Interview Schedule To Obtain by foz14265

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 22

									                                                                                    Project Case Number: ______ – _________
                                                                                                                County No.        Form No.
1A LeSueur    3A Mower   3B Waseca   4A Hennepin   5A Blue Earth   5B Brown    5C Nicillett   6A St. Louis (Range)  7A Clay
7B Mille Lacs  7C Todd    8A LaQuiParle  8B Yellow Medicine     8C Kandiyohi   9A Aitkin    9B Itasca   10A Sherburne


                                          Interview Questions (Phase 2)
                                       Minnesota Children’s Justice Initiative



                                                Purpose of Interview Questions

The purpose of the Children's Justice Initiative Case Management Review is to assess the juvenile court’s
handling of CHIPS cases in the CJI counties. The Case Management Review information will be obtained in
three ways: review of court files, hearing observations, and these interviews. Through these interviews we
want to examine a number of issues that impact the court’s ability to process cases on it’s CHIPS docket in a
timely, effective and thorough manner, including:
               CHIPS petition filings and active CHIPS caseloads
               Judicial case assignment and caseloads
               CHIPS case initiation and related paperwork requirements
               Scheduling of hearings and overall calendar management;
               Case processing and case flow management
               Appointment, training and caseloads of parent’s counsel, GALs and prosecutors
               Role of CPS caseworkers in the court process
               Ability to meet federal and state case processing time requirements
               Generation and content of minute entries/court orders
               Timing and content of reasonable efforts findings
               Availability of resources and services to CHIPS children and families
               Collaboration of court with CPS and other key agencies/stakeholders
               Coordination of CHIPS cases with parallel criminal cases
               Dual Wards -- Coordination of CHIPS cases with parallel delinquency proceedings
               Compliance with provisions of the Indian Child Welfare Act, specifically with respect to timely
                notification and transfer of cases



Interviewer:                                                                       Date of Interview: _____/_____/_____
Interviewees:
Titles:
Address:




Phone:
E-Mail:


Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                                       Page 1 of 22
CHIPS PETITION FILINGS AND ACTIVE CASELOAD

1.    Do you have caseload statistics (or estimates) of the number of CHIPS petitions filed during 2000 on new
      and reactivated families (excluding truants and runaways)? Reactivated cases are defined as those cases in
      which the filing of a new CHIPS petition results in the re-opening of a previously closed case.)


2.    Do you also have similar data for the previous four years (1995 to 1999)?

3.    Do you have any data (or estimates) of the number of new CHIPS petitions filed during 2000 that
      involved:
                     emergency removal
                     voluntary agreement for care
                     children remaining in the home
                     juveniles also involved with the court on delinquency matters (dual wards)


4.    Do you have data (or estimates) of the number of CHIPS cases that are currently active or were active at
      the end of the latest fiscal or calendar year (that is, cases in which a finding of dependency has been made
      and continuing court oversight is required)?


5.    Do you also have similar data for the previous four years (1995 - 1999)?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                               Page 2 of 22
JUDICIAL CASE ASSIGNMENT AND CASELOADS

1.    How many judges preside over CHIPS cases?


2.    Are there any other types of judicial officers (e.g., visiting judges/referees/masters) that handle specific
      pieces of the CHIPS docket?

3.    Do the judges who preside over CHIPS cases also preside over other case types (e.g., delinquency,
      dissolution, domestic violence, OFP, criminal, etc.)? If yes, what other case types?

4.    How much calendar/docket time each month is reserved for hearings on CHIPS matters? (This can be
      provided by examining the amount of time reserved for these types of cases on each judge's individual
      docket.)

5.    Are CHIPS cases assigned to a specific judge and, if so, how does that occur?
      Is the assigned judge solely responsible for conducting all hearings on these cases (including uncontested
      reviews and permanency planning hearings) or are certain types of hearings assigned to others judges? In
      what instances/types of hearings? What about TPR proceedings? Adoptions?

6.       On average each month, what percent of a judge's court calendar time is spent presiding over CHIPS
         matters? Does this vary by judge or hearing officer?

