and 'Noddy' McCarthy was the driver." They went to a house in
Roundwood Estate, Rosbrien, and drove into the garage. The witness said he and Mr
Keane were again asked "about getting the Collopys out to Sandwell Bank, near the
Island fields". "Kieran said 'there's no way we're going to do that'." The witness
recalled Mr Dundon talking on the phone and saying "we've got them". Some 10
minutes later, they were led back down the stairs. He was pushed into a green Hiace
van by Mr McCarthy and Mr Keane by Mr Dundon.
He said Mr Christopher Costelloe had a handgun. It looked like the same .38 revolver
that Mr McCarthy allegedly had in Fairgreen. "I could see David 'Frog's Eyes'
Stanners was the driver of the van and in the passenger seat, my lord, was James
McCarthy who I know all my life." Mr Costelloe sat in the back armed with the
handgun, he said
When the van stopped, Mr Stanners ordered them out and pushed Mr Keane to the
ground. "And I witnessed David 'Frog's Eyes' Stanners shoot my uncle in the back of
the head," Mr Treacy alleged.
He said Mr Stanners and Mr Costelloe came towards him. "Smokie stabbed me in the
throat." Mr Treacy said he cut his palm as he tried to take the knife. "I was stabbed



                                   Page 38 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


17 times on the 29th of January. David Stanners stabbed me in the chest a good few
times my lord," he said.
The witness added that he kept stabbing him in the ear and neck. "I was stabbed
twice in the lung with terrible force and pressure." "Who stabbed you?" asked Mr
Buckley. "Frog's Eyes David Stanners," the witness replied.
"Stanners said: 'This is the last face you're going to see and he stuck the knife into
me'." He said he heard Mr McCarthy saying "He's dead, he's dead, he's dead."
"I played dead, my lord because I knew it was the only way to get rid of these men."
After they drove off he went over to where Mr Keane was lying and could see he
was barely breathing. He went to a nearby house for help.
Cross-examined by Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC, for Mr Dundon, the witness said the night
of January 29th was the worst night of his life.
He said there was never any animosity between him and Mr Dundon. Asked what
conceivable motive could Mr Dundon have, Mr Treacy replied: "I don't know why he
done it but he done it." The five accused have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr
Keane (36), of Garryowen, Limerick on January 29th last at Drombana, Bushy
Island, Limerick and to falsely imprisoning Mr Keane on the same date.
They also deny the attempted murder of Mr Treacy (31) of St Mary's Park on January
29th last and to falsely imprisoning him.
They are: Mr Desmond Dundon (20), Hyde Road, Limerick; Mr David Stanners (31),
Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr James McCarthy (24), Delmege Park, Moyross; Mr
Christopher Costelloe (20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg and Mr Anthony
McCarthy (21), Fairgreen, Garryowen.
The trial continues at Cloverhill Courthouse on Tuesday.




                                   Page 39 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Special protection for the main witness leads to objections
Kathy Sheridan

08/11/2003
The jury of seven men and five women at Cloverhill courthouse since Wednesday
have all the appearances of an alert, hard- working crew. By now they will have
learned the value of patience.
In one 10-minute period yesterday, there were 12 objections. The jury was sent out
four times. The total time the jury sat: about two hours and 20 minutes. On
Thursday, the entire morning was spent in legal argument in its absence. In the
afternoon, the jurors were sent out twice. Total time the jury sat: under two hours.
On Wednesday, the jurors were no sooner in at about 11.10 a.m. than they were
sent out again, before reappearing at 12.30 p.m. Total time they sat: about one hour
and 20 minutes.
Yesterday began with a defence objection to the configuration of the courtroom.
The occupants of the new jury box were asked if they had a clear view of the State's
main witness in the witness box. They hadn't.
So the witness, Owen Treacy, was repositioned to the right of the court, beside the
jury but with his back to the barristers, upon which one declared that he was "not
prepared to examine the back of the witness's head".
Meanwhile, Treacy's two minders, lanky square-jawed gardaí from the "special
protection unit", armed with conspicuous ear-pieces and what one defence counsel
objected to as "some kind of padding" in their jackets, were sticking close to their
charge, taking up position on either side of the jury box.
This was deemed by defence counsel to be "so prejudicial as to be beyond belief".
Challenged as to who they were and what their ear-pieces were for, one identified
his unit and stated firmly that "my responsibility is the protection of the witness".
The ear-piece, he said, "is a communication matter between me and my colleague,
should any matter arise".
Finally, a carpenter was drafted in to install a higher chair in the witness box.
Treacy's minders remained close.
They were not the only evidence of increased security yesterday. Reporters were
scattered from the previously reserved second row directly behind the five accused
to make room for four prison officers spread across eight seats.
The five were also flanked by two officers on either side, in addition to a minimum of
three gardaí close by at all times.
The public benches have also begun to fill with family and friends. Jokes, comments
and gestures were exchanged while they were being led in and out.
But Treacy was at centre stage yesterday. The 31-year-old bread man, father of two
and nephew of the murdered man Kieran Keane, gave his evidence in a strong,
determined manner, telling defence counsel Blaise O'Carroll that "my life has ended
since the 29th of January".
He pointed firmly at each of the accused as he described their alleged roles in the
events of January 29th, always referring to David Stanners as David "Frog's Eye"
Stanners, to the audible resentment of some in the public benches.
Some of the defendants, he said, he had known all his life; "Smokie" Costelloe's
father, for example, had plastered the front of his house.
The trial resumes on Tuesday.




                                    Page 40 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Murder trial judge not happy with the media's reporting
07/11/2003
A trial judge yesterday threatened to send various media reports to the Attorney
General in connection with the coverage of the trial of five Limerick men accused of
murder.
Mr Justice Carney told the jury he had yesterday morning perused various media
reports and found a huge amount of them to be inaccurate and prejudicial.
He said it was not just tabloid newspapers he found to be at fault, but also
broadsheets that were out to create mischief.
Instructing the jury to ignore anything they may read, hear or watch on TV, Mr
Justice Carney said that he had the power to put jurors into a hotel to protect them
from the media.
He said he had absolute faith and confidence that they would act on the evidence
before them and not on anything they might glean from the media.
He told the court he may later refer some of the growing amount of material to the
Attorney General to consider what steps might be appropriate.
The jury returned to the Central Criminal Court sitting in Cloverhill Courthouse
yesterday afternoon after various legal matters had been discussed in their absence
in the morning.
They were then shown photographs of the body of the deceased man, Kieran
Keane, and injuries to Owen Treacy, the chief prosecution witness.
Det Garda Austin O'Callaghan, of the Technical Bureau, told the court he visited a
site at Drombana, Limerick, and took a number of photographs.
Asked to describe a book of four photos, he said the first was of "the body of the
deceased, Kieran Keane."
Photograph No 2 showed Mr Keane's head, while Nos 3 and 4 were of the deceased
with his hands tied behind his back and of staining underneath a tarpaulin at the
gates of a partially constructed house.
Other photos circulated to the jury showed injuries to the face, head, arms and chest
of Owen Treacy, which were taken on February 2nd last while he was in hospital.
Another witness, Det Garda Gerard Fitzgerald, also told the jury that he accompanied
Mr Treacy as he pointed out a number of locations in Limerick including Fairgreen,
Roundwood Estate, Rosbrien and Drombana, Bushy Island, Limerick.
The five accused men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Kieran Keane (36),
of Garryowen Limerick, at Drombana, Bushy Island, Co Limerick, on January 29th
last and to the false imprisonment of Mr Keane on the same date.
They also plead not guilty to the attempted murder of Mr Keane's nephew, Owen
Treacy (31), of St Munchin's Street, Limerick, on the same date and at the same
location and to falsely imprisoning Mr Treacy.
They are: Mr Desmond Dundon (20), Hyde Road, Limerick; Mr David Stanners (31),
Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr James McCarthy (24), Delmege Park, Moyross; Mr
Christopher Costelloe (20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg; and Mr Anthony
McCarthy (21), Fairgreen, Garryowen.
The trial before Mr Justice Carney and a jury continues today.




                                   Page 41 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Tight security as murder trial of five Limerick men opens
Liz Walsh


06/11/2003
The trial of five Limerick men charged with the murder of Kieran Keane and the
attempted murder of his nephew opened amid tight security in Dublin's Cloverhill
Courthouse yesterday.
It is the first time that the Central Criminal Court has conducted a trial in Dublin
outside the Four Courts or Green Street Courthouse.
Opening the case for the State, Mr Denis Vaughan Buckley SC, prosecuting, told the
jury of seven men and five women it was the State's case that all five accused men
were involved in the abduction and murder. He said the prosecution case depended
"wholly or substantially" on the evidence of Owen Treacy, Mr Keane's nephew.
Mr Buckley told the jury they will hear evidence from Mr Treacy that on the day of
the killing, he travelled in Mr Keane's car to an area near the Fairgreen, Limerick,
where they met a man identified in court as "Mr X", who is not one of the accused.
Anthony "Noddy" McCarthy and Desmond Dundon were also there and Mr McCarthy
was armed with a handgun, it is claimed. The jury would hear that Mr Dundon asked
them to telephone a Mr Callopy to get him "out the road" but he refused to make the
call.
The jury would also hear that there were a number of other men present wearing
balaclavas and Mr Treacy will say he recognised one as David "Frog Eye" Stanners.
Mr Treacy will also tell the jury that Mr Dundon tied his and Mr Keane's hands
behind their backs, placed hoods on their heads, taped them down and Mr X led
them out.
The two were then ordered into the boot of a car driven by Mr McCarthy, with Mr X
in the passenger seat. They were driven to another house in Roundwood Estate. On
arrival, the hoods were taken off and they were asked again to ring the Callopys. Mr
McCarthy then walked them down to a van at gunpoint.
Kieran Keane asked Anthony McCarthy if he was coming and he said "no". Mr
Treacy would tell the jury that David Stanners drove, James McCarthy sat in the
front seat and Christopher Costelloe sat in the back.
He would also say that Mr Costelloe had a gun in his hand which he thought was a
.38 revolver.
Mr Treacy and Mr Keane were ordered to lie on the floor of the van with blankets
over them. They were driven around for about 35 minutes. Mr Treacy will say that
David Stanners pulled Kieran Keane out of the van while Smokie Costelloe held the
gun.
He will say he saw Mr Stanners throw Mr Keane on the ground and shoot him in the
head, while Mr Costelloe held on to Mr Treacy. Counsel said Mr Treacy would tell the
jury Mr Stanners came towards him with a gun.
Mr Costelloe allegedly stuck a knife into his neck following which David Stanners took
the knife, "looked him straight in the eye and said 'that's the last face you're going to
see'." He then stabbed Mr Treacy in the side.
Mr Treacy would also say he heard James McCarthy say "come on, come on he's
dead". They then left the scene. When Mr Treacy went over to his uncle he could see
he was dead and he went for help.
Mr Buckley told the jury Mr Treacy had known most of these men for years. Counsel
said they would also hear evidence that Kieran Keane died from a single gun shot to




                                     Page 42 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


the head and also sustained six knife wounds near his left ear, while Mr Treacy
sustained multiple stab wounds.
Mr Justice Carney warned the jury there was a great deal of "inaccurate material
floating around".
The five accused men have pleaded not guilty to the murder of Kieran Keane (36),
Garryowen, last January 29th at Drombana, Limerick. The accused men also deny
the attempted murder of Mr Keane's nephew, Owen Treacy, St Mary's Park,
Limerick, on the same date and at the same location and to falsely imprisoning Mr
Treacy.
They are: Desmond Dundon (20), Hyde Road, Limerick; David Stanners (31),
Pineview Gardens, Moyross; James McCarthy (24), Delmege Park, Moyross;
Christopher "Smokie" Costelloe (20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg; and Anthony
"Noddy" McCarthy (21), Fairgreen, Garryowen.
The trial continues today.




                                  Page 43 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003



Limerick murder trial jury finally empanelled
05/11/2003
In Dublin a jury of seven men and five women has been sworn in to try five Limerick
men accused of the murder of Mr Kieran Keane.
The trial had been transferred to Dublin from Limerick after difficulties in empanelling
a jury there.
It took just over an hour in the Central Criminal Court yesterday to swear in a jury
panel. In all, 180 jury summonses were issued, of which 73 potential jurors were
called on five separate occasions before a panel was finally sworn.
Three men - two of whom had already been sworn - asked to be excused citing fear
and nervousness. One said: "I don't think I'll be able to handle this, I'm a bit
nervous". Another told the court he was "shaking", while a third also said he did not
believe he would "be able for this."
A large number of those called asked to be excused because of problems
surrounding employment, health, single parenthood and holiday arrangements. A
number also said they were caring for sick relatives.
The trial is due to open today in Cloverhill Courthouse attached to Dublin's
Wheatfield Prison. Jurors will assemble at the Four Courts and be transported to
Clondalkin for the trial .
During the jury selection, the assistant chief prosecution solicitor challenged one
potential juror on the grounds that a family member had a previous conviction.
Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC representing the accused, Mr Desmond Dundon, and a number
of other counsel representing the five, expressed concern as to whether the State
was "vetting" potential jurors.
They told trial judge Mr Justice Carney, - who rejected the challenge - that the only
information that should be held on a potential juror was name, address and
occupation.
When formally arraigned yesterday the five accused pleaded not guilty to the murder
of Mr Kieran Keane (36) Garryowen House, Greenhills Road, Garryowen, Limerick,
at Drombana, Bushy Island, Co Limerick on 29th January last and to the false
imprisonment of Mr Keane on the same date.
They also pleaded not guilty to the attempted murder of Mr Keane's nephew, Owen
Treacy of St Munchin's Street, St Mary's Park, Limerick on 29th January 2003 on the
same date and the same location and to falsely imprisoning Mr Treacy.
They are: Mr Desmond Dundon (20) Hyde Road, Limerick; Mr David Stanners (31)
Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr James McCarthy (24) Delmege Park, Moyross; Mr
Christopher "Smokie" Costelloe (20) Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty Beg and Mr Anthony
McCarthy (21) Fairgreen, Garryowen.
Trial Judge Mr Justice Paul Carney said the decision to hold the trial in Cloverhill was
for reasons of space.




