Docstoc

Advising Notebook 09-10 _with TOC_

Document Sample
Advising Notebook 09-10 _with TOC_ Powered By Docstoc
					College of Arts & Sciences

   Advising Notebook


        2009-2010
College of Arts & Sciences

   Advising Notebook


        2009-2010
 
              Table of Contents
Table of Contents                                         1
Acknowledgements                                          3
CASA Information                                          5
CASA Mission Statement                                    6
Section 1: Quick Reference                                7
College of Arts & Sciences Contact Information            9
Academic Departments - Contact Information                10
Non-Academic Departments - Contact Information            12
Course Abbreviations                                      13
Building Codes                                            14
Section 2: General Information                            15
Academic Advising at Baylor – A Brief Overview            17
The Advising Appointment                                  18
FERPA                                                     19
FERPA Consent Form                                        20
Changing Majors                                           21
List of Majors and Minors                                 22
Placement Exams                                           26
Transfer Credit Policies                                  28
Common Transfer Credit Issues                             30
College of Arts & Sciences Petition Process               31
Waivers and Permits                                       32
Unified Advising System – Quick Start Guide               33
Section 3: Arts & Sciences                                35
Bachelor of Arts MAP                                      37
Bachelor of Science MAP                                   39
College of Arts & Sciences – Updates and Reminders 2009   41
Advisor Notes – B.A. Degree                               45
Sciences for Non-Science Majors                       58
Advisor Notes – B.S. Degree                           64
Section 4: Degree Audit                               65
Degree Audit Training Manual                          67
Section 5: Programs                                   103
Honors College                                        105
BIC Degree Planner                                    106
Honors Program Advisement Guidelines                  107
Premed/Predent Prerequisite Guidelines                110
Pre-Law Guide                                         111
Pre-Law Timeline                                      119
ROTC                                                  122
Study Abroad Programs at Baylor University            123
Baylor University Study Abroad Opportunities          124
Section 6: Campus Resources                           127
Paul L. Foster Success Center                         129
Academic Support Programs                             130
Tutor Scheduling – How It Works                       131
Departmental Tutoring                                 132
Academic Referral System                              134
Office of Access and Learning Accommodations (OALA)   135
Career Counseling Process                             136
Student Guide to Baylor Career Services               137
Spiritual Life                                        138
Health Services                                       139
Health Services Contact Information                   140
 Many of the resources in this notebook were taken from the
 Academic Advisor’s Handbook developed by the Academic
  Advisement Office in the Paul L. Foster Success Center.
CASA is very grateful for your assistance and your continued
      leadership in the area of advisement at Baylor.


 In addition to the Academic Advisor’s Handbook, please be
aware of the excellent online resource provided by Academic
          Advisement at http://baylor.edu/advising




                             3
 




    4
                                CASA
                 College of Arts & Sciences Advisement


 College of Arts and Sciences Advisement (CASA) is an advising house that
offers academic advising for undergraduates and which provides resources and
  institutional coordination for departmental and program advisors. CASA is
    dedicated to offering professional academic expertise within a scholarly
                  community of creativity, hospitality, and care.


                                Advisors
         Director of Advisors                        Academic Advisors

          Deanne Kramer                                Heather Fritz
     Deanne_Kramer@baylor.edu                    Heather_Fritz@baylor.edu

                                                          Jane Lin
          Assistant Director                        Jane_Lin@baylor.edu

          Rosanne Fuller                              Adam Moore
     Rosanne_Fuller@baylor.edu                  Adam_D_Moore@baylor.edu




                                Location
             Sid Richardson Building (Paul L. Foster Success Center)
                     Ground Level, East Wing, Room #053



                   Contact Information
        Phone: 254-710-1524                          Mailing Address:
                                                   One Bear Place #97177
         Fax: 254-710-7421                        Waco, Texas 76798-7177

       Email: casa@baylor.edu                  Website: www.baylor.edu/casa


                                        5
                                       CASA
                         College of Arts & Sciences Advisement


                                      Mission Statement
College of Arts and Sciences Advisement (CASA) is an advising house that offers academic
advising for undergraduates and which provides resources and institutional coordination for
departmental and program advisors. CASA is dedicated to offering professional academic
expertise within a scholarly community of creativity, hospitality, and care.


                                 Responsibilities and Goals
Responsibilities:

   (1) Provide academic advising on a year-round, daily basis to the students of the College
       of Arts and Sciences. Students may schedule personal sessions with an academic advisor
       to review catalogue, departmental, program, and individual academic plans or to assess
       academic progress and liabilities. CASA will maintain a resource center and provide
       occasional academic and career-planning workshops.
   (2) Serve as advisor of record, providing academic advising during pre-registration
       periods for sophomores of the College of Arts and Sciences making transition from
       freshman to departmental advisement.
   (3) Provide academic advising for upperclassmen entering or reentering the College of
       Arts and Sciences. This would include, for example, transfer students, undecided
       students, students reinstated from academic suspension, and students re-entering the
       University after a withdrawal.
   (4) Refer students with issues of personal crisis, health issues, financial difficulties, spiritual
       concerns, and social stresses to appropriate university and community resources.
   (5) Provide resources, evaluative tools, and coordination for academic advisors in the
       College of Arts and Sciences’ departments, programs, and institutes.
   (6) Assist in summer orientation for incoming freshmen.


Goals:

   (1) Enhance student satisfaction with the College of Arts and Sciences experience at Baylor
       University.
   (2) Assist departments in their efforts to recruit, advise, retain, mentor, and place their
       majors.
   (3) Improve retention of College of Arts and Sciences’ students from the sophomore to the
       junior year.
   (4) Increase graduation rates of the College of Arts and Sciences.


                                                  6
             Table of Contents
Section 1: Quick Reference                       7
College of Arts & Sciences Contact Information   9
Academic Departments - Contact Information       10
Non-Academic Departments - Contact Information   12
Course Abbreviations                             13
Building Codes                                   14




                                 7
 




    8
                      DEPARTMENT CHAIRS/DEPARTMENTAL STAFF – Summer 2009
DEPT           CHAIR                  STAFF                                    BOX # EXT        FAX    BLDG
AS – Aerospace Studies Col Danny Leonard    Betty Mullins                      7070  3513       3548   ROTC Bldg. 1111 S. 7th
ANT - Anthropology,    Dr. Sara Alexander            Barbie Dutton             7173     4084    1393   3rd Floor, Marrs McLean
Forensic Science & Archaeology
ART - Art                 Prof. John McClanahan Mike Koehler, Marissa Markey 7263       1867    1566   136 Hooper Schaefer
BIO - Biology             Dr. Robert Doyle           Rhonda King, Darla Millsap 7388 2911     2969   B207 BSB.
                                                     Sandy Tighe, Mark Vestal
CHE - Chemistry &         Dr. David Pennington,      Adonna Cook              7348   3311     4272   Rm. D 208, BSB
Biochemistry              Interim                    Nancy Kallus, Barbara Rauls
                                                     Karen Humphrey, Virginia Hynek, Cristin McAnear
CHS - Church-State        Dr. Chris Marsh,           Suzanne Sellers            7308     1510   1571   315 Carroll Library
Studies                   Director                   Pat Cornett, Janice Losak, Larisa Seago
CLA - Classics            Dr. John Thorburn          Thelma Mathews            7352     1399    1367   333 Morrison
CSD - Communication       Dr. David Garrett          Pauline Marlow            7332     2567    2590   203 Neill Morris
Sciences & Disorders                                 Jeanie Lewis
CST - Communication       Dr. David Schlueter        Marilyn Spivey            7368     1621    1563   150 Castellaw
Studies                                              Melanie Ferguson
ENG - English             Dr. Dianna Vitanza, Int.   Lois Avey, Julie Sherrod 7404      l768    3894   106 Carroll Science Bldg.
ENV - Environmental       Dr. Susan Bratton          Carolyn Kallus            7266     3405    3409   Goebel Bldg.
Science                                              Glenda Plemons
FCS -Family &             Dr. Suzy Weems             Bobbie Cuzzort            7346     3626    3629   100 Mary Gibbs Jones
Consumer Sciences
GEO - Geology             Dr. Steven Driese          Paulette Penney           7354     2361    2673   D409 BSB
                                                     Jamie Ruth, Janelle Atchley
HIS - History             Dr. Jeffrey Hamilton    Linda Conlon, Mary Howard 7306        2667    2551   215 Tidwell
JOU - Journalism          Dr. Clark Baker      Margaret Kramer, Jan Loosier 7353        3261    3363   261 Castellaw
MTH - Mathematics         Dr. Lance Littlejohn     Judy Dees, Rita Massey 7328          3561    3569   317B Sid Rich
                                                   Margaret Salinas
Medical Humanities    Dr. James Marcum, Dir.         Rosie Padilla             7202     2065           D108 BSB
MILS-Military Science Lt Col John Agor                                         97179    3136           ROTC Bldg. 1111 S. 7th
MFL - Modern Foreign Dr. Richard Duran, Int.         Ann Westbrook         7391         3711    3799   204 Old Main
Languages                                            Amy Maddox, _________
MST - Museum Studies Dr. Kenneth Hafertepe           Marcia Cooper             7154     1233    1173   MMC Admin., Suite 1800
PHI - Philosophy          Dr. Michael Beaty          Marilyn McKinney          7273     3369    3838   219.1 Morrison
PHY - Physics             Dr. Greg Benesh          Chava Baker                 7316     2511    3878   D311 BSB
                                                   Marian Nunn-Graves
Pre Med/Dental            Dr. Rich Sankar     Nancy Johnson, Linda Haynes      7341     3659    3658   B111 BSB
PSC - Political Science   Dr. David Clinton, Int.  Jenice Langston             7276     3161    3122   300 Burleson
                          Dr. Mary Nichols LOA Rene Coker
PSY/NSC -Psychology       Dr. Jaime Diaz-Granados Nancy Ulman                  7334     2961    3033   B309 BSB
& Neuroscience                                    Barbara Prisco                        757-0535
REL - Religion            Dr. Bill Bellinger         Joyce Swoveland         7284       3758    3740   109 Tidwell
                                                     Louine Adams
                                                     Andrea McWilliams, Judy Mills
Sciences Bldg             Dr. James Karban           Bernice Helpert,          7046     2406    2405   D111 BSB
                                                     Melinda Rauschhuber
SOC - Sociology           Dr. Charles Tolbert        Sharon Sloan              7326     1165    1175   350 Burleson
STA – Statistical Science Dr. Jack Tubbs             Karen Schriefer           7140     1699    4477   244 Marrs McLean
THEA – Theatre Arts       Dr. Stan Denman            Sue Koehler, Renee Cluke 7262      1765    1566   l3l Hooper Schaefer


                                                                 9
                                           Departmental Offices


Department                               Office               Phone
Accounting                               HSB 120               6465
Aerospace Studies                        AFROTC                3513
American Studies                         CASTLW 261            3261
Anthropology                             MMSCI 310.1           4084
Architecture                             HSFAC 136             1867
Art                                      HSFAC 136             1867
Asian Studies                            OL 313B               2209
Aviation Sciences                        RT 240                3563
Baylor Interdisciplinary Core            MH 231 & 101          3981
Biblical Related Languages               TBB B21-B             6319
Biology                                  BSB B.207             2911
Biomedical Studies                       BSB B.109             2514
Business Law                             HSB 120               6465
Business Undergraduate Office            HSB 106               1611
Chapel (University Ministries)           BOBO                  3517
Chemistry                                BSB D.208             3311
Church State Studies                     CL 315                1510
Civic Education and Community Service    BURL 300              3161
Classics                                 MH 333                1399
Communication Sciences and Disorders     NMHALL 203            2567
Computer Science                         ROGERS 220            6821
CSS--Speech Communication                CASTLW 150            1621
Economics                                HSB 360               6177
Education                                DRAPER 100            3699
Electrical & Computer Engineering        ROGERS 301-F          4188
English                                  CS 106                1768
Entrepreneurship                         HSB 300               2261
Environmental Studies                    GOEBEL 106            3405
Family and Consumer Sciences             100 FCS               3626
Film Digital Media                       CASTLW 150            1621
Finance                                  HSB 344               4774
Financial Services & Planning            HSB 344               4774
Forensic Science                         MMSCI 310.1           4084
Geology                                  BSB D.409             2361
Great Texts                              BC 153                7251
Greek                                    MH 333                1399
Health, Human Performance & Recreation   MMG 102               3505
History                                  TBB 215               2667
Honors                                   MH 203                1119
Information Systems                      HSB 154               6245
International Business                   HSB 331               6048
International Studies                    BURL 300              3161
Journalism                               CASTLW 261            3261
Latin                                    MH 333                1399
Latin American Studies                   OMAIN 210-A           4531
Management                               HSB 300               2261
Marketing                                HSB 214               3523
Mathematics                              SRICH 317B            3561
Mechanical Engineering                   ROGERS 200            3877
Medical Humanities                       BSB D.108             2065
Modern Foreign Languages                 OMAIN 204-A           3713



                                                    10                Updated by Natalie Terry 4/2009
                                       Departmental Offices


Museum Studies                       MM 1800                  6555
Music                                RGH 103                  1161
Neuroscience                         BSB B.309                2961
Nursing                              BSB C.107                2227
Philosophy                           MH 219                   4237
Physics                              BSB D311                 2511
Political Science                    BURL 300                 3161
Premed/Predent                       BSB B.111                3659
Professional Selling                 HSB 226                  4246
Psychology                           BSB B.309                2961
Quantitative Business Analysis       HSB 154                  6245
Real Estate                          HSB 344                  4774
Religion                             TBB 106                  3735
Risk Management & Insurance          HSB 344                  4774
Slavic & East European Studies       OMAIN 200-A              4527
Social Work                          SPPKG 101                6400
Sociology                            BURL 314                 6234
Sports Sponsorship and Sales         HSB 226                  6189
Statistical Sciences                 MMSCI 244                1699
Teacher Certification and Advising   DRAPER 101               3699
Theatre Arts                         HSFAC 131                1861
University Scholars                  MH 203.8                 3744




                                                11                   Updated by Natalie Terry 4/2009
                  Non-Academic Departmental Numbers

Department                      Office                 Phone
A & S Dean's Office             BURL 210                  3361
A & S Degree Plans              BURL 108                  2200
Academic Advisement             SDRICH, 103-104           7280
Academic Records                RT, Suite 380             1181
Academic Support Programs       SDRICH, 010               8696
Admission Services              RT, Suite 480             3435
Baylor Bookstore                1201 S. 5th Street        2161
Baylor Police Department        SPEIGT                    2222
Campus Living & Learning        PENLAND                   3642
Career Counseling               SDRICH, 133               8434
Career Services                 SDRICH, 121               3771
CASA                            SDRICH, Ground Floor      1524
Cashier's Office                RT, Suite 100             2311
Counseling Center               SLC, second floor         2467
Exchange & Study Abroad         POAGEL, second floor      4824
Health Center                   SLC, second floor         1010
International Programs          POAGEL, second floor      2657
Judicial Affairs                RT, Suite 420             1715
Language Acquisition Center     300 Draper                4526
New Student Programs            BDSC                      7240
OALA                            SDRICH, #163              3605
Parking Services
       g                        RT, Suite 100
                                   ,                      3804
Paul L. Foster Success Center   SDRICH, #172              8212
Registrar                       RT, Suite 370 & 380       1814
Scholarships & Financial Aid    RT, Suite 150             2611
Student Activities              BDSC,101.6                2371
Student Life Center             SLC                       7542
Student-Athlete Services        SIMPSN 206.1              3810
Testing Center                  RT, Suite 540             2061
Transcripts                     RT, Suite 380             1059
University Ministries           BSM                       3517
Writing Center                  CS, G09                   4849




                                    12                    Updated by Natalie Terry 4/2009
COURSE ABBREVIATIONS
Accounting (ACC)                                 History (HIS)
Aerospace Studies (AS)                           Honors (HON)
African Studies (AFS)                            Human Performance (HP)
American Studies (AMS)                           International Business (INB)
Anthropology (ANT)                               Italian (ITA)
Arabic (ARB)—Arts & Sciences                     Japanese (JPN)
Aramaic (ARA)                                    Journalism (JOU)
Archaeology (ARC)                                Korean (KOR)
Art (ART)                                        Latin (LAT)
Asian Studies (AST)                              Latin American Studies (LAS)
Aviation Sciences (AVS)                          Leadership Development (LDS)
Baylor Interdisciplinary Core (BIC)              Library Science (LS)
Bioinformatics (BINF)                            Management (MGT)
Biology (BIO)                                    Management Information Systems (MIS)
Biomedical Engineering (BME)                     Marketing (MKT)
Business (BUS)                                   Mathematics (MTH)
Business Law (BL)                                Mechanical Engineering (ME)
Chapel (CHA)                                     Medical Humanities (MH)
Chemistry (CHE)                                  Middle East Studies (MES)
Chinese (CHI)                                    Military Science (MILS)
Church-State Studies (CHS)                       Modern Foreign Language (MFL)
Civic Education & Community Service (CCS)        Museum Studies (MST)
Classics (CLA)                                   Music (MUS)
Communication Sciences & Disorders (CSD)         Neuroscience (NSC)
Computer Science (CSI)                           Nursing (NUR)
Curriculum & Instruction (EDC)                   Philosophy (PHI)
Economics (ECO)                                  Physics (PHY)
Education (EDU)                                  Political Science (PSC)
Educational Psychology (EDP)                     Portuguese (POR)
Electrical & Computer Engineering (ELC)          Pre-Health Professional (PHP)
Engineering (EGR)                                Psychology (PSY)
Engineering & Computer Science (ECS)             Quantitative Business Analysis (QBA)
English (ENG)                                    Reading (RDG)
Entrepreneurship (ENT)                           Real Estate (RE)
Environmental Studies (ENV)                      Recreation & Leisure Services (RLS)
Family & Consumer Sciences (FCS)                 Religion (REL)
Film Digital Media (FDM)                         Risk Management & Insurance (RMI)
Finance (FIN)                                    Russian (RUS)
Financial Services & Planning (FSP)              Slavic & Eastern European Studies
First Year Seminars (FYS)                        (SEES)
Forensic Science (FORS)                          Social Work (SWO)
French (FRE)                                     Sociology (SOC)
Freshman Academic Seminars (FAS)                 Spanish (SPA)
Geography (GEOG)                                 Speech Communications (CSS)
Geology (GEO)                                    Statistical Sciences (STA)
German (GER)                                     Swahili (SWA)
Gerontology (GRT)                                Teacher Education (TED)
Great Texts (GTX)                                Thai (THAI)
Greek (GKC)—Arts & Sciences                      Theatre Arts (THEA)
Health Education (HED)                           University Scholars (UNSC)
Hebrew (HEB)
                                                                      Judy McClain 4/2009

                                            13
                  Building Codes, 2009
AFROTC   AFROTC Building
ALLEN    Allen Hall
AX       Alexander Hall
BARFLD   Barfield Drawing Room, BDSC
BC       Brooks College
BDSC     Bill Daniel Student Center
BEARFD   Bearfield for ROTC
BENNET   Bennett Auditorium
BF       Brooks Flats
BSB      Baylor Sciences Building
BURL     Burleson Hall
CASTLW   Castellaw Cummunications Center
CB       Hankamer-Cashion Building
CGR      Carlile Geology Research Center
CL       Carroll Library
COLLIN   Collins Hall
CS       Carroll Science
CUBFD    Cubfield for ROTC
DAWSON   Dawson Hall
DRAPER   Draper Academic Building
EDGFLD   Edgefield Playing Field
EQC      Equestrian Center
FC       Ferrell Center
FCS      Jones FCS Bulding
FCSTAD   Floyd Casey Stadium
GOEBEL   Goebel Building
HOTGLF   Heart of Texeas Golf Academy
HSB      Hankamer School of Business
HSFAC    Hooper-Schaefer Fine Arts Center
JJL      Jesse H. Jones Library
JONESC   Jones Concert Hall
KKRNOT   Kokernot Hall
MARTIN   Martin Hall
MCRARY   McCrary Music Building
ME       Memorial Hall
MH       Morrison Hall
MM       Mayborn Museum Complex
MMG      McLean Gymnasium
MMSCI    Marrs McLean Physical Science Building
MMTC     Marrs McLean Tennis Courts
MOODYG   Moody Library Garden
MOODYL   Moody Library
NMHALL   Neill Morris Hall (Speech Clinic)
NRUSSL   North Russell Hall
NVILLA   North Village Apartments
OMAIN    Old Main
PENLND   Penland Hall
PNH      Pat Neff Hall
POAGEL   Poage Legislative Library
RGH      Roxy Grove Hall
RGYM     Lloyd O. Russell Gymnasium
ROGERS   Rogers Engineering & Computer Science Building
RT       Robinson Tower
SAAC     Simpson Athletic/Academic Complex
SDRICH   Sid Richardson Building
SLC      Student Life Center
SPEIGT   Speight Plaza Building
SPPKG    Speight Plaza Parking Garage
SRUSSL   South Russell Hall
TBB      Tidwell Bible Building
WACOHE   Waco Hall East
WACOHL   Waco Hall
                            14                            Updated by Judy McClain 5/2009
              Table of Contents
Section 2: General Information                   15
Academic Advising at Baylor – A Brief Overview   17
The Advising Appointment                         18
FERPA                                            19
FERPA Consent Form                               20
Changing Majors                                  21
List of Majors and Minors                        22
Placement Exams                                  26
Transfer Credit Policies                         28
Common Transfer Credit Issues                    30
College of Arts & Sciences Petition Process      31
Waivers and Permits                              32
Unified Advising System – Quick Start Guide      33




                                 15
 




    16
                        Academic Advising at Baylor
                                   A Brief Overview


Advising Assignments

Student advising assignments are determined by multiple factors:
   • classification (based on total hours completed)
   • degree and major
   • additional programs (athletics, honors, prehealth, BIC, ROTC, etc.)
   • academic probation and suspension, and provisional status
   • possible additional factors


Additional Notes

Students may be required to see multiple advisors before registering for classes

All freshman students are required to be advised

All transfer students in the College or Arts & Sciences must be advised. Transfer
students with 30 hours or more are required to be advised by CASA.