7.    On average each month, what percent of docket time do your judges spend presiding over the CHIPS?

8.    How much experience and training are judges expected to have prior to presiding over CHIPS cases?
      Does the court require and/or provide any training or orientation to CHIPS judges? Has the court
      developed any written standards or policies regarding CHIPS judges' performance?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                  Page 3 of 22
CHIPS CASE INITIATION AND RELATED PAPERWORK REQUIREMENTS

1.    Please describe how CHIPS cases are initiated: When is the paperwork filed and by whom? What is filed
      (petition and anything else)? Who sets the date for the initial hearing (i.e., court administration or social
      services)? When is the initial hearing scheduled – does this vary by the child’s placement status at the
      time of petition filing (i.e., in-home versus out-of-home)?

2.    What information is provided to parents and legal guardians at the time of removal describing the process
      and informing them of their rights (e.g. ,right to counsel, expedited initial hearing, etc.)? Is the
      information provided orally or in writing. Who provides the information (i.e., court administration, social
      services)?

3.    Who is responsible for providing notice to parents regarding the date and time of the initial hearing on the
      case? How is that information communicated to the parents?

4.    Who is responsible for providing notice to the GAL regarding the date and time of the initial hearing on
      the case? How is that information communicated to the GAL?

5.    Who is responsible for providing notice to the child regarding the date and time of the initial hearing on
      the case? How is that information communicated to the child?

6.    Who is responsible for providing notice to the foster parents (if any) regarding the date and time of the
      initial hearing on the case? How is that information communicated to the foster parents?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                Page 4 of 22
SCHEDULING OF HEARINGS AND OVERALL CALENDAR MANAGEMENT

1.     How are hearings scheduled on a judge’s calendar? Who sets hearings on these calendars – the judge or a
       central calendar office? Does this vary by type of hearing (EPC, admit/deny, review, trial, permanent
       placement hearing)?

2.    On average, how much docket time (in minutes) is allotted when scheduling for the various types of child
      protection hearings? For difficult cases, what is the maximum amount of time you will allot on any one
      day for the following types of child protection hearings?
                                                                                 Average         Maximum
     Hearing Type                                                                (minutes)       (minutes)

     Emergency Protective Care / Protective Custody / Shelter / Hold / Detention        _________       _________
     Admit-Deny / First Appearance / Arraignment / Initial                              _________       _________
     Pre-Trial (pre-adjudication) / Settlement                                          _________       _________
     Combined Adjudication and Disposition                                              _________       _________
     Trial / Contested Adjudication                                                     _________       _________
     Review                                                                             _________       _________
     Permanent Placement Determination                                                  _________       _________
     Contested Permanent Placement Determinations / Trials                              _________       _________
     TPR Trials                                                                         _________       _________
     Post-TPR Reviews                                                                   _________       _________
     Other: ______________________________________________                              _________       _________
     Other: ______________________________________________                              _________       _________


3.     How were these time estimates developed? Have the estimates been revised since implementation of the
       new Juvenile Protection Rules in March 2000?

4.     How are cases set on the calendar -- are all cases scheduled for one time (e.g., 9:00) or are they set for
       different times (e.g., 9:00, 10:00, 11;00)? Does this vary by type of hearing? If the former, is this done to
       reduce the amount of judicial down time? How does a judge and/or courtroom staff decide which case to
       call first?

5.     To what degree are continuances a problem in your court? Can you estimate the frequency with which
       continuances are requested? Can you estimate the percentage of requests that are granted?

6.     What are the most common reasons for continuances (e.g., parents not showing up, counsel not appointed
       on time, counsel unavailable due to prior engagements, lack of timely service of petition, etc.)?

7.     If the parties stipulate to a continuance, is that usually sufficient grounds for the judge to grant the request?

8.     Has the court instituted any specific methods to reduce the number of continuances that are requested? If
       so, what are these?

9.     What have you and your staff been able to do to limit the number of continuances requested and granted?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                    Page 5 of 22
10.   Are court staff authorized to grant a continuance without a judge's prior approval? Under what
      circumstances is this permitted?

11.   Is it the practice of the court to set the next hearing date prior to the conclusion of the current hearing?
      How is this accomplished? Is written notice of the next hearing given to the parties and counsel before
      they leave the current hearing?

12.   How often are contested matters continued or set over to another day because the amount of time needed
      to complete the hearing on the scheduled day was insufficient?

13.   Generally, how soon are these cases brought back into court (next day, week, month, etc.).

14.   What types of CHIPS hearings cases are most susceptible to being continued (e.g., admit/deny, review,
      trial)? For what types of reasons? How frequently are these types of hearings continued?

