Revenue Ruling No. SD 072 – Loan Securities - Affect of

Document Sample
Revenue Ruling No. SD 072 – Loan Securities - Affect of Powered By Docstoc
					REVENUE RULING NO. SD 072 

LOAN SECURITIES ­ AFFECT OF DEEMED DATE OF EXECUTION 
PROVISIONS AND APPLICATION OF SECTION 84F 




PREAMBLE 

Division 21 of t  he Stamp Duties Act 1920 provides for the liability to duty 
of loan securities. "Loan security" is defined in section 83(1) as a mortgage 
or debenture executed in NSW, a mortgage which affects property in NSW at 
the time of its execution and a mortgage which does not affect property in 
NSW at the time of its execution but affects land in NSW within 12 months 
of its execution. 

Once a document falls within the definition it is liable to duty as a loan 
security for the full amount of the sum secured or advances made. Sections 
84B(3A) and 84F provide that a loan security which is liable to duty in 
another State or a Territory will be allowed a credit for any duty paid or 
payable in respect of the loan security in that other jurisdiction. The 
Victorian Supreme Court in Coles Myer Limited ­v Comptroller of Stamps 
(Vic) 87 ATC 4498 (both before a single judge and on appeal to the full 
Court) examined the sections of the Stamps Act 1958 (Vic) which correspond 
with sections 83 and 84F of the NSW Act. 

The decision involved a loan security executed in 1970. The amount secured 
was increased in December 1982 and duty was assessed at that time under 
section 137F(2)(a) of the Stamps Act and the taxpayer appealed claiming that 
less duty was payable by virtue of section 137DA(1) of that Act. 

The Comptroller assessed the loan security on the basis that section 137DA(1) 
was inapplicable as the loan security had been executed prior to the date it 
took effect (viz. 1 January 1982). Coles Myer argued that section 137F(2)(b) 
had the effect of making the liability in respect of the additional duty 
subject to section 137DA(1). 

The Victorian Supreme Court dismissed the taxpayer's appeal and that decision 
was upheld on appeal to the full bench of the Court. 

This Ruling examines the applicability of that decision to the NSW 
legislation. 

RULING 

The NSW provisions dealing with dutiability of additional advances and the 
date they create an additional liability to duty are sufficiently similar to 
the Victorian provisions dealt with in the Coles Myer case to make the 
principles of that decision relevant for the Stamp Duties Act. 

Section 82F was amended in a very minor way in 1982 (with effect from 15
December 1982), and again in 1986 (with effect from 1 January 1987) by 
repealing the former section and replacing it with a new section. The version 
of section 82F which will apply to a loan security will be the version which 
was in force at the date of execution of the loan security. The date of an 
advance which creates a liability in respect of the loan security will be 
irrelevant in determining which version of section 82F will be applicable. 

Section 84(6) will be interpreted on the principles applied by the Victorian 
Supreme Court in the Coles Myer case. That is, section 84(6) operates so as 
to fix a date from which the time limits for the penalties provided by 
section 25 begin to run, and for no other purpose. It is necessary to fix 
such a date because when an advance is made there is no execution and 
therefore no date from which section 25 can operate. 

Section 84 (6A) is similar in effect to section 84(6) but since section 84 
(6A) commenced on the same date as the revised section 84F any questions 
about whether the former or the revised section 84F are applicable do not 
arise in relation to instruments which are loan securities only by reason of 
its affecting land in NSW within 12 months of its execution. 




A.D. CLYNE, 
Chief Commissioner of Stamp Duties. 
3 November 1987 




Last Updated: 20­Sep­2001

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:5
posted:4/4/2010
language:English
pages:2
Description: Revenue Ruling No. SD 072 – Loan Securities - Affect of ...