IDEA9105 HUMANCOMPUTER INTERACTION UNIT PROFILE by lindahy

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									                 FACULTY
OF
ARCHITECTURE,
DESIGN
&
PLANNING



    IDEA9105
HUMAN­COMPUTER
INTERACTION

                              UNIT
PROFILE

                        1. GENERAL
UNIT
INFORMATION

1.1    UNIT
INTRODUCTION

This
unit
is
seminar‐based
and
consists
a
number
of
elements
including
lectures,

tutorials,
exercises
and
a
final
presentation
covering
human‐computer

interaction
issues
in
the
design
context.


1.2    ASSUMED
BACKGROUND

Basic
knowledge
about
computers
is
required
for
this
unit.


1.3    UNIT
STAFF

Coordinators:

Dr
Xiangyu
Wang:
Room
274,
Tel:
02
9036
7128
(consultation
by
appointment

via
email
x.wang@arch.usyd.edu.au)

Additional
Lecturer:

Dr
Martin
Tomitsch:
Room
283,
Tel:
02
9351
5297
(consultation
by
appointment

via
email
martin.tomitsch@arch.usyd.edu.au)




1.4    TIME
TABLE

Lectures:
    Thursday
10‐11

Tutorials:
   Thursday
11‐13


                            2. AIMS
AND
OBJECTIVES

2.1    UNIT
AIMS

The
purpose
of
this
unit
is
to


    1. provide
students
with
an
understanding
of
human‐computer
interaction

       concepts,
theories
and
frameworks;


    2. introduce
students
to
a
range
of
skills
for
identifying,
planning
and

       evaluating
design
projects;

    3. nurture
skills
and
knowledge
of
the
core
aspects
of
HCI
models,
theories,

       prototyping
methodologies
and
analysis
skills.


2.2    UNIT
OBJECTIVES




                                        1

                FACULTY
OF
ARCHITECTURE,
DESIGN
&
PLANNING



After
successfully
completing
this
course
students
should
be
able
to:

    •   understand
human‐computer
interaction
and
describe
some
of
the
key

        steps
of
implementing
a
HCI
design;

    •   understand
the
physiological
theories
for
human
mental
models
for
HCI

        design;

    •   apply
models
from
social
communication
models
to
HCI
design
in
terms

        of
an
organisational
and
collaborative
context;

    •   understand
the
multi‐disciplinary
nature
of
HCI
and
brief
introduction
for

        various
technologies
available
for
HCI
design;

    •   understand
the
role
and
procedures
of
requirement
analysis
in
the

        development
of
HCI
systems;

    •   use
different
types
of
design
methods
in
the
process
of
interactive
system

        implementation;


    •   understand
the
standards
and
principles
for
a
good
HCI
design;

    •   understand
key
elements
in
interface
design
and
how
different
theories

        merge
in
this
area;

    •   understand
the
role
of
prototyping
and
be
able
to
implement
prototyping

        technologies
according
to
the
requirements;

    •   understand
various
models
and
frameworks
for
evaluation
and
how
to

        design
the
evaluation
using
appropriate
methods;


    •   analysis
the
data
gained
from
the
evaluation
to
verify
hypnosis
both

        qualitatively
and
quantitatively.


                              3. LEARNING
RESOURCES

3.1     REQUIRED
RESOURCES

•   Text
Books

    Dix,
 A.,
 Finlay,
 J.,
 Abowd,
 G.,
 Beale,
 R.
 (2004).
 
 Human
 computer
 interaction

    (3rd
edition).
New
York:
Prenctice‐Hall


•   Recommended
Texts

    Rogers,
Y.,
Sharp,
H.
&
Preece,
J.
(2007).
Interaction
design:
Beyond
human‐
    computer
interaction.
(2nd
edition).
New
York:
Wiley.



3.2     RECOMMENDED
RESOURCES

•   Fisher
and
faculty
libraries
are
invaluable
resources.


• Faculty
infrastructure.