15.   Do you receive any workload or case aging reports that you rely on to manage your case flow? What types
      of information do these reports provide?
      Are they generated manually or produced by the court’s automated system?
      How do you use these reports?

16.   Do you have any special procedures for the active management of complex cases? If so what are these?

17.   Has the court established any local rules or internal procedures to govern the handling (specifically,
      timeliness) of CHIPS proceedings? Can we obtain a copy of these? How closely are these adhered to?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                  Page 6 of 22
COURT STAFF CASE PROCESSING AND CASE FLOW MANAGEMENT

1.    Are any court staff specifically assigned to handle the processing of CHIPS cases? How many? Who are
      they? What are their responsibilities? Are CHIPS cases their only responsibilities or do they also work on
      other case types (e.g., delinquency, dissolution, criminal, OFP)?

2.    Are court staff responsible for drafting any orders resulting from any type of CHIPS hearings (e.g., EPC
      hearing, admit/deny hearing, review hearing, trial, disposition, etc.)

3.    What staff are assigned to judges (and referees) to help these jurists handle CHIPS cases on their calendar?
      Are these staff also assigned similar responsibilities for other types of cases (e.g., delinquency)?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                              Page 7 of 22
PARENTS ATTORNEYS -- APPOINTMENT, TRAINING, AND CASELOADS

1.    What percentage of parents are provided court-appointed attorneys in CHIPS cases? How are these
      attorneys’ appointed (e.g., public defenders office, list of private pro bono attorneys, etc.)? Who is
      responsible for making the actual appointment? Are their financial eligibility requirements to qualify for
      court-appointed counsel? Are there other requirements before the court will appoint counsel? Does your
      county have a standing order to appoint counsel on all cases for which parents are financially eligible?

2.    At what point in the case are attorneys appointed to represent the parents? Under what circumstances?
      How is this accomplished?
      Do attorneys for parents remain involved in the case through all proceedings (including reviews,
      permanency determination hearings, TPR proceedings, appeals)?

3.    How are court-appointed attorneys compensated? Do you feel the compensation schedule is sufficiently
      fair to attract competent attorneys?

4.    Generally speaking, when do court appointed attorneys first meet with their clients (e.g., outside the
      courtroom or prior to the first hearing)? What about other meetings -- how frequently do court appointed
      attorneys meet with their clients and when (e.g., outside the courtroom or prior to the hearing)?

5.    What are the minimum, maximum and/or average caseloads of attorneys who represent parents?
      What percent of their practice do CHIPS cases represent? Do these attorneys carry a dual caseloads –
      parents on some cases and CHIPS children on other cases? What about representing children in
      delinquency matters?

6.    What is expected of your court-appointed attorneys representing parents? Are they expected to provide
      input into case plans and planned services?

7.    How much experience and training are court-appointed attorneys expected to have prior to being
      appointed to a CHIPS case? Does the court require and/or provide any training or orientation to court-
      appointed CHIPS attorneys? Has the court developed any written standards or policies regarding CHIPS
      attorney performance?

8.    How would you rate the quality of the legal representation afforded parents in CHIPS proceedings? Why
      do you say this?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                              Page 8 of 22
GALS -- APPOINTMENT, TRAINING, AND CASELOADS

1.    Does the court use attorney or non-attorney GALs, or both? Does it depend on case type (e.g., CHIPS,
      delinquency, family court)?

2.    Are GALs compensated, if so what is the rate? Does it depend on type of GAL (attorney or non-attorney)?
      Do you feel the compensation rate is sufficiently fair to attract and keep competent GALs? Are GALs
      reimbursed for expenses?

3.    What percentage of children are appointed GALs in CHIPS cases? Does your county have a standing order
      to appoint GALs on all child protection cases? How are these GALs appointed? Who is responsible for
      selecting the GAL to be assigned to the case? Does the court issue an order specifying the GAL's duties for
      that particular case?

4.    What are the minimum, maximum and/or average caseloads of GALs? What percent of caseload are
      CHIPS cases? Do these GALs carry a dual caseloads – CHIPS, delinquency, and family court cases?

5.    At what point in the case are GALs appointed (e.g., EPC hearing, admit/deny, post-adjudication, review)?
      How is this accomplished?