                                    Page 44 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Predicament created by Keane case requires more than hasty
responses
05/11/2003
The promised review of the law and criminal justice system in the wake of the
collapse of the Keane trial is unlikely to produce major changes, writes Carol
Coulter, Legal Affairs Correspondent
Mr McDowell was quick to promise a review of the courts system, Garda resources
and the law following the collapse of the trial of Liam Keane for murder on Monday,
when the DPP decided not to proceed with the prosecution. This followed a
succession of witnesses saying they were unable to recall the events of the night in
question.
There has been understandable outrage that a man accused of murder has walked
free from a court, still presumed innocent, because the case prepared by the DPP did
not stand up in court. This has been accompanied by calls for action of various kinds,
ranging from extended use of the Special Criminal Court to the formation of heavily-
armed squads of gardaí to "take on" criminal gangs.
Hasty responses to perceived crises in the criminal justice system do not have a very
good track record. A few years ago there was a huge outcry about the committing of
crimes by people on bail, leading to a constitutional referendum on reducing the
right to bail. This was overwhelmingly passed. Yet the law was not implemented for
a number of years because of a lack of prison spaces. Meanwhile the crime rate fell
anyway.
Last year there was understandable public outrage about the death of two gardaí in
an accident involving two young joyriders. In response, the Government announced
that it would establish a special detention unit in St Patrick's Institution for 14 to 15-
year-olds, at an estimated cost of close to €10 million.
Despite substantial work being carried out on the new unit, it later emerged that it is
not going to be used for this age group at all, but for 16 and 17-year-olds, part of
the age group for which St Patrick's exists anyway. Although it was due to open this
autumn, there is no sign of it opening its doors, and there are still no extra detention
or other facilities for 14 and 15-year-olds who get involved in joyriding.
These are just two examples of deciding in haste and (hopefully) repenting at
leisure, though some recent initiatives in the criminal justice area, like the criminal
assets legislation, have been effective.
So what can the Minister do?
Yesterday he announced an extra €2 million for Garda initiatives in Limerick to tackle
gang-related crime. He will examine a Canadian legal precedent where statements
made to police can be used in court even if those who made them do not give direct
evidence. He will also undoubtedly consult experts in the area.
But experts contacted b did not see any easy solutions. "The Minister will need to
formulate the problem, decide how to deal with it, and make sure the solution is
effective," said Dr Ian O'Donnell of UCD's Institute of Criminology. "People don't feel
confident they can be protected if they go to the police. This is not a question of
more police powers or resources."
Witnesses needed to be protected, and to feel protected, he said. Part of this was
more speedy trials, where there was not a long delay between a suspect being
charged and brought to trial. Another part of it was the use of the bail regime itself
to prevent any possible intimidation.
Dr O'Donnell pointed out that the suspicion that witnesses might be intimidated was
itself a reason to refuse bail even before the recent bail referendum. Conditions



                                     Page 45 of 101
                                Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


could also be placed on the granting of bail, like insisting that the accused person
reside away from the area and keep away from nominated areas and people.
In England there are bail hostels, he said, where people can be required to live, and
where a curfew can be imposed, if the courts consider this necessary to ensure that
an accused does not interfere with witnesses.
"This Minister knows better than most that you can't make good law on the back of
hard cases," said Professor Dermot Walsh of the Department of Law in Limerick
University. "The basic facts of this case are not unique. Cases regularly collapse
because the prosecution discovers at a late stage that witnesses won't come up to
speed."
Part of the solution was greater integration on the part of the Garda into the
communities involved, he said. "In any normal society the prosecution line-up will
feel able to tell the authorities when they come under pressure, and seek their
support and protection. But in certain communities you don't see the gardaí as part
of your support system. You see them as enemies.
"This needs to be addressed within the gardaí, and they need to build meaningful
bridges with these communities at all levels, not just among community gardaí,
otherwise the cooperation won't be there. People who can give information don't
have confidence in the system to come forward, and in its ability to protect them."
Professor Finbarr McAuley of UCD agreed that the shorter the time between arrest
and trial, the better.
The Special Criminal Court has been invoked as a possible solution. But it was set up
to deal with a fear of jury intimidation, and this was not an issue in this case, nor is it
expected that the trial of those accused of the murder of Kieran Keane, which has
been moved from Limerick, will not be able to be tried by a jury in Dublin.
This court has been used in a number of high-profile criminal cases where jury
intimidation was feared, most recently that of John Gilligan. However, the Minister
for Justice told law students in UCD recently that he hopes to see it phased out as
soon as possible, and its continued existence has been widely questioned in the light
of the peace process.
Certain rules of evidence are different there, notably the use of a Garda
Superintendent's opinion that a person is a member of an illegal organisation.
However, that is a specific, technical offence created by the Offences Against the
State Act, and it is difficult to see how it could be applied to ordinary crime.
Professor McAuley advised caution in rushing to quick solutions. "It behoves
everyone to stand back and see what those charged with the responsibility of dealing
with this come up with. Firing suggestions around is not helpful."




                                      Page 46 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Liam Keane's family no strangers to gardai in city
Conor Lally

04/11/2003

Background: Liam Keane's family are no strangers to the gardaí in Limerick. The
19-year-old is the son of Christy Keane, currently serving a 10-year prison sentence
for drugs related offences.
Liam Keane's uncle was Kieran Keane, the Limerick drug dealer who was abducted
and shot dead just outside the city last January.
In May 2002 at Limerick Circuit Court, Christy Keane (42) was described as the
leader of the gang responsible for most of the drugs in the Shannon-side city.
The court heard that Christy Keane, of Singland Gardens, Ballysimon, was caught
with 19.5 kg of cannabis by three Garda detectives at St Munchin's Street on August
21st, 2001.
The cannabis, which was contained in a coal sack, was being carried by Christy
Keane across some waste ground when he was apprehended. It had a street value
of €240,000 and was sufficient to make 190,969 hand-rolled cigarettes, the court
heard.
A defence witness, who was not named during the proceedings because he was
before the court on another charge, said he was carrying the "sack of hash" when he
saw gardaí coming towards him. He claimed he had dropped the hash and hidden.
Christy Keane, who pleaded not guilty to possession of the drug worth in excess of
€12,697 for sale or supply, said he had been wrongly identified by gardaí. He
claimed he was carrying a bridle and a rope for a horse when he was confronted by
the officers.
Supt Gerry Mahon, of Roxboro Garda station, told the court that Christy Keane, a
father of two, was not a drugs courier but a gang leader who had no known means
of income and was living in a private house. He had a criminal record dating back to
1978 when he was convicted of larceny in a juvenile court.
Judge Sean O'Leary said Christy Keane was a substantial operator in the drugs
scene as evidenced by his ownership of a sizeable cache of drugs.
After sentencing, Judge O'Leary referred to a court atmosphere which he described
as hostile to the jury. On the first day of the trial, he ordered a person out of the
court for acting in an intimidatory manner towards the jury. He was not suggesting
Christy Keane was responsible but he did not want it to happen again, he said.
With Christy in prison, his younger brother Kieran (36) assumed control of his
brother's drugs enterprise. Kieran was the main suspect in the 2000 murder of
Limerick man Eddie Ryan Snr. He was shot dead in November of that year as he sat
drinking in Limerick's Moose Bar.
Kieran Keane and Eddie Ryan Snr had once been close, but had fallen out and
become bitter rivals.
The Ryans and Keanes have been embroiled in a bitter feud for the last number of
years.




                                   Page 47 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Move to defer trial over media coverage fails
30/10/2003
The Irish Times and RTÉ were among a number of media organisations criticised in
the Central Criminal Court for what was termed "prejudicial" coverage in advance of
a forthcoming Limerick murder trial.
Yesterday lawyers acting for five men due to stand trial in Dublin on Tuesday applied
for an adjournment because of what they described as frenzied and "totally
inaccurate" reporting in broadsheet and tabloid newspapers at the weekend. They
claimed that print and broadcast material created a "real and substantial risk" that
the accused would not receive a fair trial.
Applying for a deferment to allow the "fade factor" to kick in, Mr Brendan Nix SC,
acting for Mr Christopher Costelloe, said it was outrageous that his client's
presumption of innocence was undermined by recent reports. He singled out in
particular an article in Ireland on Sunday which linked attacks on a prosecution
counsel's home and other recent incidents, to this case.
Network 2's The Panel and TV3 were criticised for recent broadcasts as was a
weekend report i . A bundle of articles handed to the court included those from two
other Sunday newspapers.
Mr Anthony Sammon SC, for accused Mr David Stanners, submitted that it was "not
safe for this trial to proceed" and asked that it be adjourned to allow for the heat
generated by media reports to fade.
Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC, Mr John Edwards SC and Mr Roddy O'Hanlon SC, also asked
for an adjournment because of media reports linking the trial to the Limerick feud
prior to the trial's commencement.
Prosecuting counsel Mr Denis Vaughan Buckley SC, while criticising the Ireland on
Sunday article "as totally inaccurate in its entirety", submitted that the trial should
not be adjourned because of recent media reports.
Rejecting the defence application, Mr Justice Carney said juries act on the evidence
and on directions from the trial judge and are not prejudiced by media reports. He
said there is a tendency to treat juries like "simpletons in many respects".
"I don't share that view," he said. "I am satisfied that the accused will get a fair
trial."
Mr Justice Carney pointed out that the expeditious hearing of the case was of
enormous public interest and ruled that it will go ahead as scheduled.
He commented that the case could not be run without reference to a feud and said
the duration of the trial as previously reported was totally overstated.
The five accused have pleaded not guilty of the murder on January 29th of Kieran
Keane (36), from Greenhills Road, Garryowen, Limerick. They also deny the
attempted murder of his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, on the same occasion and two
counts of false imprisonment.
Last week, the trial was moved from Limerick to Dublin because of difficulties in
selecting a jury. It is now set to go ahead on Tuesday with a new jury.




                                    Page 48 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Judge moves murder trial from Limerick to Dublin
Kathryn Hayes


25/10/2003
The trial of five men charged with the murder of crime figure Kieran Keane, due to
begin in Limerick last Tuesday, was finally moved to Dublin yesterday following
unsuccessful attempts to select a jury.
After three days of difficulties in selecting 12 jurors, Mr Justice Butler referred to the
"exceptional circumstances of a case involving five accused men from a community
with a relatively small population".
Mr Justice Butler said it was likely that if they tried to select a new panel of jurors in
Limerick the same problems would arise. "It is my view in the light of our experience
with the present panel that there is no reason why similar difficulties would not be
incurred with the next panel."
A total of 170 jurors were due to appear at the Central Criminal Court on Tuesday for
the opening of the murder trial, but fewer than 100 turned up.
It is understood that a number of medical certificates had been submitted.
After three days, the trial was left with a panel of just 10 jurors when a number of
those who attended asked to be excused.
Mr Justice Butler discharged the 10 yesterday and ruled that the trial be moved to
the Central Criminal Court, sitting in Dublin on November 4th.
The judge said: "The experience so far is that the sittings of the Central Criminal
Court in Limerick have been highly successful. What occurred in the present case
represented a glitch in that short record.
"It was due to the exceptional circumstances of a trial involving five accused from a
community with a relatively small population and a case that is expected to last for
at least eight weeks.
"I confidently expect that no such difficulties will arise in the vast majority of cases
that may be tried in Limerick, and I do know that a judge will be available for the
Central Criminal Court sitting here on November 4th next."
On Tuesday the five accused men pleaded not guilty to the murder of Kieran Keane
in Drombana, Co Limerick, last January 29th, and to the attempted murder of his
nephew, Owen Treacy, on the same date. They also pleaded not guilty to falsely
imprisoning the two men on the same date.
The five accused Limerick men are: Messrs James McCarthy (24), Delmege Park,
Moyross; David Stanners (31), Pineview Gardens Moyross; Christopher Costelloe
(20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty; Anthony McCarthy (21), The Fairgreen; and Dessie
Dundon (20), Hyde Road.
They are represented by five senior counsel, five junior counsel, along with
instructing solicitors.
Prosecution for the State comprises one senior counsel, one junior counsel and an
instructing solicitor.
Legal fees alone to barristers and solicitors are estimated to be in the region of
€100,000 for the three days.
In addition there were major costs associated with security for the trial, including the
deployment of the Garda helicopter, the sub-aqua unit, members of the armed
Emergency Response Unit, along with overtime costs for prison officers, detectives
and uniformed gardaí.




                                     Page 49 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Opposition critical of policies on crime
Arthur Beesley, Political Reporter

25/10/2003
The Opposition strongly criticised the Government after the trial of five men accused
of the murder of Kieran Keane was transferred to Dublin from Limerick.
However, a spokesman for the Minister for Justice, Mr McDowell, denied that the
strategy of basing criminal trials outside Dublin had backfired.
Fine Gael's justice spokesman, Mr John Deasy, said the failure to empanel a jury in
the trial indicated that the Government had failed in the basic task of protecting its
citizens.
Placing the blame on the Minister for Justice, he said the events illustrated that the
Government was unable to deal with the growth of organised crime.
The gang culture in Limerick had spiralled out of control, leaving citizens in fear, Mr
Deasy claimed. The Government had failed to provide sufficient resources to tackle
the drug problem at the root of gang culture.
Labour spokesman Mr Joe Costello said the transfer of the trial was "a serious
development" for the legal and policing systems. It was a stark indicator of the
extent to which people were in fear of organised crime.
"The failure to find 12 citizens willing and able to sit on a jury is a reflection of the
climate of fear that has been created, largely as a result of the failure of the
Government and the gardaí to take on and defeat criminal gangs," he said.
"There was probably no alternative to the decision to transfer their trial to Dublin.
However, we all have to consider the implications for Irish society of a situation
where it has not been possible to empanel a jury in the third-largest city in the
country to hear a major trial."
The gang problem was not confined to Limerick. "There have been up to 17
gangland-type murders in the country this year so far, many of them in Dublin.
There are parts of Dublin where people are living in constant fear of the crime
barons."
Mr McDowell's spokesman said the Government fully supported the hearings of the
Central Criminal Court in Limerick. Other cases had gone ahead in Limerick and
sittings of the court in the city would continue.




                                     Page 50 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Limerick murder trial to be moved to Dublin
Carol Coulter, Legal Affairs Correspondent

24/10/2003
The trial in Limerick of five men for the murder of Kieran Keane will be transferred
to Dublin has learned. It is expected to start in the Central Criminal Court in the
Four Courts on Tuesday week.
It is understood the decision was made by High Court president Mr Justice Finnegan,
following difficulties in empanelling a jury in Limerick on Wednesday. An
unprecedented number of those who attended for jury service sought to be excused.
The trial was due to resume today with the final empanelling, following a day's
reflection on the situation by the presiding judge, Mr Justice Butler.
While this case will now be transferred, the Central Criminal Court will continue next
week in Limerick under Mr Justice Butler and will hear other cases.
It is not yet known what judge will hear the murder case in Dublin. Mr Justice
Carney, who is in charge of the Central Criminal Court lists, is absent this week, but
is due to return next week, when he will decide whether he will hear the case or
allocate it to another judge.
Mr Justice Butler adjourned the case on Wednesday to consider the implications of
the difficulty of getting a jury. Of the 170 people who were called, about 100 turned
up. A large number of medical certificates were handed in and, of the 100 who
turned up, many said they would be unable to commit themselves to the trial for
various reasons. More than 40 were objected to by counsel for the five accused and
for the DPP, leaving 11 sworn in.
Mr James McCarthy (24), Delmege Park, Moyross; Mr David Stanners (31), Pineview
Gardens, Moyross; Mr Christopher Costelloe (20), Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty; Mr
Anthony McCarthy (21) the Fairgreen; and Mr Dessie Dundon (20), Hyde Road, all in
Limerick, pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane on January 29th and to the
attempted murder of his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy.
They also pleaded not guilty to falsely imprisoning the two men on the same date.




                                    Page 51 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane trial further delayed over jury selection
23/10/2003
The trial of five men charged with the murder of Limerick crime figure Kieran Keane
was further delayed yesterday after three jurors were discharged from the jury
panel. The trial at the Central Criminal Court in Limerick was adjourned yesterday by
Mr Justice Butler until tomorrow morning.
The proceedings had opened amid tight security on Tuesday when it took just over
two hours to empanel a jury of nine men and three women. Yesterday, however, two
of the men were excused from the panel.
It emerged that one of them lived near one of the accused. A second man was
discharged when he said he could not concentrate on the case due to an ongoing
situation at his place of work involving possible redundancies.
"I find it hard to concentrate when my livelihood is at stake," he said.
Another juror was then sworn in but later excused after he said he had important
university exams coming up.
A hundred and seventy potential jurors were deemed eligible for the trial but fewer
than 100 turned up in court on Tuesday. It is understood a number of doctor's
certificates had been handed in to the court.
Mr Justice Butler said: "I can see this trial going in a particular direction and I want
to consider it further so I'm going to adjourn it until Friday. We should have a
definitive position by then."
On Tuesday, Mr James McCarthy (24), Delmege Park, Moyross; Mr David Stanners
(31) Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr Christopher Costelloe (20,) Moylish Avenue,
Ballynanty; Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), The Fairgreen, and Mr Dessie Dundon (20),
Hyde Road, all in Limerick, pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane at
Drombana, Co Limerick, on January 29th last and to the attempted murder of his
nephew Mr Owen Treacy.
They also pleaded not guilty to falsely imprisoning the two men on the same date.
The five accused were brought to court yesterday under armed escort and everyone
entering the courtroom was searched and checked by electronic scanner.
The prosecution's chief witness, Mr Treacy, sat in the upstairs viewing gallery of the
courtroom accompanied by armed detectives. Mr Keane's widow, Ms Sophie Keane,
was in the public gallery.