3.3     FACULTY
RESOURCES


                                            2

                FACULTY
OF
ARCHITECTURE,
DESIGN
&
PLANNING



Course
material,
assignments,
marks
and
other
information
can
be
found
on
the

University’s
 WebCT
 website.
 Additional
 course
 resources
 are
 also
 available
 on

this
 site.
 The
 University
 offers
 a
 range
 of
 resources
 and
 services
 to
 support

student
learning
–
details
are
available
on
the
Faculty
website.


                    4. TEACHING
&
LEARNING
ACTIVITIES

A
 one‐hour
 lecture
 and
 a
 two‐hours
 tutorial
 are
 organised
 every
 week
 on

Wednesday
 for
 twelve
 weeks.
 Students
 are
 required
 to
 attend
 all
 the
 lectures

and
 tutorials
 to
 develop
 their
 understanding
 and
 skills
 related
 to
 human‐
computer
interaction
design.


                                    5. ASSESSMENT

5.1    ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
&
GRADING

•   Participation
(10%)


    This
 portion
 reflects
 the
 involvement
 of
 students
 in
 the
 course.
 It
 reflects

    more
 than
 participation
 rate,
 their
 engagement
 and
 questions
 asked
 during

    the
classes
will
be
taken
into
account.


•   Tutorial
(15%)


    There
 will
 be
 three
 small
 activities
 carried
 out
 through
 the
 tutorials
 (5%

    each).
They
are
designed
to
help
students
understand
the
key
technologies
in

    HCI
design.

•   Assignment
1:
Bad
design
critique
(10%)

    Identifying
 a
 bad
 design
 product
 and
 analysis
 the
 alternatives
 for
 a
 better

    solution.

•   Assignment
2:
Proposal
(10%)


    This
is
the
proposal
for
the
individual
project.
Every
student
has
to
come
up

    with
an
idea
for
his
or
her
design
project.
The
idea
needs
to
be
approved
by

    the
unit
instructors.


•   Assignment
3:
Requirement
analysis
(15%)

    A
 report
 needs
 to
 be
 submitted,
 which
 clearly
 identifies
 and
 explains
 user

    needs
and
requirements
and
how
they
will
be
addressed
in
the
design.

•   Assignment
4:
Prototype
implementation
(15%)


    Implementation
of
a
low
or
high
fi
prototype,
using
methods
and
techniques

    introduced
in
the
unit.


•   Assignment
5:
User
evaluation
(15%)


    Evaluation
of
the
prototype
with
4‐5
users
and
discussing
results
as
well
as

    suggestions
for
improvements
in
an
evaluation
report.




                                            3

                FACULTY
OF
ARCHITECTURE,
DESIGN
&
PLANNING



•   Presentation
(10%)

    

    40%
presentation
quality:
slide
design,
style,
clarity,
engagement,
...

    60%
presentation
content:
background,
problem
statement,
originality
of

    idea,
sophistication,
...


5.2     LATE
SUBMISSIONS

A
penalty
of
10%
of
a
grade
will
be
applied
for
each
day
late.


5.3     OTHER
ASSESSMENT
INFORMATION

All
 deliverable
 submissions
 should
 confirm
 with
 the
 style
 and
 format
 of
 the

Publications
Manual
of
the
APA
(latest
edition).


5.4     ASSESSMENT
DETAILS

Lodgement

Hardcopy
of
the
assignments
and
reports
should
be
submitted
with
appropriate

covers
letters
attached.

Outcomes
of
assessment
exercises


The
 following
 standards
 will
 be
 applied
 to
 the
 grading
 of
 work.
 Each
 passing

grade
subsumes
and
goes
beyond
the
grads
lower
than
it.

High
 Distinction:
 Outstanding
 understanding
 of
 readings,
 excellent
 original

        thinking,
 high
 level
 of
 contribution
 to
 critical
 discussion,
 complete

        resolution
 of
 tasks
 and
 extensive
 critical
 analysis,
 thorough
 graphic

        analysis
 and/or
 numerical
 analysis.
 Communication
 is
 to
 be
 of
 an

        excellent
stand.
Mark
85‐100%

Distinction:
 Thorough
 understanding
 of
 readings,
 medium
 level
 of
 contribution

         to
critical
discussion,
completes
resolution
of
tasks
and
extensive
critical

         analysis,
 competent
 graphic
 analysis
 and/or
 numerical
 analysis.