6.    Do GALs remain involved in the case through all proceedings (including reviews, permanency
      determination hearings, TPR proceedings, adoptions, long-term foster care, appeals)?

7.    Generally speaking, when do GALs first meet with the parents and children (e.g., outside the courtroom or
      prior to the first hearing)? What about other meetings -- how frequently do GALs meet with the parents
      and children and when (e.g., outside the courtroom or prior to the hearing)?

8.    Are written reports submitted? If so, when (initial hearing, every hearing)? Are the reports orally
      supplemented in court? Is the GAL responsible for drafting, serving and filing the report, or does the GAL
      office assist with some of those duties? Does the GAL coordinator or a supervisor review the GALs report
      and recommendations with the GAL prior to serving and filing?

9.    Are GALs expected to provide input into case plans and planned services? Are they expected to do the
      same type of information gathering on each case or do the duties vary from case to case?

10.   If the GAL requests counsel, will counsel generally be appointed. If so, how does that occur? At what
      stage of the proceeding? Who represents the GAL (public defenders, panel of attorneys, etc.)?

11.   How much experience and training are GALs expected to have prior to being appointed to a CHIPS case?
      Does the court require and/or provide any training or orientation to CHIPS GALs? Has the court
      developed any written standards or policies regarding GAL performance?

12.   How would you rate the quality of the GAL representation afforded children in CHIPS proceedings? Why
      do you say this?

13.   Under what circumstances are children also appointed an attorney to represent the child’s wishes? How
      frequently does this happen? Are their instances in which the GAL will serve in both roles?


Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                             Page 9 of 22
PROSECUTORS -- APPOINTMENT, TRAINING, AND CASELOADS

1.    What agency is responsible for the prosecution of CHIPS cases (e.g., county attorney's office)? Do these
      attorneys also act as counsel to the local social services agency in CHIPS cases? How is it handled if there
      is a conflict between what the social worker is recommending and what the county attorney determines?

2.    Please describe the organization of the unit that handles the prosecution of CHIPS cases (e.g., number of
      attorneys, support staff)? Does this office also prosecute delinquency matters? If so, do the CHIPS
      prosecutors also handle delinquency cases?

3.    Are cases assigned to a specific prosecutor and if so how (e.g., randomly, alphabetically, etc.)? At what
      point in the process are CHIPS cases assigned to a specific prosecutor? Does the same prosecutor remain
      involved in the case through all proceedings (including EPC, admit/deny, reviews, permanency
      determinations, TPR, and appeals)?

4.    Generally speaking, when is the attorney expected to first meet with the client case worker (e.g., outside
      the courtroom or prior to the first hearing)? What about other meetings -- how frequently does the county
      attorney meet with the case worker (e.g., outside the courtroom or prior to the hearing)?

5.    What is expected of county attorneys involved in CHIPS cases? Are they responsible for drafting the
      CHIPS petition? What about drafting the permanency pleading? How frequently do they meet with
      agency representatives? Do they meet with the agency representative prior to the first hearing?

6.    Are county attorneys expected to draft orders resulting from any hearings and which ones? What is the
      general turn around time for drafting and submitting orders?

7.    What are the minimum, maximum and/or average caseloads of county attorneys? What percent of their
      practice do CHIPS cases represent? Do these attorneys carry a dual caseloads – parents on some cases and
      CHIPS children on other cases? What about representing children in delinquency matters?

8.    How much experience and training are county attorneys expected to have prior to being appointed to a
      CHIPS case? Does the court require and/or provide any training or orientation to county attorneys serving
      on CHIPS attorneys? Has the court developed any written standards or policies regarding county attorney
      performance on CHIPS cases?

9.    How would you rate the quality of county attorney prosecution in CHIPS proceedings? What about the
      quality of representation provided to the local social services agency in CHIPS proceedings? Why do you
      say this?

10.   To what degree is county attorney turnover a problem in your county? Do you feel that county attorney
      salaries are sufficient to attract and keep competent county attorneys?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                              Page 10 of 22
SOCIAL WORKERS -- APPOINTMENT, TRAINING, AND CASELOADS

1.    Please describe how your local social services agency is organized. How many units/divisions (e.g.,
      intake, assessment, on-going, adoption)? Responsibilities of each unit? Number of caseworkers assigned
      to the units? Is an organizational chart or annual report available?