                                    Page 52 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Keane murder trial starts amid tight security
22/10/2003
Five men charged with the murder of Limerick man Kieran Keane have pleaded not
guilty at the Central Criminal Court in Limerick.
The trial opened yesterday morning amid tight security. Everyone entering the city's
newly refurbished Circuit Courthouse was searched for weapons and frisked by an
electronic scanner.
Metal crowd-control barriers were erected outside and armed marksmen from the
Garda Síochána stood on the roof of the court building.
A Garda helicopter hovered overhead from early yesterday morning. The five
defendants were brought to court under armed escort.
All of them pleaded not guilty to the murder of Mr Keane at Drombana, Co Limerick,
on January 29th and to the attempted murder of his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, on
the same date.
They also pleaded not guilty to falsely imprisoning Mr Keane and Mr Treacy in
Limerick city on the same date.
The five accused men are Mr James McCarthy (24), Delmege Park, Moyross; Mr
David Stanners (31), Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr Christopher Costelloe (20),
Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty; Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), The Fairgreen; and Mr
Dessie Dundon (20), Hyde Road, all in Limerick.
Mr Treacy, the prosecution's chief witness, was brought to court yesterday flanked
by five armed detectives.
He sat alone during yesterday's proceedings in the upstairs viewing gallery of the
courtroom. He was guarded by armed detectives.
Mr Keane's widow, Ms Sophie Keane, was among those gathered in the public
gallery.
It took just over two hours for a jury of three women and five men to be sworn in
for the trial.
A total of 170 jurors were due at court yesterday but fewer than 100 were present.
It is understood a number of medical certificates were handed into the court by
potential jurors who did not attend.
Mr Justice Paul Carney, who was due to preside over the trial, was unable to attend
due to illness and Mr Justice Paul Butler arrived in his place.
The trial - which is expected to continue until Christmas - is today due to hear
opening statements from the prosecution.




                                   Page 53 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Murder victim discovered in Limerick field
Karl Hanlon and Kathryn Hayes

21/10/2003
The execution-style killing of a known criminal found yesterday in Limerick is thought
to be connected to an ongoing gang feud in the city.
The body of the man, in his early 20s, was found dumped in a ditch in a field at the
back of the Southill estate on the southside of the city.
He was named locally last night as Michael Campbell-McNamara.
He was well-known to gardaí in Limerick and had served time in prison for a number
of offences. The dead man was originally from the Southill area but had recently
been living in the Dublin Road area of Limerick.
The body was discovered by a man out walking his dog on the outskirts of the city
shortly before 10 a.m. yesterday morning.
The victim, who was fully clothed, had been shot in the head and his hands and feet
had been tied. Gardaí said it was unclear whether he was killed at the scene or
whether he was murdered elsewhere and his body dumped in the field.
Gardaí confirmed that a full murder investigation was under way and said they could
not rule out the possibility of a link with a vicious ongoing feud in the city.
"We have an open mind on this investigation. We are ruling nothing in or out at this
stage and a full murder investigation is under way," said Supt Gerry Mahon who is
leading the investigation. Supt Mahon, of Roxboro Garda Station, who is being
assisted by members of the National Bureau of Criminal Investigation, also confirmed
that the murder victim had been bound and gagged.
The launch of the murder inquiry came on the eve of the trial of five men charged
with the murder of crime boss Kieran Keane at the Central Criminal Court in
Limerick.
Keane (36) was shot dead in a similar killing at Drombana last January, barely two
miles away from where Mr Campbell-McNamara's body was found yesterday.
The last gangland killing in Limerick - which claimed the life of John Ryan in July -
came on the eve of the first sitting of the Central Criminal Court in Limerick.
The area around yesterday's crime scene was sealed off pending the arrival of
forensic experts from Garda headquarters in Dublin and the Deputy State
Pathologist, Dr Marie Cassidy.
A post-mortem was due to be carried out last night at the Mid-Western Regional
Hospital in Limerick. The murder victim's body was dumped just yards from the new
Limerick by-pass, which is currently under construction.
When the man walking his dog discovered the body yesterday morning, he alerted
nearby construction workers who were carrying out work on the new road.
"He asked me if I had a phone to ring the guards because there was a body in the
field. It's lucky that children are all back at school now or else it could have been one
of them who found the body," said a construction worker at the scene yesterday.
Garda sources in Limerick said last night the victim had close associations with one
of the factions involved in a well-publicised bloody feud in the city.
This feud - largely based on the city's northside - has already claimed three lives in
as many years. However, it is understood that the dead man was also involved in a
separate dispute with other factions in the Southill area of the city.
It is believed that Michael Campbell-McNamara had recently armed himself with a
high-powered weapon which gardaí believe could have been used in the ongoing
feud.




                                     Page 54 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Five must stand trial in Limerick
Karl Hanlon

01/08/2003
Five men charged with the murder of crime boss Kieran Keane must stand trial in
Limerick, a judge has ruled.
Mr Justice Carney made the order at the Central Criminal Court in Limerick yesterday
as he set a date for the trial.
Appearing before Mr Justice Carney were Mr James McCarthy (24) and Mr David
Stanners (31), both of Pineview Gardens, Moyross; Mr Christopher Costelloe (20),
Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty; Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), The Fairgreen; and Mr
Dessie Dundon (20), Hyde Road, all in Limerick.
They are charged with the murder of Kieran Keane (36), at Drombana on January
29th last. They are also charged with the attempted murder of Mr Keane's nephew,
Mr Owen Treacy.
Denying a defence counsel application to have the trial moved to Dublin, Mr Justice
Carney said: "To transfer the trial out of Limerick would mean stripping Limerick of
policemen and that is the reason why I am here." A 28-page statement provided to
gardaí by Owen Treacy would be central to the prosecution case, the court heard.
The court also heard that the State would allege that Kieran Keane and Owen
Treacy were lured to a house in The Fairgreen area of Limerick on a "pretext" before
they were hooded and driven to another house where they were detained and later
transferred into a van. It would also be alleged that one of the five accused shot Mr
Keane and repeatedly stabbed Mr Treacy at Drombana.
Mr Treacy pretended he was dead and after his abductors had fled, he managed to
raise the alarm, the court heard.
Objecting to a bail application, Garda Det Insp Bob Noonan said the murder of Kieran
Keane had led to "a serious escalation of an ongoing feud in Limerick".
Mr Justice Carney refused bail to four of the five accused and fixed Tuesday, October
21st, as the date for the start of the trial.




                                   Page 55 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Kieran Keane murder accused in court
31/07/2003
A 5,000-page book of evidence has been served on the five men charged with the
murder of Limerick man Kieran Keane.
The massive dossier - comprising some 720 statements - was served yesterday amid
tight security at Limerick District Court.
A date for the murder trial is expected to be set today when the five accused men
appear before Mr Justice Carney at the Central Criminal Court, which is currently
sitting in Limerick.
Appearing before Judge Tom O'Donnell at Limerick District Court yesterday were Mr
James McCarthy (24) and Mr David Stanners (31), both of Pineview Gardens,
Moyross, Limerick;
Mr Christopher Costelloe (20), of Moylish Avenue Ballynanty, Limerick;
Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), The Fairgreen, Limerick, and Mr Dessie Dundon (20), of
Hyde Road, also in Limerick.
All five men are charged with the murder of Kieran Keane on January 29th last at
Drombana - a few miles outside Limerick city - and with the attempted murder of his
nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, on the same date.
All five had previously been charged with the false imprisonment of both men.
Keane's widow Ms Sophie Keane and members of her family were present in the
packed courtroom for yesterday's sitting.
Armed members of the Garda Emergency Response Unit were on patrol outside the
courthouse during the sitting.
There was also a heavy Garda presence in the public gallery and each of the accused
men was flanked by at least five gardaí in an effort to eliminate eye contact with
people in the public gallery.




                                  Page 56 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Accused changes plea on Limerick killing
31/07/2003
The trial of a Limerick man for the murder of Eddie Ryan snr ended yesterday when
the accused pleaded guilty to manslaughter.
Ms Mary Ryan, the widow of the dead man, was in the Central Criminal Court when
Paul Coffey changed his plea from not guilty to murder to guilty of the manslaughter
of her husband.
Mr Ryan (41) was shot 11 times by two gunmen who burst into the Moose Bar in
Limerick in November 2000.
Expressing disappointment at yesterday's outcome, Ms Ryan said she hoped those
involved in the killing would be brought to justice. "The women and men that he \
named in the statement" were still walking around freely, she added.
When the trial resumed yesterday, the court heard that the DPP had accepted a
manslaughter plea. The formal rearraignment was delayed briefly to allow Ms Ryan,
who was travelling from Limerick, time to reach the court.
Mr Justice Abbott rejected a defence application for Coffey to be remanded on
continuing bail. He said it would be "entirely inappropriate" for him to return to
Limerick on bail given the "group tensions" there and the "fraught" background to
the case.
To do so "would place the law in a position of low regard with people who have
awaited a decisive outcome of these proceedings".
Mr Justice Abbott remanded him in custody for sentencing on October 17th. He also
agreed to a psychological assessment after Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC, defending, told
the court that the accused had a low IQ.
The trial had heard that Coffey (26), whose last address was Craeval Park, Moyross,
was the getaway driver for two gunmen who burst into the Moose Bar on Limerick's
Cathedral Street at 10 p.m. on November 12th, 2000, and fired 11 shots at Mr Ryan.
In an interview, Coffey, a father of two, allegedly named the late Kieran Keane as
one of the gunmen. He also named the second gunman, along with a others
allegedly involved. Neither man was ever charged with the murder.
The trial also heard that Coffey's partner, Ms Michelle Ryan, a relative of the Ryan
family, allegedly made a statement to gardaí implicating Coffey in the murder. The
defence accepted that Coffey was the driver of the car, but claimed he drove the two
men to the pub without knowing what they were going to do.
In statements to gardaí, Coffey said he drove Mr Keane and another named man to
the Moose Bar, where the two donned balaclavas and fired shots into the pub. He
then dropped them off at a housing estate and afterwards followed Mr Keane's
instructions to "get rid" of the car.
The stolen car which had been "hotwired" was later found burned out.




                                   Page 57 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Limerick woman denies implicating her partner
30/07/2003
A relative of Limerick man Eddie Ryan snr allegedly made a statement to gardaí
implicating her partner and the father of her children in Ryan's murder, a jury has
heard.
In the Central Criminal Court in Dublin, retired Det Garda James Hanley said he
believed that Ms Michelle Ryan, the girlfriend of murder accused Mr Paul Coffey,
changed her account of Mr Coffey's movements because she was told she could be
charged with aiding and abetting him.
Ms Ryan had earlier told other gardaí that her partner was with her driving around
Limerick at the time of the murder.
The prosecution alleges that Mr Coffey was the getaway driver for two gunmen who
burst into the Moose Bar in Cathedral Place shortly before 10 p.m. on November
12th, 2000, and shot Ryan 11 times.
In an interview prior to making the signed statement, Ms Ryan allegedly told Mr
Hanley and his colleague, the late Det Sgt Jeremiah Healy of the National Bureau of
Criminal Investigation, "I will tell you everything I can. He can do what he wants. I
am not going to cover for him anymore."
Mr Blaise O'Carroll SC, defending, put it to Mr Hanley that Ms Ryan denied ever
making those remarks. He said that Ms Ryan would say that the interview, in which
Mr O'Carroll said she allegedly "abandoned her partner and the father to her
children", never took place.
The memo of the interview was not signed by Ms Ryan. Mr Hanley said he invited
her to sign it, but she said: "I have signed my statement, it's the truth."
The jury has heard that the accused allegedly named Kieran Keane as one of the
gunmen in the shooting. He also named the second gunman. The jury heard that
neither of the two was ever charged with the murder.
Mr O'Carroll and barrister Mr Michael Maloney have told the jury that Mr Coffey will
deny that he named any names.
The trial continues.




                                    Page 58 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Murder accused denies naming Ryan's killers
29/07/2003
A man on trial for murder allegedly named the two gunmen he drove to and from
the shooting of Limerick man, Eddie Ryan senior, a Central Criminal Court jury has
heard.
In a late sitting of the Central Criminal Court in Dublin, Mr Paul Coffey named Kieran
Keane as one of two gunmen who shot Eddie Ryan in a Limerick pub in November
2000, according to replies he allegedly gave to gardaí during interrogation in
Mayorstone Garda station almost a month after the killing.
Mr Coffey denies a murder charge, and Mr Michael Maloney, for the defence, told the
jury that his client denies he named the two gunmen to gardaí.
Mr Maloney said that Paul Coffey will say he never named Kieran Keane or the other
alleged gunman, and that in a series of interviews over three days, he never
mentioned any names to the gardaí. But the defence admit he did describe driving
two men to the Moose Bar, without naming them.
The prosecution alleges that Mr Coffey drove the getaway car, a stolen vehicle, and
that he later carried out the instructions of Kieran Keane to "get rid of it". The car
was later found burned out. It alleges that Paul Coffey was "an accessory" to the
murder and as guilty as the men who fired the fatal shots that killed Mr Ryan.
Det Garda James B Hanley (now retired) read a statement Mr Coffey allegedly made
to gardaí on the third day of his detention admitting that he drove the gunmen to
the murder scene and that he dropped them off in a housing estate afterwards. In
the statement, Mr Coffey said he did not know what was happening until he saw
Kieran Keane and another named gunman pulling down woollen caps over their
faces as balaclavas just before they entered the Moose Bar and fired shots from
inside the doorway. Det Garda Hanley told Mr Shane Murphy SC, prosecuting, that in
interviews with himself and Det Sgt Jerry Healy (now deceased), Paul Coffey first
said he had nothing to do with the shooting. He said he only "vaguely" knew about
"the hassle" between the Keanes and the Ryans.
In a later interview, he allegedly said of Mr Ryan senior: "He's like what the General
was in Dublin. If whoever shot Eddie is found, he will get the same." Paul Coffey
(26), whose last address was at Craeval Park, Moyross, Limerick, has pleaded not
guilty to the murder of Edward ('Eddie') Ryan (41) of Hogan Avenue, Kileely,
Limerick, at Cathedral Place in Limerick city on November 12th, 2000.
In the statement, he allegedly said that he was driving around with his girlfriend and
one of their children at around 9.30 p.m. on the night of the shooting, when one of
the gunmen beckoned to him and said: "Come here. I want you to drive a car for
me." Mr Coffey allegedly told gardaí he dropped off his girlfriend and child and went
to a house, where 10 named men were gathered. Kieran Keane allegedly then took
him down to Keane's coal yard, where another named man was standing at a large
dark car.Kieran Keane and the other named man jumped into the car and told
Coffey to drive to the Moose Bar.
When they got there, Keane got out of the car and made a phone call on his
mobile, Mr Coffey allegedly said. He then heard Keane say, "F*** it, [a named man]
isn't there". Keane got back into the car and told Coffey to drive over in front of the
pub. As he was doing that, the two men put on woollen caps and pulled them down
as balaclavas. Kieran Keane then said, "If [another named man] is there, he's going
to get it too."




                                    Page 59 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


The two men jumped out of the car and started shooting into the pub, his statement
continued. "I could see they were firing into the pub and pointing downwards", he
said. "I knew they were firing at someone down low or on the ground." Coffey's
statement said he got a fright from the shooting and the car cut out. He started it up
again, and the two gunmen jumped back in. Kieran Keane was saying, "Drive,
drive".
Earlier, Det Garda Gerard Hogan denied in evidence a defence claim that he offered
a deal to Coffey if he turned State witness, under which, Coffey, his partner and their
children would be placed in the Witness Protection Progamme and brought to the
USA. The trial continues today.