Advising requirements in the College of Arts & Sciences are determined by the
individual academic departments and programs

Many (but not all) freshmen students (0-29 hours) are required to be advised by
Academic Advisement in the Paul L. Foster Success Center

Many (but not all) sophomore students (30-59 hours) are required to be advised by CASA

Some departments do not require advising after the freshman or sophomore years


Who is my advisor?

All students can find out their advisement information in Bearweb by following these
instructions: Log into BearWeb - Registration - Advisement & Contact Information
to verify that your major is listed correctly, determine if advising is required or
recommended, and find your assigned advisor(s).

Advisors will also find this information in the Unified Advising System




                                            17
                           The Advising Appointment
Before

   •     Allow approximately 30 minutes for each advising appointment.

   •     Print a copy of the degree audit to go over with the student. You may also want to refer
         to the Major Academic Plan document (MAP).

   •     Review the student’s overall academic record in the Unified Advising System. You may
         want to read any notes previously recorded for the student.

During

   •     Talk to the student about how classes are going.

   •     Ask the student what he/she wants to do after graduation. Many students avoid thinking
         about life after Baylor until graduation. Advisors are in a prime position to mentor
         students and encourage them to consider how their academic life at Baylor intersects with
         matters of vocation and career.

   •     Be careful to listen for any issues that may be underneath the surface – academic
         difficulties, social and emotional problems, uncertainty regarding the major of study.

   •     Go over the degree audit with the student, specifically noting the 124 hour overall
         requirement, 36 hour advanced credit requirement, 60 hour residency requirement, and
         the last 30 hour residency requirement.

   •     Highlight any courses still needed and any requirements not yet fulfilled.

   •     Talk with the student about any GPA issues – particularly if the student’s overall GPA,
         term GPA, or major GPA is under 2.0.

   •     Calculate the total required hours, total advanced hours, and overall hours remaining.

   •     Be careful to notice any classes that may need to be petitioned to meet remaining
         requirements. This is particularly important when meeting with a new transfer student.
         These classes are often listed under the elective portion of the audit with a generic 1000,
         2000, 3000, or 4000 course number.

   •     If the student has a minor, be careful to note if there is a class that should count in both
         the major and minor (one class is allowed to count in both the major and minor). If the
         course is cross-listed it will need to be petitioned to count for credit in both areas.

   •     Make any necessary referrals.

After

   •     Enter recommended classes and make notes regarding the appointment in the Unified
         Advising System.


                                                   18
                                       FERPA


The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) protects the privacy of
student education records and provides students with a right to review information in
their student records, including advising files. All advising notes should be written with
that in mind; notes of a personal nature should not be included in this student file.
University officials with a legitimate educational interest may view student files, but as a
general rule, other parties may do so only with the student’s written permission.
Advisors may encourage parents to work cooperatively with their students and can refer
parent requests to review student records to the Registration and Academic Records
Office.


Although students have a right to privacy, advisors may discuss confidential information
with other appropriate University officials, such as deans or other advising staff, who
have a legitimate educational interest in the information (e.g., they are involved in
advising the student academically).


For more information concerning FERPA and Baylor, please contact the Office of
Academic Records or Lesa Lawson at 710-1181 or Lesa_Lawson @baylor.edu.




                                                                     Chris Holmes 4/2009




                                             19
                         FERPA GENERAL DISCLOSURE CONSENT FORM
                                     Baylor University

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) was designed to protect the privacy of
students’ educational records and to establish the rights of students to inspect and review their educational
records. In accordance with FERPA, as a general rule the prior written consent of the student must be
obtained before the school may disclose the student’s educational records to a third party.

ATTENTION BAYLOR OFFICIALS: This consent is not valid unless: (1) the educational records
are identified; (2) the person to whom disclosure is to be made is identified; (3) the purpose of the
disclosure is listed; and (4) the form is signed and dated by the student. A copy of this consent must
be kept with the student’s records. In addition, certain Baylor University offices (i.e., Judicial
Affairs and the Student Health Center) have different procedures for the release of student records.
Students wishing to release records maintained by those offices must contact those offices directly.

I hereby consent to disclosure of these records [please initial the blank beside the categories of the
documents which you wish to have disclosed] for the time period indicated:

____    ACADEMIC RECORDS (transcripts, grades, or any information that is on file)
        Baylor can share this information with _________________________________
        ________________________________________ (insert person/s or business)
        Baylor can share this information through effective date of _________________.
        Baylor can share this information for the purpose(s) of ____________________
        ________________________________________________________________.


____    ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT RECORDS
        Baylor can share this information with _________________________________
        ________________________________________ (insert person/s or business)
        Baylor can share this information through effective date of _________________.
        Baylor can share this information for the purpose(s) of ____________________
        ________________________________________________________________.


____    ACCOUNTING RECORDS
        Baylor can share this information with _________________________________
        ________________________________________ (insert person/s or business)
        Baylor can share this information through effective date of _________________.
        Baylor can share this information for the purpose(s) of ____________________
        ________________________________________________________________.


____    FINANCIAL AID RECORDS
        Baylor can share this information with _________________________________
        ________________________________________ (insert person/s or business)
        Baylor can share this information through effective date of _________________.
        Baylor can share this information for the purpose(s) of ____________________
        ________________________________________________________________.

This written consent is valid from the date of execution and through the time period(s) indicated above
unless student provides written notice withdrawing his or her consent to the Registrar’s Office.


Student’s Signature                      Date Signed               Student’s BU Identification Number

                                                                                                  OGC/0701
Student’s Name Printed                                 20
                                CHANGING MAJORS

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES:
     Students who have earned less than 30 credit hours and who wish to change to a major and/or
     degree offered through the College of Arts & Sciences should go to Academic Advisement, 103
     Sid Richardson Building.

        Students who have earned more than 30 credit hours and who wish to change to a major and/or
        degree offered through the College of Arts & Sciences should preferably access the Data Form
        online under College of Arts & Sciences’ Degree Plan Office or go in person to the College of
        Arts & Sciences Degree Plan Office, 108 Burleson to complete the paper form.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS:
     Students who have earned less than 30 credit hours and who wish to change to a major offered
     through the School of Business should go to Academic Advisement, 103 Sid Richardson
     Building.

        Students who have earned 30 or more credit hours and who wish to change to a major offered
        through the School of Business should go to the Undergraduate Students Office, 106 Hankamer
        School of Business.

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION:
     All students who wish to change to a major offered through the School of Education should go to
     the School of Education Advising Office, 100 Draper. Before changing to an education major,
     students will need to make an advising appointment at 710-3699.

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCE:
     All students who wish to change to a major in mechanical engineering should go to the
     Mechanical Engineering Department, 200 Rogers, and see Ms. Minnie Simcik. If a student is
     changing to electrical and computer engineering, he/she should see Ms. Linda Kerr in the
     Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, 304A Rogers. If a student is changing to
     general engineering, he/she can see either Ms. Kerr or Ms. Simcik.

        All students who wish to change their major to computer science or bioinformatics should see
        Ms. Sharon Humphrey in 220 Rogers.

SCHOOL OF MUSIC:
     All students who wish to change to a major and/or degree offered through the School of Music
     should go to 107 Roxy Grove Hall.

SCHOOL OF NURSING:
     All students who wish to change to a major in nursing should go to the School of Nursing Waco
     office in the Baylor Science Building C. 107.

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK:
     Students who have earned less than 30 credit hours and who wish to change to a major offered
     through the School of Social Work should go to Academic Advisement, 103 Sid Richardson
     Building.

        Students who have earned 30 or more credit hours and who wish to change to a major offered
        through the School of Social Work should go to 124 Speight Parking Garage.

                                                                                      Judy McClain 4/2009




                                                  21
                                Baylor University Undergraduate
                                 Academic Programs 2009-2010
                                    College of Arts and Sciences
Bachelor of Arts Degree                Foreign and Classical Language      Bachelor of Science Degree
Area/World Studies Majors              Majors                              _____Anthropology,w/concentrations
_____Asian Studies                     _____Biblical and Related                 _____Forensic Anthropology
_____Latin American Studies                 Languages                            _____General Anthropology
_____Slavic and East European          _____Classics                       _____Biochemistry
     Studies                           _____French                         _____Biology w/concentrations in:
                                       _____German                              ____Ecology
Family and Consumer Sciences           _____Greek                               ____General Biology
                                       _____Latin                               ____Pre-Health Care
Majors
                                       _____Russian                             ____Science Education
_____Child and Family Studies
                                       _____Spanish                        _____Chemistry
_____Fashion Design
_____Fashion Merchandising                                                      ____American Chemical
_____General Family and Consumer       History and Social Sciences                     Society Certified
      Sciences                         Majors                                   ____Concentration in
       _____Option I (leading to       _____Anthropology                               Biochemistry
      teacher certification)           _____Geography                           ____Concentration in a
      _____Option II                   _____History                                    subdiscipline
_____Interior Design                   _____Economics                      _____Clinical Laboratory Science*
_____Nutrition Sciences                _____Philosophy                     _____Dentistry*
                                       _____Political Science              _____Economics
Fine Arts and Communication            _____Psychology                     _____Environmental Health Science
                                       _____Religion                       _____Environmental Science
Majors
                                       _____Sociology                      _____Environmental Studies
Art:
_____Architecture*                                                         _____Forestry*
_____Art History                       Science/ Mathematics Majors         _____Geology
_____Studio Art                        _____Biochemistry                   _____Geophysics
Communication Studies:                 _____Biology, w/concentrations in   _____Mathematics
_____Communication Specialist                 _____General Biology         _____Mathematics, Applied
_____Film & Digital Media                     _____ Pre-Health Care        _____Medicine*
_____Speech Communication                     _____Science Education       _____Neuroscience
English:                               _____Chemistry                      _____Nutrition Sciences
_____English                           _____Environmental Studies          _____Optometry*
_____Language and Linguistics          _____Forestry*                      _____Physics, w/concentrations in:
_____Professional Writing              _____Geology:                            _____Computational Physics
Journalism:                                   _____Earth Science                _____Prehealthcare Physics
_____Journalism, w/sequences in:       _____Mathematics                    _____Psychology
         _____News Editorial           _____Physics                        _____Statistics
         _____Public Relations
Music:                                 Other Majors                        *Interuniversity Programs
                                       _____American Studies**             **Intrauniversity Programs
_____Academic Studies                                                      ***Honors College
_____Applied Studies                   _____Computer Science**
Theater:                               _____Great Texts of the Western
_____Theater Arts                            Tradition***                  Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
                                       _____International Studies**        Art:
Healthcare Related Majors              _____University Scholars***         _____Studio Art, with
_____Communication Sciences &                                                      concentrations in:
Disorders, with concentrations in                                               ____Ceramic Design
      _____Speech Pathology                                                     ____Fabric Design
      _____Deaf Education                                                       ____Graphic Design
_____Dentistry*                                                                 ____Painting
_____Medical Humanities                                                         ____Photography
_____Medicine*                                                                  ____Printmaking
_____Optometry*                                                                 ____Sculpture
                                                       22
                                                                              _____Theory
Theater :
_____Theater Design                                                           Bachelor of Music Education
_____Theater Performance
                                            School of Business                Degree

                                                                              _____Choral Music
Bachelor of Science in Aviation
                                                                                      _____Voice
Sciences Degree                           Bachelor of Business                        _____Keyboard
                                          Administration Degree               _____Instrumental
_____Aviation Sciences                    _____Accounting                             _____String
                                          _____Baylor Business Fellows                _____Wind/Percussion
Bachelor of Science in Family             _____Business French**
and Consumer Sciences Degree              _____Business German**
                                          _____Business Journalism
_____Child and Family Studies             _____Business Russian**               School of Nursing
_____Fashion Design                       _____Business for Secondary
_____Fashion Merchandising                     Education (with Teacher
                                                  Certification)
                                                                              Bachelor of Science in Nursing
_____General Family and Consumer                                              Degree
      Sciences                            _____Business Spanish**
                                          _____Distribution Management &      _____Nursing
_____Option I (leading to teacher
      certification)                              Technology
                                          _____Economics
_____Option II
                                          _____Entrepreneurship                    School of
_____Interior Design
_____Nutrition Sciences                   _____Finance
                                          _____Financial Services &
                                                                                Engineering and
                                                Planning                        Computer Science
                                          _____Human Resource Management
Prehealthcare Programs                    _____Information Systems
                                                _____Accounting Info. Sys.    Bachelor of Science in
The following are not majors, but               _____Management Info. Sys.    Computer Science Degree
students may prepare for various          _____International Business**
professional programs via the following                                       _____Computer Science, with
                                          _____Management
pre-professional tracks:                                                           concentrations in:
                                          _____Marketing
                                                                                     _____Computer Science
                                          _____Media Business
_____Predental                                                                       _____Gaming
                                          _____Professional Selling
_____Predental Hygiene                                                               _____Software Engineering
                                          _____Public Administration
_____Premedical                           _____Real Estate
_____Preoccupational Therapy              _____Risk Management &              Bachelor of Science in
_____Preoptometry                               Insurance                     Informatics Degree
_____Prepharmacy                          _____Sports Sponsorship & Sales     _____Bioinformatics
_____Prephysical Therapy                  **Requires completion of a second
_____Prephysician Assistant               major in the School of Business
_____Prepodiatry
                                                                              Bachelor of Science in
_____Preveterinary Medicine                                                   Engineering Degree
                                              School of Music                 ____ Engineering (Biomedical Option)
                                                                              ____ Engineering (Flexible Option)

                                          Bachelor of Music Degree            Bachelor of Science in
                                          _____Applied Music
                                                 Organ
                                                                              Electrical and Computer
                                                 Piano                        Engineering
                                                 Voice                        ____Electrical and Computer
                                                 Wind/String/Percussion           Engineering (ECE)
                                          _____Church Music
                                                 Instrumental                 Bachelor of Science in
                                                 Keyboard                     Mechanical Engineering
                                                 Voice
                                                                              ____Mechanical Engineering
                                          _____Composition
                                          _____History and Literature
                                          _____Pedagogy



                                                         23
                                            School of Education
Bachelor of Science in Education Degree

The school of Education offers teacher certification programs in the following areas:

    •   Elementary, Elementary/Gifted and Talented, Elementary/Special Education (Pre K-Grade 6 certification)

    •   Middle Grades with a major in Mathematics
        (Grades 4-8 Certification)

    •   Secondary with majors in English Language Arts and Reading, Life Science, Mathematics, Physical Science
        and Social Studies (Grades 8-12 certification)

    •   All-Level programs with majors in Physical Education, Spanish, and Special Education

    •   Supplemental Certificate in English as a Second Language

    •   Minors in Dance Pedagogy, Community Health, and Science Pedagogy (only for BA or BS Biology majors. with
        Science Education Concentration)


The Health, Human Performance, and Recreation division offers the following non-certification majors through the
School of Education:

    •   Athletic Training
    •   Community Health
    •   Exercise Physiology
    •   General Studies in HHPR
    •   Health Science Studies in HHPR with two options:
           o Prephysical Therapy
           o Premedical/Predental
    •   Recreation and Leisure Studies with two tracks:
           o Church Recreation
           o Outdoor Recreation




                                          School of Social Work
Bachelor of Social Work
_____Social Work




                                                            24
                                                   Minors

Minors consist of a minimum of 18 credit hours and may be added to complement a major, but are not required. Minors
                       are interdisciplinary; therefore, they may be taken under any degree plan.



American Studies                        Computer Science                          History
Anthropology                            Criminal Justice                          Journalism:
Area Studies:                           Dance                                         News Editorial
    African Studies                     Economics                                     Photojournalism
    Asian Studies                       Engineering                                   Public Relations
    Latin American Studies              English:                                  Mathematics
    Middle East Studies                     Creative Writing                      Medical Humanities
Art :                                       English                               Modern Foreign Languages:
    Art History                             Linguistics                               French
    Studio Art                          Entrepreneurship                              German
Biology                                 Environmental Studies                         Russian
Business Administration                 Family and Consumer                           Spanish
Chemistry:                                 Sciences:                              Museum Studies
    Biochemistry                            Child and Family Studies              Music
    Chemistry                               Fashion Merchandising                 Non-profit Studies
Church Music                                General Family and                    Philosophy
Classics:                                       Consumer Sciences                 Physics
    Classics                                Nutrition Sciences                    Political Science
    Greek                               Family Studies                            Religion:
    Latin                               Forensic Science                              Recreation Ministry
Communication Sciences and              Gender Studies                                Religion
    Disorders:                          Geology:                                  Religion, Politics, and Society
    Communication Sciences                  Earth Science                         Social Work:
        and Disorders                       Geography                                 Gerontology
    Sign Language                           Geology                               Sociology
        Interpreting                    Great Texts of Western Tradition          Statistics
Communication Studies:                                                            World Affairs
    Corporate Communication
    Film & Digital Media
    Media Management
    Rhetoric and Argumentation
Community Health




                                                                                  Judy McClain
                                                                                  Revised 6/01/2009LJ




                                                        25
                             PLACEMENT EXAMS, 2009
                                     Information for Advisors

 Placement exams do not bear credit; the score determines the level of the course for which the
 student may register. Scores will be entered electronically in Banner and can be viewed on the
 UAS, Student Profile.
                                              English
 Students are required to take the English Placement Exam if their highest ACT ENG score is 19
 or below or their highest SAT Verbal score is 460 or below. Transfer students who do not have
 ACT or SAT scores must take the EPE before they can register for ENG 1302 at Baylor.

                        UAS and SOATEST/BANNER will show the results as follows:
                              20 test not taken
                              40 student to take ENG 0300
                              60 student to take ENG 1302

                                  Modern Foreign Language
The score is actually the course prefix and number for which the student is allowed to register; i.e.
 SPA 1401, GER 1412, FRE 2310, etc.

         •   Students MUST take the MFLPE in order to register for either French, German, or
             Spanish if the student has had 2 or more years of high school courses or living
             experience in the language the student is planning to take at Baylor.
         •   Students who have had less than 2 years of course work or living experience in the
             language they plan to take at Baylor (French, German, or Spanish) may register
             for the beginning course (1401) without taking the MFLPE.


 Admission to Baylor requires 2 consecutive years of high school language; therefore, a
 student who does not report 2 years of any language in high school on the New Student
 Questionnaire may not register for French, German or Spanish without taking the MFLPE.


 LAC location: Draper 300
 Hours: Monday - Thursday: 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. ; and Friday: 8 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
 Students can take the MFLPE on a first-come, first-served basis anytime the Language Acquisition Lab
 (LAC) is open. Allow 30 minutes for the computerized exam. A photo ID is required (Driver's license,
 high school ID, Baylor ID, etc.) to take the exam. There is no charge for the MFLPE.

 Students who score 2310 or 2320 may want to consider taking a CLEP test in order to receive
 academic credit for SPA, FRE or GER 2310 and /or 2320. (Students interested in taking the
 CLEP should contact the Testing Office, 5th floor Robinson Tower, phone 254-710-2061, after
 obtaining permission from the Modern Foreign Language Department.)
                                                                              Judy McClain 4/2009



                                                  26
                                                        Mathematics
Students wishing to enroll in MTH 1304 or MTH 1321 may be required to take the Mathematics Placement Test (MPE).
See the following chart:

SAT or ACT                 RECOMMENDATION
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SAT <550                   Student should take the MPE.
ACT<24
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
550<=SAT<600               Students may enroll in MTH 1304 without taking the MPE or may
24<=ACT<28                 take the MPE to see if he or she qualifies to take MTH 1321
                           without taking MTH 1304.
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
600<=SAT<690               Student may enroll in MTH 1304 without taking the MPE but is
28<=ACT<33                 strongly advised to take the MPE to see if he or she qualifies to
                           take MTH 1321 without taking MTH 1304.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SAT>=690                   Student need not take the MPE and is strongly advised to enroll in
ACT>=33                    MTH 1321 instead of MTH 1304. Students in this category may enroll
                           in MTH 1321 – H1 or MTH 1321 – H2.

The students who take the MPE will receive a “combined score”, a number calculated from the MPE score and the SAT
or ACT mathematics component. These scores can be viewed on UAS as well as BANNER/SOATEST. The score
MUST be in Banner to allow registration.

COMBINED SCORE                     RESULT (The student may enroll in this course)
Less than 20                      A student may only enroll in MTH 1304 (with a waiver) if we give them the
                                  caution letter from the Mathematics Department Chair. For very low scores, the
                                  student is encouraged to take a college algebra course at a community college
                                  before attempting MTH 1304 at Baylor. An alternative would be to take MTH
                                  1308, our pre-calculus for business course which covers basic college algebra:
                                  however, the MTH 1308 course will not count toward any degree/major except
                                  the business degree/major.
20 to 39 (inclusive)               MTH 1304
40 or higher                       MTH 1321
52 or higher                       MTH 1321-H1 is encouraged
for exceptional students           MTH 1321-H2 is encouraged

A student who has credit recorded for MTH 1304 (with a grade of C or better) or is enrolled in MTH 1304 at Baylor may
register for MTH 1321. The department WILL NOT give permits for a student to enroll in MTH 1321 (even if the
student is enrolled in MTH 1304 at another school) until the prerequisite is in Banner or the student’s ACT or SAT
math score allows registration.