2.    Do you have any data on the number of abuse/neglect calls received by your agency in 2000? How about
      the number of calls investigated? Number of cases where abuse/neglect substantiated? How many
      substantiated cases resulted in CHIPS petitions? How many cases resulted in child being removed from
      home? How many voluntary placement agreements?

3.    Please describe how abuse and maltreatment cases are initially investigated? How is court involvement
      initiated? When does the first contact with the county attorney occur? Are all investigation findings
      forwarded to the county attorney's office for review to determine if court involvement is warranted?

4.    How closely are caseworkers expected to work with the county attorney in determining whether a CHIPS
      petition should be filed? How often do caseworkers disagree with the county attorney's office regarding
      the decision to file (or not file) a CHIPS petition?

5.    Are cases assigned to a specific caseworker and if so how (e.g., randomly, alphabetically, etc.)? At what
      point in the process are CHIPS cases assigned to a specific social worker? Does the same caseworker
      remain involved in the case through all proceedings (including intake, EPC, admit/deny, reviews,
      permanency determinations, TPR, and appeals)?

6.    What is expected of an investigative caseworker prior to the emergency protective care hearing? Are they
      expected to notify parents and others of the EPC hearing?

7.    What is expected of a case worker involved in CHIPS cases? Are they responsible for drafting the CHIPS
      petition? What about drafting the permanency pleading? What about development of case plans? Case
      plan modifications? Other court reports? Administrative hearings and staffings? How frequently do case
      workers meet with county attorney representatives? Do they meet prior to the first hearing?

8.    How often are caseworkers expected to meet with clients? Children? Foster parents? Service providers?

9.    At what point are case plans developed? What about progress reports? Who else is expected to be
      involved in drafting case plans? How far in advance of hearings are case plans expected to be filed with
      the court? Who is responsible for serving the case plans and other reports on the parents, GAL, and other
      parties?

10.   Are case workers expected to draft orders resulting from any hearings and which ones? What is the
      general turn around time for drafting and submitting orders?

11.   What are the minimum, maximum and/or average caseloads of case workers? What percent of their
      practice do CHIPS cases represent? Are all of the cases court-involved or are some cases handled on a
      voluntary or informal basis? Do caseworkers have sufficient time to actively handle their cases and to
      meet all the requirements associated with court proceedings on these cases?



Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                             Page 11 of 22
12.   How much experience and training are case workers expected to have prior assuming an active CHIPS
      caseload? Does the court require and/or provide any training or orientation to case workers serving on
      CHIPS attorneys? Has the court developed any written standards or policies regarding case worker
      performance on CHIPS cases? Does the agency provide caseworkers any in-service training?

13.   How would you rate the quality of case worker performance in CHIPS proceedings? Why do you say this?

14.   To what degree is caseworker turnover a problem in your county? Do you feel that caseworker salaries are
      sufficient to attract and keep competent case workers?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                             Page 12 of 22
ABILITY TO MEET FEDERAL AND STATE CASE PROCESSING TIME REQUIREMENTS

1.    How well has your court adapted to federal and state mandates that require the juvenile court to take an
      active role in the decision-making and oversight of CHIPS cases. Specifically, to what degree has the
      juvenile court been able to do the following:

      a.     How often does the court order the following early on at the initial stages of the case (i.e., at the
             emergency protective care hearing or other hearings prior to adjudication/disposition)?

                     Type of Service                           Never        Rarely   Sometimes        Often
        Parent assessments or evaluations                        1            2         3               4
        Child assessments or evaluations                         1            2         3               4
        Relative or parent searches                              1            2         3               4
        Home studies                                             1            2         3               4
        Changes in placement                                     1            2         3               4
        Specific visitation provisions                           1            2         3               4
        Specific treatment services (counseling,                 1            2         3               4
        vocational, education, therapy, etc.)
        Family preservation services                              1           2           3              4
        Intensive in-home services                                1           2           3              4
        Family assistance services (housing,                      1           2           3              4
        food, clothing, etc.)
        Other (                                 )                 1           2           3              4
        Other (                                 )                 1           2           3              4

      b.     Prompt scheduling and completion of initial hearings at which time the court examines the need for
             continued placement and issues related to placement alternatives, visitation, early provision of
             services, paternity, service of process, etc.?

