Designing the Instructional Unit

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					                         Designing the Instructional Unit
                  Components and Directions for Completing Task G
                                  Education 532

Required components and specific instructions for preparation and formatting:

Learning Context and Implications. Based on Task A-1, identify two to three implications
and/or a give a focused rationale for teaching this unit. Explain why this unit is important and
appropriate for students. Anticipate the students’ question, “When am I ever going to need to
know this?” Will you be able to give reasons why the content is important to study in this way?
Also, provide an overview of available technology that could be used to enhance your instruction
and student learning.

This "Why are we learning this?" Q & A is repeated several times
throughout the unit:
How many students know of someone who has gotten a speeding ticket?
Have you been in the car with someone who was speeding? How do you know
when you were speeding? How did the policeman know? What marks are on
the speedometer of your car? Miles per hour? Kilometers per hour?

This lesson introduces the formula for speed with a cockroach race. I
maintain a colony of Madagascar hissing cockroaches in my classroom.
The students will race the cockroaches for a prize (plastic medal on a
ribbon, one for each of the winning members of the group). The winner
of the race for each class will be determined through the use of the
formula for speed.

Additional technology that could be used to enhance my unit would be to
download Unitedstreaming video clips, use additional websites with
additional computer days.
A power point (http://www.pppst.com/science.html) could be helpful.


Kentucky Core Content and Program of Studies to be addressed. Identify the Program of
Studies and Core Content that will be the focus of instruction for the unit. Use the Combined
Curriculum Document at the link above.

Other Standards (national, district, English language proficiency, Kentucky World
Languages Framework, etc.).

Program of Studies: Understandings - SC-8-MF-U-1
Students will understand that Isaac Newton developed a set of rules that can be used to
describe and predict virtually all observed motion on Earth and in the universe. These
Laws of Motion demonstrate that the rules governing the Earth are the same as those
controlling the rest of the observed universe.

Program of Studies: Skills and Concepts - SC-8-MF-S-1
Students will differentiate speed and acceleration and classify real-life examples of
each.

SC-8-MF-S-2
Students will explain and experimentally verify how Newton's Laws show that forces
between objects affect their motion, allowing future positions to be predicted from their
present speeds and positions
SC-8-MF-S-3
Students will investigate motion of objects to generate and experimentally test
predictions/conclusions. Compare and critique the results of others for accuracy,
identifying strengths and weaknesses in the experiment, insisting on the use of
evidence to support decisions

Core Content SC-08-1.2.1
Students will describe and explain the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on
motion as found in real-life phenomena.

Objects change their motion only when a net force is applied. Newton’s Laws of Motion
are used to describe the effects of forces on the motion of objects.
DOK 3

Motion and Forces - SC-08-1.2.1
Students will describe and explain the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on motion and
real-life phenomenon. Objects change their motion only when a net force is applied. Newton's
Laws of Motion are used to describe the effects of forces on the motion of objects. DOK 3

Speed is part of a larger concept of motion.

Levels and Categories of Student Performance Expected. Identify the levels or categories of
performance you will expect from your students as a result of instruction in this unit of study.
You may use the schema or descriptors of your choosing, but you should indicate the different
kinds of learning (e.g., thinking skills, taxonomies) you expect from your students.


Key Concepts/Big Ideas/Essential Question Focus. Identify 3-6 “Key Concepts” or “Big
Ideas” or “Essential Questions” that will guide the planning and focus for this unit. Kentucky’s
Core Content lists specific knowledge and skills that all students should know and be able to
demonstrate. Describe how your unit will contribute to what Kentucky expects all students to
know and be able to do. The focus of your unit should be the “hook” or “essential knowledge”
or “hub” or “big ideas” that catch the interest of your students and demonstrate the relevance or
value of learning the content in the unit. Remember: You must also have a focus for each
lesson plan in your unit.

        1. How can the formula for speed be applied to real-world problems?
        2. What steps are required to successfully apply the formula for speed to a
        problem/ situation?
        3. How can you modify the formula for speed to find distance or time?
        4. What does a graph representing the results of a speed problem/situation
        typically look like?

This "Why are we learning this?" Q & A is repeated several times throughout the unit:
How many students know of someone who has gotten a speeding ticket? Have you
been in the car with someone who was speeding? How do you know when you were
speeding? How did the policeman know? What marks are on the speedometer of your
car? Miles per hour? Kilometers per hour?

On a smaller scale:
At the end of the year our 8th graders have sporting competitions between the maroon
and gold teams (students and teachers). This unit will not only determine their
knowledge of this core content (speed) but it will help them make informed choices
about what students represent the maroon team in these end of the year competitions.

Connections to Literacy. Literacy includes reading, writing, and the creative and analytical acts
involved in producing and comprehending text.
WR-M-3.5.0
Language: Students will exemplify effective language choices by
     Applying correct grammar and usage
     Applying concise use of language
     Incorporating strong verbs, precise nouns, concrete details and sensory details
      Applying language appropriate to the content, purpose and audience
DOK2

WR-M-2.4.0
Sentence Structure: Students will create effective sentences by
    Applying a variety of structures and lengths
    Developing complete and correct sentences unless using unconventional structures
     for an intentional effect when appropriate
DOK3

Students will address these core content areas when writing the lab report as a part of
the authentic assessment/ inquiry lesson (lesson 5).