Transfer students will not always have ACT and SAT scores on record. The following are the raw score guidelines
from the MPE that allow students to register in placing students:
 MPE SCORE                   RESULT:
Less than 15              The student can only enroll in MTH 1304 (with a waiver) if we give
                          him/her the caution letter from the Department Chair
15 to 21                  MTH 1304
22 or higher               MTH 1321

                                                                                               Judy McClain 4/2009
                                                                27
Transfer Credit Policies
It is the student's responsibility to review and follow the policies and general information
below. If the student fails to abide by these policies, the student risks losing the credit
when an audit of the degree plan occurs.

General Information
To receive a Baylor degree, at least 60 hours must be earned in residence at Baylor
including the last 30; business students cannot take courses in their major at another
institution. Courses taken at another regionally accredited institution will be considered
for credit if at least a "C" was earned; courses taken pass/fail will not be eligible for
transfer.

All course work that a student takes at another college is evaluated for equivalent transfer
credits, not for degree requirements. It is the student's responsibility to determine if the
equivalent course applies to a specific degree requirement by referring to the Baylor
University Catalog or to the appropriate college or school.

Some Texas colleges and universities participate in the Texas Common Course
Numbering system (TCCNS). These courses are referenced in the Baylor Catalog.

Transferring Credit from another School

   •   After matriculation, a student may transfer a maximum of 15 semester hours to
       Baylor. If the Admissions Committee requires more than 15 hours for readmission
       to Baylor, the transfer of any of these additional hours for credit may be limited
       by individual Baylor colleges/schools for degree credit. The student should seek
       further information from the school or college in these circumstances.
   •   In summer school, a student may earn credit for two courses in six weeks or four
       courses in twelve weeks (not to exceed a total of 14 semester hours). This
       privilege does not apply to the last 30 hours of degree requirements nor will
       exceptions to general or major residence requirements be approved.
   •   A grade of "C" or better must be earned in all courses transferred to Baylor; this
       work does not alter the GPA.
   •   Courses taken in residence, failed or not, may not be repeated at another school
       for transfer to Baylor.
   •   A maximum of 70 semester hours may be transferred from a junior or community
       college.
   •   No course at or above the "3000" level may be taken at a junior or community
       college, and no junior or community college course will be evaluated as an
       advanced course.
   •   Degree credit will not be given for courses taken at other college or universities
       while concurrently enrolled at Baylor.



                                             28
   •   Students may not defer basic required courses in the expectation of taking such
       courses elsewhere.
   •   Elementary science and modern foreign language courses without laboratory will
       not be accepted for transfer.
   •   Political Science 2302 may not be transferred from another school after the
       student has earned hours at Baylor.

If a student earns credit for as many as two of the four required English courses before
registering as a Baylor Student, it is recommended that the remaining English credit be
earned in residence.

Current Baylor students must submit an Equivalent Course Approval Form unless they
are attending one of the schools identified in the Equivalent Course Lists section of our
Web site. Prospective students may submit an Equivalent Course Approval form unless
they are attending one of the schools identified in the Equivalent Course Lists section of
our Web site.



(information taken from: http://www.baylor.edu/admissions/index.php?id=56751)




                                            29
Common Transfer Credit Issues
• Psychology
With the exception of general or introductory psychology, most psychology courses are
advanced level courses and will not transfer from a community college.

• Math
Instructional patterns vary among institutions and may not directly equate with Baylor
sequences on a course-for-course basis. Click here for detailed information regarding the
Department of Mathematics transfer policy.

• Bus 1301 - Introduction to Business
Introduction to Business must be taken at Baylor.

• Accounting
Accounting courses must be approved by the Accounting Department.

• Modern Foreign Language
Intermediate level modern foreign language courses must be approved by the Department
before the courses can be transferred into Baylor.

• Military Credit
Limited credit is granted for military experience based on the military transcript.

• Credit by Exam
Credit by exam originally earned at other institutions is processed by Baylor's Office of
Institutional Research and Testing. Please visit IRT's web site to review acceptable
scores.



(information taken from: http://www.baylor.edu/admissions/index.php?id=54991)




                                             30
      




31
                            Waivers and Permits

Pre-requisite Waivers

If a student wants to take a course without having met the pre-requisites, the student will
need a pre-requisite waiver. Pre-requisite waivers are approved or denied through each
individual department and/or the course professor. The person issuing the waiver will
need the student’s ID number and the particular section of the course the student desires
to take.


Closed Class Permits

Closed class permits are handled in the same manner as pre-requisite waivers. Each
department and/or course professor controls the class size and is in charge of issuing any
closed class permits. The student’s ID number and the particular section of the course are
needed in order to issue the permit.




                                             32
                                   Quick Start Guide
Logging in:    From the Advising Web site (www.baylor.edu/Advising), click on Just for Advisors, and choose Unified Advising
System. Enter Bear ID (example Bobby_Baylor) and password. Click OK.

Finding a student:           Enter Baylor ID number or search by
Last Name & First Name (following the name entry instructions
on the screen). Click Find this student. You may also pick a
student from a list. Refer to the Quick List section (bottom of
next page) for instructions.

NOTE: You will only be able to display information on students
you have permission to see (either they’ve been assigned to your
advising area, or they’ve given you temporary permission to see
their record in UAS. (Students can do this on BearWeb).




Academic Profile:            This tab displays a full picture of the student’s academic program and progress as of the term selected. On
this page are the student’s:
          level, classification, college, degree, majors, minors, concentrations, and educational goals.
          special programs like BIC, Honors, or Athletics
          cumulative GPA, attempted hours and earned hours
          placement exams and highest SAT & ACT scores
The student’s last enrolled term is the default. You may change the term to display the student’s academic profile for a different term.

Contact Information:           This tab displays the student’s current home and local addresses, phone numbers and Baylor email
address. Privacy flags are honored.

Advise (top half):
                                                                                      Make sure you’ve entered the correct term!


                                                                          Enter courses you recommend for the student:
                                                                              1) Click the arrow to choose a course prefix
                                                                              2) Enter the course number
                                                                              3) Choose recommended level
                                                                              4) Enter any notes about this course
                                                                              5) Click Save Course
                                                                          Note: Guidelines and examples for entering courses are just
                                                                          below the Save Course button.

                                                                          Once you’ve saved a course, it will appear in a list under the
                                                                          heading Course Recommendations. You may edit or delete
                                                                          any course recommendations you have entered.


                                                                          If you entered a course above, the appropriate advising flag
                                                                          status will automatically be updated to Advised. If you don’t
                                                                          want to enter any recommended courses, you can manually set
                                                                          the advising flag here. Note: Only the advising flags you have
                                                                          permission to set will be available for update.
                                                                               1) Change advising flag status to Advised
                                                                               2) Click Set Advising Flags
                                                                   33
  Advise (bottom half):
Enter any notes you want the student to walk away with or to
see in BearWeb. Make sure you click Save Student Notes.


  Enter notes about this student or advising session
  you want other advisors to see:
       • Select type of advising session and date
       • Enter up to 4000 characters in notes
       • Click Save Advisor Notes


  If you want to edit or view previous notes for this
  student for the selected term, click the arrows.
  You’ll only be able to edit your own notes.

  Advising History: Each term of advisement is shown in reverse order (most recent first) with course advice, notes for students
  and notes for advisors. Some terms may have notes from more than one advisor.

  Registration Info: This tab displays student registration information for the terms involved in the current advising season. For
  example, mid March, the following information about the student would be displayed for the upcoming summer and fall terms: any
  course registrations, the student’s assigned date and time for pre-registration, and any registration holds that exist for the student.

  Permits & Waivers:          The functionality of this tab is very similar to the current PAWS application, with the added ability of
  displaying any permits and waivers that already exist for the student for terms in the current advising season.

  Degree Audit:
                         To run a current audit, click Run an Audit.

    Click Run What If Audit to simulate a change in
    program for this student.


         Note the audits that have already been run for this student. You may choose one from the list.

                                                            For What If Audits, enter the program you want to simulate for the
                                                            student and click Run What If Audit.




    This is an example of a What If Audit. Note: the
    type of audit will be indicated in red at the top.
    On all audits, a status line highlighted in yellow
    indicates the requirement is not fulfilled, a green
    highlight indicates fulfilled.

  Transcript:       This tab will display the last batch transcript generated for the student. The date of the transcript will be identified in
  red at the top.

  Quick List:      This option appears at the top of each page as an alternative to searching for a specific student. The Quick List
  allows you to create a list of your advisees. Then you may choose a student from the list to display, or download the list into a
  spreadsheet. For the list you should choose a term, and whether or not you want all advisees, students already advised, or students yet
  to be advised. Optional choices further restricting your list include: classifications, majors, education goals, and special programs, like
  BIC, Honors, and Athletics. Any Quick List will be pulled from the group of students assigned to your area(s) of advisement.
  However, it will not include any students who have designated you as a temporary advisor in BearWeb.
                                                                       34
             Table of Contents
Section 3: Arts & Sciences                                35
Bachelor of Arts MAP                                      37
Bachelor of Science MAP                                   39
College of Arts & Sciences – Updates and Reminders 2009   41
Advisor Notes – B.A. Degree                               45
Sciences for Non-Science Majors                           58
Advisor Notes – B.S. Degree                               64




                                  35
 




    36
Name:_______________________________                                                                          Date:_________________



                                       Bachelor of Arts - Degree Requirements
                                A Suggested Sequence of Required Courses (2009-2010 Catalog)
                                                   F r e s h m a n Y e a r
        Fall                                                     Spring
       _____    0 Chapel (CHA 1088)                               _____   0 Chapel (CHA 1088)
       _____    3 ENG 1302 or FAS 1302                            _____   3 ENG 1304 (see below)
       _____    3 Math (see reverse)                              _____   3 REL 1310
       _____    4 Lab Science - Area 1 (see reverse)              _____ 2-3 Fine Art (see reverse)
       _____ 3-4 Foreign Language 1401/12 (see reverse)           _____   3 Social Science (see reverse)
       _____    1 Human Performance                               _____ 3-4 Foreign Language - 1402/2310 (see reverse)
       Total: 14-15                                              Total: 14-16
                                                 S o p h o m o r e Y e a r
        Fall                                                     Spring
       _____    3 ENG 2301 or ENG 2304/2306/GTX                   _____   3 ENG 2301 or ENG 2304/2306/GTX
       _____    3 REL 1350                                        _____   3 PSC 2302
       _____    3 Social Science (see reverse)                    _____   4 Lab Science - Area 3 (see reverse)
       _____    4 Lab Science - Area 2 (see reverse)              _____   3 Foreign Language - 2320 (see reverse)
       _____    3 Foreign Language - 2310 (see reverse)           _____   1 Human Performance
       Total: 16                                                 Total:  14
                                                      J u n i o r Y e a r
        Fall                                                     Spring
       _____ 2-3 Fine Art (see reverse)                           _____ 2-3 Fine Art (see reverse)
       _____    3 Social Science (see reverse)                    _____   3 History (see reverse)
       _____    3 History (see reverse)                           _____   1 Human Performance
       _____    1 Human Performance                               _____   3 Advanced Elective
       _____    3 Major                                           _____   3 Major
       _____    3 Major                                           _____   3 Major
       Total: 15-16                                              Total: 15-16
                                                       S e n i o r Y e a r
        Fall                                                     Spring
       _____    3 Major                                           _____   3 Major
       _____    3 Major                                           _____   3 Major
       _____    3 Major                                           _____   3 Major
       _____    3 Advanced Elective                               _____   3 Advanced Elective
       _____    3 Elective                                        _____   3 Elective
       _____    3 Elective (Variable depending on hours)          _____   3 Elective (Variable depending on hours)
       Total: 18                                                 Total:  18
                                                                 All students must graduate with a minimum of 124 hours,
                                                                 36 of which must be at the 3000/4000 level.

       Notes:
       − Minimum requirement: 124 semester hours. Some programs may exceed this minimum.
       − Residence requirement: minimum sixty semester hours including the last thirty hours. After matriculation, a
         student may transfer a maximum of fifteen semester hours to Baylor.
       − Grade point average: minimum of 2.00 ("C") overall and also in the major and minor for work at Baylor. Some
         departments require a "C" or better in every course applying to the major or minor.
       − Chapel: Students entering as freshmen or who transfer as freshmen or sophomores are required to attend two
         semesters of Chapel. Students who transfer to Baylor and are classified as juniors or seniors must attend one
         semester of Chapel.
       − Major: One required, others if available on the same degree may be elected. The policy of the College of Arts &
         Sciences is that any course that is cross-listed or common in multiple majors may be counted toward only one
         major. A student seeking more than one major must complete all credit hour requirements for each major
         independent of the other major(s).
       − Minor: Optional, may elect one or more minors. No more than three hours of the major may be applied to the
         minor.
       − Electives: Number of electives and advanced electives will vary depending on major, minor, degree, etc.
       − English requirement: Students are allowed to take either ENG 1304 or FAS 1118, 1128, and 1138. Students
         majoring in the sciences may take ENG 3300 during their junior year instead of ENG 1304.
       − Check your degree audit often through Bearweb to ensure that you are making timely progress toward your degree.
       − For more information, see the undergraduate catalog.
       Please see reverse side for important information on general requirements.




                                                               37
Notes about General Requirements:
• Course selection is subject to availability within each semester.
• Please keep in mind that this is only a suggested sequence. Actual sequence will vary according to possible second
  major, minor, other program of study (including pre-health), and individual circumstances (ex., transfer credit, dual credit,
  and credit by exam).
• In order to complete your degree, you must fulfill all requirements in your major and general requirements for the
  Bachelor of Arts.
• To complete a double major, you may not count any courses toward both majors.
• For more specific information on general requirements, see the undergraduate catalog.
• Check your degree audit often through Bearweb to ensure that you are making timely progress toward your degree.

Social Science (One course from 3 areas - 9 hours):
− ANT 1305 or 3301
− ECO 1305 or 2306 or 2307
− FAS 1303 or 1305, or 3 courses from FAS 1115, 1125, 1135
− GEOG 1300
− HONORS 3100 or 3101 or 3200 or 3201 (for Honors Programs only, at least two must be taken)
− PHI 1306 or 1307 or 1308 or 1321 or 3301 or 3310 or 3312 or 3322
− PSC 1305 or 1306
− PSY 1305
− SOC 1305

Fine Arts (One course from 3 areas - 7-9 hours):
− ART 1300 or 2302 or 2303
− CLA 3380
− CSS 1301 or 1302 or 1304
− FDM/JOU 1303
− FAS 1306 or 3 courses from FAS 1116, 1126, 1136
− FCS 3313 or 4313
− MUS 1220 or 3322 or 3323 or 4320
− THEA 1206 or 2374

Foreign Language:
− Option A: One modern language through 2320 level:
        Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Thai
− Option B: One classical language through 2320 level or two classical through 1302 level:
        Latin, Greek, Hebrew (If available, Akk di
        L ti G k H b                il bl Akkadian, A      i Syriac, and/or U iti may b used)
                                                     Aramaic, S i        d/ Ugaritic       be d)

Math:
− MTH 1301 (Ideas in Math) or MTH 1304* (Pre-cal) or MTH 1321 (Calculus) or STA 1380. *Math 1304 is intended only for
  students who intend to take 1321.

History (choose 2 courses - 6 hours): HIS 1305, 1307, 2365, 2366 or FAS 1304

Lab Science (12 hours) Choose one science course from each area - each must include a lab:
*Credit allowed for only one of these courses.
                   Area 1                                             Area 2                                        Area 3
BIO 1305/1105 Modern Concepts of Bio             *CHE 1300/1100 Intro to Chemistry              ANT 1404
BIO 1306/1106 Modern Concepts of Bio II          *CHE 1301/1100/1316 Basic Prin of Mod Chem I   ENV 1301/1101 Exploring Env Issues
BIO 1401 General Biology                         CHE 1302/1102/1316 Basic Prin of Mod Chem II   ENV 1303/1103 Wildlife Ecology
BIO 1403 Exploring the Living World              *CHE 1405 Chemistry in Society                 Or any other lab science including:
GEO 1401 Earthquakes & Other Disasters           CHE 1341/1146 Intro to Organic Biochemistry    BIO, CHE, GEO, PHY, and FAS 1407
GEO 1402 World Oceans
GEO 1403 Environmental Geology                   PHY 1404 Light, Vision, and Optics
GEO 1405 The Dynamic Earth                       PHY 1405 General Physics for BA Students
GEO 1406 Earth Through Time                      PHY 1407 Sound and Acoustics
GEO 1408 Earth Science                           PHY 1408 Gen Physics-Natural & Behav Sci
                                                 PHY 1420 General Physics I
NSC 1306/1106 Intro to Neuroscience              PHY 1455 Descriptive Astronomy




                                                                                  38
Name:_______________________________                                                                          Date:_________________



                                     Bachelor of Science - Degree Requirements
                                A Suggested Sequence of Required Courses (2009-2010 Catalog)
                                                      F r e s h m a n Y e a r
        Fall                                                       Spring
       _____    0 Chapel (CHA 1088)                                 _____   0 Chapel (CHA 1088)
       _____    3 ENG 1302 or FAS 1302                              _____   3 ENG 1304 (see below)
       _____    3 REL 1310                                          _____   3 REL 1350
       _____    3 MTH 1304 (if needed )                             _____   3 MTH 1321
       _____    4 Lab Science                                       _____   4 Lab Science
       _____ 3-4 Foreign Language 1401/12 (see reverse)             _____ 3-4 Foreign Language - 1402/2310 (see reverse)
       Total: 16-17                                                Total: 16-17
                                                   S o p h o m o r e Y e a r
        Fall                                                       Spring
       _____    3 ENG 2301 or ENG 2304/2306/GTX                     _____   3 ENG 2301 or ENG 2304/2306/GTX
       _____    3 History/Social Science (see reverse)              _____   3 History/Social Science (see reverse)
       _____    3 Math or Statistics (major specific)               _____ 3-4 Science/Math (see reverse)
       _____ 3-4 Science/Math (see reverse)                         _____ 3-4 Science/Math (see reverse)
       _____    3 Foreign Language - 2310 (see reverse)             _____   3 Foreign Language - 2320 (see reverse)
       _____    1 Human Performance                                 _____   1 Human Performance
       Total: 16-17                                                Total: 16-18
                                                        J u n i o r Y e a r
        Fall                                                       Spring
       _____    3 PSC 2302                                          _____ 3-4 Science/Math (see reverse)
       _____ 3-4 Science/Math (see reverse)                         _____   1 Human Performance
       _____    1 Human Performance                                 _____   3 Advanced Elective
       _____    3 Major                                             _____   3 Major
       _____    3 Major                                             _____   3 Major
       Total: 13-14                                                Total: 13-14
                                                         S e n i o r Y e a r
        Fall                                                       Spring
       _____    3 Major                                             _____   3 Major
       _____    3 Major                                             _____   3 Major
       _____    3 Major                                             _____   3 Major
       _____    3 Advanced Elective                                 _____   3 Science/Math (see reverse - variable)
       _____    3 Elective                                          _____   3 Elective
       _____    3 Elective (Variable depending on hours)            _____   3 Elective (Variable depending on hours)
       Total: 18                                                   Total:  18
                                                                 All students must graduate with a minimum of 124 hours,
                                                                 36 of which must be at the 3000/4000 level.

       Notes:
       − Minimum requirement: 124 semester hours. Some programs may exceed this minimum.
       − Residence requirement: minimum sixty semester hours including the last thirty hours. After matriculation, a
         student may transfer a maximum of fifteen semester hours to Baylor.
       − Grade point average: minimum of 2.00 ("C") overall and also in the major and minor for work at Baylor. Some
         departments require a "C" or better in every course applying to the major or minor.
       − Chapel: Students entering as freshmen or who transfer as freshmen or sophomores are required to attend two
         semesters of Chapel. Students who transfer to Baylor and are classified as juniors or seniors must attend one
         semester of Chapel.
       − Major: One required, others if available on the same degree may be elected. The policy of the College of Arts &
         Sciences is that any course that is cross-listed or common in multiple majors may be counted toward only one
         major. A student seeking more than one major must complete all credit hour requirements for each major
         independent of the other major(s).
       − Minor: Optional, may elect one or more minors. No more than three hours of the major may be applied to the
         minor.
       − Electives: Number of electives and advanced electives will vary depending on major, minor, degree, etc.
       − English requirement: Students are allowed to take either ENG 1304 or FAS 1118, 1128, and 1138. Students
         majoring in the sciences may take ENG 3300 during their junior year instead of ENG 1304.
       − Check your degree audit often through Bearweb to ensure that you are making timely progress toward your degree.
       − For more information, see the undergraduate catalog.
       Please see reverse side for important information on general requirements.




                                                                39
Notes about General Requirements:
• Course selection is subject to availability within each semester.
• Please keep in mind that this is only a suggested sequence. Actual sequence will vary according to possible second
  major, minor, other program of study (including pre-health), and individual circumstances (ex., transfer credit, dual credit,
  and credit by exam).
• In order to complete your degree, you must fulfill all requirements in your major and general requirements for the
  Bachelor of Science.
• To complete a double major, you may not count any courses toward both majors.
• For more specific information on general requirements, see your undergraduate catalog.
• Check your degree audit often through Bearweb to ensure that you are making timely progress toward your degree.