         Communication
is
to
be
of
an
accomplished
standard.
Mark
75‐84%

Credit:
 Thorough
 understanding
 of
 readings,
 adequate
 level
 of
 contribution
 to

         critical
 discussion,
 completes
 resolution
 of
 tasks
 and
 critical
 analysis.

         Communication
is
to
be
above
average
standard.
Mark
65‐74%

Pass:
Satisfies
some
of
the
basic
learning
requirements
of
the
course.
Assignment

        resolution
 satisfies
 all
 fundamental
 requirements
 and
 demonstrates

        competence
against
all
assessment
criteria.
Communication
is
clear
and

        complete.
Mark
50‐64%

Fail:
 Falls
 short
 of
 satisfying
 all
 basic
 requirements
 for
 a
 pass.
 Inadequate

          referencing.
Mark
45‐49%

Fail:
 Fails
 to
 satisfy
 some
 of
 the
 basic
 requirements
 of
 the
 unit.
 Incomplete
 or

          inadequate
 skills
 in
 communication.
 Inadequate
 referencing.
 Mark
 25‐
          44%.



                                            4

                FACULTY
OF
ARCHITECTURE,
DESIGN
&
PLANNING



Fail:
 Fails
 most
 or
 all
 of
 the
 basic
 requirements
 of
 the
 unit.
 Incomplete
 or

          inadequate
 skills
 in
 communication.
 Inadequate
 referencing.
 Mark
 0‐
          24%


Formative
and
Summative
Assessment

Formative
 assessment
 advice
 will
 be
 provided
 during
 tutorials
 and
 group

presentations.
This
assessment
will
not
form
part
of
the
summative
assessment.

Summative
assessment
is
provided
with
the
return
of
the
marked
assignments.

Students
 will
 have
 written
 feedback
 using
 a
 criterion‐based
 assessment
 sheet.

Staff
will
mark
the
assignment
and
the
marks
moderated
across
the
class.


                                        6. POLICY

6.1    ASSESSMENT
RELATED
POLICIES
AND
GUIDELINES

An
overview
of
the
University’s
assessment‐related
policies
can
be
found
in
the

Faculty
Handbook.


Academic
Integrity
&
Plagiarism:

It
is
the
University’s
task
to
encourage
ethical
scholarship
and
to
inform
students

and
 staff
 about
 the
 institutional
 standards
 of
 academic
 behaviour
 expected
 of

them
 in
 learning,
 teaching
 and
 research.
 Students
 have
 a
 responsibility
 to

maintain
 the
 highest
 standards
 of
 academic
 integrity
 in
 their
 work.
 Students

must
 not
 cheat
 in
 examinations
 or
 other
 forms
 of
 assessment
 and
 must
 ensure

they
 do
 not
 plagiarize.
 The
 University
 has
 adopted
 the
 following
 definition
 of

plagiarism:

Plagiarism
 is
 the
 act
 of
 misrepresenting
 as
 one’s
 own
 original
 work,
 the
 ideas,

interpretations,
 words
 or
 creative
 works
 of
 another.
 These
 include
 published

and
 unpublished
 documents,
 designs,
 music,
 sounds,
 images,
 photographs,

computer
 codes
 and
 ideas
 gained
 through
 working
 in
 a
 group.
 These
 ideas,

interpretations,
words
or
works
may
be
found
in
print
and/or
electronic
media.

The
following
are
examples
of
plagiarism
where
appropriate
acknowledgement

or
referencing
of
the
author
or
source
does
not
occur:

•   Direct
copying
of
paragraphs,
sentences,
a
single
sentence
or
significant
parts

    of
a
sentence;


•   Direct
copying
of
paragraphs,
sentences,
a
single
sentence
of
significant
parts

    of
a
sentence
with
an
end
reference
but
without
quotation
marks
around
the

    copied
text;

•   Copying
 ideas,
 concepts,
 research
 results,
 computer
 codes,
 statistical
 tables,

    designs,
images,
sounds
or
text
or
any
combination
of
these;

•   Paraphrasing,
 summarising
 or
 simply
 rearranging
 another
 person's
 words,

    ideas,
etc
without
changing
the
basic
structure
and/or
meaning
of
the
text;

•   Offering
 an
 idea
 or
 interpretation
 that
 is
 not
 one's
 own
 without
 identifying

    whose
idea
or
interpretation
it
is;




                                            5

                FACULTY
OF
ARCHITECTURE,
DESIGN
&
PLANNING



•   A
‘cut
and
paste'
of
statements
from
multiple
sources;

•   Presenting
as
independent,
work
done
in
collaboration
with
others;


•   Copying
 or
 adapting
 another
 student's
 original
 work
 into
 a
 submitted

    assessment
item.