                                    Page 60 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003



Victim of Limerick feud is buried
Kathryn Hayes


11/07/2003
A daughter of the Limerick murder victim, Mr John Ryan, read a letter to her dead
father at his funeral Mass yesterday. "We'll protect each other the way you protected
us, " promised 20-year-old Sammy-Joe Ryan.
"We love you, we can't stop thinking about you and you'll be in our hearts for ever,"
she said.
At the beginning of the Mass a hammer, a trowel and a measuring tape were
brought to the altar as a reminder of the man who was described as "gifted with his
hands".
A photograph of him with his daughter Bernadette, who died as a child, was placed
on his white marble coffin.
Mr Ryan's five daughters and seven-year-old son, John jnr, comforted their
distraught mother, Christina, during the service.
John Ryan was gunned down while working on a garden patio last Monday evening
at a house in the Thomondgate area of Limerick.
Ms Mary Ryan, Eddie Ryan's widow and a sister-in-law of John Ryan, left the church
in tears as How Can I Live Without You? was played on a CD player.
In November 2000 Ms Ryan stood in the same church for her husband's funeral,
after he was shot dead in the Moose Bar in Limerick city three years ago.
During his homily yesterday the local curate, Father Michael O'Shea, prayed for an
end to violence, which has now claimed three lives.
"We have to say the tragedy of John's death should not have happened. There is no
excuse to take another person's life.
"No one has the right to inflict such pain on anyone or another family. Everyone here
today has a role to play in ending violence in our city," said Father O'Shea.
The murders of Mr Ryan (47) and of Mr Eddie Ryan have been linked to a continuing
feud between the Ryan and Keane families which has claimed three lives in as many
years.
It is understood that John Ryan's murder was a direct reprisal for the execution of Mr
Kieran Keane, who was shot dead last January.
John Ryan's nephews, Kieran and Eddie Ryan, who were allegedly abducted shortly
before Kieran Keane's murder, helped carry their uncle's coffin from St Lelia's
Church in Kileely yesterday.
He was buried in Mount St Oliver cemetery.




                                   Page 61 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Murder re-ignites fear and tension
09/07/2003
The killing of John Ryan in Limerick on Monday evening has been met with
disgust, but little surprise, in a city that has become hardened to a
long-running gang feud, writes Carl O'Brien.
All the signs of a surprise attack are there. The trowel still lies on the wall where
John Ryan was laying a patio for his neighbour. Sand lies scattered along the
ground. Black skid-marks are visible on the tarmac.
Yet the latest murder in Limerick's long-running gang feud, which dates back almost
a decade, seemed to came as no surprise to anyone.
"It's sad that it should come to this," says a neighbour, as the Garda technical
bureau inspects the area just yards from his house. "I'm not so much angry as sad.
There are just three, maybe four, families involved, and everyone is made to suffer."
John Ryan, the uncle of Eddie and Kieran Ryan, who were allegedly abducted last
January, once estimated that his house had been attacked 30 times. He moved
house and slept away from his family, fearing further attacks. Just days ago, while
speaking to the Minister of State, Mr Willie O'Dea, about finding suitable
accommodation, he predicted his own death.
Yet, when he was shot by two men on a motorcycle at 6.30 p.m. on Monday as he
finished the patio outside a house at Canon Breen Park in Thomondgate, it jolted the
community.
After a heavy Garda presence in the area in recent months, regular surveillance and
some weapons seizures, some residents began to relax as it appeared the lid was
being kept on a bitter feud which had threatened to spill out of control earlier in the
year.
Now, with talks of reprisal attacks and reports of a further shootings and mini-riots in
the Island Field part of the city, the fear has returned again.
Sitting in the cramped offices of St Mary's Aid, Cllr John Gilligan, who represents the
area at the centre of the feud, is despondent.
"There is a sombre and fearful mood," he says. "People are horrified that anyone
should die. Especially Johnny. In my view he was a moderating influence on the
whole thing. I spoke to him on a number of occasions and he said he wanted it to
end. Now people are apprehensive, they fear reprisals, they fear that others will
follow."
To describe this unfolding saga of gang warfare as a simply a family feud is to
simplify what is a complex and often confusing story. It is complicated by factors
such as drug-dealing, domestic crime and links to dissident republicans and the
emergence of new rival gangs in the city.
The source of the feud can be traced to the activities of Limerick city's main drug-
dealing gang which emerged in the early 1990s.
It included Kieran Keane and Eddie Ryan who, along with members of affiliated
families, built up a lucrative alliance until around five years ago, when Ryan broke
out on his own.
There are differing versions as to what led to the breakdown in relations between
the pair. Some say it was due to a fight between teenage girls of each family in a
school playground which resulted in one getting their ear bitten and the other being
mutilated with a Stanley knife. Others say it was due to the irreconcilable ambitions
of Keane and Ryan in seeking to individually control the drug trade.
What is clear is that it ignited events that impacted on both families and the wider
community with devastating consequences. First there were threats of violence, then



                                    Page 62 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


there was a failed assassination on one of the men. It soon escalated to actual
shootings. A car bomb was found under one man's car. A stash of high-powered
machine- guns were found on another occasion. Inevitably the rise in violence began
claiming lives.
Eddie Ryan (40) was shot as he was drinking in the Moose Bar following a funeral, in
front of members of the family. One of the gunmen was reportedly Keane. He was
shot last January.
Gardaí believe a third gang was responsible for this murder and the double
kidnapping of the young Ryan brothers who were abducted. Some sources also say
that this emerging gang is seeking to size control of the drug trade in the Munster
area.
This gang is suspected of murdering Limerick doorman Brian Fitzpatrick and another
man in Co Clare at the beginning of this year.
While this gang, based in Moyross in Limerick, have a history of violence, they have
tended to remain in serious organised crime, drug dealing and burglary, according to
Garda sources.
While residents in the Island Field area of the city, known locally as "the parish", wait
for the next development in this bloody conflict, questions are beginning to be asked
of the gardaí. The Emergency Response Unit had been drafted onto the streets
following the murder of Keane and the abductions of the Ryan in January.
"There were helicopters, there were armed detectives and helicopters. It was like
west Belfast during the Troubles," recalls Cllr Gilligan. He, however, accepts that it is
almost impossible to stop two groups intent on killing each other over a long period
of time.
While the ERU drifted quietly away, the Garda insists it has kept a heavy presence in
the meantime with armed gardaí regularly patrolling the area.
Talk of Limerick living in fear, however, is an exaggeration. There are pockets of the
city which are tense and fearful, such as "the parish" that encompasses the three of
the most neglected housing estates. But the rest of the city is mostly oblivious.
Nevertheless, the murder rate in these pockets is extraordinary. There have been
almost 20 murders in the city since February 2001, compared to around 30 in Dublin
which has a population around 15 times greater. Gardaí have complained they are
undermanned, but there is little sign of an increase given the state of the public
finances.
In the meantime, the residents of the Island Field area are waiting for the next
"surprise" attack to come. As onlookers gathered at the site of the shooting they
expressed the fears of a community on the edge.
"This is a close-knit place and we've never seen anything like this until recently. I'm
living on my nerves," says one woman.
"People used to want to live in an area like this," says another. "It was the kind of
place you could go into a house, push the door open and have a cup of tea. No one
wants to live here now."




                                     Page 63 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Gardai find bike used by gunmen in killing
09/07/2003
Gardaí in Limerick believe they have found the motorbike used by two gunmen who
killed 47-year-old John Ryan, writes Kathryn Hayes in Limerick
The Limerick father-of-seven died after he was shot twice outside a house in the
Thomondgate area of the city at 6.30 p.m. on Monday.
Mr Ryan was a brother of murder victim Eddie Ryan - who was shot dead in the
Moose Bar in Limerick in November 2000. John Ryan was also an uncle of Kieran and
Eddie Ryan Jnr - the two brothers who were allegedly abducted shortly before the
murder of Kieran Keane last January.
Mr Ryan's death is believed to be linked to a bloody feud between the Keane and
the Ryan families which has seen a massive escalation in violence since the death of
Eddie Ryan three and half years ago.
John Ryan had been working on a patio in the front garden of a house in Canon
Breen Park, Thomondgate when two men pulled up on a motorbike. At least four
shots were fired by the pillion passenger who was armed with a handgun.
Last night gardaí said a motorbike recovered yesterday is almost certainly the one
used by the gunmen. The 125cc bike was found in the early hours of yesterday burnt
out behind a coal shed in the St Mary's Park area. "The motorbike is still at the scene
and is being examined by forensic experts," said a garda source. "We'd be pretty
happy that it was the same one that was used by the men responsible for the
attack."
Two men in their early 20s arrested shortly after Monday night's murder, were
yesterday released without charge.
According to Supt Willie Keane more than 30 officers are currently working on the
murder investigation along with members of the National Bureau of Criminal
Investigation who arrived in Limerick from Dublin yesterday.
"The Garda presence has been increased on the streets and it will be monitored on a
day-to-day basis," said Supt Keane who appealed to those involved in the feud to
"step back from the brink" and let gardaí continue with their job.
Meanwhile, a daughter of John Ryan, who was with her father after he was shot,
yesterday branded his killers as inhuman. "They're scum. They are not even human,"
said 20-year-old Samantha Ryan.
"I was with him as he was lying on the ground and I went in the ambulance with
him. I was talking to him and he was talking to me. I told him 'you'll be alright' and
he said he would be grand," she said.
"We've been left here without a father. I'm sick of it. We had to get out of our home
because of them." Yesterday, a nephew of John Ryan, "Fat" John McCarthy, said he
does not see any end to the feud, which has now claimed three lives.
"All I can say is it's not going to stop. It's going on too long now," said Mr McCarthy,
whose own home in Moyross was attacked by two men carrying a Kalashnikov AK 47
assault rifle.
"My own home has been targeted. They nearly killed my child."
According to Mr McCarthy, his uncle knew he was a marked man.
Described by his nephew as "not a man for trouble", John Ryan had recently moved
from his home in Lee Estate to Moyross after his house in Lee Estate was attacked
more than 30 times.
"He was targeted because he was Eddie's brother," said Mr McCarthy




                                    Page 64 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Escalation of Limerick feud feared after latest killing
Karl Hanlon and Kathryn Hayes in Limerick


08/07/2003
Gardaí fear an escalation of the feud between the Ryan and Keane families in
Limerick following the shooting dead last night of Mr John Ryan.
A murder investigation was under way following the drive-by shooting in
Thomandgate, in the north of Limerick city at 6.30 p.m.
Two men were being questioned last night in connection with the shooting. They
were arrested in the Thomandgate area and were being held at Mayorstone Garda
Station.
Late last night there were reports of a further shooting in Garryowen and of a mini-
riot in the Island Field area of the city.
Mr Ryan was the brother of Mr Eddie Ryan - who was murdered in the Moose Bar,
Limerick, in November 2000, and an uncle of Eddie and Kieran Ryan whose alleged
abduction in January led to an escalation of the feud.
He was shot a number of times in the back and leg outside a house in Canon Breen
Park, Thomondgate. A number of previous attempts had been made on his life.
According to witnesses, Mr Ryan, who was in his late forties, was working on a patio
in a front garden when two men pulled up on a scooter. At least four shots were
fired by the pillion passenger, who was armed with a handgun. Mr Ryan was taken
by ambulance to the Mid-Western Regional Hospital in Limerick where he was
pronounced dead shortly after 7 p.m.
A witness said: "I saw the man lying on the ground. There was blood everywhere."
Detectives were quickly at the scene and several houses were cordoned off while
forensic tests were carried out.
Gardaí were investigating reports last night that shots were fired at a house in
O'Malley Park on the southside of the city minutes earlier. One theory was that the
first shooting incident may have been a decoy to distract mobile Garda patrols.
Gardaí fear the killing will spark a further escalation in the vicious ongoing feud
which is believed to have led to the murder of Mr Kieran Keane in January this year
and to more than 100 other "serious" incidents.
One man is currently on trial before the Central Criminal Court for the role he
allegedly played in Mr Eddie Ryan's murder.
Earlier this year, the late Mr Eddie Ryan's sons - Kieran and Eddie jnr - were the
victims of an alleged kidnap which led to a massive Garda manhunt.
However, they turned up safe at a Garda station in Portlaoise a week later. Just a
few hours after that, Mr Kieran Keane (36) was found murdered in Drombana on
the outskirts of Limerick city. He had been shot in the head. His nephew, Mr Owen
Treacy, survived multiple stab wounds in the same incident.
Mr Keane was one of the chief suspects in the murder of Mr Eddie Ryan but was not
charged in connection with his killing.
Five men are currently before the courts charged with Mr Keane's murder and with
the attempted murder of Mr Treacy.




                                   Page 65 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


No end in sight to city's bloody feud
Conor Lally

08/07/2003
The murder in Limerick last night of Mr John Ryan represents a very significant and
provocative escalation in the gang warfare which has gripped the city for the last
four years.
The murder comes as a major blow to senior gardaí both in Limerick and at national
level, many of whom believed the force had begun to close in on armed and
dangerous elements on both sides of the gang warfare.
John Ryan was the uncle of two Limerick brothers, Kieran and Eddie Ryan jnr, who
were allegedly abducted and released unharmed last January.
His brother, and father of the two younger Ryans, was Eddie Ryan snr. He was shot
dead while he sat drinking in the Moose Bar in Limerick City in November 2000.
The younger Ryan's arch-rival, well-known drug dealer Kieran Keane, was abducted
from his Limerick home and murdered at a remote laneway in Drombanna, Co
Limerick, just hours before the two allegedly abducted men were released on
January 30th.
Although Mr Ryan was very outspoken during his nephews' abduction, and was
charged with being involved in an on-street gang fight outside Limerick courthouse
at that time, he was not a major figure in the feud.
Just after the Keane killing, Mr Ryan boarded up his family home in the Lee estate
in Limerick and temporarily fled the area, fearing for his safety.
It was a tactic which would be unthinkable to those elements involved at the core of
the feud, who would risk injury or even death rather than leave their homes and lose
face, as they would see it.
So brazen are the gang members that at height of the fighting in January and early
February, when gardaí and media attention was focused on them, they continued
carrying out petrol bomb attacks on homes in the area.
A total of five men are currently facing charges in connection with the Kieran Keane
killing.
Two other men were convicted of a gun attack on a home in the city when an AK 47
was used.
Just last month, gardaí in the city scored a spectacular success when they uncovered
a massive cache of weapons which they believe were destined for use by one of the
factions involved in the feud.
The find included a booby-trap car bomb which gardaí believed was about to be
used. A sub-machine gun and assorted ammunition were also uncovered.
However, last night's killing was a clear demonstration, if one were needed, that
tensions are still running high and that those embroiled in the feud are as willing to
shed blood as ever.
The Emergency Response Unit are expected to be on Limerick city streets in force
today.
There remain so many uncontrollable variables that gardaí cannot hope to stem the
killing without massive additional resources over a very prolonged period. And even
then they are facing a mammoth task.




                                    Page 66 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Limerick to host Central Criminal Court
Joe Humphreys


07/07/2003
The Central Criminal Court is to sit for the first time outside of Dublin tomorrow
following the relocation of some murder trials to Limerick Courthouse.
The initiative, prompted by an order of the President of the High Court, is aimed at
clearing a backlog of murder trials, where the accused are from Limerick and waiting
to be heard before the Central Criminal Court.
As well as helping to facilitate earlier court hearings, the move will minimise
inconvenience to gardaí, witnesses and victims who are due to attend the trials.
Two murder trials have been listed for the court, which is due to conduct hearings
until the end of the month, when the legal holidays begin, before resuming in
November.
Concern had been expressed by the Garda to the Minister for Justice, Equality and
Law Reform about the likely cost implications of holding the trials in Dublin.
As well as paying travel and subsistence allowances, the Garda would have had to
recruit cover for officers travelling to the capital, thereby adding to overtime costs.
Speaking last May at the reopening of Limerick Circuit Courthouse, which had
undergone a €10 million refurbishment, Mr McDowell said: "To conduct these trials in
Limerick will lead to less cost, less inconvenience for civil witnesses and, most
important of all, result in gardaí having to spend a much lesser amount of time away
from their normal policing duties."
Concern at the extent of criminal activity in Limerick reached a peak in May following
the murder of Mr Robert Fitzgerald (23) at Moyross, and the shooting and abduction
of a number of other young men.
Last week, four men charged with the murder of Mr Kieran Keane (36) on January
29th last at Drombana, outside Limerick city, and with the attempted murder of his
nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, on the same date, were further remanded in custody at
Limerick District Court. A fifth man was also charged with the murder at a separate
hearing of the court.
The book of evidence relating to the case was said to be substantial, containing 720
statements and a 500-page report.