History/Social Science (choose 2 courses from the following areas - 6 hours):
− Anthropology, Economics, History, Honors, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, GEOG 1300, FAS 1303,
  1304 or 1305, or 3 courses from FAS 1115, 1125, 1135.
− Check your major to determine if special courses are needed.



Foreign Language:
− Option A: One modern language through 2320 level:
        Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Thai
− Option B: One classical language through 2320 level or two classical through 1302 level:
        Latin, Greek, Hebrew (If available, Akkadian, Aramaic, Syriac, and/or Ugaritic may be used)
             *Chemistry majors must take a modern foreign language; German or Russian are strongly recommended.



Math & Science: You must complete a minimum of 34 hours of math and science courses. See the undergraduate catalog for a more
detailed explanation.

Fine Arts: None required for this degree.




                                                                       40
  College of Arts and Sciences Updates and Reminders 2009


                                          Updates

Anthropology:

FORS 2357 Crime Scene Investigation, has a new description and no longer has a prerequisite.

Biology:

A new version of the Biology major, the Science Education Concentration, is offered under
both the BA and BS degrees. This program is designed for students interested in science
education and certification to teach secondary science. Biology majors can still also choose from
the other, previously existing, versions of this major as well: General Biology or the Pre-Health
Care Concentration on the BA and BS degrees; plus the Ecology Concentration, which is
offered under the BS degree only.

A new course: BIO 1403 Exploring the Living World, is now offered and has been approved
to count for an Area 1 lab science on the BA degree. This course is for non-science majors
and will focus on ecological issues in the media, including ecosystems and biodiversity.

BIO 1401 has a new title and description: Current Issues in Human Biology. It is an
introductory course for non-science majors examining biological issues in the current media,
focusing primarily on the human subject.

Another new course in biology: BIO 1125 Freshman Biology Resource Seminar

       Course Description: An examination of the breadth of careers in the field of biology
       and the resources available to biology majors, including an introduction to the faculty and
       facilities of the Department of Biology, and analysis of scientific data and writing in the
       sciences.

       Course Objectives: Students will learn what is required to be successful in the field of
       biology and how to prepare for a fulfilling career. Students will hear about research in
       the department from biology faculty, careers in biology from invited speakers, summer
       research programs both at Baylor and at other institutions and graduate and professional
       schools. Data analysis and scientific writing will be discussed and students are required
       to write a minimum of two essays.




                                                                                 Linda Johnson 6/4/2009

                                               41                                                      
English:

English Majors: For Fall 2009, ENG 2301.20 and ENG 2304.09 are for English majors only.
Students will need permits for these classes.


Environmental Science:

 New Major: B.S. in Environmental Health Science
Environmental health is a field of science that studies how the environment influences human
health and disease. Since this program was approved after the 2009-10 catalog went to press, the
requirements for this program are included here:

        B.S. Degree (127 -140 total hrs)
        Requirements for a Major in Environmental Health Science
        Thirty-seven semester hours including the following:
   A.   ENV 1101 and 1301.
   B.   ENV 3100, 3314, 3316, 3387 + 3187, 3370, 4325, 4344, 4345.
   C.   One of the following: ENV 4307 or 3300.
   D.   Three semester hours in one of the following: ENV 4V90 or 4V93.
   E.   Four semester hours of additional environmental science electives (for the minimum of
        37 semester hours required for the major) from the following: ENV 2375/2175, 2407,
        3306/3106, 4307, 4327, 4355, 4373, 4380, 4384, 4397.

        Required courses in other fields:
        A. CHE 1301, 1302, and 1316.
        B. CHE 3331.
        C. MTH 1321.
        D. STA 2381.
        E. BIO 1305, 1105, 1306, 1106, BIO 2306, 2106, 3422.
        F. HED 2331.
        G. FCS 1301.
        H. One from each of following two groups: BIO 1402 or 4401; HED 3351 or 4355.
        I. One of the following: ENV 4310 or FCS 3435.
        J. One the following: PHY 1408 or 1420.
        K. One of the following: ENV 2376, REL 4393 or 4395.


Math:

A change to one paragraph of the “math caution letter”:
 I strongly recommend that you carefully review algebra before you enter MTH 1304. If your
score on the Mathematics Placement Examination is less than 13, you may want to take a college
algebra course prior to enrolling in MTH 1304. An alternative to taking college algebra off
campus would be to take MTH 1308, our pre-calculus for business course which covers basic


                                                                                Linda Johnson 6/4/2009

                                               42                                                     
college algebra. The MTH 1308 course will not count toward any major but the Business
major. Baylor does not offer college algebra as a credit.


Medical Humanities:

Since FAS 1303 Freshman Academic Seminar: Medicine, Meaning, and the Patient/Physician
Relationship has been approved as a core course for the Medical Humanities program this
course is now cross-listed with Medical Humanities: FAS/MH 1303 FAS 1303, not MH 1303,
satisfies a social science on the BA or BS degree.


Philosophy:

PHI 1308 Introductory Topics in Ethics can be repeated once provided the topic is different,
not to exceed six hours.


Religion:

The A&S Religion requirement now reads as follows in the catalog: REL 1310 and (REL 1350
or FAS 1308); or 6 hours from REL 1211, 1221, 1231.

A new course FAS 1308 Freshman Academic Seminar: Religion can replace REL 1350 on
all A&S degree plans. Prerequisites are ACT 21 or SAT 550 (verbal) and freshman standing.


Religion, Politics and Society:

This is the new name for the minor which was formerly called “Religion and Politics.”


Sociology:

New ELG courses: SOC 1105, 1106, and 1107. They have been approved as substitutes for
Sociology 1305 on the B.A. and BBA degrees as well as for the School of Education. Credit
may not be earned for this course if credit is earned in SOC 1305.




                                                                              Linda Johnson 6/4/2009

                                              43                                                    
                                        Reminders


Anthropology: Remember ANT 1404 Introduction to Human Evolution, a rather new AREA 3
science option in A&S. It will NOT meet the science requirement on the BBA degree, however.

Chapel: One semester of Chapel is required for a student who transfers to Baylor with 60 or
more hours. New transfer students should register for BU 1000 instead of the University 1000
that freshmen take in the fall.

English: In order to receive AP credit for ENG 1302, students need to make at least a “4” on
one of the AP English exams AND have either an ACT English Subscore of 29+ or and SAT
Verbal/Critical Reading Score of 670+. If students don’t have these ACT/SAT scores let them
know that they will NOT be receiving the ENG AP credit, and they can register for English for
the fall. If they are just a couple of points away from these ACT/SAT scores, students can make
arrangements to take an ACT Residual Test administered by our Testing Office and should hold
off on registering for English.

Family and Consumer Science: Follow the FCS Advising Sheet at the back of the A&S
section of the handbook when advising students considering one of the FCS majors.

Foreign Language: Students whose MFLPE results places them at one of the sophomore levels
(or higher) of SPA, FRE, or GER may want to consider taking a CLEP test to receive credit
for 2310 and/or 2320 instead of registering for foreign language.

Freshman Academic Seminars: The prerequisites for all of the 3 and 4 credit hour FAS courses
are ACT 21 or SAT 550 (verbal) and freshman standing.

Math: MTH 1304 is a good option for a student who is undecided between the BA and BBA
degrees.

Just because students may have taken the MPE and place into MTH 1304 or MTH 1321 does not
mean they need to register for it. Always consider their program requirements.

Political Science: Students who transfer in credit for PSC 1305 and 1306 for coursework taken
prior to attending Baylor do not need to take PSC 2302 at Baylor unless they are Political
Science majors.




                                                                               Linda Johnson 6/4/2009

                                              44                                                     
                                                                                                                     1
                                      B. A. Degree Requirements
                                          And Advisor Notes
Minimum requirement................................................................................l24 semester hours
Residence requirement-minimum (including the last thirty hours).............................60 hours
Grade point average- minimum of 2.00 ("C") overall and in the major for work done at Baylor.
Basic requirements (See Below)…………………………………………….... 65-78 hours
Major - One required, others may be elected from the list of majors for this degree included in
    the section in the catalog on undergraduate programs. See departmental sections for specific
    requirements.
Minor - Optional, may elect one or more minors. Specific requirements in departmental sections
    of the catalog.
Advanced work ("3000" or "4000" numbered courses) minimum .............................36 hours.
Maximum credit - Within the minimum of 124 hours required for a degree, the following
     maximum credits are applicable: (1) four courses of human performance (activity), and (2)
    ten hours of applied music and/or ensemble.
Additional information on the requirements for advanced credit, residence, language, a specified
    comprehensive examination, chapel, minimum grade point average, maximum credit,
    human performance, and majors and minors is listed under the "General Regulations for the
    College of Arts and Sciences" (page 63) and "General University Regulations."


                            Basic Requirements for the B.A. Degree

                                                   CHAPEL

    •    Chapel attendance is a graduation requirement at Baylor—two semesters. Entering
         students take Chapel their first semester at Baylor. In addition to Chapel registration,
         new freshmen take UNIV 1000 and new transfer students take BU 1000.

    •    One semester of Chapel is required for a student who transfers to Baylor and who is
         classified by Baylor at the time of transfer as either a junior or a senior.

    •    No grade or credit hours are assigned. This is listed as “CHA 1088.”

                                                  ENGLISH
ENGLISH: (12 hours)
_______ENG 1302 Thinking and Writing OR FAS 1302
_______ENG 1304 Thinking, Writing & Research OR ENG 3300 Technical and Professional Writing,
        may be substituted the junior year (for science majors) OR 3 courses from: FAS 1118, 1128,
        1138
_______ENG 2301 British Literature
_______ENG 2304 American Literature OR ENG 2306 World Literature OR 3 hours of Great Texts
        (GTX)




                                                         45                                      Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                        2
English Placement Exam:
   • Required for incoming freshmen who score
          o 460 or below on the SAT verbal exam or
          o 19 or below on the ACT English

   •    Determines whether these students will be required to take ENG 0300 before they can
        take ENG 1302. (In some cases ENG 1300 or 1301, English as a Second Language
        courses, may be required before going into 1302.) Credit for this course does not apply
        toward any degree program.

   •    On the Banner SOATEST form and on UAS the test results are reported as follows:
                           20 = not taken
                           40 = student to take ENG 0300
                           60 =student to take ENG 1302

    •   Transfer students who bring in no English credit and who have no test scores on record
        will need to get a waiver from the English Department to register for ENG 1302 and may
        be asked to take the placement exam before registering for ENG 1302.

Prerequisites for courses fulfilling the A&S basic English requirement:
   • ENG1302 is a prerequisite for ENG 1304.

   •    In order to register for ENG 2301, 2304 or 2306, students need to have credit on the BU
        record for both ENG 1302 and 1304 (or the equivalent) or be currently registered for
        ENG 1304.

   •    Students planning to take ENG 3300 in lieu of ENG 1304 must see the English
        department for a prerequisite waiver to register for a sophomore literature class.

   •     If a student fails the prerequisite course they should drop/add as soon as possible;
        otherwise the English department will process a drop from the literature course.

   •    Students who have credit for one or both literature courses and have not taken one or both
        freshman composition courses will need to see the English department on a case-by-case
        basis for a petition to go back to the freshman course or work out another substitution at
        the 3000 level since there is a prerequisite policy. A waiver is required to register for the
        freshman level course when credit for the literature course is in Banner.

   •    ENG 2301 is NOT a prerequisite for ENG 2304 or 2306

   •    There are no prerequisites for GTX courses.

Other English Notes:
   • Students should take ENG 1302 and ENG 1304 during their first sixty hours; students
      with over sixty hours take ENG 3303 and ENG 3300 to meet the writing requirement.

   •    For Fall 2009, ENG 2301.20 and ENG 2304.09 are for English majors only. Students
        will need permits for these classes. Students may take the two courses in any sequence.

                                                 46                                 Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                            3
   •   Although any 2000 level or above Great Texts (GTX) course can replace the ENG 2304
       or 2306 literature requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences, English majors are
       required to take either ENG 2304 or 2306.

   •   The English Department will not issue permits for ENG 1302 or ENG 1304 once the
       sections are closed.

                   FRESHMAN ACADEMIC SEMINARS (FAS)
There are a number of FAS courses that have been approved to substitute for basic A&S
requirements. The BA and BS Degree Checklists show how these courses will count towards
basic requirements.

The prerequisites for all of the 3 and 4 credit hour FAS courses are: ACT 21 or SAT 550 (verbal)
and freshman standing.

                                        FINE ARTS

              FINE ARTS: (7-9 hours) One course from three areas:
              ________AREA 1: Art
                     ART 1300 Introduction to Art
                      ART 2302 History of Art I
                      ART 2303 History of Art II
              ________AREA 2: Classics
                      CLA 3380 Classical Mythology
              ________AREA 3: Family & Consumer Sciences
                      FCS 3313 Historical Design I
                      FCS 4313 Historical Design II
              ________AREA 4: Freshman Academic Seminars
                      FAS 1306 or three courses from: FAS 1116, 1126, 1136
              ________AREA 5: Journalism/Film & Digital Media
                      JOU 1303 / FDM 1303 Introduction to Mass Communication
              ________AREA 6: Music
                      MUS 1220 Introduction to Music
                      MUS 3322 American Popular Music
                      MUS 3323 History of Jazz
              ________AREA 7: Speech
                      CSS 1301 Fundamentals of Public Communication
                      CSS 1302 Speech for Business and Professional Students
                      CSS 1304 Argumentation, Discussion, and Debate
              ________AREA 8: Theater
                      THEA 1206 Theater Appreciation
                      THEA 2374 History of Theater


   •   Some of the above are 2 credit hour courses and some are 3 credit hour courses.

   •   Some will count towards the upper level credit requirement and some will count towards
       major requirements in certain departments.

   •   Applied courses may not be substituted.
                                                 47                             Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                     4

                                FOREIGN LANGUAGE
         FOREIGN LANGUAGE: To be fulfilled with one of the following options:
            A. Complete ONE Modern or Classical language through the 2320 level OR
            B. Complete TWO Classical languages through the 1302 or 1402 level.
            Two languages from Latin, Greek, and Hebrew may be used.
         Modern Languages:
             Arabic (ARB)______ Korean         (KOR)______ 1401_____
             Chinese (CHI)______ Portuguese (POR)______ 1402_____
             French (FRE)______ Russian          (RUS)______         (OR 1412)_____
             German (GER)______ Spanish         (SPA) ______ 2310_____
             Italian   (ITA) ______ Swahili     (SWA)______ 2320_____
             Japanese (JPN)_____
         Classical Languages:
             Latin (LAT) _____ 1301(or 1401)______
             Greek (GKC) ______ 1302(or 1402)______
             Hebrew (HEB) _____ 2310 ______
                                    2320 ______


   •   Students may fulfill the foreign language requirement for the B.A., B.S., and B.S.F.C.S.
       degrees by completing the above requirements.

   •   It is strongly recommended that the language requirement be started during the first year
       of residence work.

   •   Note that chemistry, biochemistry, mathematics, and applied mathematics majors are
       required to take a modern foreign language.

The Modern Foreign Language Placement Exam (MFLPE):
Students’ responses on the New Student Advising Questionnaire are used to determine if a
placement exam is required or not. For students who have filled out the questionnaire, the
Modern Foreign Language Placement Exam

   •   IS NOT required:
       for students who indicate on the questionnaire that they have had less than 2 years of
        coursework or living experience in the language they plan to take at Baylor (French,
       German, or Spanish). They may register for the beginning course (1401) in that
       particular language without taking the MFLPE.

   •   IS required:
       if the student indicates on the questionnaire that they have had 2 or more years of high
       school courses or living experience in the language they plan to take at Baylor in order to
       register for French, German, or Spanish.

Admission to Baylor requires 2 consecutive years of high school language; therefore, a student
who does not report 2 years of any language in high school on the New Student Advising
Questionnaire may not register for French, German or Spanish without taking the MFLPE.


                                               48                                Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                             5
The placement exam prescribes which course a student should begin with at Baylor. It should be
taken on Day One of Orientation in the Language Acquisition Center, Room 300 Draper, on a
first come - first served basis. The exam takes approximately 20-30 minutes; a photo ID is
required.

Although we must go by what the test results indicate for the student, in general, these French,
German, or Spanish courses are intended as follows:
   • 1401 is for students who have not studied the language or have had only one year of
      study of that language in high school
   • 1402 is for students who have completed 1401
   • 1412 is for students who have recently completed two or three years of the language in
      high school.

CLEP (College Level Examination Program) Test:
The department recommends that students who score
   • above 350 on the departmental placement exams in Spanish or French, or
   • above 450 on the German exam,
consider taking a CLEP Test in order to receive academic credit for SPA, FRE or GER 2310
and /or 2320. Students interested in taking the CLEP should
      1. First obtain permission from the Modern Foreign Language department
      2. Then contact The Office of Institutional Research and Testing, 5th floor Robinson
          Tower, phone #710-2061

Spanish:
   Students who wish to take Spanish can meet their foreign language requirement with the
   following Spanish courses:
          o 1401 and 1402 Elementary Spanish OR 1412 Accelerated Elementary Spanish.
          o Plus… 2310 Intermediate Spanish, OR one of the following:
                        • 2311 Intermediate Spanish for Teachers
                        • 2312 Intermediate Spanish for Business
          o Plus…2320 Intermediate Spanish, OR one of the following:
                        • 2321 Intermediate Spanish for Medical Professions
                        • 2322 Intermediate Spanish for Christian Ministry

Other Foreign Language Notes:
   • Note that sophomore level Spanish and French courses do not count toward the minor or
      major.

   •   The Intermediate I and II (2000 level) courses for Spanish, French, and German now
       transfer in only as electives from most schools. Students who may have taken these
       courses elsewhere will need to petition course substitution for the Baylor requirements so
       that Modern Foreign Language department can verify that they were not taken online.

                                         CLASSICS
Although the course numbers for the lowest two levels of all modern foreign languages are 1401
and 1402, in the classics languages, Greek and Hebrew, 1301 and 1302 are the first two
course numbers.

                                               49                               Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                        6
Students wishing to begin Latin can start with either 1401 or 1301. The 1401 requires
department approval and is intended for the student who may need extra help in learning a
foreign language.

                                           HISTORY
                          History: (6 hours)   Any two from the following:
                                 HIS 1305      World History to 1500
                                 HIS 1307      World History since 1500
                                 HIS 2365      History of the U.S. to 1877
                                 HIS 2366      History of the U.S. since 1877
                                 FAS 1304      Freshman Academic Seminar


The history department prefers that BA students take one of the following combinations of
history courses:
    • His 1305 and 1307 OR
    • His 2365 and 2366
Other combinations of these world and American history courses will count, however.


                                HUMAN PERFORMANCE

             HUMAN PERFORMANCE: Four semesters of HP are required:
                  HP 11______ HP 11 ______ HP 11______ HP 11 ______


A maximum of 4 HP’s will count towards degree requirements.

When not registering a student during the advising appointment, the advisor should list HP on
the advising form only as HP 11** , leaving the specific course open for the student to choose
when registering.

These classes are to be educational experiences, as opposed to just recreational. Written tests
and performance tests are used to establish grades.

Once a higher skill level course is completed, students cannot later register for a lower level.

Only HP courses beginning with 11** count as activity HP requirements. HP courses at the
2000, 3000, and 4000 level do not apply to meeting the general HP requirement for degree plans.

Students may elect to take any HP course on a pass/fail basis, but this decision must be made at
the time of registration or during the drop-add period. All business and Education students must
take HP courses on a graded basis.




                                                   50                               Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                      7
Variations for University HP requirements are:
   • Age: This requirement may be waived for persons over 25 years of age at the time of
       matriculation. If a person reaches age 25 subsequent to matriculation, the requirement
       stipulated in the degree plan must be completed.

   •   Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) : One hour per semester for a maximum of four
       semesters: AS 1111, AS 1112, AS 2111, and AS 2112. Military Science (Army ROTC):
       One hour per semester for a maximum of four semesters: MILS 1111, MILS 1112,
       MILS 2111, MILS 2112.

   •   Marching Band (MUS 0102): One hour of credit will be granted each fall semester for
       those participating in marching band.

   •   Athletes: All students participating in intercollegiate athletics may receive two
       semesters’ credit by enrolling in and completing HP 1128 and HP1129. The remaining
       credit, as specified by the degree, must be taken from the available courses.

   •   Military Veterans: Students who are military veterans will be exempted from one
       semester of activity for each 135 days of active duty. Students must submit a copy of DD
       Form 214 to the Program Director, Division of Non-major Human Performance, to be
       granted this exemption.

   •   Adaptive Human Performance: No student is excused from human performance because
       of physical limitations. Prior to the beginning of each semester, students with disabilities
       must present to the Coordinator for HP 1104 Adaptive HP a medical statement from a
       physician outlining the nature of the disability and recommendations for activity. An
       individualized rehabilitation program and/or academic-oriented program will be
       provided, as outline by the attending physician.

Course substitutions for any of the activity courses:
  • HED 1145 Health and Human Behavior
  • CCS 1100 Introduction to Citizenship and Community Service
         (Or, a student can petition CCS 1102, Community Law Enforcement, to count
         instead. They can only apply ONE of these two CCS courses, however, towards the
         A&S HP requirement.)
  • Transfer credit that is posted by records as HP 0001


                                            MATH

          MATH: (3 hours) One course is required:
              MTH 1301 Ideas in Mathematics
              MTH 1304 Pre-Calculus (for students who plan to take MTH 1321.)
              MTH 1321 Calculus I
              STA 1380 Elementary Statistics

Note that some majors have specific mathematics requirements. Be sure to check these.