Academic
honesty
is
a
core
value
of
the
University
of
Sydney.
The
University
is

committed
to
the
basic
academic
right
that
students
receive
due
credit
for
work

submitted
for
assessment.
Integral
to
this
is
the
notion
that
is
clearly
unfair
for

students
 to
 submit
 work
 for
 assessment
 that
 is
 not
 their
 own
 and
 that
 is
 not

attributed
 to
 the
 original
 authors.
 This
 is
 known
 as
 plagiarism.
 Such
 activity

represents
 a
 form
 of
 fraud.
 The
 academic
 Board
 Resolution
 on
 ‘Academic

Honesty
in
Coursework’
sets
out
principles,
procedures
and
a
code
of
practice
for

academic
 honesty
 in
 submitted
 work
 in
 the
 University.
 This
 document
 is

available
 at
 www.usyd.edu.au/policy.
 Students
 who
 are
 found
 to
 have

plagiarised
face
a
range
of
penalties
from
warning,
failure
of
the
unit
of
study
of

disciplinary
 action
 under
 the
 University
 by‐laws.
 The
 Faculty
 of
 Architecture,

design
and
Planning
takes
plagiarism
very
seriously.


Feedback
on
Assessment

For
a
detailed
explanation
of
the
feedback
you
are
entitled
to,
you
should
consult

the
policy
on
Student
Access
to
Feedback
on
Assessment.
As
a
student
you
have
a

responsibility
 to
 incorporate
 feedback
 into
 your
 learning;
 make
 use
 of
 the

assessment
criteria
that
you
are
given;
be
aware
of
the
rules,
policies
and
other

documents
 related
 to
 assessment;
 and
 provide
 teachers
 with
 feedback
 on
 their

assessment
practices.
There
are
certain
steps
you
can
take
if
you
feel
your
result

does
not
reflect
your
performance.
Please
refer
to
the
Faculty
Handbook.

Faculty
Assessment
Guidelines

The
Faculty’s
late
submission
policy
can
be
found
at:

http://www.usyd.edu.au/handbooks/architecture/03_FacultyPolicies.shtml


6.2    OTHER
POLICIES
AND
GUIDELINES

Students
with
Disability

Any
 student
 with
 a
 disability
 who
 may
 require
 alternative
 academic

arrangements,
 including
 assessment,
 in
 course/program
 is
 encouraged
 to
 seek

advice
 at
 the
 commencement
 of
 the
 semester
 from
 the
 Faculty.
 Where
 an

adjustment
 is
 made
 to
 an
 accredited
 program,
 it
 is
 the
 responsibility
 of
 the

relevant
Faculty
to
liaise
with
professional
and
registration
bodies
regarding
the

acceptability
of
the
change/s.


Occupational
Health
and
Safety

Undergraduate
Students
and
Postgraduate
Students
should
be
familiar
with
the

University
policies
on
occupational
health
and
safety
in
the
laboratory.


Other
Faculty
Guidelines




                                           6

                FACULTY
OF
ARCHITECTURE,
DESIGN
&
PLANNING



For
 safety
 reasons,
 full
 access
 to
 all
 construction
 sites
 may
 not
 be
 possible
 for

students
 with
 disabilities,
 and
 alternative
 arrangements
 may
 need
 to
 be
 made

for
 the
 associated
 assessment
 tasks.
 Any
 student
 with
 a
 disability
 who
 may

require
 alternative
 arrangements
 is
 encouraged
 to
 seek
 advice
 at
 the

commencement
 of
 the
 semester
 from
 a
 Disability
 Adviser
 at
 Student
 Support

Services
and
to
consult
the
course
coordinator.








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