                                    Page 67 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Four are charged in murder trial
Karl Hanlon Limerick


26/06/2003
Members of the public were searched for weapons entering Limerick District Court
yesterday for the appearance of four men charged with the murder of crime boss
Kieran Keane.
More than 50 gardaí - including members of the Emergency Response Unit, armed
detectives and uniformed members - mounted a massive security operation outside
the courthouse building.
Barriers were erected at entrances to the courthouse plaza and Garda marksmen
took up positions on rooftops and in the grounds of St Mary's cathedral.
Appearing before Judge Tom O'Donnell were Mr James McCarthy (24) and Mr David
Stanners (31), both of Pineview Gardens, Moyross, Mr Christopher 'Smokey'
Costelloe (20), of Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty, and Mr Anthony 'Noddy' McCarthy
(21), The Fairgreen, all in Limerick.
They were charged yesterday with the murder of Kieran Keane (36) on January
29th last at Drombana - a few miles outside Limerick city - and with the attempted
murder of his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, on the same date. All four had previously
been charged with the false imprisonment of both men.
Keane's widow, Sophie, and members of her family were present in the packed
gallery for the 15-minute sitting.
Gardaí formed a cordon in front of the public gallery in an effort to eliminate any eye
contact with the accused men.
Outlining evidence of arrest, charge and caution - Det Garda Gerry Doherty told the
court that Mr James McCarthy replied, "That's only a waste of paper" in response to
the charges.
Det Garda Dave Burke told the court that in response to the charge of attempted
murder - Mt Anthony 'Noddy' McCarthy replied: "It must be raining murder."
The other two accused made no reply when the charges were read out to them,
Judge O'Donnell heard.
Applying to further remand all four accused in custody for a period of one month,
Insp John Courtney told the court that the book of evidence was "a considerable
book of work" comprising a 5,000-page file, 720 statements and a 500-page report.
Solicitor for the accused, Mr Aeneas McCarthy, told the court that three of his clients
had been in custody for 94 days and that the State had a statutory obligation to
produce the book of evidence after 42 days.
Judge O'Donnell remanded all four in custody, to appear again before Limerick
District Court on July 2nd.




                                    Page 68 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Man held in Limerick arms haul a 'key figure'
Kathryn Hayes


05/06/2003
One of four men being questioned by gardaí in Limerick following a massive haul of
weapons - including a booby-trap car bomb - is an "enforcer" for one of the criminal
gangs involved in a long-running bitter feud.
The man in his late 30s - who often wears a bullet proof jacket - was arrested along
with three other men at a house on the outskirts of the city on Tuesday afternoon.
A father and son, and a second man in his 30s, were also being questioned by gardaí
last night, following the discovery of an arsenal of weapons which included a
submachine gun, more than 100 rounds of ammunition and cortex wire.
A small quantity of cocaine and heroin was also seized by members of the Garda
Emergency Response Unit and a team of local detectives.
It's believed the 58-year-old father and his son have connections with criminal
factions in England. It's also understood that they had been renting the bungalow in
Lockmore, Mungret, where the discovery was made.
The two other men arrested at the house are well known to gardaí locally and are
heavily involved in drugs and serious criminal activities in Limerick city.
"One of these men is a key figure in one of the gangs involved in the feud, He would
be involved in securing weapons and organising attacks for one of the criminal
factions and is very close to the boss of one of the families at the centre of feud,"
said a Garda source.
Gardaí believe the arsenal of weapons was bought from dissident republicans for a
sizeable sum of money and was intended for use by one of the gangs involved in the
feud which led to the gangland murder of local crime boss Kieran Keane and the
alleged abduction of brothers Eddie and Kieran Ryan earlier this year.
"Money is no object for these people. The car bomb was ready for use and
undoubtedly lives have been saved as a result of it being found," said a Garda
source.
All four men are being held under Section 30 of the Offences Against the State Act,
which means they can be held for up to 72 hours.




                                   Page 69 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Limerick feuds not resolved but city is calmer
05/05/2003
Limerick is quieter since it attracted national attention earlier this year, writes Carol
Coulter.
One thing unites Limerick people of widely different views on many matters -
indignation at the image of the city as a place with an unusual amount of crime.
Gardaí and residents - whether living in the well-off suburbs or on the estates at the
centre of recent criminal events - all insist that there is no more crime in Limerick
than anywhere else.
Statistics released by the Department of Justice last month showed Limerick below
Dublin and Cork for the number of sexual assaults and no higher for crimes like
larceny. However, there was a higher number of murders and serious assaults, often
of a brutal nature.
"Feuding adds to the serious assaults and murders," Supt Willie Keane of Henry
Street station in the city said.
"The feuding has been there for years and years. There are only a handful of families
involved and there is a high detection rate, but it seems intractable.
"If a person is arrested, convicted and jailed, a younger person will take their place.
They will make references to incidents that occurred 20 or 30 years ago. Even when
cases go through the courts, people still want their pound of flesh and to perpetuate
the feud. It gives a bad image to the city and it does contribute to a sense of fear."
The Emergency Response Unit was called in last January when two brothers were
allegedly abducted as part of one such feud.
At that time too, Kieran Keane was murdered and six people are before the courts
in connection with that crime. The investigation into the alleged abduction is
ongoing.
There are still armed patrols around to deter those who might consider continuing
the feud, according to Supt Keane. "This has been effective. The situation has been
calmer during the past three months."
The brother of the dead man, Christy Keane, is serving a 10- year sentence for
possession of cannabis resin and the superintendent said the drugs trade was part of
the problem.
This mainly involves cannabis and ecstasy, with a small and select trade in cocaine.
Seizures of heroin are rare in Limerick and there is little drug-fuelled robbery of the
kind which has bedevilled Dublin for decades.
Random violent attacks on the streets are also rare, according to Supt Keane.
"There are no major public order issues outside nightclubs. You could have 10,000 to
13,000 coming on to the streets from clubs on a busy night and by and large there
are very few problems. It is not unsafe to be out and about at any hour. Most
incidents are connected in one way or another to the feuds."
He admitted that there had been a number of firearms finds, including a Kalashnikov
and another machine-gun.
Last Thursday night a man was shot in the chest in Moyross estate and was seriously
injured. However, Supt Keane did not consider this incident to be linked to the
feuds.
It is also true that in a number of local authority estates, there is sometimes trouble.
On April 30th, four firefighters were attacked in the same estate while attempting to
douse a bonfire.
Bonfires are traditional in Limerick on May Eve and dozens were blazing around the
city. One in Moyross threatened the gable of a house and the fire brigade came to



                                     Page 70 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


douse it. About 25 youths attacked them with baseball bats and stones and one
firemen was taken to hospital with a suspected broken collar-bone. The other three
were less seriously hurt.
Gardaí described this as "an isolated incident."
Sgt Dave Mulcahy has been a community garda in the area since 1989. "I never had
a situation I could not handle or where I had to call for assistance," he said.
He is involved with the local community in a number of development projects,
ranging from environmental projects to running a pipe band and helping with various
sporting activities.
Almost 200 people are employed by these projects, involving FÁS and the community
employment schemes.
He said most people in the Moyross estate were employed nowadays. A number
were running taxis.
The phenomenon of third-generation unemployment exists no longer and some of
the young people in the estate go on to third-level education. The estate houses
about 6,000 people in 1,130 homes. While there is a church and a primary school,
there are no supermarkets, no public telephones, no café or pub, no pharmacy and
only a handful of small local shops. There is a community centre, a health centre and
a credit union, but nothing even resembling a town centre with indoor facilities.
There is a lot of green space, home to several ponies. There is no through road and
children play on the streets and in the open spaces when the weather is fine, as it
was last week.
Sgt Mulcahy said the estate was clean, with little litter, due to a locally organised
environmental project.
But in the evenings there is nowhere for young people to go except into town or
hang around the estate. One can easily imagine the excitement provided by bonfires
on a fine late spring evening or how quickly a fight could flare between groups with
a history of antagonism.




                                   Page 71 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Men on kidnap charges remanded
17/04/2003
A 21-year-old man charged with the kidnapping of Limerick crime boss, Kieran
Keane, could abscond to England if granted bail, a court has heard.
Mr Anthony McCarthy with an address at Fairgreen, Limerick, is also charged with
the false imprisonment of Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, on January 29th last.
Judge Tom O'Donnell yesterday refused an application for bail by Mr McCarthy's
solicitor, Mr Aeneas McCarthy.
Gardaí had objected to bail based on the seriousness of the charge and the risk that
the accused could leave Limerick or Ireland.
Insp Pat Connolly said Mr McCarthy formed part of an ongoing feud in Limerick city
and that on previous occasions when he was arrested he had given false names and
addresses.
The court heard that Mr McCarthy had recently gone to England to visit his father.
The accused denied that he was part of any feud in Limerick and also denied
suggestions by Insp Connolly that he didn't get on with his father. Judge O'Donnell
rejected the application for bail and remanded Mr McCarthy in custody until May
30th.
A second man, Mr Dessie Dundon (20), from Hyde Road, Limerick, was also further
remanded in custody at Limerick District Court on the same abduction charges.
Judge O'Donnell refused an application for bail for Mr Dundon for the second time.
He also refused an application by Insp Connolly to adjourn both cases to Cork
District Court.
Both of the accused are being held in custody in Cork Prison. Judge O'Donnell
refused this application and said he could not burden his colleagues in Cork with a
Limerick case. Both men are due to reappear next month.




                                   Page 72 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Limerick murder accused remain in custody
16/04/2003
Three men charged in connection with the murder of Mr Kieran Keane have been
further remanded in custody at Limerick District Court.
Mr James McCarthy (23) and Mr David Stanners (31), both with addresses at
Pineview Gardens, Moyross, and Mr Christopher Costelloe (20), of Moylish Avenue,
Ballynanty, are charged with kidnapping Mr Keane on January 29th last.
All three are also charged with the abduction of Mr Keane's nephew, Mr Owen
Treacy, on the same date.
Previously there had been angry scenes outside the court when the accused
appeared, but these were not repeated at yesterday's brief court sitting.
There was a strong Garda presence as the men were being led in and taken away.
Judge Tom O'Donnell heard that bail was being opposed by the State and that
further serious charges would form part of a substantial file being prepared for the
Director of Public Prosecutions.
He said that any further charges should be brought within the next four weeks, given
that the State was maintaining its opposition to the accused men's bail. All three
accused were further remanded in custody to appear again before Limerick District
Court on May 13th next.
Meanwhile, two other men also charged with kidnapping Mr Keane and Mr Treacy
are due to appear before the court today.
Mr Keane was murdered in an "execution-style" killing on January 29th last. His
body was dumped on a roadside at Drombana outside Limerick. Mr Treacy survived
multiple stab wounds in the same incident.




                                   Page 73 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Security tight as two face charges in Limerick
Kathryn Hayes


01/04/2003
A major security operation was mounted at Limerick District Court yesterday where
two men were charged with the false imprisonment of the murdered criminal figure,
Mr Kieran Keane.
Mr Anthony McCarthy (21), The Fairgreen, Limerick and Mr Dessie Dundon (20),
Hyde Road, Limerick, were also charged with the false imprisonment of Mr Keane's
nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, on January 29th last.
Armed detectives and members of the Emergency Response Unit patrolled the area
outside the courthouse during the 30-minute hearing.
The tension outside was palpable as people shouted threats at the accused men as
they were being led by gardaí to and from the court building.
The court heard that both men were arrested in Kilkenny last Friday night.
Bail was refused in the case of Mr Dundon following an objection by the State, who
said that more serious charges are expected.
Insp Bob Noonan said he believed that Mr Dundon was part of an ongoing feud in
the city and that if released on bail he would become involved in this feud "which will
result in the loss of life".
The court heard that in the last month a number of firearms had been seized -
including one Uzi submachine gun - which gardaí believe were destined for feuding
factions in Limerick.
Insp Noonan said that when arrested in Kilkenny last Friday night, Mr Dundon gave a
false name and address. This was the second time he had given gardaí a false name
and address. Insp Noonan said that just hours after Mr Keane's murder, Mr Dundon
gave gardaí a false name and address when he was stopped driving through
Roscrea.
Mr Dundon said the reason he gave a false name on that occasion was because he
was driving without insurance.
The accused denied that he was involved in any ongoing feud and also denied giving
a false name to gardaí when he was arrested in Kilkenny last Friday night.
Judge Tom O'Donnell refused bail because of the seriousness of the charge and said
he had to take into account the possibility of further charges.
Mr McCarthy's solicitor, Mr Aeneas McCarthy, did not apply for bail.
Judge O'Donnell remanded both men in custody until Thursday next, when they will
reappear before Limerick District Court.




                                    Page 74 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Men in court over Kieran Keane kidnap
24/03/2003
Three men have appeared in court charged with the kidnapping of murdered
Limerick man Kieran Keane.
All three were also before a special sitting of Limerick District Court charged with the
abduction of Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy. Mr James McCarthy (23), and Mr
David Stanners (31), both with addresses at Pineview Gardens, Moyross, and Mr
Christopher Costelloe (20), of Moylish Avenue, Ballynanty, were charged with falsely
imprisoning both men on January 29th last.
Armed gardaí patrolled the area outside the courthouse during the brief court
sitting.Judge Terence Finn heard that further serious charges - possibly murder - are
expected to follow as part of a major Garda investigation.
Defence counsel told the court that all three men were unemployed and in receipt of
social welfare.
None of the men spoke in court and all three were remanded in custody to Tuesday's
sitting of Limerick District Court.
They were the first people to be charged in connection with the Kieran Keane
murder.
Six other people - three men and three women - who had been arrested on Friday in
connection with the same murder investigation were released without charge at the
weekend.
Kieran Keane was murdered in an "execution-style" killing on January 29th last. He
was shot in the head with his hands tied behind his back and his body was dumped
on a roadside at Drombana - just a few miles outside Limerick city.
His nephew, Mr Treacy, survived multiple stab wounds in the same incident and later
made a statement to gardaí about the abduction.




                                    Page 75 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Eight quizzed over Limerick murder
Kathryn Hayes


22/03/2003
Eight people were last night being quizzed by gardaí about a gangland murder in
Limerick in January, following a number of early morning arrests in the city.
Three women and five men were arrested after a Garda swoop on a number of
housing estates on the north side of the city shortly before 8 a.m. yesterday. All
eight are being questioned about the murder of Kieran Keane who was shot dead in
an execution-style killing on January 29th last.
The 36-year-old crime boss had his hands tied behind his back and was shot once in
the back of the head. His nephew Owen Treacy was stabbed several times in the
same attack.
Since Mr Keane's murder gardaí have interviewed 20 people about his death and
recent serious crimes in the city, including the alleged gunpoint abduction of Eddie
and Kieran Ryan on January 23rd last.
The two brothers - who had been missing for a week - turned up safe and well just
hours after Mr Keane was shot dead.
Files have been prepared for the DPP in relation to a number of those questioned but
no one has yet been charged in connection with the murder or the alleged
kidnapping.
The arrest of eight people yesterday brings to 28 the number of people questioned
to date in connection with recent serious crime in the city.
On January 30th and 31st last, two men and two women were arrested in Tipperary
and questioned about Kieran Keane's murder.
On February 19th, four men were arrested in Limerick city and questioned about the
Keane murder and the alleged abduction of brothers Eddie and Kieran Ryan.
Between March 6th and March 9th, six more men and three women were arrested in
Limerick and Tipperary and questioned.
On March 7th last, three Limerick men, connected to Kieran Keane, were arrested in
Co Kildare after being found in possession of suspected explosive materials. They
were released without charge but a file has been sent to the DPP.
The eight people arrested yesterday range in age from late 20s to early 30s.
It is understood all are connected to the northside-based Ryan family who have been
locked in a bitter family feud for the past number of years.