                                                51                                Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                                8


Mathematics Placement Exam (MPE):
Students wishing to enroll in MTH 1304 or MTH 1321 may be required to take the Mathematics
Placement Exam (MPE). See the following chart:

SAT or ACT                    RECOMMENDATION
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SAT <550                      Student should take the MPE.
ACT<24
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
550<=SAT<600                  Student may enroll in MTH 1304 without taking the MPE or may
24<=ACT<28                    take the MPE to see if he or she qualifies to take MTH 1321
                              without taking MTH 1304.
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
600<=SAT<690                  Student may enroll in MTH 1304 without taking the MPE but is
28<=ACT<33                    strongly advised to take the MPE to see if he or she qualifies to
                              take MTH 1321 without taking MTH 1304.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SAT>=690                      Student need not take the MPE and is strongly advised to enroll in
ACT>=33                       MTH 1321 instead of MTH 1304. Students in this category may enroll in MTH
                              1321 – H1




The students who take the MPE will receive a “combined score,” a number calculated from the
MPE score and the SAT or ACT mathematics score.


  COMBINED SCORE                    RESULT (The student may enroll in this course)

  Less than 20                      A student may only enroll in MTH 1304 if they are given the
                                    “caution letter” from the mathematics department chair. For
                                    very low scores (less than 13) the student is encouraged to
                                    take an algebra course at a community college before they
                                    attempt MTH 1304 at Baylor. An alternative to taking college
                                    algebra off campus would be to take MTH 1308, Baylor’s pre-
                                    calculus for business course, which covers basic college algebra.
                                    The MTH 1308 course will not count toward any major other than
                                    the Business major. Baylor does not offer college algebra as a
                                    credit.
  20 to 39 (inclusive)             MTH 1304
  40 or higher                     MTH 1321
  52 or higher                     MTH 132-1H1 is encouraged


A student can also register for MTH 1321 if they have credit recorded for MTH 1304 (with a
grade of C or better) or are enrolled in MTH 1304.



                                                      52                                    Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                  9



Transfer students will not always have ACT and SAT scores on record. The following are the
raw score cut-offs from the MPE that should be used in placing students:

MPE SCORE              RESULT:
Less than 15           The student can only enroll in MTH 1304 if the advisor gives
                       them the “caution letter” from the math department chair
15 to 21               MTH 1304
22 or higher            MTH 1321

Mathematics Course Information:
MTH 1301 Ideas in Mathematics: Designed as a terminal course in mathematics and is
appropriate for most B.A. majors. Some exceptions are business, economics, science,
mathematics, pre-med, and pre-architecture students.

Honors Calculus: The Department of Mathematics offers one section of Honors Calculus,
MTH 1321-H1. Honors credit is available in MTH 1321-H1. Non-honors students also with
appropriate scores may enroll in this class with a permit.

MTH 1322 Calculus II: Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in MTH 1321.

MTH 1308 Precalculus for Business: No test or specific ACT or SAT scores required.
Designed to prepare students for MTH 1309. (Can also be taken to help prepare students for
MTH 1304.) This course will not count toward any major other than the Business major.

MTH 1309 Calculus for Business Students: Requires a grade of C or better in MTH 1304 or
MTH 1308 or an SAT math score of 600 or better or an ACT Math score of 28.

MTH 1308 and MTH 1315 DO NOT fulfill the B. A. mathematics requirement and petitions
requesting this WILL BE DENIED. These courses would only be elective courses on this
program. If a student has taken and received a grade of C or higher in MTH 1309, Calculus
for Business Students, as a business major and then switches to a B. A. degree, encourage them
to petition the Department of Mathematics to have this course count as their B.A. mathematics
requirement.

Relationship between MTH 1308/1309 and MTH 1304/1321:
A student who has received a C or better in MTH 1304 will be considered to have satisfied the
Business School’s MTH 1308 requirement.

A student who has received a C or better in MTH 1321 will be considered to have satisfied the
Business School’s MTH 1309 requirement.

A student who has received a C or better in MTH 1308 and then wishes to take MTH 1321 must
take the MPE and score a 40 or higher in order to be allowed to take MTH 1321.

A student who has received credit for MTH 1309 will NOT be considered to have satisfied the
MTH 1321 requirement for those majors that require MTH 1321.

                                              53                              Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                   10

Transfer Credit:
   • Students sometimes bring in credit for a mathematics course taken at another school that
      does not exactly match up to any that Baylor offers and are given the designation “Math
      1000”. Students may petition to have the “Math 1000” count as fulfilling the B.A. degree
      mathematics requirement and the mathematics department will evaluate the course. As
      long as the “Math 1000” is equivalent to MTH 1301, 1304, or 1321, it will be approved.

   •   A course in college algebra WILL NOT be approved. A course in college algebra and
       trigonometry may be accepted as equivalent to our MTH 1304 in certain circumstances.
       The main, but not only, criterion that applies here is whether these courses are considered
       as sufficient prerequisites for enrollment in Calculus I at the school where they are
       offered. If they are not, they will not be considered sufficient for our Calculus I.

   •   The department WILL NOT give permits to enroll in MTH 1321 to students who tell
       them that they are planning to transfer in credit for MTH 1304 but have not transferred
       such credit for approval .

   •   The department of statistical science may be petitioned to approve a course equivalent to
       STA 1380.

   •   If the course or courses are on the Baylor web course equivalency list, or are specifically
       approved by petition, they will be accepted.

   •   The department does not wish to accept correspondence courses, internet courses, or
       minimester courses. However, they will not automatically exclude all distance learning
       courses. Questions of transfer credit should be directed to the Department of
       Mathematics, Ms. Judy Dees, 3561.

                                 POLITICAL SCIENCE
            Political Science (3 hours): PSC 2302 American Constitutional Development

Most Baylor degrees require PSC 2302 and this course must be taken at Baylor only. Exception:
If PSC 1305 and 1306 are both transferred to Baylor from another institution prior to a student’s
beginning coursework at Baylor, these courses may substitute for PSC 2302, unless the student is
a Political Science major.

The political science department recommends that students not take this course until after
completion of 45 hours since it is a very heavy reading course.

                                         RELIGION
                    RELIGION: (6 hours)
                    ________REL 1310 The Christian Scriptures AND
                    ________REL 1350 The Christian Heritage OR FAS 1308

                    ________OR 6 hours from REL 1211, 1221, 1231


                                               54                                Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                             11
REL 1310 is a prerequisite for REL 1350.


                                               SCIENCE
            LAB SCIENCE: (12 hours) Three courses, each from a different group:
            _______AREA 1:
                    BIO 1401 Current Issues in Human Biology
                    BIO 1403 Exploring the Living World
                  BIO 1305-1105 Modern Concepts of Bioscience
                  BIO 1306-1106 Modern Concepts of Bioscience, Continued
                   GEO 1401 Earthquakes & other Natural Disasters
                   GEO 1402 World Oceans
                   GEO 1403 Environmental Geology
                   GEO 1405 The Dynamic Earth
                   GEO 1406 Earth Through Time
                   GEO 1408 Earth Science
                  NSC 1306-1106 Introduction to Neuroscience
             ______AREA 2:
                 *CHE 1300-1100 Introduction to Chemistry
                 *CHE 1301-1100 Basic Principles of Modern Chemistry I
                  CHE 1302-1102 Basic Principles of Modern Chemistry II
                  CHE 1341-1146 Introductory Organic Biochemistry
                 *CHE 1405 Chemistry & Society
                  *(Credit allowed in only one)
                   PHY 1404 Light, Vision and Optics
                   PHY 1405 General Physics for BA Students
                   PHY 1407 Sound and Acoustics
                   PHY 1408 Gen. Physics for Nat. & Behavioral Sci.I (PreMed-PreDent)
                   PHY 1420 General Physics I
                   PHY 1455 Descriptive Astronomy
            _______AREA 3: A third 4-hour lab science course from the above or others in
                   the fields of biology, chemistry, geology or physics OR
                    ANT 1404 Intro to Human Evolution OR
                    FAS 1407 OR
                    ENV 1301-1101 Exploring Environmental Issues (and lab) OR
                    ENV 1303-1103 Wildlife Ecology (and lab)
              Note: Underlined courses count towards premed requirements.


Baylor offers different levels of science for science vs. non-science majors.

The freshman level courses recommended for non-science majors are:
       Area 1:        BIO 1401 Current Issues in Human Biology
                      BIO 1403 Exploring the Living World
                      Any of the Geology courses listed on the B.A. checklist

        Area 2:          CHE 1405 Chemistry and Society
                         PHY 1404 Light, Vision and Optics
                         PHY 1405 General Physics for B.A. Students
                         PHY 1407 Sound and Acoustics
                         PHY 1455 Descriptive Astronomy



        Area 3:          Can be a third 4-hour lab science from the above or others in the fields of
                         biology, chemistry, geology or physics, OR
                                                     55                                    Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                          12
                       ANT 1404 (Introduction to Human Evolution) OR
                       FAS 1407 OR
                       ENV 1301-1101 (Exploring Environmental Issues, and lab) or
                       ENV 1303-1103 (Wildlife Ecology, and lab)

(Note: The order of these groupings is consistent with the order in which they appear on degree audits,
however Areas 1 and 2 appear in the reverse order in the undergraduate catalog.)


Freshman level courses for Science Majors:
      BIO 1305-1105 Modern Concepts of Bioscience (note that 1105 has lab lecture + lab!)
      BIO 1306-1106 Modern Concepts of Bioscience, Cont’d.            ( 1106 “  “     “   “)
      CHE 1300 Introduction to Chemistry (for students not ready for 1301)
      CHE 1301 Basic Principles of Modern Chemistry I (prerequisite: 1 year of high school
              chemistry),
      CHE 1302 Basic Principles of Modern Chemistry II (prerequisite: CHE 1301),
      CHE 1316 Laboratory Measurements and Techniques (prerequisite: CHE 1302 or concurrent
              registration),
      CHE 1100, 1102 (labs which can be taken later…usually taken by students who change OUT of
              a science major)
      PHY 1408 Gen. Physics for Natural and Behavioral Sciences (prerequisite: MTH 1304)
      PHY 1420 Gen. Physics I (requires MTH 1321 or concurrent enrollment)
      NSC 1306-1106 (for PSY, NSC and SWO majors) Introduction To Neuroscience, and lab



More notes on Lab Sciences:
  1) Note that students are required to sign up for both a LECTURE and a LAB for all of the 4-credit
      hour lab science courses. The section for the lecture will be a number and the section for the
      lab will be a letter.

   2) Where the lab has a separate number from the lecture (it’s usually a 1-hour course), students can
      actually register for the lecture without the lab (since the two are not linked together on the
      computer)…although this is usually not a good idea…except when they may need to retake only
      one part of it (due to making a D or F in one of these - either the lab or the lecture).

   3) Bio 1105 and 1106 and CHE 1100 have two parts: 1) a LAB LECTURE, which is designated
      with a number for the section and 2) the LAB itself, which is indicated as a letter for the section.

   4) CHE 1100 and 1102 are generally only taken AFTER a student switches OUT of premed or a
      science major (except Nursing majors, who are required to take the CHE 1100 along with CHE
      1300). The CHE 1300 or 1301 alone will not fulfill the Area 2 science requirement for the B.A.
      degree. However, when the CHE 1100 is also completed, this requirement will then be complete.

   5)    CHE 1405 is the chemistry recommended for non-science majors who are interested in taking a
        chemistry course and is required for FCS students.

   6) BIO 1401 and 1403 are the biology courses recommended for non-science majors who wish to
      take a biology course.




                                                   56                                   Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                                                                                                     13

                                   SOCIAL SCIENCES

          ______3. Other Social Sciences: (9 hours) Three hours from each of three of the
                 following fields:
                   A. Anthropology
                        ANT 1305 Introduction to Anthropology
                        ANT 3301 Science, Society and Culture
                   B. Economics
                       ECO 1305 Survey of Economic Principles For Non-business
                       Majors
                        ECO 2306 Principles of Microeconomics
                        ECO 2307 Principles of Macroeconomics
                   C. Freshman Academic Seminars
                        FAS 1303 or 1305 or three courses from FAS 1115, 1125, 1135
                   D. Geography
                        GEOG 1300 World Geography
                  E. HON (For honors program only, at least 2 must be taken) 3100,
                       3101, 3200, 3201
                   F. Philosophy
                        PHI 1306 Logic
                        PHI 1307 Critical Thinking
                        PHI 1308 Introduction to Ethics
                        PHI 1321 Introduction to Philosophy
                        PHI 3301 Moral Philosophy
                        PHI 3310 History of Philosophy: Classical
                        PHI 3312 History of Philosophy: Mod. European
                        PHI 3322 Philosophy and the Arts (for art majors)
                  G. Political Science
                        PSC 1305 American National Government
                        PSC 1306 American State & Local Government
                  H. Psychology
                        PSY 1305 Introductory Psychology
                  I. Sociology
                       SOC 1305 Introduction to Sociology


Three hours from each of three of the above areas is required (9 hours).

Check specific requirements of the major.




                                                57                                 Linda Johnson 5/1/2009
                           Sciences for Non-Science Majors

(Note: These Area 1 and Area 2 designations are in agreement with the order in which
these groups of science requirements appear in Degree Audits but these categories are
listed in the reverse order in the Undergraduate Catalog)

                        The Following Courses Fulfill Area 1 of the
                            B.A. Degree Science Requirement:

BIO 1401 Current Issues in Human Biology
        An introductory course on current issues in biology, focusing on the human organism.
The course guides students through the process of science, how scientists conduct research, and
why that knowledge is so profoundly important to students’ lives. Class discussions of “science
in the news” focus on weekly press articles and essays. Major topics include human body
systems and disease, evolution, and how “life” functions-from the cellular to the organism level.
Weekly labs provide hands-on application of classroom concepts.


BIO 1403 Exploring the Living World
         An introductory course covering current issues in ecology and the ways humans interact
with nature. The course begins with the study of basic ecological concepts and how healthy
ecosystems function. Students then explore how humans (human populations, human attitudes,
human technology, etc.) have enacted drastic alterations to ecosystems on a global scale. Weekly
press articles and essays are used for class discussion of relevant topics. Multiple field trips will
facilitate application of class concepts to local ecosystems.


GEO 1401 Earthquakes and Other Natural Disasters
         The study of earthquakes and volcanoes offers a unique opportunity to understand the
Earth. Few other phenomena impact so dramatically upon society and at the same time offer a
fundamental insight into a natural science such as geology. To understand the causes of
earthquakes and volcanoes is to understand the basic dynamics of the planet. To understand the
hazards presented by these forces and the efforts of scientists to reduce the risks to life and
property is to gain a new perspective on our relation to the environment. This course emphasizes
the processes and methods by which scientific data are acquired and prompts the student to assess
critically the conclusions that are drawn from the data. Examples are provided and emphasis is
placed on the use of the scientific method and the role of multidisciplinary contributions to the
evolution of hypotheses and theories. Internet resources are utilized to supplement the course
material. The lab utilizes the same geophysical equipment that is used in risk assessment and
prediction of these natural disasters. This course satisfies 4 semester hours of the lab science
requirement.
          The specific objectives of the course are to (1) introduce the history and physical
processes associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic hazards; (2) illustrate the
relationships between these processes and the basic structure and dynamics of the Earth; (3)
describe the impact on society of natural phenomena and examine ways that risk can be reduced;
and (4) introduce the means and methods of geoscience and provide an understanding of critical
scientific thinking. Unlike most introductory courses that explore a broad topic superficially,
GEO 1401 looks at a narrow topic in depth. This approach provides surprising opportunities for
the discussion of issues under current interpretation.


                                                                                    Linda Johnson 5/2009




                                                 58
                                                                                                     2
GEO 1402 World Oceans
        As we view Earth from space photographs, we recognize that our planet might have been
better named "Planet Ocean." Earth is dominated by oceans that cover more than 70% of her
surface. The vast undersea mountain ranges and canyons more than seven times deeper than the
Grand Canyon hold clues to the origin of Earth and its continents with their natural resources.
The waters, which provide the basis for life, are crowded with diverse life forms that live in a
delicate balance. The ocean is a chemical factory and perpetual motion machine that maintains
the stability of life, climate, and resources on Earth. It is necessary to understand oceanic
processes because disrupting these processes could lead to environmental disaster.

        As we look at the relationship of human populations to the oceans, we recognize that our
impact has been greater than that of any other species. Topics such as global warming, El Nino,
poor water quality, disposal of radioactive wastes, sewage, and solid wastes, alternative energy
sources, and alternative food supplies are of increasing concern to every person on the planet.
The ocean is being viewed as a potential solution to many of the world's problems. It is necessary
that we understand the ocean environment and learn how to live in harmony with the sea if Earth
as we know it is to endure.
        This course has a hands-on lab and satisfies 4 semester hours of the lab science
requirement.


GEO 1403 Environmental Geology
         Environmental Geology emphasizes the importance of geology to society and the
environment. It uses examples of environmental geological problems and solutions (both global
and local) as a way of learning about the Earth. Lectures will cover basic geologic concepts and
terms but will also include applications of geology to specific environmental problems and relate
geology to other disciplines, both in science and the humanities. This course will be appropriate
for non-majors but can count toward geology, geophysics and earth science majors.
, pollution, and regional
planning
GEO 1405 The Dynamic Earth
         This course is designed to acquaint you with the interrelationships between geologic
hazards, pollution, resources, and the physical environment of the earth. This course concentrates
on the processes that are active in shaping the exterior of the Earth (rivers, glaciers, erosion and
landslides mass movement, faulting) and the phenomena by which we infer the internal structure
of the Earth (earthquakes, seismology, Plate tectonics). Other topics include preservation and
protection of the Earth's surface and groundwater water supply, formation of ore deposits and
other economic minerals, formation of the landscape ( mountain building and erosion processes)
and the relationship between geology and our environment.
         The Dynamic Earth has a laboratory that meets once per week, and this course satisfies 4
semester hours of the lab science requirement. This course is designed for the non-major or major
interested in an overview of the physical processes governing planet earth.


GEO 1406 The Earth Through Time
        Earth has a long and rich history that has involved vast changes in geography, climate,
and life forms. One of the principal aims of geology is to discover how Earth has changed
through time and to understand the physical, chemical, and biological processes that have brought
about these changes. The study of Earth’s history began in a formal way in the mid 1700’s,
largely as a matter of intellectual curiosity. Today, the history of the Earth forms the
underpinnings of all modern geology and of such diverse practical endeavors as petroleum
exploration and predicting future climate change. The specific objectives of this course


                                                                                   Linda Johnson 5/2009

                                                59
                                                                                                        3
are to (1) explore the history of changes on Earth and processes that have produced those
changes; (2) illustrate methods, concepts and observations that have led to our current
understanding of Earth’s history; and (3) emphasize the relationships between the physical,
chemical and biological processes active on Earth.
        Earth Through Time has a laboratory that meets once per week, and this course satisfies 4
semester hours of the lab science requirement.


GEO 1408 Earth Science
        Earth Science provides an introduction to astronomy, geology, meteorology, and
oceanography. Each lab provides the student with practical field experience in observing,
measuring, and evaluating scientific phenomena. This course should be of interest to any non-
science major who would otherwise never have the opportunity to learn about these subjects.
Education majors will find this course particularly useful in obtaining a broad science
background.
        Earth Science has a laboratory that meets once per week, and this course satisfies the 4
semester hours of the lab science .


NSC 1306 Introduction to Neuroscience
        This course is an introduction to the biological bases of human behavior. Emphasis is
placed upon neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and behavioral methodologies which
contribute to an understanding of brain-behavior relationships. The NSC 1106, Introduction to
Neuroscience Laboratory, includes experiments illustrating procedures in neuroanatomy,
behavioral neuroscience, animal learning and behavior, and human sensation and perception.
(Note: This is a required course for Psychology, Neuroscience, and Social Work majors.)



                        The Following Courses Fulfill Area 2 of the
                            B.A. Degree Science Requirement:


CHE 1405 Chemistry and Society
        This course explores the influence of chemistry on everyday life, including energy
sources, agricultural chemicals, food and food additives, medicines, drugs, water, air and
pollution. Laboratory exercises involve the chemistry and physical properties of common
materials.


PHY 1404 Light, Vision and Optics
         Physics 1404 provides liberal arts students with a better understanding of the physics of
light, color and optics. The following topics will be covered:
        Fundamentals of Light – Waves, particles, polarization
        Geometrical Optics – Reflection and refraction, mirrors and lenses
        Cameras and Photography – Pinholes, f-stops, aperture and depth perception
        Human Eye – Optics and image processing
        Optical Instruments – Eye glasses, binoculars, telescopes
        Color – Color perception, paints and filters
        Wave Optics—Diffraction, interference and polarization
        Natural Optical Phenomena – Rainbows, mirages, blue skies and halos
        Lasers and Holograms
        Digital Imaging

                                                                                 Linda Johnson 5/2009
                                                 60
                                                                                                         4
PHY 1405 General Physics for B.A. Students
         The Physics 1405 course is designed for the non-science major and therefore uses very
little mathematics. We use a conceptual approach to introduce the topics covered and we are now
using the text: The Physics of Everyday Life, How Things Work. It is intended for liberal arts,
business and other non-science majors who need a better understanding about the highly technical
society and world in which we live. The goals for the student are:
         1. Begin to see science in everyday life.
         2. Learn that science isn't frightening.
         3. Learn to think logically in order to solve problems.
         4. Develop and expand their physical intuition.
         5. Learn how things work, i.e. the science of how things work.
         6. Begin to understand that the universe is predictable rather than magical.
         7. Obtain a perspective on the history of science and technology.