Connections for Career/Workplace. These are the skills necessary for a successful transition to
postsecondary education or work and a desire for life-long learning in a global society.

The cooperative learning skills (ability to problem-solve with others who are not their
close friends) is essential for the work place. The organizational skills involved in
compiling a lab report apply to any report on the job. Inquiry skills in middle school
develop critical thinking abilities. Being a more independent learner fosters the desire to
be a life-long learner and provides the skills to do it.
Communication with Students, Parent/Caregivers, and Colleagues. Describe several ways in
which you plan to provide feedback throughout the INSTRUCTIONAL UNIT. How will you
provide information to students, parents/caregivers, and colleagues prior to instruction, during
instruction, and after the post–assessment?


As the students get graded work, I have them staple the pages together and take those
packets of graded work home to have signed by a parent or guardian.

If a student demonstrates difficulty with the formula for speed, I use our enrichm ent
period to pull the student into my classroom and tutor him/her. Usually there are several
students and we form a study group to tackle the concept.

I use exit surveys with or without student names to get feedback as closure. I review
these questions as bell ringers the next day to address problems with speed.

After the assessment I pass out the graded papers and have the students make
corrections to their test as needed. Students who received high marks act as peer
tutors.
     Objectives for the Unit. Develop three to six learning objectives/outcomes that will be the focus
     of instruction in this unit. Write these as performance statements/behavioral objectives (use
     Bloom’s Process Verbs). Remember: (1) you must include the appropriate DOK Level for each
     objective and (2) the level of Bloom’s Process Verbs and the “descriptive” DOK Level Verbs are
     not always the same. Use the Objective/Assessment Plan Organizer from the Conceptualization
     Map to record your objectives.

                                                                                           Assessment
  Unit Learner Objective         Type of          Description of         Depth of          Adaptations
         Number                Assessment          Assessment           Knowledge              and/or
                                                                          Level         Accommodations*
          Objective 1          Formative**         Experiment               3           Partially completed
 The student will create two                     Scientific method                        graph. X and y
to three graphs based on the                                                             axis with intervals
      formula for speed.                                                                   completed. A
                                                                                         poster hanging in
                                                                                          the room with a
                                                                                         scientific method
                                                                                              outline.
        Objective 2             Formative       Written experiment           3           Prepared outline
The students will modify the                     and lab report                             for formula,
 formula for six speed word                                                             Student will plug in
         problems.                                                                          appropriate
                                                                                        numbers and units.
         Objective 3            Summative            Written                 3            Combination of
 The student will create and                       manipulated                              both above
conduct an experiment using                         formulas                             accommodations.
   the formula for speed.




     Assessment Plan for the Unit. In tabular format, organize how each unit objective will be
     assessed. Include the following components described in the Conceptualization Map: (1)
     Procedures using a T-chart (2) Pre-Instructional Assessment, and (3) Post Unit Assessment
     (Culminating Activity/Assessment). The culminating project (authentic performance task) or
     assessment MUST allow students to demonstrate what they learned from the WHOLE unit
     (matched to stated unit objectives), be engaging, challenging, developmentally appropriate,
     feasible, and a worthwhile use of instructional time.




     References and Credits. Texts, articles, films, Web sources, etc., should be given in APA
     bibliography form. Give proper credit for another person’s ideas or materials.

     Peterson, Arlys. (1999). Assessment Sites. Retrieved July 3, 2008 from
          Web site: http://faculty.usiouxfalls.edu/arpeterson/assessment.htm


     Unit Organizer: Unit Instructional Design.
Using the visual organizer in the Conceptualization Map, outline a series of lessons that
facilitate student learning toward unit learning objectives/outcomes. Your lessons should include
a variety of appropriate instructional strategies. In addition, please explain how your awareness of
achievement gaps within your students guides your instruction.



Sequence of Lessons. For this class, develop 5-10 sequential lessons using the recommended
lesson plan format. The sequence of lessons is the “heart” of the unit plan; the organization and
presentation of concepts is critical for student understanding. Make sure each lesson includes
objectives with corresponding student assessments that are matched to each lesson objective.

Place the actual lesson plans for this unit (using the recommended lesson plan format) behind
this framework in your notebook portfolio. Your unit self-assessment should be placed in front
of the unit framework and your self-assessment for each lesson should be placed in front of the
appropriate lesson. The final unit must include all essential components listed on “Designing
the Instructional Unit: Components and Directions for Completing Task G” including the
Cover Page and Table of Contents. Identify, in the Table of Contents, the lesson being used to
meet the requirement of (1) Lesson with Significant Use of Technology (2) Lesson with
Differentiation Using Tiered Activities, and (3) Lesson that addresses higher order thinking
using an inquiry or critical reasoning lesson.



12-13-07

				
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