                                   Page 76 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


File prepared after Limerick interviews
12/03/2003
Two young men who were questioned by gardaí for three days in connection with
recent serious crime in Limerick city were yesterday released without charge.

It is understood the two, aged 19 and 20, are central to the investigation into the
alleged gunpoint abduction of two Limerick brothers, Kieran and Eddie Ryan, last
January.
The two men were arrested in the Kileely area of Limerick last Saturday, but were
released without charge yesterday shortly before 5p.m. According to Garda sources,
a file is being prepared for the DPP on the matter. The two men - who were held for
an initial period of 48 hours - were detained for a further 24 hours following an
application to the court on Monday. It is understood the two men have addresses on
the north side of Limerick city.
Meanwhile a woman arrested on Sunday night in connection with the murder of Mr
Kieran Keane was released without charge on Monday night. The 36-year-old was
shot in the back of the head in an execution style-killing on January 29th.
Mr Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, was stabbed several times in the same attack
but narrowly escaped death. A total of 20 people have now been questioned by
gardaí in connection with Mr Keane's murder and recent crimes in the city relating
to ongoing feuds.




                                  Page 77 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


More time granted to question Limerick men
Kathyrn Hayes in Limerick


11/03/2003
Two Limerick men being questioned by gardaí last night are central to the
investigation into the alleged gunpoint abduction of brothers Kieran and Eddie Ryan.
The two men were arrested in the Kileely area of Limerick city last Saturday night.
They were held for an initial period of 48 hours under Section 30 of the Offences
Against the State Act.
But yesterday their period of detention was extended by a further 24 hours following
an application to the court.
The pair were last night being quizzed at Henry Street Garda Station in the city.
It's understood the two men - who are connected to the Ryan family - are being
questioned about the alleged gunpoint abduction, which took place on January 23rd
last.
They are aged 19 and 20 and have addresses on the north side of Limerick city.
A woman in her 20s was also being questioned last night in connection with the
investigation into the gangland killing of crime boss Kieran Keane.
The 36-year-old was shot in the back of the head in an execution-style killing in on
January 29th last. Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, was stabbed several times in
the same attack and narrowly escaped death.
The woman was arrested on Sunday night in Limerick city and is also being detained
under Section 30 of the Offences Against the State Act.
Her arrest brings to 20 the number of people questioned so far in connection with
Keane's murder and related incidents.
No one has yet been charged but a file is being prepared for the DPP.
Meanwhile, the arrest of three associates of Kieran Keane in Co Kildare last Friday
night has increased fears of an escalation of violence in the feuds in Limerick.
The three men were arrested in Kill, Co Kildare, after gardaí stopped and searched
two cars on the Naas Dual Carriageway.
During the searches of the cars component parts of a suspected explosive device
were found.
The device that was found is similar to those that are used by paramilitaries in the
North.
The three men were detained at Naas Garda Station for questioning but were
released without charge on Sunday.
A file is being prepared for the DPP.




                                   Page 78 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Three held in Limerick feud inquiry
10/03/2003
Two men arrested as part of the investigation into the Limerick gangland murder of
Kieran Keane are members of one of the families involved in a bitter feud.
The men were arrested in the Kileely area of Limerick city on Saturday night. Both
were being questioned by detectives last night at Henry Street and Roxboro Garda
stations, under section 30 of the Offences Against the State Act.
A third man, arrested in Thurles, Co Tipperary, on Saturday was released last night
without charge. A woman detained in Thurles on Friday was released yesterday
without charge, but another woman was arrested last night in the Limerick area.
A total of 19 people have now been arrested as part of the investigation into the
Kieran Keane murder and related incidents. The gang leader was shot dead in an
"execution syle" killing on January 29th. His nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, narrowly
survived death in a frenzied knife attack. The weekend arrests in Thurles followed a
major Garda operation last Thursday in which three men and a woman were arrested
in a raid of houses in the area. All four were brought to Limerick city for questioning.
They were released without charge on Saturday, but gardaí are preparing a file for
the Director of Public Prosecutions.
It is understood the four were questioned about the alleged abduction of the
brothers Kieran and Eddie Ryan on January 29th last. They were also questioned
about other criminal activities in the Limerick area.
Following their arrests, four houses were sealed off in Thurles and forensic
examinations carried out by gardaí.
Separately, three men from Limerick were released from Naas Garda station
yesterday after they were arrested in Co Kildare on Friday evening.
No charges were made, but a file is also being prepared for the DPP.
It is believed the three - who have connections to the Keane family - were found in
possession of suspected explosive materials.




                                    Page 79 of 101
                                Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Members of Limerick gang held
By Kathryn Hayes, in Limerick


20/02/2003
Four men arrested in connection with a gangland killing in Limerick are members of a
north-side gang which has been locked in a bitter feud between rival families, it
emerged last night.
The four were last night being questioned about the murder of Mr Kieran Keane
(36), who was shot dead in Limerick three weeks ago.
Mr Keane had his hands tied behind his back and was shot in the back of the head
in what was described as an execution-style killing on January 29th last.
Mr Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, was stabbed a number of times in the same
attack.
A 19-year-old man, a man in his 40s and two men in their 20s were arrested by
gardaí yesterday morning following raids on a number of houses in the north of the
city.
It is believed that the four are connected to a family involved in a long-running feud
with a second family and that they are also being questioned about the alleged
abduction of Kieran and Eddie Ryan, which had been linked to the Keane murder.
The brothers, who were taken at gunpoint on January 23rd last, turned up safe and
well the morning after the murder of Mr Keane, but have been reluctant to tell
gardaí about where they were being held or who was holding them.
The four men were last night still being questioned by gardaí at Mayorstone and
Roxboro Garda stations.




                                     Page 80 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Mourners at funeral of murdered man told to avoid hatred
By Conor Lally, in Limerick


07/02/2003
People needed to let go of prejudice and hatred and change their behaviour and
attitude if peace was to be secured, mourners at a Limerick drug dealer's funeral
were told yesterday.
Father Donough O'Malley told friends and family of Mr Kieran Keane, who was shot
dead near Limerick 10 days ago, that peace was God's gift to us. "Like all gifts it
[should be] appreciated and valued and it must be worked at".
As he gave his homily in St Mary's Church, Limerick city, gardaí mounted a major
security operation involving dozens of uniformed gardaí, armed detectives and the
Garda helicopter.
Tensions were running high in the city as Mr Keane was buried. At 7 a.m. yesterday
morning, just hours before the 11 a.m. funeral Mass, another home - the second in
less than a week - was petrol-bombed. The attack was linked to the long-running
feud in the city in which Mr Keane and his associates were involved.
While there was a small media presence at Mr Keane's removal on Wednesday night
and at the funeral Mass yesterday, journalists did not attend the burial at Castletroy
because of safety fears. Just a handful of photographers were present at the Mass
and all stayed as far away from the mourners as possible. One TV crew shot footage
from inside its car.
A crowd of several hundred, smaller than the estimated 800 seen at the removal
Mass, was present at yesterday's service. Leading the mourners were Mr Keane's
widow, Mrs Sophie Keane, and his two young sons, Joseph and Kieran. Also in
attendance was Mr Keane's nephew Mr Owen Treacy, who had been stabbed
repeatedly during the same attack which claimed his uncle's life.
The proceedings had been delayed so Mr Treacy could be given time to recover and
attend. Absent was Mr Keane's brother Christie Keane, who was refused temporary
release from prison, where he is serving a 10-year drugs sentence. The dead man's
four other brothers and six sisters were at the service.
Many of the extended Keane gang who were sentenced to short terms of
imprisonment after a melee outside Limerick Circuit Court last Monday week were
among the mourners having secured bail and leave to appeal.
Mr Keane's coffin was covered by a lavish presentation of red roses and his hearse
and two other funeral cars were packed with flowers from his wife, sons, nephews
and family and friends - they read "Husband", "No 1 Uncle", and "Best Dad" while a
fourth simply read "Keane".
A fleet of four other limousines ferried female members of the family to and from the
church. A large group of male mourners, predominantly in their 20s and early 30s, all
dressed in black suits and ties with white shirts, walked behind the coffin from the
service.
Earlier, Father O'Malley had told the mourners: "Death by violence is difficult to
accept. Violence is the result of deep hatred".
Father O'Malley urged those gathered to "pray for Kieran's immortal soul, to ask God
to be merciful to him and in the fullness of time to receive him into his kingdom".
"To have peace it is necessary to let go of prejudice and hatred. This is difficult, for
all of us to do, as it requires a change of heart, attitude and behaviour ... it requires
hard work on our part to change our attitude. But this can be done successfully with




                                     Page 81 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


God's help and our own goodwill. Two thousand years ago, people believed God was
a God of revenge - an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth," Father O'Malley said.
"But God is the person Christ told us and showed us by his life, and the true sign of
a Christian is to be a person of forgiveness and love. That is \ each of us has to try
to live each day".




                                    Page 82 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


House bombing believed linked to feud
By Conor Lally, in Limerick


07/02/2003
The simmering tensions in Limerick city yesterday once again spilled over after a
house was petrol-bombed. It was the second such attack in less than a week. It
came as gardaí were preparing to mount a massive security operation for Mr Kieran
Keane's funeral and as armed officers from the Emergency Response Unit patrolled
some suburbs.
Yesterday's attack occurred at around 7 a.m. at a house in Hyde Road, Ballinacura
Weston, Limerick city.
Three units of the fire brigade were called to the scene and fought the blaze for over
an hour. However, the terraced property was badly damaged.
Yesterday's attack was significant in that it was on a home belonging to members of
a third faction who gardaí suspect may have been involved in the murder of Mr
Keane last week and the alleged double abduction of the Ryan brothers just over a
fortnight ago.
Gardai are examining the possibility that the third party, based around one known
Limerick family, may have killed Mr Keane as part of a turf war in the city. It is not
yet clear how the alleged abduction of Kieran and Eddie Ryan fits into the puzzle.
It is understood nobody was injured in yesterday's blaze and that the occupants of
the house had left some time in the last week.
Gardaí insist they are satisfied with progress made in the investigation into recent
events in the city.
Last week they questioned four people - two men and two women - and released
them without charge. And on Tuesday forensic experts examined a house in the city
as part of the investigation into the murder and alleged double abduction.




                                    Page 83 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Crowds at removal of Limerick murder victim
06/02/2003
Around 800 mourners gathered in Limerick city last night for the removal of Mr
Kieran Keane, the drug-dealer murdered last Wednesday. The ceremony passed off
without incident. Conor Lally reports.
Gardaí staged a big surveillance operation, with dozens of uniformed gardaí as well
as armed detectives watching from unmarked cars.
A similarly heavy security operation is expected this morning when Mr Keane is due
to be buried in Castletroy after 11 a.m. Mass in the city.
The funeral had been postponed for a number of days because family members
wanted to wait until Mr Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, was well enough to
attend. Mr Treacy was stabbed repeatedly in the same attack which claimed his
uncle's life last Wednesday but left hospital yesterday and was present last night.
A crowd of around 600 gathered at Cross's Funeral Home in the city centre last night
where most stood in the freezing rain for over an hour before Mr Keane's remains
were taken by hearse to St Mary's Church around 15 minutes' walk away.
The public house across the road from Cross's appeared to have closed for business
for the evening.
The mourners walked behind the hearse in silence through city streets where many
curious residents appeared in doorways to watch the procession. It included two
other funeral cars packed with floral tributes and four limousines packed with family
members.
The mourners made their way to St Mary's where a second crowd of at least 200 had
gathered.
Such was the volume of people in attendance that many already-sodden mourners
were forced to listen to the Mass in the car park of the sizeable church.
Mr Keane leaves behind two young children.
The dead man's brother, Christie Keane, who is serving a 10-year prison term in
Portlaoise prison, was refused temporary release to attend the funeral.
Both Mr Keane and Mr Treacy were taken by abductors from the Garryowen area in
Limerick last Wednesday night to a rural lane three miles away in Drombanna where
Mr Keane was shot in the head and Mr Treacy stabbed. Gardaí believe last week's
attack was linked to the alleged abduction of brothers Eddie and Kieran Ryan.
Detectives also believe a third party was involved and that the alleged Ryan
abduction and the attack on Mr Keane and Mr Treacy were part of a drug-related
gang feud in Limerick city.




                                   Page 84 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Gardai examine house in Limerick
By Conor Lally


05/02/2003
Garda forensic experts yesterday examined a home in Limerick as part of the
ongoing investigation into the murder and alleged double abduction in the city in the
last fortnight.
The examination took place at a house in the Roundwood Estate near Rosbrien, off
Childers Road, in the south of the city. Gardaí also conducted house-to-house
inquiries in the area.
The development came less that 24 hours after the Garda Commissioner, Mr Pat
Byrne, said he was happy with the progress made by gardaí investigating recent
events in Limerick.
Meanwhile, the funeral of a former drug-dealer, Mr Kieran Keane, is to take place
tomorrow. His remains will be taken from Cross's funeral home in the city for 7 p.m.
Mass at St Mary's Church this evening, one week after his murder.
He will be buried tomorrow morning at Kilmurray Cemetery in Castletroy.
Gardai are expected to mount an extensive surveillance operation at both the
removal and funeral.
Senior sources said that despite recent events it was hoped the funeral would pass
without incident. "We have a plan of action in place," said one source.
The dead man was murdered last Wednesday night during a gun attack at
Drombanna just outside Limerick city. Mr Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, was
stabbed repeatedly during the attack and has been recovering in hospital.
The Keane family had delayed the funeral until Mr Treacy was well enough to
attend. But while he is expected to be at tonight's service Mr Keane's brother,
Christie, is not. He is serving a 10-year drug-related term in Portlaoise Prison.
He lodged a request to be released temporarily for the funeral or to at least visit his
brother's remains to "say goodbye".
However, that request is understood to have been rejected. It was felt his presence
might further heighten tensions between the feuding gangs in Limerick.
Gardaí are working on the theory that Mr Keane's murder and the attack on Mr
Treacy are linked to the alleged abduction and subsequent release of brothers Kieran
and Eddie Ryan.
It is believed a third party, aiming to take control of the drugs supply in Limerick,
played a key role in recent events.
Gardaí are keeping an "open mind" on whether the Ryans were abducted.
The Ryans are rivals of the Keane family. Kieran Keane was a chief suspect in the
murder of the Ryans' father, Eddie, just over two years ago.