The classes are not typical lectures. There are numerous demonstrations of the topics covered to
illustrate the principles. Some of the ideas discussed are: wheels, bicycles, automobiles, projectile
motion and gravity, water flow, Frisbees, airplanes and rockets, light, optics and the eye, waves
and sound; electric and magnetic concepts in air cleaners, copiers, motors and computers; medical
imaging and radiation, nuclear power generation and weapons; relativity, the solar system and the
universe.


PHY 1407 Sound and Acoustics
        This 4-hour lab course is an introductory survey of the basic concepts of sound and
acoustics. It covers foundational topics such as vibrations, wave motion, resonance, pitch and
timbre. Then, the perception and measurement of sound, including the human hearing
mechanism, is discussed. Other topics included are the human vocal apparatus and speech
production, the acoustics of rooms, and the control of noise. The last part of the course surveys
the physics of musical scales and musical instruments, with a brief introduction to
electroacoustics.
        The students perform lab experiments on simple harmonic motion, vibrating strings, the
speed of sound, the acoustics of rooms, and environmental noise. The last part of the lab consists
of an independent experimental acoustics project chosen by each student which gives them an
opportunity to delve into an area of sound and acoustics in which they are particularly interested.
        Since the course is primarily conceptual in nature, the only math background needed is
the material taught in most high school algebra courses.


PHY 1455 Descriptive Astronomy
         This course is a survey of the fundamentals of astronomy along with a summary of the
historical development of the science as related to the development of man, demonstrated through
presentation of the leading facts concerning the solar system, including the planets, asteroids,
meteoroids, and comets.



                        The Following Courses Fulfill Area 3 of the
                            B.A. Degree Science Requirement:


         Can be a third 4-hour lab science course from the above or others in these fields, OR one
of the following:

                                                                                  Linda Johnson 5.2009
                                                 61
                                                                                                     5
ANT 1404 Introduction to Human Evolution
          This course provides an introductory treatment of the study of humans as biological
organisms; a field known as biological anthropology. As part of the larger discipline of
anthropology, this sub-field seeks to better understand what it means to be human by offering a
biological context for interpreting the human experience. The course is designed to introduce
students to the many facets of biological anthropology: history of evolutionary thought, cell
biology & genetics, primate ecology & behavior, and human evolution. The goals of this
curriculum are to:
·      familiarize students with the mechanisms that underlie inheritance, variation, and evolution
·      introduce the behavioral and ecological heritage of our primate relatives
·      offer a glimpse of the evolutionary sequence that produced modern humans
Additional pedagogical aims include: developing students’ analytical skills through examination
of assumptions, recognition of bias, and evaluation of data and conclusions and encouraging
interactive participation among students and the intellectual domain
          Learning experiences will range from lectures and discussions to lab exercises, films, and
a field trip. Every aspect of the course is designed to be interactive, so daily reading assignments
are crucial! Upon completion of this course, students should have a broad knowledge of the role
biological anthropology plays within the larger discipline of anthropology. More importantly,
however, they should have a better understanding of their own biological heritage


ENV 1301 Exploring Environmental Issues
         An introduction to environmental science and the related political and social issues. The
course is taught with textbooks suitable for non-science majors, and is suitable for freshmen with
only a basic high school science background.         Class lectures cover topics such as global
warming, water pollution, world food resources, endangered species and renewal energy. Case
histories may include issues such as water availability in Central Texas, the nuclear accidents at
Chernobyl or Three Mile Island, the impacts of acid rain in lakes, protection of whales and other
marine mammals, the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone, the dumping of garbage at sea,
the reduction of power plant or automobile emissions, or the potential for wind or solar energy in
Texas.
         Class assignments include short papers and written responses (generally 3-5 pages or
less) and completion of exams covering the textbook and class lectures. This course is useful for
student interested in professions such as teaching, law, public administration, business,
international missions, interior design, or natural resource management. Students who are
concerned about social issues, such as world hunger, can broaden their understanding of the
sources of these global problems. All students planning to major in Environmental Studies must
take ENV 1301 or the equivalent, except for students completing the BIC program, who may
replace ENV 1301 with BIC 2447. BIC students must still complete ENV 1101 to major in
Environmental Studies.

ENV 1101 An Introduction to Environmental Analysis (Lab)
         This course provides laboratory exercises to accompany ENV 1301. Students must take
both ENV 1301 and ENV 1101 to obtain general education science credit toward a B.A. degree.
Students may take ENV 1101 at the same time they enroll in ENV 1301 or may take ENV 1101
after they complete ENV 1301. The class conducts the laboratory exercises indoors in a “wet”
lab, in the computer room and outdoors at several locales, including the Baylor Campus, the
Cameron Park Zoo and the Lake Waco Wetlands. Students engage in at least one public service
activity, such as cleaning trash out of Waco Creek or Lake Brazos. Other exercises may include
monitoring sound pollution at Baylor, evaluating the impacts of acid rain on aquatic plants,
sampling Waco Creek for pollutants such as nitrogen and phosphorus, viewing endangered
animals, visiting an energy plant, or operating a basic computer model of lake food-chains.


                                                                                   Linda Johnson 5/2009
                                                62
                                                                                                     6
         Students who enjoy the outdoors, like animals or plants, are interested in social issues or
community politics, or prefer a variety of laboratory exercises will find this a top choice for
filling general education science requirements.
         ENV 1101 is required for all Environmental Studies majors including those transferring
Natural World credit from BIC (Baylor Interdisciplinary Core).


ENV 1303 Wildlife Ecology
         This course covers basic wildlife biology and how the natural history of different wildlife
species influences their management. Students investigate what defines an animal species, how
animal behaviors adapt them to their environment, and how availability of food, water and cover
influence wildlife population levels. The course covers common forms of wildlife mortality and
injury, including predation and disease, and wildlife life cycles. Examples presented in class
include mammals, birds, reptiles and fish from a variety of ecosystems such as forests, prairies,
ponds and rivers. Both game and non-game species, including endangered species, will provide
case histories that exemplify different ecological principles. The class will be useful to students
interested in sports and outdoor recreation, farming and gardening, wildlife observation, teaching,
or environmental management.
         The class is taught at a beginner’s level and has no science prerequisites.

ENV 1103 Wildlife Ecology Laboratory Exercises
         This hands-on laboratory incorporates exercises in identifying wildlife, such as different
bird species, understanding wildlife adaptations, such as different types of teeth or claws, and
surveying wildlife species by habitat. Classes will be held indoors in the laboratory and computer
room, and outdoors, on campus and at nearby field sites, including Cameron Park Zoo and the
banks of the Brazos River. This course should interest students who enjoy observing animals and
plants, those who participate in outdoor recreation, such as hiking and fishing, and those who are
interested in the life sciences.
         Students seeking general education science credit must take both ENV 1303 and ENV
1103.

                                                                                   Linda Johnson 5/2009




                                                63
                           Advisor Notes:  B. S. Degree 
Distinctives of the B.S. degree:
   • Chapel, English, Religion, PSC 2302, HP and Foreign Language requirements are the
       same as for the B.A. Degree
   • Fine arts are not required
   • Only 6 hours of history and/or social science are required
   • More lab science and math oriented than the B.A.

Distinctives of Majors Under the B.S.:
   • Environmental Studies requires a second major. (The second major must also fall under
       a B.S. degree.)
   • The B.S. Degree in Environmental Science does NOT require a second major.
   • Geology, Geophysics, Environmental Science, Clinical Laboratory Science,
       Neuroscience, and Statistics majors must pursue a B.S. degree since the B.A. degree is
       not offered for these majors. Other science majors can go under the B.A. or B.S.
   • The B.S. in psychology differs significantly from the B.A. in psychology in terms of the
       number and rigor of the math and science requirements. Note that PSY majors can take
       PSY 1305 and PHI 1306 (Logic) to fulfill their B.S. Degree social science requirement
       and these courses will also meet specific requirements in their major.
   • The B.S. in Geology is a professional geology degree, whereas the B.A. in Earth Science
       is not considered a professional geology degree.

Course Distinctives under the B.S.:
  • English: ENG 3300 (Technical and Professional Writing) may be substituted for ENG
      1304 the junior or senior year. (This is recommended for Geology majors.) Students
      could take their sophomore level English literature without the prerequisite ENG 1304
      but they must get a prerequisite waiver from the English department to do so. This
      sequence cannot be changed once started.

   •   Foreign Language: Some majors recommend or require certain foreign languages.
       Chemistry, Biochemistry, Mathematics, and Applied Mathematics majors are required to
       take a MODERN Foreign Language.

   •   History and/or social science: Courses from the following departments may be
       used to fulfill this requirement: anthropology, economics (except for the Economics
       major) , history, honors, philosophy, political science (except PSC 2302), psychology
       (except for lab courses) sociology, GEOG 1300, and FAS 1303 or 1304 or 1305 or three
       courses from FAS 1115, 1125, 1135.

   •   Mathematics requirement: Students pursuing a B. S. degree are required to complete
       MTH 1321 (Calculus 1) with a C or better and then pass a course in Math or Statistics
       for which MTH 1321 serves as a prerequisite.
                                                                           Linda Johnson 5/01/2009




                                              64
             Table of Contents
Section 4: Degree Audit             65
Degree Audit Training Manual        67




                               65
 




    66
 Degree Audit
Training Manual




             Last updated:
   September 29, 2008 by Adam Moore



                  67
Sample Audit

Bachelor of Arts
  History Major




        68
PREPARED: 07/27/09 - 15:07                          889787695
Baylor,Bobby Joe              This is a 'WHAT IF' audit
PROGRAM CODE: AS BA HIS                  CATALOG YEAR: 200830
                         BA in History
================================================================
=
The University reserves the right to correct errors in records a
t
any time.
================================================================
=
      AT LEAST ONE REQUIREMENT HAS NOT BEEN SATISFIED
================================================================
=
NO     MINIMUM HOURS AND GPA
       A minimum of 124 hours must be earned.
       (Elective hours may be required.)
   -    124 hours must be completed with a minimum GPA of 2.0.
  -     60 hours must be earned in residence.
   -    The last 30 hours must be earned in residence.
         NEEDS:   30.0 HOURS
================================================================
=
NO     MINIMUM ADVANCED HOURS
       36 hours advanced credit (including courses in the major)
       must be earned.
================================================================
=
NO     UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS
  - 1) Complete 2 courses (semesters) of Chapel.
         NEEDS:                 2 COURSES
        SELECT FROM: CHA 1088
   - 2) SELECT FROM: PSC 2302
================================================================
=
NO     ENGLISH REQUIREMENT
--> NEEDS:                            4 SUB-GROUPS
   - 1) NEEDS:                  1 COURSE
        SELECT FROM: ENG 1302 FAS 1302
   - 2) Complete ENG 1304,3300, or 3 courses from FAS 1118,
        1128, 1138.
   - 3) SELECT FROM: ENG 2301
   - 4) Select one course: ENG 2304, 2306, or 3 hours of GTX
        at the 2000 level or above.
================================================================



                               69
=
NO      RELIGION REQUIREMENT
--> NEEDS:                             1 SUB-GROUP
   - 1) NEEDS:                   2 COURSES
         SELECT FROM: REL 1350 OR FAS 1308 REL 1310
   - OR) NEEDS:                  3 COURSES
         SELECT FROM: REL 1211,1221,1231
================================================================
=
NO      MATH REQUIREMENT
   - 1) NEEDS:                   1 COURSE
         SELECT FROM: MTH 1301,1304,1321 STA 1380
================================================================
=
NO      FINE ARTS REQUIREMENT
         Complete 3 courses from the following groups, each from
         a different group.
  - 1) SELECT FROM: ART 2302,2303,1300
   - 2) SELECT FROM: JOU 1303 FDM 1303
   - 3) SELECT FROM: CLA 3380
  - 4) SELECT FROM: MUS 1220,3322,3323
  - 5) SELECT FROM: THEA1206,2374
  - 6) SELECT FROM: CSS 1301,1302,1304
  - 7) SELECT FROM: FCS 3313,4313
  - 9) SELECT FROM: FAS 1306, or 3 courses from FAS 1116,
         1126, 1136
================================================================
=
NO      HISTORY REQUIREMENT
   - 1) Complete 2 history courses.
          NEEDS:                 2 COURSES
         SELECT FROM: HIS 1305,1307,2365,2366 FAS 1304
================================================================
=
NO      SOCIAL SCIENCE REQUIREMENT
--> NEEDS:                             3 SUB-GROUPS
         Complete 3 courses, each from a different group to
         total 9 hours.
  - 1) SELECT FROM: ANT 1305,3301
  - 2) SELECT FROM: ECO 1305,2306,2307
   - 3) SELECT FROM: GEOG1300
   - 4) SELECT FROM: HON 3100,3101,3200,3201
  - 5) SELECT FROM: PHI 1306,1307,1308,1321,3301,3310,3312,
            PHI 3322
  - 6) SELECT FROM: PSC 1305 OR 1306



                               70
   - 7) SELECT FROM: PSY 1305
   - 8) SELECT FROM: SOC 1305
  - 10) SELECT FROM: FAS 1303, 1305, or 3 courses from FAS 1115
         1125, 1135
================================================================
=
NO     LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
   - 1) Complete one language through 2320 (or 2321 or 2322)
         level.
   - OR Complete two Classical languages (Greek, Latin, Hebrew)
         through 1302 or 1402 level.
================================================================
=
       LABORATORY SCIENCE INFORMATION
        The BA lab science requirement has 3 sections.
       Section 1: Biology, Geology, or NSC 1306-1106
       Section 2: Chemistry or Physics
       Section 3: Additional lecture and lab choices
       All 3 sections (listed separately below) must be
       completed.
       AN INCOMPLETE SECTION WILL HAVE "NO". A COMPLETED
       SECTION WILL HAVE EITHER AN "OK" OR "NA".
================================================================
=
NO     LABORATORY SCIENCE - SECTION 1
       Complete a lecture and a lab from Biology, Geology,
        or complete Neuroscience 1306 & 1106.
   -      NEEDS:    4.0 HOURS
         SELECT FROM: BIO 1105 & 1305,1106 & 1306 NSC 1106 &
            NSC 1306 BIO 1401,1403 GEO 1401,1402,1403,1405,
            GEO 1406,1408
================================================================
=
NO     LABORATORY SCIENCE - SECTION 2
       Complete a lecture and a lab from Chemistry *1300 & 1100,
       *1301 & (1100 or 1316), 1302 & (1102 or 1316), *1405,
        1341 & 1146, or PHY 1404, 1405, 1407, 1408, 1422 or 1425,
       1455. (*Credit allowed for only one.)
================================================================
=
NO OR (Section 2 continued)
================================================================
=
NO     LABORATORY SCIENCE - SECTION 3
       Complete a lecture and lab from Biology, Chemistry,



                                71
       Geology, Physics, NSC 1306 & 1106, ANT 1404
       ENV 1301 & 1101, ENV 1303 & 1103, or FAS 1407.
================================================================
=
NO OR (Section 3 continued)
================================================================
=
NO     HUMAN PERFORMANCE ACTIVITY REQUIREMENT
   -    4 courses of activity human performance required.
================================================================
=
NO     HISTORY REQUIREMENTS
--> NEEDS:   33.0 HOURS               5 SUB-GROUPS
   - 1) NEEDS:                  4 COURSES
        SELECT FROM: HIS 1305,1307,2365,2366
   - 2) American History Courses:
         NEEDS:                 2 COURSES
        SELECT FROM: HIS 3360,3362,3371,3380,3395,4357,4360,
           HIS 4362,4363,4365,4368,4371,4374,4375,4377,4378,
           HIS 4380,4383,4384,4386,4388,4390,4392,4395,4396,
           HIS 4398
  - 3) Global History - African, Asian, Latin American or
        Middle Eastern:
         NEEDS:                 2 COURSES
        SELECT FROM: HIS 2389,3305,3307,3310,3311,3353,3355,
           HIS 4305,4312,4313,4350,4357,4389
   - 4) European History Courses:
         NEEDS:                 2 COURSES
        SELECT FROM: HIS 2380,2381,3308,3315,3340,3342,3344,
           HIS 3395,4300,4322,4324,4326,4327,4328,4329,4331,
           HIS 4332,4333,4336,4337,4338,4339,4341,4343,4345,
           HIS 4346,4348
  - 5) Complete 3 hours of history electives.
         NEEDS:    3.0 HOURS
================================================================
=
NO     HISTORY 4000 LEVEL COURSES
  - 1) 9 hours from the History Major must be 4000 level.
         NEEDS:    9.0 HOURS
================================================================
=
NO     MAJOR HRS/GPA/RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
   -    HISTORY HRS/GPA: 33 hours and a minimum GPA of
        2.00 must be achieved on all History courses.
         NEEDS:   33.0 HOURS                  2.00 GPA



                               72
    -   ADVANCED HOURS: 15 hours of 3000-4000 level courses
        must be completed in the major.
         NEEDS:   15.0 HOURS
  -     ADVANCED HOURS IN RESIDENCE: 12 hours of advanced
        credit in the major must be earned in residence.
         NEEDS:   12.0 HOURS
================================================================
=
       ELECTIVES REQUIREMENT
       Elective hours vary according to the program of study.
================================================================
=
       WORK NOT APPLICABLE
================================================================
=
********************* END OF ANALYSIS *********************
 




                               73
                              Degree Audit Basics




                                                                               1

                                                                               2


                                                                               3
                                                                               4

                                                                               5




1. “NO” and “OK”
“NO” means the requirement is not currently met. “OK” means the requirement is
currently being met. In order for a student to graduate, the audit must read “OK” all the
way down the document.

2. Year and Term (06.3)
To the immediate left of each class on the audit is a number. This number represents the
year and term the course was taken. In the example above, 06 means 2006 and .3 means
the fall term. .1 = spring, .2 = summer, .3 = fall

3. Plusses and minuses
The plus symbol (+) indicates that the sub-requirement is currently met. The minus
symbol (-) indicates that the sub-requirement is not currently met.

4. RG = registered

5. IP = in progress (RP = repeated course)

See the following page for a more complete listing of codes, terms, and symbols used
on the degree audit.


                                            74
                DARS Degree Audit Codes, Terms, and Symbols
A, B+, B, C+, C, D, F – Standard grades for undergraduates
TA, TB, TC, TD, TP – Transfer course grades
I – Incomplete grade
CR – Credit for credit/no credit course
P – Passing grade for a pass/fail course
FA – Failing grade for a pass/fail course
DP – Dropped course, passing
DF – Dropped course, failing
MG – Missing grade
WP – Withdraw from university, passing
WF – Withdraw from university, failing
WVC – Course that is waived
WVH – Hours that are waived
RGRP – Registered, repeating course
RGIP – Registered (in progress) course
RP – Repeated (Duplicated) course (appears after the course grade)
>D – Course is registered to be repeated. Hours are 0.0 (not counting toward hours), but
grade is still in the GPA (appears after the course grade)
>X – Course has been repeated and replaced. Hours are 0.0 (not counting toward hours)
and it is not included in the GPA .(appears after the course grade)
>S – Course hours split between sub-requirements (appears after the course grade)
PROCESSED AS: - Course has been renumbered and DARS is reading it as the new
course. Most often with language course.
01.3 SPA 2302         3.0 B    PROCESSED AS: SPA 2320
MATCHED AS: - The course has been petitioned to count as another course.
01.3 SPA 4302         3.0 A     MATCHED AS: SPA 4330
OK – Requirement is complete.
NO – Requirement is not complete.
NA – Requirement is not needed to complete degree (not applicable)
+ – Sub-requirement is complete.
- – Sub-requirement is not complete.
* – Sub-requirement is not looking for hours.
===== (dashed double line) – Separates requirements



DIVISIONAL COMMENTS – This section may be at the bottom of the audit. It
includes a summary of petitions that have been posted to the audit, but those petitions
will show above in the degree requirements of the audit. The “WORK NOT
APPLICABLE” section is the last section of requirements for the degree.


                                                                    Kathy Mulkey 4/2009




                                            75
Degree Audit - Bachelor of Arts




Catalog Year
When a student begins at Baylor he/she is listed under the most current Undergraduate
Catalog. The student may choose to change to a later catalog year. However, for most
students the catalog year will be the same as when the student started at Baylor.

200810 = Spring 2008
200820 = Summer 2008
200830 = Fall 2008

When a student is currently registered for all remaining classes needed to graduate, the
following statement will show on the degree audit.




When a student has completed all requirements for graduation, the following statement
will show on the degree audit.




                                            76
Minimum hours and GPA




124 hours must be completed with a minimum GPA of 2.0.
This section of the audit is very important. All degrees in the College of Arts & Sciences
require at least 124 total hours. This is the minimum requirement. A student may end up
with more hours than the minimum requirement. In addition, a student may complete all
the general requirements for the BA and all the requirements for their major and still have
less than 124 total hours. In this situation the student must take additional elective
courses (or the student may want to earn an additional major or minor).

60 hours must be earned in residence.
In order to graduate from Baylor, a student must earn at least 60 hours at Baylor. This is
an important requirement for transfer students.

The last 30 hours must be earned in residence.
In order to graduate from Baylor, a student must earn his/her last 30 hours at Baylor. A
student cannot take summer school away from Baylor, return to Baylor for the fall
semester, and then graduate in December.