                  Rarely/                                      About Half                Almost Always/
                  Not at All        Occasionally               The Time      Often       Always
                    1                   2                          3           4            5

             Why do you say this?

           c. Adhere to and meet timelines for adjudication?

                  Rarely/                                      About Half                Almost Always/
                  Not at All        Occasionally               The Time      Often       Always
                    1                   2                          3           4            5

             Why do you say this?
             How frequently are adjudications contested?
             Can you estimate the number of cases which settle early (before trial) and those in which a trial is set?
             How frequently are there last minute settlements (just prior to or at the initiation of the trial?



Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                      Page 13 of 22
           d. Adhere to and meet timelines for petition disposition?

                  Rarely/                                      About Half            Almost Always/
                  Not at All        Occasionally               The Time     Often    Always
                    1                   2                          3          4         5

             Why do you say this?
             How frequently are adjudications and disposition combined?
             How closely is the court able to scrutinize case plans and case plan goals at disposition?
             How frequently does the court modify the case plan goal or specific services provisions in the case
           plan?

      e.     Adhere to and meet timelines for post-disposition review hearings?

                  Rarely/                                      About Half            Almost Always/
                  Not at All        Occasionally               The Time     Often    Always
                    1                   2                          3          4         5

             Why do you say this?

      f.     Adhere to and meet permanency planning timelines, including the expedited permanency timeframes
             for children under age 8 at the time of removal?

                  Rarely/                                      About Half            Almost Always/
                  Not at All        Occasionally               The Time     Often    Always
                    1                   2                          3          4         5

             Why do you say this?

      g.     Adhere to and meet timelines for TPR decisions – specifically conducting the TPR trial within 90
             days of the TPR petition filing?

                  Rarely/                                      About Half            Almost Always/
                  Not at All        Occasionally               The Time     Often    Always
                    1                   2                          3          4         5

             Why do you say this?
             How frequently are TPR matters contested?


      h.     Adhere to and meet timelines for post-permanency reviews – specifically for state wards (children
             whose parental rights have been terminated)?

                  Rarely/                                      About Half            Almost Always/
                  Not at All        Occasionally               The Time     Often    Always
                    1                   2                          3          4         5

             Why do you say this?

Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                Page 14 of 22
2.    How are court orders produced (handwritten, word-processed) and distributed (at the conclusion of the
      court hearing or some point afterwards)?
      a. Does the court use a template order and does this vary by type of hearing?
      b. How detailed are these court orders regarding reasonable efforts findings, case plan goals, placement,
         services, paternity, child support, protection orders, etc.?
      c. Who is responsible for drafting the court orders (judge, court administrator, county attorney)?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                              Page 15 of 22
TIMING AND CONTENT OF "REASONABLE EFFORTS" AND "CONTRARY TO WELFARE" FINDINGS

1.    At what stages of the court process is the judicial determination of reasonable efforts conducted? That is,
      how frequently does the court make a reasonable efforts finding? At all hearings in which the child
      remains out of the home or only in specific types of hearings (e.g., Emergency Protective care Hearing,
      Adjudication, Disposition, and Review/Permanency Planning Hearings)?

         a. Timing of the “Continuation in the home is contrary to the welfare of the child” finding at the first
            hearing? How detailed is this finding?

         b. Timing of the reasonable efforts finding regarding efforts to prevent the child’s removal from the
            home – within the first 60 days? How detailed is this finding?

         c. Timing of the reasonable efforts finding to finalize a permanency plan – within 12 months of a child
            entering foster care and every 12 months thereafter? How detailed are these findings?

         d. Use of aggravated circumstances? How frequently utilized and under what circumstances? How is
            this issue presented to the court – motion on original petition or supplemental petition? If a finding
            of aggravated circumstances is made how are permanency timelines accelerated?

2.    How often does the court find that reasonable efforts were not made or that no finding is made until more
      information is provided by the agency?

3.    Recent statutory changes to Minnesota statutes require that the court initiate the permanency determination
      process no later than six months after removal for children under the age of 8 – how successful has you
      court been in initiating these? How often are permanency decisions deferred for another six months in
      these cases? Do you have any recommendations regarding revisions to these statutory requirements?