                                    Page 85 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Satisfactory progress in Limerick inquiry, says Byrne
By Conor Lally


04/02/2003
The Garda Commissioner, Mr Pat Byrne, last night said he was "very pleased with
the progress being made and developments so far" in the investigation into the
murder and alleged double abduction in Limerick last week.
Limerick was no more dangerous than other cities and people should not be afraid to
walk its streets, to invest there or to visit, he said.
It emerged yesterday that Christie Keane, the brother of murder victim Kieran
Keane, had requested temporary release from prison to "say goodbye" to his
brother. It is understood Christie Keane, who is serving a drug- related 10-year
prison term in Portlaoise prison, would not be allowed to attend his brother's funeral
scheduled for Thursday, but may be brought to visit his brother's remains, as soon
as today.
Kieran Keane was murdered in a gun attack in Drombanna, just outside Limerick
city, on Wednesday night. Gardai are working on the theory that the murder was
linked to the alleged abduction and release of Limerick brothers Kieran and Eddie
Ryan who are rivals of the Keanes. Detectives believe a third party was involved.
Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, was stabbed repeatedly during the attack that
claimed his uncle's life. The Keane family decided to postpone the funeral until Mr
Treacy is well enough to attend.
Speaking at Roxborough Garda station in Limerick city, Mr Byrne said he was
satisfied with the way his officers had handled recent events in Limerick. His
comments came less than 24 hours after a home was petrol bombed on the Lee
Estate in the city.
That attack, at around 7 p.m. on Sunday night, was the latest incident linked to a
long-running gang feud in the city. It came as armed officers from the Emergency
Response Unit (ERU) patrolled the streets close to where the attack happened.
"I think you can take it from what I am saying that I'm very hopeful for the future in
relation to these \," Mr Byrne said. "I feel at the end of the day they'll come to a very
satisfactory conclusion. We know we have a challenge here and a task to do but we
won't be found wanting in that task. Our record in Limerick speaks for itself."
He described as "appalling" intimidation seen in Limerick during recent Garda
inquiries into serious crime. "Intimidation, even if it is only one case, is a serious
matter," he said.
Arrests would follow on the basis of evidence. "We don't just arrest people for the
sake of it," he said.
It was put to him that many detectives and gardaí based in Limerick are currently
occupied by long homicide cases in Dublin and that this has been a strain on
resources.
In reply he said the level of detection of serious homicide crimes by Limerick gardaí
meant the force in the city was a "victim of its own success".
He said the ERU would continue to patrol in Limerick and he would take direction
from local gardaí as to when it might be withdrawn. It is expected the crack unit will
remain in the city for at least several more weeks and maybe a lot longer.




                                     Page 86 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Mediation efforts rejected in Limerick feud
By Conor Lally, in Limerick


03/02/2003
Attempts at mediation in the Limerick feud have been rebuffed by the Keane family,
adding to fears of further bloodshed.
It has emerged that the Criminal Assets Bureau (CAB) is now investigating the assets
of one of the men questioned by gardaí but released last week and also the assets of
the Ryan brothers.
Both investigations are understood to be in their early stages. CAB was about to
serve a demand of €200,000 on last Wednesday's murder victim, Mr Kieran Keane.
More arrests are expected in Limerick in coming days in connection with the murder
of Mr Keane.
The dead man's funeral was not expected to go ahead until Wednesday because the
family want to wait until his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, is well enough to attend. Mr
Treacy was stabbed repeatedly during the same attack that claimed his uncle's life.
Mr Treacy has been interviewed by gardaí a number of times, and it is understood
that he may have known his attackers. His evidence, if he is prepared to co-operate
fully with gardaí, could be central to bringing to justice those involved in both Kieran
Keane's murder and the Ryan brothers' abduction.
But the feuding in Limerick in recent years has been characterised by an
unwillingness of key players to co-operate with gardaí.
Over the weekend, gardaí released another man and woman who were being
questioned about the murder. The four who were being detained were suspected of
having played a minor role in the murder, and it is thought that two other factions
working together were the primary forces behind last Wednesday's attack.
The investigation is now focusing on these two principal factions who loosely make
up a third gang now believed to have been involved in Mr Keane's murder and also
the alleged abduction of Kieran and Eddie Ryan.
One avenue still be explored is that this gang may have been hired by Mr Keane to
abduct the Ryans but, after a falling out with Mr Keane, may have killed him and
released the Ryans.
However, it has not been ruled out that this gang was operating independently of
the Keanes and simply wanted to murder Mr Keane and link it to the Ryan
abduction. Both factions are known to gardaí.
One family believed to have been involved lives very close to members of the Keane
family, and the other faction has a reputation for extreme violence. The latter are the
main suspects in a spate of brutal attacks on a number of elderly people in the west
of Ireland in recent years where robbery was the motive.
It is believed these groups, along with a former businessman from Limerick, are
intent on taking over the Keane drug-dealing patch.
Some of those involved have also been connected to the murder of a night-club
bouncer, Mr Brian Fitzgerald, last year. He was shot because he would not allow
drugs to be sold in the club where he worked.
The murder of Fitzgerald and Keane and the violent history of those suspected to
have been involved has led to fears among gardaí that serious violence will occur
again soon.
It is believed that the former businessman is a drugs wholesaler who has been
supplying drugs to most of the city's criminals for a number of years. He was the




                                    Page 87 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


man arrested but released who is being investigated by CAB. He has owned several
businesses in the city in recent years.
Yesterday saw continued armed Garda presence in Limerick, and the Garda
helicopter could be seen circling parts of the city. The Emergency Response Unit was
still deployed in some suburbs, and its presence, while under constant review, was
expected to continue in the short term.




                                   Page 88 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Ten days that shook Limerick
01/02/2003
Conor Lally unravels the complex web of crime gripping Limerick city. The brutal
conflict is being played out against a backdrop of drug dealing where the main
players are armed and dangerous.
When two young Limerick brothers reappeared in the early hours of Thursday
morning having allegedly been held against their will for just over a week, their
mother was understandably overjoyed. Everybody else was simply confused.
Eddie and Kieran Ryan appeared well, unharmed and in high sprits. They were even
clean-shaven. But immediately questions were asked. Who would risk holding them
for a week and then just let them go? How would anyone do that undetected? Why?
Gardaí admitted they were keeping an open mind as to whether the men had been
abducted, in the usual sense of the word, at all.
And did the murder of their rival, Kieran Keane, in the freezing darkness of a remote
Limerick laneway, have anything to do with the Ryans' sensational release? The
events were less than six hours apart. Keane was murdered at about 9.30 p.m. on
Wednesday and the Ryans were free before 3 a.m. on Thursday. The Ryan brothers
were questioned by gardaí yesterday.
This weekend, an army of detectives in Limerick are trying to figure out this complex
puzzle.
Chief Supt Gerry Kelly said this week that the nature of the gang warfare now
gripping the Shannon-side city makes it particularly difficult to police. It is a brutal
conflict based on "deep hatred" and "madness", he said, and it is all taking place
against a backdrop of organised drug dealing where the main players are armed and
dangerous.
Chief Supt Kelly added that most of the guns in circulation in Limerick have been
supplied by republican groups or have been bought from international drugs
wholesalers from whom city gangs source their drugs. But while the Chief Supt and
his colleagues in the force are intent on bringing the gangs to justice in the long-
term, first they must deal with the events of the last week and a half.
Since the beginning of this 10-day drama, the facts have not seemed to add up. This
feud has been presented as a clear battle between two warring factions in Limerick
city. On the one side are the Ryans from Hogan Avenue in Kileely and their
supporters from Moyross. On the other we have the Keanes and their associates
from St Mary's Park on Kings Island. Both factions have supporters in Lee Estate on
Kings Island. The locations are modest working-class housing estates on the north
side of Limerick city, approximately a mile apart.
It seemed the Ryans had been abducted by their enemies. They were gone for so
long that the gardaí had begun to look for bodies.
Then, on Wednesday night, when Kieran Keane and his nephew Owen Treacy were
abducted from Garryowen in the city, and murdered and stabbed respectively, it was
believed the widely predicted reprisal for the Ryans' abduction had happened. Less
than six hours after Keane's murder, the Ryans emerged from captivity. From a
telephone box in Portlaoise they phoned local gardaí and were driven to Limerick city
for a triumphant homecoming. A beer and alcopop fuelled celebration got under way
immediately.
Gardaí working on the case say it just does not add up. First of all, the circumstances
surrounding the Ryans' abduction, while not beyond belief, are strange. The boys'
friend, Christopher Costelloe, managed to escape the scene on foot and it was he
who raised the alarm. He said just three men had come for his friends, one was



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                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


driving and the other pair were armed. It is unusual that such a small gang of
abductors would try to take more than one person.
Costelloe's escape, while not impossible, is unusual.
The second aspect puzzling observers are the circumstances of the abduction of
Kieran Keane and Owen Treacy. The two men were allegedly taken from the
Garryowen area of the city, where they were last seen in Keane's car on Wednesday
night. Keane was tied up and shot in the head. His body was found in a roadway in
Drombanna, three miles from Limerick city, where he had either been murdered, or
dumped after being killed elsewhere. Treacy survived the attack and raised the alarm
at a nearby house in Drombanna.
Gardaí are confused as to why Keane was shot in the head and Treacy stabbed. But
one theory is that the weapon used to kill Keane jammed and a knife was all the
attackers had at their disposal in their efforts to kill Treacy.
But Keane (36) was a different player to the 19- and 20-year-old Ryans. He was the
most senior figure in the Keane gang, a crime figure of considerable standing and
means. It remains a mystery as to how somebody would get him into a vehicle for
the purposes of abduction. He is said to have been the kind of man who would have
fought, who would had to have been killed on the spot. But he may have known his
abductors and gone with them freely.
There is much local speculation as to what has been going on in Limerick for the last
10 days. But the possibility that these events involved a third party, as well as the
two gangs, has not been discounted.
One possibility that has not been ruled out by gardaí is that a well-known third
faction was responsible for the Ryans' abduction and they played the feuding gangs
off each other. After they kidnapped the Ryans they may have then murdered
Keane and tried to kill Treacy because they wanted Keane out of the way in order
to encroach on his drug dealing business.
The Ryans may have been released so shortly after the Keane murder in order to
make it look as though the two events were linked.
There is also speculation that Keane's killing may have arisen from a botched
ransom demand for the Ryans, also involving a third party.
The one fact we know for certain is that Keane is dead. His brother Christy is
serving a lengthy drug-related prison sentence and it is believed that with those two
brothers out of the way, their associates will not have the wherewithal to keep their
criminal empire going. Keane's murder was a very significant act in that it has
cleared the way for a rival gang to step in.
The third party suspected of being involved in some way is believed to have been
linked to the murder of Limerick doorman Brian Fitzgerald late last year. Fitzgerald
was murdered because he refused to co-operate with drug dealers who wanted to
sell drugs in the nightclub where he worked. His death demonstrated that this third
party was looking for opportunities to expand their drugs business and were willing
and able to shed blood to further that cause.
If the theory regarding the third gang was true, it would mean the Ryans were
innocent in all of this, that their abduction was genuine, but that they were merely
used as a smokescreen and were never going to be harmed. They were being
questioned by gardaí yesterday, but early indications after their release were that
they were "threatened not to talk" by those who abducted them. It must also be
noted that when the Ryans' father, Eddie Ryan Snr, was killed in November 2000
while having a drink in a Limerick pub after a funeral, one of the chief suspects was
Kieran Keane, the man whose life was taken on Wednesday night.
But this story is as complex as it is fascinating and gardaí insist they are exploring a




                                    Page 90 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


number of avenues because they need to keep an open mind in this investigation. It
was hoped information arising from the questioning of four people yesterday in
relation to the Keane murder might advance the case, or at least put some order to
the facts. Anything Owen Treacy can tell about his and Keane's abduction would be
crucial to getting to the bottom of recent events, gardaí said.
But putting the immediate investigation aside, gardaí are also under huge pressure
arising from this nearly four-year gang feud. The specialist Emergency Response Unit
may be patrolling the suburban streets of Limerick today, but the intense localised
gang fighting in the city is not going to be stopped by extra manpower.
Last Monday, a fight erupted between feuding factions outside Limerick courthouse
in the city. The melee took place on the steps of a courthouse, in front of a
significant number of gardaí, all of whom seemed to know all of those involved by
name. One of the men involved wore a bullet-proof vest and one faction had
reinforcements waiting in two vehicles around the corner from the courthouse in
case they were needed. The incident indicated the apparent disregard participants in
this conflict have for law and order. It is difficult to see some of the main players
being seriously hampered by having a few more, or even a lot more, gardaí on the
streets.
The personalised nature of the feud between the gangs also makes a peaceful
outcome seem impossible.
In the early 1990s, Eddie Ryan Snr worked closely with the Keane gang. He was a
"runner" and "enforcer" in that gang. But Ryan's more junior role in the operation did
not sit easy with him and was a constant source of conflict between him and his
"employers".
Eventually he decided to work alone. Around the same time, schoolchildren in the
Ryan and Keane families became involved in a row in a schoolyard. Both families
learned of the row and it, combined with the simmering unease, led to the feud
which has dominated the media this week.
Gardaí say there have been about 40 reported incidents at various homes around the
city linked to the feud in recent years. But there are likely to have been many more
unreported ones. The reported attacks involved the petrol-bombing of homes, and
drive-by shootings, a tactic more associated with gang feuds on the other side of the
Atlantic than here. It was during one such attack that Eddie Ryan Snr was killed. It is
said in the days before his murder, Ryan made an attempt on the life of Kieran
Keane, but that his gun jammed.
While there had been no more killing until this week, the conflict has been marked
by a string of more low-key incidents. The Ryan brothers' mother, Mary Ryan, was
reportedly head-butted outside a courthouse last year by Wednesday night's murder
victim.
And there has been alleged intimidation of witnesses when gardaí have endeavoured
to bring charges against perpetrators. It is hoped that bringing in the Criminal Assets
Bureau will result in the confiscation of the means of the feuding gangs and so
diffuse the situation. The CAB has civil powers to gather intelligence covertly, which
means it is not as dependent on witness co-operation as gardaí involved in more
straightforward criminal cases.
Chief Supt Gerry Kelly said the CAB's investigations are at an advanced stage and
that one portion of its work is complete. But a lot of the criminal wealth in Limerick is
squirrelled away in cash and many criminals have not acquired expensive cars and
properties which CAB usually confiscates. The family homes of the men visited b this
week were very modest ones and there was little sign of expensive cars.
In the last fortnight, a criminal case involving some players in the feud collapsed.




                                     Page 91 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


The manner of its failure demonstrated exactly the type of difficulties facing the
gardaí in this conflict.
Liam Keane was giving evidence in a case against Kieran Ryan, one of the men
abducted and returned safely this week. Ryan was charged with assault and two
counts of being in possession and producing a knife on March 5th, 2002 in Limerick
city centre. The court heard that in a statement to gardaí, Keane had named Ryan
as his attacker. But when the case appeared before Judge Carroll Moran, Keane said
he was unable to identify his attacker.
"Kieran Ryan stabbed me in the back," Keane told the court. But when asked if he
could identify Ryan who was in court, he said No.
Judge Carroll Moran then said he was left with "no alternative" but to direct the jury
to find the accused not guilty.
"It is a very sorry state of affairs that this should happen and if this is going to
persist we are going to live in a state of social chaos and anarchy," commented
Judge Moran.
That case took place on the same day the Ryans were abducted. Just hours after the
judge's warning of "chaos and anarchy" the men were abducted at gunpoint. There
ensued a massive search for them in counties Clare and Limerick, the murder and
stab attack in Drombanna, the subsequent release of the Ryans in Portlaoise and the
drafting in of the specialist Emergency Response Unit.
The question on everybody's lips is, what will happen next?