See next page for an example of a current student’s audit


                                            77
Example - Minimum hours and GPA




Hours Earned = total hours successfully completed.

GPA Hours = total hours counting towards the GPA. This includes any failed courses.

Points = total of all GPA points earned from all classes completed.

Hours from Transfer Courses
This includes any courses taken before coming to Baylor, and any courses transferred
into Baylor after matriculation at Baylor. Students are allowed to transfer a maximum of
15 hours into Baylor after matriculation.




                                            78
Minimum Advanced Hours




36 hours advanced credit must be earned
This is a very important and often overlooked requirement. In order to graduate from
Baylor, a student must earn at least 36 advanced hours. Advanced hours are 3000 and
4000 level courses. All 3000 and 4000 level courses taken at Baylor, or transferred into
Baylor, count toward this requirement (all advanced level general requirements, courses
in the major, electives, etc.)

In most cases a student will not earn all of his/her advanced hours in the general
requirements and major requirements combined. In most cases the student will need to
take additional 3000 or 4000 level courses to complete this requirement. A student may
earn these additional advanced hours by taking elective courses and/or earning an
additional major or minor.

In a few cases a student will earn all of his/her advanced hours without needing
additional electives. However, it is very important to always double-check this
requirement, because a student will not be able to graduate with less than 36 advanced
hours.




See next page for an example of a current student’s audit


                                            79
Example - Minimum Advanced Hours




This example shows a student who has completed 15 hours of advanced credit, is
currently registered for 6 hours of advanced credit, and will still need an additional 15
hours of advanced credit – for a total of 36 advanced hours.

All advanced courses currently completed and in progress will show under the minimum
advanced hours section of the degree audit.




                                             80
University Requirements




Complete 2 courses (semesters) of Chapel.
A student must complete two semesters of Chapel in order to graduate from Baylor.
Transfer students bringing in 60 hours or more will only need one semester of Chapel.

PSC 2302
Most all students in the College of Arts & Sciences must take PSC 2302. This course
must be taken at Baylor – it cannot be transferred in from another institution. However,
transfer students who have already completely PSC 1305 and PSC 1306 before coming to
Baylor will not have to take PSC 2302. This exception is only valid for transfer students
who have completed these two classes before coming to Baylor.




                                           81
English Requirement




FAS = Freshman Academic Seminar (only available for freshman students)

3 courses from FAS 1118, 1128, 1138 = this option is for an Engaged Learning Group
(ELG). ELGs are for first year students and are completed over three successive
semesters. For this particular ELG the student is given credit for the second English
requirement. There are additional ELGs available for other requirements. These are
noted throughout.

GTX = Great Text




                                          82
Religion Requirement




SELECT FROM: REL 1211, 1221, 1231 = this option is for an Engaged Learning
Group (ELG). ELGs are for first year students and are completed over three successive
semesters. For this particular ELG the student is given six hours of credit in place of
taking REL 1310 and REL 1350. There are additional ELGs available for other
requirements. These are noted throughout.




                                           83
Math Requirement




MTH 1309 (Business Calculus)
If a student changes from the Business School into the College of Arts & Sciences, MTH
1309 can be petitioned to count for the BA math requirement (the student must have
earned a ‘C’ or better in the course). MTH 1308 (Business Pre-Calculus) will not meet
the BA math requirement.

MTH 1315
For education majors only - does not meet the BA math requirement.




                                          84
Fine Arts Requirement




A student must complete three courses, each from a different group. This requirement
does not require a certain number of total hours, only a total of three classes from three
different groups (MUS 1220 and THEA 1206 are two hour courses). 3000 or 4000 level
courses listed under the fines arts requirement will count towards the overall advanced
hours requirement (all 3000 and 4000 level classes count towards the overall advanced
hour requirement).

FAS = Freshman Academic Seminar (only available for freshman students)

3 courses from FAS 1116, 1126, 1136 = this option is for an Engaged Learning Group
(ELG). ELGs are for first year students and are completed over three successive
semesters. For this particular ELG the student is given credit for one fine arts course.
There are additional ELGs available for other requirements. These are noted throughout.




                                            85
History Requirement




HIS 1306
This course is no longer available. However, students who already have credit for this
course will receive credit towards the history requirement.

FAS = Freshman Academic Seminar (only available for freshman students)




                                           86
Social Science Requirement




A student must complete three courses, each from a different group. This requirement
must add up to nine total hours. 3000 or 4000 level courses listed under the social
science requirement will count towards the overall advanced hours requirement (all 3000
and 4000 level classes count towards the overall advanced hour requirement).

HON = Honors (only available to students in the Honors Program). To earn credit under
group 4 a student must earn at least three hours from the HON courses listed (this will
require taking more than one class).

FAS = Freshman Academic Seminar (only available for freshman students)

3 courses from FAS 1116, 1126, 1136 = this option is for an Engaged Learning Group
(ELG). ELGs are for first year students and are completed over three successive
semesters. For this particular ELG the student is given credit for one social science
course. There are additional ELGs available for other requirements. These are noted
throughout.



                                           87
Language Requirement




There are two options for the foreign language requirement. A student may complete one
language through the fourth semester (2320) or complete two classical languages through
the second semester (1302 or 1402). Please note that the Classics department does not
recommend taking two semesters of Greek and two semesters of Latin. The department
recommends students to take four semesters of either Greek or Latin.

Students may need to take a placement exam for Spanish, German, and French.

There is not a requirement for total hours under the language requirement. If a student
takes the placement exam and is able to start at the third semester of the language, then
the student will only need to complete the third and fourth semesters of the language.

SPA 1412, GER 1412, and FRE 1412
These courses are only available for students who have taken the placement exam. These
courses cover material from the first two semesters of the language and will allow the
student to complete the foreign language requirement in three total semesters.

For most foreign languages the first two semesters of the language (1401 and 1402) are
four hour classes, and the last two semesters (2310 and 2320) are three hour courses.
With most languages, a student beginning with the first semesters of the language will
take a total of 14 hours to complete the language requirement.




                                             88
Laboratory Science Requirement




A student must complete three courses, one from each of the three sections. Each
laboratory science class must have both a lecture and a lab. In some cases the student
will need to sign up for two separate courses to meet the requirement (example: BIO
1305 and 1105). In other cases the student will only need to sign up for one class (BIO
1405). Each lecture and lab course will add up to four hours total. The laboratory
science requirement requires a total of 12 hours.

NA = both “NA” and “OK” indicate the student has completed the section. Incomplete
sections will be labeled with “NO.” This is often a point of confusion.




                                           89
Laboratory Science – Section 1




A student must complete one of the course options under Section 1. Some options
require two separate courses for the lecture and lab (Example: BIO 1305 and BIO 1105).
Other options only require one course, which includes both the lecture and lab (Example:
BIO 1401).

Courses for non-science majors
BIO 1401
GEO 1401, 1402, 1403, 1405, 1406, 1408




                                           90
Laboratory Science – Section 2




A student must complete one of the course options under Section 2. Some options
require two separate courses for the lecture and lab (Example: CHE 1300 and CHE
1100). Other options only require one course, which includes both the lecture and lab
(Example: CHE 1405).

Courses for non-science majors
CHE 1405
PHY 1404, 1405, 1407, 1455




                                           91
Laboratory Science – Section 3




A student must complete one of the course options under Section 3. Some options
require two separate courses for the lecture and lab (Example: ENV 1301 and 1101).
Other options only require one course, which includes both the lecture and lab (Example:
ANT 1404).

Courses for non-science majors
BIO 1401
GEO 1401, 1402, 1403, 1405, 1406, 1408
CHE 1405
PHY 1404, 1405, 1407, 1455
ANT 1404
ENV 1301/1101, ENV 1303/1103

FAS = Freshman Academic Seminar (only available for freshman students)




                                           92
Human Performance Activity Requirement




Any 1100 level HP course (HP 11__) will count for the Human Performance
requirement. 2000, 3000, and 4000 level HP courses do not count towards the Human
Performance requirement.

Other options for the Human Performance requirement
CCS 1100 – Civic Education and Community Service (can be taken once)
HED 1145 – Health and Human Fitness
MUS 0102 – Marching Band
AS 1111 – ROTC
AS 1112 – ROTC
AS 2111 – ROTC
AS 2112 – ROTC

Age Waiver
The HP requirement may be waived for persons over 25 years of age at the time of
matriculation. If a person reaches age 25 subsequent to matriculation, the requirement
stipulated in the degree plan must be completed.

Athletes
All students participating in intercollegiate athletics may receive two semesters of credit
by completing HP 1128 and HP 1129. The remaining credit must be taken from other
available courses.

Military Veterans
Military veterans will be exempted from one semester of activity for each 135 days of
active duty. Students must submit a copy of DD Form 214 to the Program Director,
Division of Non-major Human Performance, to be granted this exemption.

Adaptive Human Performance
No student is excused from human performance because of physical limitations. Prior to
the beginning of each semester, students with disabilities must make arrangements with
the Coordinator for HP 1104 Adaptive HP (Margaret Wooddy).


                                             93
Major Requirements (History)




In this example (History), a student must complete all five of the subgroups. Each
subgroup lists the number of required courses. The total hours will vary between majors.
The total for history is 33 hours. The total hours for the major are not always listed.




                                           94
Major Requirements, continued




History 4000 Level Courses
This separate part of the history requirements is not an additional number of hours to be
completed. Rather, this requirement is stating that at least 9 hours of the 33 total hours in
History must be 4000 level courses.

This section of the major requirements is not present for all majors.




                                             95
Major Requirements, continued




Major Hours/GPA/Residence Requirements
This separate portion of the major requirements section is included for all majors and is
primarily important for graduation purposes. Each major has a requirement for minimum
hours earned in the major, minimum GPA, advanced hours earned in the major, and
advanced hours earned in residence (courses taken at Baylor).

Some majors require students to earn a minimum 2.0 GPA for each course taken for the
major. If this is a requirement, it will be listed in this section of the audit.




See next page for an example of a current student’s audit


                                           96
Example – Major Hours/GPA/Residence Requirements




The above example shows the requirements in the major for overall hours/GPA,
advanced hours, and advanced hours in residence.




                                         97
Electives Requirement




All classes that do not count as a general requirement or towards a major/minor will show
up under the electives requirement section.

Some majors do not require any electives, but other majors may require a considerable
number of electives.

Determining how many electives are needed
The number of electives needed is determined by calculating how many overall hours and
how many advanced hours the student will likely earn after completely all of his/her
general requirements and major requirements. If the student does not end up with 36
hours of advanced credit, he/she will need to make up the rest as electives. After
counting the estimated advanced electives needed, if the student does not earn at least
124 hours total, then the student will need some additional any-level electives.

The following is an example of how you can determine the number of electives
needed (using the History major as an example).

The BA degree requires approximately 78 hours of general requirements
(this number is variable depending on how many foreign language courses are needed
and how many hours are taken under the fine arts requirement)

The History major requires an additional 27 hours
(this number is not 33 hours because six hours of history that count for the major are
earned for the BA general requirements)

78 hours       BA general requirements
27 hours       History major
105 hours      Total hours

124 hours are needed to earn the BA degree (minimum). This means the student will
need at least 19 hours of electives (124-105=19).



                                            98
The next number to calculate is how many (if any) of the elective hours need to be
advanced electives.

By looking at the classes required in the major, you can determine that a student with a
History major can earn a maximum of 21 advanced hours when completing the 33 hours
for the major. This means the student will need to earn at least an additional 15 hours of
advanced credit somewhere else. Some of these hours can be earned under the BA
general requirments (Example: 3000 and 4000 level GTX, fine arts, and/or social science
courses). However, most students will earn these hours with electives. And since the
History major requires approximately 19 hours of electives, a student can easily earn 15
advanced hours within the 19 hours of total electives.

It is important to remember all of these calculations are approximate and depend on
various choices the student will make during his/her career at Baylor.

Summary

124 hours total required
- 78 hours are general requirements
- 27 hours are for the history major
- 15 hours are advanced electives
- 4 hours are any-level electives

These numbers will vary for every major and every individual student. That is why it is
important to calculate these numbers for each individual student based on the information
in the degree audit.




See next page for an example of a current student’s audit



                                            99
Example - Electives Requirement




The above is an example of classes showing up under the electives requirement. These
are all classes that are not counting for the student under his/her general requirements or
major/minor requirements.

Transfer students
You can observe that all the classes listed above have been transferred into Baylor
because all of the grades are preceded with a ‘T.’ This is always something to watch for.
For this example it is important to note the classes that have transferred in as generic
“1000” or “2000” classes. When a class transfers in as “1000,” “2000,” “3000,” or
“4000” this indicates that the course is not counting as a specific Baylor equivalent
course. However, in many cases the student should pursue course equivalency approval
or a petition to gain credit for specific course requirements. The courses above are
counting as credit but are not meeting any specific requirements – they are only counting
as electives, which may or may not be needed.

In particular, the classes above that should stick out are ART 1000, ENG 2000, and MTH
1000. All of these classes could potentially count for specific Baylor classes such as
ART 1301, ENG 2301, and MTH 1304. If a student does not petition to gain credit for
these classes, he/she will lose this potential credit towards a course requirement. Of
course, not all course equivalency requests and petitions will be approved, but many
times students should make the attempt.




                                            100
Work Not Applicable




Any courses listed in this area are not counting for credit. Failed courses will be listed in
this portion of the audit. Courses without missing grades are also listed in this section.
There may be other instances when courses are listed in this section, but those instances
are uncommon.




See next page for an example of a current student’s audit


                                             101
Example - Work Not Applicable




The above is an example of how failing (F) and “no credit” (NC) grades show up under
the “work not applicable” section of the degree audit. These classes do not count towards
the overall earned hours but they do count towards the GPA hours, unless the class has
been retaken. In the example above the SPA 1401 class has been retaken and the grade
has been replaced. The >X symbol signifies that the failing grade has been replaced with
a new grade.




                                           102
             Table of Contents
Section 5: Programs                            103
Honors College                                 105
BIC Degree Planner                             106
Honors Program Advisement Guidelines           107
Premed/Predent Prerequisite Guidelines         110
Pre-Law Guide                                  111
Pre-Law Timeline                               119
ROTC                                           122
Study Abroad Programs at Baylor University     123
Baylor University Study Abroad Opportunities   124




                                103
 




    104
                                                                        Academic Programs
                                                                       of the Honors College

                                   BIC                                          Honors Program                             University Scholars                                       Great Texts
                                 - - - - - - - - Programs that work with your major - - - - - - - - - -                               - - - - - - Academic Majors (Bachelor of Arts degree) - - - - - -

Brief          The BIC (Baylor Interdisciplinary Core) program           The Honors Program supplements                  Designed for intellectually gifted, highly           The Great Texts Program (GTX)
Description    consists of an alternative core curriculum that           traditional & nontraditional degrees &          motivated students, the University Scholars          is an initiative in which students
of Program     takes the place of Baylor’s traditional general           majors with a focus on classroom                Program allows these students the freedom            will find a sustained curriculum
               studies. BIC is not a major. Students still               discussion, independent research, &             to create an individualized curriculum with          in the greatest works of human
               receive credit hours for Baylor recognized AP,            interdisciplinary approaches to learning.       the help of an adviser. Program                      intellectual and creative
               IB, & dual credit courses completed in high               The hallmark of the program is a thesis,        requirements include a sequence of three             achievement. Baylor offers both
               school, but these do not affect the BIC                   researched during the junior & senior years     Great Texts courses, an independently read           a major and a minor in Great
               curriculum. BIC curriculum consists of five               & defended in spring of the senior year.        list of texts, and a senior thesis. Students         Texts of the Western Tradition,
               sequences which cover the humanities, social              Students work on such projects in               receive a B.A. degree with a major in                and students in Honors & UNSC
               sciences, & physical sciences.                            collaboration with faculty mentors.             University Scholars.                                 Programs take special GTX
                                                                                                                                                                              courses.




       105
Admission      All regularly admitted Baylor students may                All highly qualified and motivated, Baylor-     No required minimum SAT; however,                    No specific requirements for
Requirements   submit an application. Test scores and                    admitted students are invited to apply to the   current scores average above 1400 (M + V).           admission into the program.
               applications are reviewed. A phone interview              program. The average SAT for the 2007-          Online application consists of application           Students who declare a major in
               will be required.                                         2008 entering class was 1350 (M + V).           form, 500-word essay, three letters of               Great Texts are considered
                                                                         Some students with outstanding academic         recommendation*, 1-2 page resumé                     Honors College participants.
                                                                         records are admitted between their              (optional).
                                                                         sophomore and junior years.
                                                                                                                         *(National Merit Finalists not required to
                                                                                                                         submit rec. letters)


                                      Apply online at www.baylor.edu/honors_college. (Complete Honors College common application and then apply to specific programs)

Contact        Dr. Anne-Marie Bowery, Director                           Dr. Andrew Wisely, Director                     Dr. Alden Smith, Director                            Dr. Scott H. Moore, Director
Information                                                              Faculty Assistant Directors:                                                                         Scott_Moore@baylor.edu
               Program Coordinators:                                                                                     Assistant Directors:
                 Dr. Melanie G. Nogalski                                   Dr. Perry Glanzer                              Dr. Susan Colón                                     Advisement:
                 Ms. Hillary A. Train                                      Dr. J. Wesley Null                             Dr. David D. Corey                                  Ms. Michele Anderson,
                                                                         Mrs. Diane Haun, Office Coordinator              Dr. Phillip Donnelly                                  Office Manager
               Ms. Theresa Williams, Office Manager                                                                                                                             Office: 254-710-7251
                                                                         Dr. Al Beck,                                     Dr. Robert Miner
                 Office: 254-710-3981
                                                                          Admissions & Advisement Coordinator            Ms. Doris Kelly, Office Manager                      www.baylor.edu/Great_Texts
               bicadmissions@baylor.edu                                   Albert_Beck@baylor.edu                           Office: 254-710-3744
               www.baylor.edu/bic                                         Office: 254-710-6470
                                                                                                                         University_Scholars@baylor.edu
                                                                         www.baylor.edu/honors_program
                                                                                                                         www.baylor.edu/univ_sch
                                        BIC Degree Planner
     BIC courses are taken in sequence and are only offered in their respective sequence semesters.
      Occasionally, BIC 4389 and BIC 3358 will be offered in the fall semester, as well as the spring.
   Course         Fall                                         Spring
  Numbers         BIC 1212: Examined Life I                    BIC 1324:World Cultures II
                  BIC 1314: World Cultures I                   BIC 1323: World of Rhetoric II (see side bar)
BIC 1212
BIC 1314          BIC 1413: World of Rhetoric I
BIC 1413
BIC 1324
BIC 2334
BIC 2330
BIC 2344          Summer I                                     Summer II
BIC 2340
BIC 3358

BA, BS, BFA,
BSAS,
BSFCS,               Fall                                      Spring
BSW, BBA,
BSEd, BM,         BIC 2334:World Culture III                   BIC 2344: World Cultures IV
BMEd, BSN:        BIC 2330: Social World I                     BIC 2340: Social World II
BIC 1323
                  BIC 2437: Natural World I (see side bar)     BIC 2447: Natural World II (see side bar)
BA, BFA,
BSFCS,
BSW, BBA,
BSEd, BSCS,
BSI, BM,
BMEd, BSN:        Summer I                                     Summer II
BIC 2437
BIC 2447

BA, BSW:
BIC 4374          Fall                                         Spring
BA, BSFCS,                                                     BIC 3358: Examined Life II
BSW:
BIC 4389




                  Summer I                                     Summer II




                  Fall                                         Spring
                  BIC 4374: World Cultures V (see side bar)    BIC 4389: Examined Life III (see side bar)




                  Summer I                                     Summer II



                                                                                               BIC office 5/2009
                                                    106
Here are some general advisement guidelines for Honors Program students:
First-Year Seminars:
Pending seat availability, all incoming Honors students are encouraged to enroll in one of our Honors
First-Year Seminars. These seminars can substitute for other required courses on several degrees.
Two-course requirement:
Generally, Honors Program students should sign up for two Honors classes each semester. (A sample
Honors Four Year Plan is attached.) Because of the size of the incoming class, we may not have enough
seats in Honors classes to allow each of our students to enroll in the two Honors courses, but we always
offer other options for such students to meet their first-semester Honors requirements. We’ll discuss
these options with them during advisement.
Social Science Requirements (BA & BS Degree):
Certain Honors classes (ie., HON 3100, 31010, 3200, 3201) count towards the social science requirement
on the BA and BS degree. These classes are not taken until the end of the sophomore year, at the earliest,
so Honors students should be advised into Social Science classes very carefully. It will be important to
leave room on the degree for these forthcoming Honors classes. Generally, students pursuing a BS should
usually not take any general social-science or history courses during their first year.
Great Texts, GTX 2301.H & 2302.H:
Honors students are required to take two GTX Honors courses as part of their Honors curriculum. GTX
2301 is usually taken during the spring term of the freshman year, and GTX 2302 during the fall term of
the sophomore year. These Honors courses are offered only during these particular semesters, so, for
example, if a student fails to take Honors GTX 2301 during the spring of his freshman year, she will have
to wait until the spring of her sophomore year to take the class. GTX 2301 is not a prerequisite for GTX
2302, but is preferred that the student first take GTX 2301. The first GTX course meets the non-British
literature requirement for the BA and BS degree.
Colloquium, HON 3200 & 3201:
This series of book discussions meet six times per semester, usually in small groups of 10-15, to discuss
readings selected by Baylor professors and community leaders. Students choose which books to read off
of a ballot of available books. The two required Colloquium courses introduce Honors Program students
to a variety of issues, historic or contemporary, and to the unique perspectives of scholarly disciplines
outside of their major. Students in certain majors need to take only one Colloquium class; an Honors
Program Director must verify and approve this one-course modification.
Independent Readings, HON 3100 & 3101:
During the junior year Honors Program students undertake two sections of Independent Readings in
order to explore specific topics with the guidance of a faculty mentor. These reading courses enable the
student to define an area of research interest that will become the basis for the Honors thesis. Reading
courses can be taken sequentially or concurrently. Students doing a lab-based thesis should take the
courses sequentially, and they may begin them during the sophomore year when approved by an Honors
Program advisor. A letter grade is assigned for both hours of Independent Readings.
Thesis Hours, HON 4177, 4178, 4187, 4188:
Honors students are awarded a total of four credit hours for finishing the thesis. Credit for these four
classes is awarded retroactively once the thesis has been successfully defended before a faculty
committee. Students generally sign up for one or two thesis hours during the penultimate semester and
the remaining thesis hours during their final semester at Baylor. Instead of a letter grade, students are
awarded “credit” or “no credit” based upon the evaluation of the faculty committee.