4.    Do your provide any alternatives to the formal court processing of CHIPS cases (e.g., mediation,
      alternative dispute resolution, family group conferencing, etc.)? Can you describe the alternatives? At
      what stage of case processing can these alternative be introduced?

5.    How would you rate the quality of court proceedings on CHIPS cases? What are the strengths of your
      county's court process? What parts, if any, would you like to see improved?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                Page 16 of 22
AVAILABILITY OF RESOURCES AND SERVICES TO CHIPS CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

1. What types of services are in greatest demand for children and families? Are provider resources and quality
   of services adequate?

2. How quickly can these services b e accessed? Are there any delays in the process for certain types of
   services (screening, eligibility determinations, waiting lists)? Why?

3. Does the agency or some other agency pay for most mental health services provided to children and
   families? With what frequency do parents reimburse the agency for services rendered?
   Is there a bifurcated process -- the agency refers but the final eligibility determination and provision of
   services is the responsibility of another entity? How much control does the agency have in ensuring that
   services are provided in a timely manner?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                              Page 17 of 22
COLLABORATION OF COURT WITH SOCIAL SERVICES AND OTHER KEY AGENCIES AND STAKEHOLDERS

1. Does the court meet on a regular basis with representatives from other key agencies involved in servicing
   CHIPS families? For what reason?

2. How would you rate the current level of collaboration between the court and these other stakeholder
   entities? Why do you say this?

3. What types of collaborative efforts has the court been involved in recent years that involve the servicing of
   CHIPS children and families,




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                              Page 18 of 22
COORDINATION OF CHIPS AND PARALLEL CRIMINAL PROCEEDINGS

1. How frequently are parents prosecuted for child maltreatment in your county? Under what circumstances?

2. How does the juvenile court become aware of when a parallel criminal prosecution is being considered or
   pending?

3. What are the biggest challenges facing the court in keeping cases on track when criminal prosecution is
   pending or being considered?

4. Has the court taken any steps to coordinate or consolidate juvenile and criminal matters?

5. If a criminal case is pending, what do you think can be done in the juvenile court matter pending the
   criminal matter?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                             Page 19 of 22
DUAL WARDS – CONSOLIDATION/COORDINATION OF CHIPS AND DELINQUENCY PROCEEDINGS

1. Can the court readily identify children that are involved in both delinquency and CHIPS matters? Please
   describe. Can you estimate how many such cases there are?

2. What attempts are made to coordinate or consolidate dual delinquency and CHIPS matters? Under what
   circumstances and how is this accomplished?

3. What are the biggest challenges facing the court and the child protection system in adequately addressing the
   needs of these children in a timely manner?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                            Page 20 of 22
COMPLIANCE WITH PROVISIONS OF THE INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT

1.    Does your court actively monitor child protection cases for issues related to the Indian Child Welfare Act
      (e.g., notification of Indian Tribe)? How is this accomplished?

2.    If there is a possibility that the Indian Child Welfare Act applies, does the court require a search for and
      notice to the tribe?

3.    How often are tribal authorities or their representatives actually involved in a child protection, TPR, or
      adoption hearings in your court? Is counsel appointed for the tribe or representatives?

4.    What are the biggest challenges facing the court in keeping ICWA cases on track? At what case
      processing points do delays occur? Why?

5.    What measures has the court collaboratively taken to ensure that ICWA cases are handled in a timely
      manner?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                 Page 21 of 22
IMPROVING COURT PRACTICE IN CHIPS CASES

1.   In what areas do you feel that the court process can be improved? (e.g., substantiveness of court hearings,
     more active judicial oversight, more timely decisions, improved (closer) case management of CHIPS cases,
     early appointment of counsel/GALs, better (streamlined) access to services, expedited TPR and adoptions,
     stabilizing long-term foster care placements, etc.)?

2.   What would it take with respect to resources, procedural changes, training, etc. to improve court practice in
     the ways just discussed?

3.   In what areas do you feel that state statutes and court rules can be revised/strengthen to encourage the
     juvenile courts to take a more active and timely oversight role in the administration of child
     welfare/maltreatment cases?

     To improve the judicial handling of these cases including the amount of time needed to achieve
     reunification or other permanent resolution of the case?




Interview Questions 06/20/02 -- Minnesota Children's Justice Initiative                                Page 22 of 22

								
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