                                   Page 92 of 101
Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003




     Page 93 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Limerick gardai examine 'hired gun' theory
By Conor Lally, in Limerick


01/02/2003
Two of four people detained by Limerick gardaí in connection with the killing of crime
figure Kieran Keane were released without charge last night.
Two other people, a man and a woman, were still being detained in the city as it
emerged gardaí now believe a third party, and not just rival Limerick gangs, was
involved in the events of the past week.
Gardaí are examining the theory that a freelance crime figure was hired by murder
victim Mr Keane to kidnap the Ryan brothers, Eddie and Ciaran, and hold them to
ransom. They believe Mr Keane and the hired criminal may have fallen out over
money and that Mr Keane was killed as part of that dispute and the Ryans were
then freed.
However, gardaí were not aware of any ransom demand being made during the
Ryans' week-long ordeal.
Mr Keane was one of the city's biggest drug-dealers. His brother, Christie, was also
a major drug dealer but is currently serving a 10-year drug-related prison term.
With the Keane brothers no longer active in the drugs scene in the city, it is now
feared a new turf war may erupt as rival parties attempt to take over from the
Keane's associates, who are not considered to be as astute as the brothers.
Investigating officers yesterday interviewed the Ryan brothers for two hours. They
are understood to have provided information to the gardaí.
This will be evaluated and the brothers may be interviewed again. The Ryans went
to Mayorstone Garda station by arrangement yesterday.
Gardaí also spent a lengthy period interviewing Mr Keane's nephew, Mr Owen
Treacy, who was repeatedly stabbed during the same attack which claimed Mr
Keane's life on Wednesday night. It is understood Mr Treacy co-operated with
gardaí and investigations will now focus on how best to use that information. Mr
Treacy has been identified as a crucial witness in trying to establish who and what
was behind the abduction of the Ryan brothers and the murder of Mr Keane.
Mr Treacy, who is seriously ill but stable, was interviewed at Limerick Regional
Hospital during a number of short sessions with gardaí.
The team conducting the investigation into the abduction and murder last night said
progress had been made yesterday and a lot of information was now in the hands of
the gardaí. Further arrests are expected. Garda Supt John Farrelly said that while the
situation in Limerick remained "volatile", tensions had been confined to "small
pockets" in the city. "It is tense and we have to wait and see what happens," he said
yesterday. The Emergency Response Unit was again patrolling Limerick streets last
night. It is understood Mr Keane is to be buried on Monday. His funeral may prove
another flashpoint in the feud in the city.
Yesterday morning a man and woman were detained by gardaí in Tipperary and
were being questioned at Mayorstone Garda station in Limerick. The man was aged
33 and woman aged 42.
A second woman, aged 40, was released after being questioned at Roxborough Road
Garda Station. The man detained with her in Limerick on Thursday morning was also
released. The two still being detained were being held under Section 30 of the
Offences Against the State Act and can be detained for a total of 72 hours. Once that
period has expired, they must be charged or released.




                                    Page 94 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Patrols continue for tense weekend
By Conor Lally, in Limerick


01/02/2003
On the eve of what seems likely to be a tense weekend in Limerick, armed detectives
and members of the Emergency Response Unit were again patrolling the city streets
last night.
Gardaí said more gang-related bloodshed in coming days could not be ruled out
despite the massive Garda presence in the city.
It is now believed a third party or parties, and not just two rival gangs, were involved
in the events of the last 11 days.
A hired criminal or another faction is believed to have played a role in the reported
abduction of the Ryan brothers and the subsequent murder of drug dealer Kieran
Keane.
Two further people were detained yesterday morning for questioning in connection
with the murder of Keane who was gunned down on Wednesday night.
Last night a 39-year-old man detained in the early hours of Thursday morning was
released without charge. A 40-year-old woman detained with that man was
questioned at Roxborough until late last night before being released.
And two other people - a 33-year-old man and 42-year-old woman - who were
arrested in Tipperary early yesterday were still being questioned at Limerick's
Mayorstone station.
Yesterday detectives also interviewed Kieran and Eddie Ryan about their reported
abduction.




                                    Page 95 of 101
                              Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Gardai to question Limerick brothers
By Conor Lally

31/01/2003
The Limerick brothers who turned up safe and well in the early hours of yesterday
after being missing for seven days will be questioned by gardaí about their ordeal
today.
Links to their dramatic release - and the murder of a major crime figure and rival of
the Ryans in Limerick less than six hours before the men were set free - were also
being investigated.
Two suspects, a man and a woman in their 40s, were yesterday arrested in
connection with the murder of Mr Kieran Keane, of Greenhills, Garryowen, at around
9.30 p.m. on Wednesday night.
They were arrested outside Limerick at around 4 a.m. yesterday and taken to
Roxborough Garda station, where they are being held under Section 30 of the
Offences Against the State Act.
Gardaí said they wanted to question Kieran and Eddie Ryan about all aspects of their
abduction, detention and release. But yesterday the brothers said they had been
threatened by their captors, and would not be speaking.
Meanwhile, as armed officers from the specialist Emergency Response Unit were
drafted in to patrol the city, senior gardaí insisted last night that Limerick's crime
problem would not be brought under control by extra resources alone.
Assistant Commissioner Mr Adrian Culligan said the Garda was just one part of the
State's judicial system and he believed it was often asked to bear too much
responsibility. The level of work facing the force in Limerick was not "reasonable", he
said.
Mr Culligan said it was time to fast-track court cases and to examine the
effectiveness of how the judicial system was working.
Chief Supt Gerry Kelly said he feared further violence in the feud between the Ryans
and their rivals.
He said the feud was driven by "deep hatred" and "madness".
But he claimed that a major crime-fighting operation in the city involving specialist
units of roaming armed officers had been a considerable success in recent years.
After a night of high drama late on Wednesday and in the early hours of yesterday
morning, gardaí were trying to establish the facts about Kieran and Eddie Ryan's
abduction and sensational release.
They also launched a murder investigation into the death of Mr Keane, a leading
member of a rival gang who was shot dead at around 9.30 p.m. in the gateway of a
house in the townland of Drombanna, about three miles east of Limerick city.
Mr Keane's nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, had been taken to the same spot. He was
stabbed but managed to raise the alarm by making his way to a house about 80
metres from where Mr Keane's body was found. Mr Treacy was recovering in
hospital last night. Gardaí say information from him will be crucial. He is to be
interviewed today.
Mr Keane was a leading figure in the family now feuding with the Ryans. It is
believed that he played an active part in the murder of the Ryans' father, Mr Eddie
Ryan snr, during a gun attack in a Limerick bar in November 2000.
Garda sources said a "deal may have been done" on the road where Mr Keane's
body was found.
It is believed that his murderers may have extracted information, through threats,
from either Mr Keane or Mr Treacy, and that that information may have helped



                                    Page 96 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


secure the release of the Ryan brothers.
Mr Keane and Mr Treacy were last seen driving in Mr Keane's car at St Mary's
estate in north Limerick city at around 7 p.m. on Wednesday night.
The car was later found abandoned in the estate and was being examined last night.
Gardaí were also conducting door-to-door investigations, and armed checkpoints had
been erected in some flashpoint estates.




                                  Page 97 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Reprisals feared as armed gardai brought in
By Conor Lally, in Limerick


31/01/2003
Members of the specialist Garda Emergency Response Unit were last night drafted on
to the streets of Limerick to prevent further bloodshed in the ongoing violent feud
between two families in the city.
The decision to deploy the highly trained gardaí to Limerick followed the murder of a
member of one of the families, Mr Ciaran Keane (42) on Wednesday night.
His shooting dead came hours before the dramatic appearance in the early hours of
yesterday at Portlaoise Garda station of members of the other family, teenage
brothers Eddie and Kieran Ryan. They had been missing for a week and reported as
abducted.
As fears of reprisal for Mr Keane's death increased, the Minister for Justice, Mr
McDowell, announced he was considering transferring some Central Criminal Court
murder trials to Limerick so local gardaí would not have to travel to Dublin while
cases were being heard.
Last night two people were being questioned in relation to Mr Keane's death. The
two, a man and woman both in their 40s, were being detained at Roxborough Garda
station.
Gardaí said they planned to question the Ryan brothers today to get a "clearer
picture" of what had happened. When asked if the gardaí were satisfied the Ryans
had in fact been abducted and held for seven days, Chief Supt Gerry Kelly said it was
best to keep an "open mind". However, the Ryans had acted like men who had been
through "an experience", he said.
An investigation into the financial affairs of the feuding gangs is well advanced, Chief
Supt Kelly said.
Mr McDowell was heavily criticised for the rise in crime in Limerick by opposition
politicians in the Dáil yesterday. Earlier he met the Garda Commissioner, Mr Pat
Byrne, to discuss how to tackle the problem in the city.
While the Minister denied there was a crisis in law and order in the State, Chief Supt
Kelly said he feared a revenge attack. The feud between the Ryan and Keane
families was driven by a deep hatred, a form of madness that was difficult to control,
he said. Assistant Garda Commissioner Adrian Culligan said in Limerick that the
gardaí were sometimes asked to bear too much pressure when it came to the
enforcement of the law. He called for the entire workings of the judicial system to be
examined, and said up to 12 murder cases now being dealt with by Limerick gardaí
might have to be fast-tracked in an effort to take the pressure off local members of
the force. But he insisted extra resources alone would not solve Limerick's problems.
"We need to be supported by other agencies," he added.
Last night members of the Garda Response Unit had set up checkpoints and
patrolled the estate where the Ryan family live.
The mother of Eddie and Kieran Ryan appealed for an end to the animosity and
trouble between feuding families. Mrs Mary Ryan said that she had no hatred for
anyone - she just wanted to live in peace with her family.
Meanwhile, five men from one of the groups involved in the Limerick feud were
given jail sentences yesterday for being involved in a confrontation with members of
the other faction outside the city's courthouse over the past week.




                                    Page 98 of 101
                               Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Gang Wars in Limerick
31/01/2003
Crime has come to an extraordinary pass. Two young men, Eddie and Kieran Ryan,
are allegedly abducted by armed and masked men late at night in Limerick city. Their
friend flees the scene with pellet fragments in his jacket.
A week later, Kieran Keane is found dead in the middle of the night, his companion
is stabbed but comfortable in hospital. The abducted Ryan brothers return home
alive. A major criminal investigation is now under way into these frightening events.
The unfolding saga of gang warfare and family feuding on the streets of Limerick is
as strange as the slayings, kidnappings and threats to kill which, apparently, have
been part of the ongoing behaviour between rival factions for a couple of years. It is
impossible to believe that an exchange between two children in a school playground
could fully explain this descent into violent disorder. Similarly, it is difficult to
understand why such criminal feuding could only have come to the surface nationally
in the last seven days.
The Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform, Mr McDowell, was called to
account for the breakdown of law and order by Opposition parties in the Dáil
yesterday. The scale of open and armed hostility which has emerged in Limerick in
the past week puts the litany of violent, though isolated, incidents in the capital city
in recent times in the shade.
The Minister maintains that the deployment of the Garda's Emergency Response Unit
to Limerick was not an indication that numbers were below strength there. It was
facile to suggest that the problem related to Garda numbers. He also holds that the
Criminal Assets Bureau, which has been active in Limerick, is not the answer either. "
It is hostility and hatred that has welled up. The tackling of assets is not going to
tackle this particular problem".
The Government's immediate solution is to transfer some Central Criminal Court
murder trials to Limerick to ease pressure on detectives who will spend large
amounts of time travelling to Dublin this year and next to give evidence in trials
following earlier killings.
Sittings of the Central Criminal Court outside the capital may go some way towards
easing the current pressure on Garda resources in Limerick. But it will confront only
one aspect of the underlying problem. The outbreak of gang wars in Limerick is a
direct consequence of the drug and criminal culture and it will take more than the
criminal justice system to tackle it at its roots.




                                    Page 99 of 101
                             Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


City in a state of siege awaits the next episode
31/01/2003
The Emergency Response Unit was making its presence felt in Limerick
yesterday, writes Conor Lally.
Limerick was a city under siege last night. The long-running feud between rival
gangs claimed one life this week, and local people feared that more blood would be
spilled.
Members of the Garda Emergency Response Unit were yesterday drafted into the
city from Dublin and last evening they were making their presence felt.
Special armed checkpoints had been set up and they were patrolling the suburbs to
prevent another outbreak of violence.
Local people are already worried that the funeral in the coming days of Wednesday
night's murder victim, Kieran Keane, may lead to more trouble.
Mr Keane was shot dead and his nephew, Mr Owen Treacy, received stab wounds
and was seriously ill in hospital last night.
Mr Keane's body lay yesterday in the gateway of a substantial rural home in
Drumbana, three miles from Limerick city, waiting on the attentions of deputy State
pathologist, Dr Marie Cassidy.
It is believed the men may have been abducted by attackers who wanted
information which might secure the release of the Ryans.
The savage violence on Wednesday night and the sensational release of the Ryan
brothers less than six hours later were shocking in themselves. But the fear of
reprisals, of what may lay ahead was the real talk of the town.
Such was the media feeding frenzy yesterday that gardaí convened a press
conference at Roxborough Garda station in an effort to satisfy in some small way the
media's insatiable hunger for the latest news.
The drama was merely added to by the fact that in police cells just yards away from
where reporters bombarded senior gardaí with questions two people, a man and
woman, both in their 40s, were being held in connection with the murder of Mr
Keane and the stabbing of his nephew.
This is a feud which has been driven by a deadly cocktail of ingredients.
Chief Supt Gerry Kelly said the rival factions had been motivated by "deep hatred"
and "madness".
He said many of the weapons, including machine guns, which seem so freely
available in this small city, had been supplied by subversive republican groups.
Guns had also been imported by many gang members when they bought their drugs
from international wholesalers.
The sub-text of it all is the vast amounts of money being generated through drug
dealing, money which Chief Supt Kelly said the Criminal Assets Bureau is close to
getting its hands on. Time will tell.
As the Ryans were welcomed home by cheering well-wishers yesterday morning,
across the city men involved in a gang fight last Monday were being sentenced to
various terms of imprisonment at Limerick District Court.
The law enforcers could be seen all over Limerick yesterday and the days ahead will
be anxious ones for many families.




                                  Page 100 of 101
                                Reference: Kieran Keane - Irish Times Articles 2003


Trials may be held in Limerick to help gardai
By Mark Hennessy, Political Reporter

31/01/2003
The Government is considering transferring some Central Criminal Court murder
trials to Limerick to ease pressure on gardaí in the city.
The measure was announced yesterday by the Minister for Justice, Mr McDowell,
after he held a crisis meeting with the Garda Commissioner, Mr Pat Byrne, to discuss
the ongoing Limerick gang feud.
Limerick Chief Supt Gerry Kelly has expressed concern to the Minister that a large
number of the city's detectives will have to spend large amounts of time in Dublin in
the next two years giving evidence in trials relating to recent killings in the city. This,
he said, will drain much-needed resources. Yesterday Mr McDowell revealed that he
was contemplating whether it would be possible or appropriate to move the Central
Criminal Court to Limerick, so as not to reduce the strength of the gardaí. He
rejected allegations that the worsening criminal crisis in Limerick has been caused by
Garda shortages. "We have increased the number there from 420 to over 460 in
recent years." he said. Mr McDowell said the issue in Limerick was not numbers of
gardaí. "I think that that is a facile view. It is not a question of numbers. It is a
question of underlying problems." he added.
Mr McDowell also defended an offer by the Minister of State for Justice, Limerick
East TD Mr Willie O'Dea, to mediate a peace deal between the feuding families.
The Minister said Mr O'Dea had acted as "any person of political prominence" would
have done.
"He is doing this as a local TD. He is not doing it in his capacity as Minister of State
at the Department of Justice."
Mr McDowell said he had been fully briefed about the crime situation in Limerick, and
the role played by organised gangs long before the Ryans' kidnapping. The Minister
discussed the worsening crisis in Limerick yesterday morning with the Garda
Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner, Mr Noel Conroy.
Afterwards Mr McDowell said the gardaí would take every step to maintain order and
to re-establish a sense of trust amongst the citizens of the city that there would be
an end to slayings, kidnappings and threats to kill
The gardaí have deployed members of the Emergency Response Unit in the city amid
fears that "a spiral of killings" would be provoked by the Kelly murder.
Mr McDowell stressed yesterday that the ERU deployment was not an indication that
Garda numbers in Limerick are below strength.
"It is a mobile force, which is able to go anywhere in this State at a moment's
notice." Mr McDowell said he was relieved the two Ryan brothers had been found.
However, he said he was horrified and angered by the latest killing in Limerick.
He dismissed allegations by the Association of Garda Sergeants and Inspectors that
Garda numbers have fallen to dangerously low levels in Limerick over the last year.
"I am absolutely satisfied that the necessary resources have been directed towards
these crimes. I have reinforced my willingness to pursue any other measure that
would assist the gardaí," he told the Dáil. He urged the public not to ignore the
killing of Mr Kieran Keane or the Ryans' kidnapping because of their alleged links
with organised gangs. "Just as no one is above the law, nobody is beneath the law
either. "Because somebody may be associated with some group or organisation it
does not mean that their life is cheaper in the eyes of the law and that the gravity of
any offence committed against them is lessened," he said.




                                     Page 101 of 101

				
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