                                                    107                                Updated: Al Beck 5/8/2009
Dropping the Honors Program:
Students who drop the Honors Program will not be automatically dropped from their Honors courses,
including the upper-level HON classes. Students must complete the requirements for their current
Honors classes or make any change-of-schedule request separately. If the student has an incomplete
in any HON 3100/3101 course, he must make arrangements with the relevant professor to have a letter
grade assigned for the work; otherwise, the incomplete will automatically convert to an “F” before
graduation. Students who drop the Honors Program also forfeit their eligibility for a spot in the
Honors Residential College unless they are in another Honors College Program.




Typical Honors Curriculum:

                                     Fall Term                             Spring Term

                                                                      GTX 2301: Intellectual
                            FYS 1399*: First-Year Seminar
                                                                     Tradition of the Ancient
                                (Honors), if possible
           First Year                                                   World (Honors)
            of Study
                               Additional Honors unit**              Additional Honors unit

                           GTX 2302: Medieval Intellectual
                                                                    HON 3200: Colloquium I
            Second              Tradition (Honors)
            Year of
             Study
                                Additional Honors unit               Additional Honors unit

                                                                      HON 3100 and 3101#:
                              HON 3201: Colloquium II               Independent Readings &
             Third
                                                                           Research
            Year of
            Study
                                Additional Honors unit               Additional Honors unit

                              HON 4177 (and optionally,           HON 4178: Honors Thesis II
            Fourth          4178): Honors Thesis I (and II)      (if not completed in fall term)
            Year of
            Study                                                    HON 4187 and 4188:
                              Additional Honors unit
                                                                    Honors Thesis III and IV


       Notes:
       *        Incoming Honors students for whom an FYS 1399 section is unavailable or inadvisable may
                meet this requirement by completing some other Honors course (designated or, if
                necessary, by contract).

       **       Additional Honors Units are usually earned through the completion of an Honors class
                or an Honors course contract in a regular class. There are also alternative means of
                satisfying these Additional Honors units that may be available to an Honors student.
       #        Some Honors juniors, especially in the natural and social sciences, will be advised to
                complete Honors 3100 (Independent Readings I) during the fall of the junior year and
                Honors 3101 (Independent Readings II) during the following spring, instead of enrolling
                for them concurrently in the spring, as shown above.




                                                     108                                 Updated: Al Beck 5/8/2009
Sample University Scholars Honors Curriculum:
                                    Fall Term                        Spring Term
                              GTX 2301: Intellectual              GTX 2302: Medieval
            First             Tradition of the Ancient           Intellectual Tradition
            Year                  World (UNSC)                          (UNSC)
              of              Additional Honors unit:
            Study                possibly FYS 1399              Additional Honors unit
                                     (Honors)
            Secon              Additional Honors unit           HON 3201: Colloquium
            d Year
              of
            Study              Additional Honors unit           Additional Honors unit

                              (HON 3201: Colloquium,
            Third                                              HON 3101: Independent
                               if not completed in 2nd
            Year                                                Readings & Research
                                        year)
              of
            Study              Additional Honors unit           Additional Honors unit

                                                              HON 4178: Honors Thesis
                             HON 4177 (and optionally,
            Fourt                                                          II
                              4178): Honors Thesis I
            h Year                                             (if not completed in fall
                                     (and II)
              of                                                         term)
            Study              Additional Honors                 HON 4187 and 4188:
                                      unit                    Honors Thesis III and IV



Sample BIC Honors Curriculum
                                    Fall Term                        Spring Term
                                      BIC 1314                         BIC 1324
            First             (with group contract for         (with group contract for
            Year                  Honors credit)                   Honors credit)
              of
            Study                                               Additional Honors unit

                                     BIC 2334
                              (with group contract for         HON 3200: Colloquium I
                                  Honors credit)
            Secon
                                     BIC 2330                          BIC 2344
            d Year
                              (with group contract for         (with group contract for
              of
                                  Honors credit)                   Honors credit)
            Study
                                                                      BIC 2340
                                                               (with group contract for
                                                                   Honors credit)
                                                              HON 3100 and 3101#:
                          HON 3201: Colloquium II           Independent Readings &
       Third Year                                                   Research
        of Study
                           Additional Honors unit            Additional Honors unit

                          HON 4177 (and optionally,        HON 4178: Honors Thesis II
         Fourth         4178): Honors Thesis I (and II)   (if not completed in fall term)
         Year of
         Study                                               HON 4187 and 4188:
                         Additional Honors unit
                                                            Honors Thesis III and IV



                                                 109                          Updated: Al Beck 5/8/2009
                                     Basic Premed/Predent Prerequisite Guidelines*
      Biology (BIO)              Chemistry (CHE)                Physics (PHY)                        Math (MTH)**                English (ENG)

      1305 &1105 (lab)           1301 &1302                     1408 & 1409                          1304 and/or 1321            1302
      1306 & 1106 (lab)          1316 (lab)                     Or: 1420 & 1430                                                  1304     Or:   3300
                                 3331 & 3332
                                 3238 (lab)

      Choice of 2 additional BIO courses for Science majors (see prehealth office for suggested courses to fulfill this requirement)



      *NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to meet with an advisor in the prehealth office to determine specific courses for professional school
      admissions and to verify that the sequencing of coursework is appropriate for individual programs. This handout only serves as a general




110
      guide on which to build the foundation for academic requirements. Professional schools may accept alternate courses and/or change
      prerequisites at any time.
      **Although dental schools do not have a math requirement, math is a prerequisite for some required coursework.

      The prerequisite requirements for PreVet, PreOpt, PrePT, PreOT, PrePharm, PrePA, and PreDental Hygiene programs
      will vary. Students in these areas are urged to visit the prehealth office for course lists.
      Baylor Prehealth Office: BSB, B.111

      Email for Appointment: Linda_B_Haynes@baylor.edu (Students with 45 HRS .or fewer completed; Premed, Predent, PreVet, PreOpt, PrePT, PreOT,
                                                      PrePharm, PrePA)

                             Nancy_Johnson@baylor.edu (Students with more than 45 HRS. completed; Predental Hygiene students, or to inquire about
                                                      professional school applications)
                                   Baylor University
                                    Pre-Law Guide

Pre-Law at Baylor is not a major. Rather, it is a pre-professional track available to all
undergraduate students. The American Bar Association (ABA) Preparing for Law School Web
site does not recommend any particular group of majors for students interested in becoming
lawyers. Rather, experts recommend maximizing your education by taking the most rigorous and
demanding classes possible. For detailed recommendations on each stage of pre-law preparation,
read the Pre-Law Timeline provided with this document. If you wish to add or delete the pre-law
designation on your student record, please see an advisor in Academic Advisement (freshmen),
CASA (sophomores-seniors in Arts & Sciences), or the primary advisors in other schools and
colleges.

                                     Course Recommendations

Many of the courses below might serve as upper-level electives or general education
requirements. It is essential to consult with your academic advisor before registering for courses
or choosing a major. She or he can advise you best on which courses best fit your degree plan,
goals, and interests. Many of these courses could fall under several different categories.
Please note that this list is not exhaustive and these classes may not be offered each semester.
Also, many courses have prerequisite requirements that must be satisfied in order to register for
them.

Courses which help with LSAT preparation:

    •   MTH 1321 Calculus I.
    •   PHI 1306 Intro to Logic.
    •   PHI 1307 Critical Thinking.

Courses related to specialties of law practice:

There are many areas of practice within the legal profession. For many practice areas, there are
specific undergraduate courses that can help prepare students for the future practice of law. Some
of these are listed below.

Practice Area and Description:             Useful Courses:
Administrative Law: focuses on the         ECO 4317 Economics of Regulation
practices of federal, state or local       ECO 4320 Economics of Government
administrative agencies, and judicial      PSC 4321 Administrative Law
review of agency actions. Some areas of
specialization are energy, immigration,
social security, professional licensing,
and local land use planning.



                                                                              Updated by Charles North 5/2009
                                                 111
Practice Area and Description:               Useful Courses:
Antitrust Law: focuses on the laws           ECO 3306 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
governing the promotion and protection       ECO 4316 Industrial Organization
of competition in national and               ECO 4317 Economics of Regulation
international markets.                       ECO 4319 Game Theory
                                             ECO 4347 Econometrics
Business/Corporate Law: Business             ACC 2303. Financial Accounting
lawyers provide general legal and            ACC 2304. Managerial Accounting
business advice to businesses across a       BL 4303. Employment Law
variety of areas of law, including           ECO 4316. Industrial Organization
contracts, labor and employment,             FIN 3310. Introduction to Financial Management
corporations law, securities regulation,     FIN 4360. Corporate Finance
and more.                                    FIN 4365. Investment Analysis
                                             FIN 4366. Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives
                                             RMI 3305. Fundamentals of Risk Management and Insurance
Constitutional Law: focuses on matters       PSC 2302. American Constitutional Development
arising under constitutional rights,         PSC 4361. American Constitutional Law
including criminal rights, free speech,      PSC 4381. American Constitutional Law
freedom of religion, and due process.        PSC/AMS/REL 3339. Law and Religion in the United States
Criminal Law: focuses on enforcement         PSC 3302. Criminal Justice and Community Law
of the criminal laws and administration      SOC 4352. Criminology
of the criminal justice system. Criminal     SOC 3360. Juvenile Delinquency
prosecutors and defenders handle             SOC 3361. Extreme Deviance
offenses against the state, rather than      CCS 3372. Law, Justice and Community
claims belonging to individuals.
Environmental Law: focuses on                ENV 3300. The Environment and Political Processes
matters related to the environment,          ENV 3306. Conserving Biodiversity
natural resources, and energy.               ENV 3333. Watershed Assessment
                                             ENV 4335. Applied Environmental Analysis
                                             ENV 4307. Environmental Law
                                             ENV/ECO 4323. The Environment and Economic Analysis
Estate Planning: assists in long-term        ACC 4377. Personal and Business Tax Planning
financial planning, with a focus on          FIN 3310. Introduction to Financial Management
transmission of assets at death, provision   FIN 4365. Investment Analysis
of care for minor children after death of    FSP 3301. Personal Finance
parents, and creation of living trusts.      FSP 3367. Introduction to Personal Financial Planning
Family Law: handles matters related to       SOC 3330. Women in American Society
the family, such as in areas such as         SOC 3355/ECO 4355. Introduction to the Economics of
adoption, divorce, custody, military law,     Poverty and Discrimination
alternative families, and elder law.         SOC 3311. Race, Class, and Gender
International Law: provides advice to        BL 4398. International Law
clients on matters relating to               ECO/INB 3331. International Economics
international treaties, acquisitions, and    ECO 4338. Economic Systems of the World
trade activities.                            PSC 4305. International Law
Patent Law: assists developers of new        A general background in engineering is exceptionally valuable
technology in protecting intellectual         in the practice of patent law.
property rights in their inventions.




                                                                                  Updated by Charles North 5/2009
                                                    112
Practice Area and Description:             Useful Courses:
Real Estate Law: provides advice in        ACC 2303. Financial Accounting
connection with real estate transactions   ACC 2304. Managerial Accounting
ranging from residential to high-end       FIN 3310. Introduction to Financial Management
commercial, including eminent domain       FIN 4360. Corporate Finance
laws.                                      Any RE (Real Estate) courses
Tax Law: provides advice on tax            A major in accounting with an emphasis on tax accounting
consequences of a wide variety of           would be very valuable, though not necessary.
activities.

Courses which help prepare for law school and the practice of law:

The American Bar Association recognizes a number of key values and skills as important for
lawyers. As you explore whether law may be a good fit for you, you may want to consider taking
some of the courses below that directly relate to these skill sets and values.

Analytic / Problem Solving Skills. Students should seek courses and other experiences that will
engage them in critical thinking about important issues, that will engender in them tolerance for
uncertainty, and that will give them experiences in structuring and evaluating arguments for and
against propositions that are susceptible to reasoned debate. Students also should seek courses
and other experiences that require them to apply previously developed principles or theories to
new situations, and that demand that they develop solutions to new problems.

    •   Courses in Philosophy, such as
        ⋅ PHI 1321. Intro to Philosophy.
        ⋅ PHI 2310. Law, Science, and Society
        ⋅ PHI 2370. Business Ethics
        ⋅ PHI 3301. Moral Philosophy.
        ⋅ PHI 4318. Philosophy of Law
        ⋅ PHI 4360. Contemporary Ethical Theory
        ⋅ PHI 4361. Social Philosophy
    •   Courses in Mathematics, beginning with MTH 1321 (Calculus I)
    •   Courses in Physics, beginning with PHY 1408(General Physics for Natural and
        Behavioral Sciences I) or PHY1420 (General Physics I)
    •   Courses in Statistics and Probability, beginning with STA 1380, 2381, or 3381.

Critical Reading. Preparation for legal education should include substantial experience at close
reading and critical analysis of complex textual materials, for much of what law students and
attorneys do involves careful reading. Law school should not be the first time that a student has
been rigorously engaged in the enterprise of carefully reading and understanding, and critically
analyzing, complex written material of substantial length.

    •   Any 2000-level course in ENG or GTX
    •   GKC 1301-2320. Can be used to fulfill the language requirement in many cases
    •   LAT 1301-2320. Can be used to fulfill the language requirement in many cases
    •   Any 3000- or 4000-level course in the Humanities or Social Sciences

                                                                               Updated by Charles North 5/2009
                                                  113
Writing and Research Skills. Students should acquire and refine fundamental writing skills
before entering law school. Those preparing for legal education should seek as many experiences
as possible that will require rigorous and analytical writing, including preparing original pieces
of substantial length and revising written work in response to constructive criticism. Those
wishing to prepare for legal education should select courses and seek experiences that will
require them to plan a research strategy, to undertake substantial library research, and to analyze,
organize and present a reasonably large amount of material.

   •   ENG 3303. Advanced Expository Writing
   •   ENG 4309. Advanced Argumentative and Persuasive Writing
   •   Any other 3000- or 4000-level course in the Humanities or Social Sciences requiring a
       substantial research paper.
   •   Preparation of a thesis as part of the Honors, University Scholars, or Baylor Business
       Fellows programs (see information below)

Oral Communication/ Listening Abilities. The abilities to speak clearly and persuasively and to
listen effectively are essential to success in law school and the practice of law. Before coming to
law school, individuals should seek to develop their basic speaking and listening skills, such as
by engaging in debate, making formal presentations in class, or speaking before groups in
school, the community, or the workplace.

   •   CSS 1304. Argumentation and Debate.
   •   CSS 3305. Advanced Public Speaking
   •   CSS 3307. Legal Communication
   •   CSS 3312. Non-Verbal Communication
   •   CSS 3316. Persuasion and Communication
   •   HIS 2389. Introduction to Model Organization of American States
   •   HIS 4389. Advanced Model Organization of American States

Public Service and Promotion of Justice. Members of the legal profession should be dedicated
both to the objectives of serving others honestly, competently, and responsibly, and to the goals
of improving fairness and the quality of justice in the legal system.
    • CCS 1102. Community Law Enforcement. Students in the College of Art & Sciences can
        petition this to count for an HP
    • CCS 3300. Citizenship/Community Service Learning. Includes an internship in the legal
        community and provides students with solid law school preparation, including writing the
        statement of purpose




                                                                             Updated by Charles North 5/2009
                                                114
Courses that may enhance knowledge useful for the practice of law: Students entering the
law profession should aim to obtain a broad understanding of history, particularly American
history, and the various factors (social, political, economic, and cultural) that have influenced the
development of the pluralistic society that presently exists in the United States. As law has
become more woven into the fabric of our society, and as that society is increasingly influenced
by disparate national and global forces, a broad knowledge base is essential for success in law
school and for competence in the legal profession. Some additional courses that can help develop
such knowledge are:

   •   ECO 4318. Law and Economics
   •   HIS 2365. The United States to 1877
   •   HIS 2366. The United States since 1877
   •   HIS 3371: History of Black Americans
   •   HIS 4357: Inter-American Relations
   •   HIS 4363: American Revolution and Constitution
   •   HIS 4365: The Early Republic, 1789-1860
   •   HIS 4368: Civil War and Reconstruction
   •   HIS 4371: The United States, 1877-1920
   •   HIS 4374: United States since 1920
   •   HIS 4375: The American Civil Rights Movement
   •   HIS 4377: History of American Women, 1600-1865
   •   HIS 4378: History of American Women since 1865
   •   PSC 1305. American National Government
   •   PSC 1306. American State and Local Government
   •   SOC 3322. Urban Sociology
   •   SOC 4322. Social Stratification




                                                                             Updated by Charles North 5/2009
                                                 115
                   Special Academic Programs and Unique Opportunities

Baylor Business Fellows Program: The Baylor Business Fellows major is a program within the
Hankamer School of Business targeted at students who demonstrate high intellectual standing
and wish to maximize their time as a student to learn what will best benefit them in the future.
Baylor Business Fellows is a special degree program offered to the best Baylor students, giving
them the flexibility to reach all their educational goals by allowing them to choose the pieces that
compose their degree. Admission to Baylor Business Fellows is competitive and is separate from
and subsequent to admission to Baylor University.

The Honors Program in the Honors College allows students to maximize their education along
the lines recommended by the ABA. Because of the emphasis on critical thinking, research, and
writing, the Honors Program may be a good option for students wishing to pursue a career in
law. In particular, the thesis component helps students have the experience of rigorous and
analytical writing, including preparing original pieces of substantial length and revising written
work in response to constructive criticism. Good lawyers have the ability to make persuasive
arguments within complex circumstances, and the thesis is an opportunity to bring together a
great deal of information. The Honors Program also emphasizes the broad range of disciplines,
fields, and practices. Law, like other professions, is an interdisciplinary practice, for which the
best preparation is an interdisciplinary curriculum that helps future lawyers see the connections
between the various subject areas.

Pre-Law Economics Track: The economics major provides a sequence of courses of particular
interest for students interested in pre-law, including ECO 4316 (Industrial Organization), ECO
4317 (Economics of Regulation), ECO 4318 (Law and Economics), ECO 4319 (Game Theory),
ECO 4320 (The Economics of Government), and ECO 4322 (Forensic Economics).

Pre-Law Philosophy Track: The philosophy department has a track for Philosophy majors
interested in pre-law. Please contact either advisor in Philosophy if you are interested.

The University Scholars Program gives the student excellent pre-law preparation because all
students must read widely on their own outside of the course requirements with a view to
preparation for an exit interview in the junior year of study. Moreover, because the program
gives each student an extremely flexible schedule, students can take courses from each of the
areas outlined in this booklet developing a unique, individualized course of study as excellent
preparation for law school.




                                                                            Updated by Charles North 5/2009
                                                116
Academic Contacts/Advisors with Pre-Law Expertise

These faculty and staff members are available for discussions about majors and your interest in
pursuing law as a potential career.

Business School: Rosanne_Fuller@baylor.edu (HSB 106)

Classics: Timothy_Heckenlively@baylor.edu (MH 203.7).

Communication Studies: William_English@baylor.edu (CC 156), Scott_Varda@baylor.edu
(CC 147), Matt_Gerber@baylor.edu or David_Schlueter@baylor.edu (CC 155)

College of Arts & Sciences: Sinda_Vanderpool@baylor.edu (PN 109)

Economics: Charles_North@baylor.edu (HSB 366)

Environmental Science: Julie_King1@baylor.edu (Goebel 109)

History: Joan_Supplee@baylor.edu (TB 310)

Honors Program: Albert_Beck@baylor.edu (MH 203.3)

Philosophy: Francis_Beckwith@baylor.edu (MH 220) or Michael_Beaty@baylor.edu (MH 217)

Political Science: Thomas_Myers@baylor.edu (B 301AB)

Service Learning: Thomas_Myers@baylor.edu (B 301AB)

Sociology: Randy_Jacobs@baylor.edu (B 319B)

University Scholars Contact: Alden_Smith@baylor.edu (MH 203.7)

All Majors: Sinda_Vanderpool@baylor.edu (PN 109); Joyce_Miller@baylor.edu (SR 114);
Charles_North@baylor.edu (HSB 366)




                                                                          Updated by Charles North 5/2009
                                               117
Other Resources

Phi Alpha Delta (Baylor’s pre-law society) — This organization 1) hosts speakers from
various fields of law who share their insights, 2) provides networking opportunities with
professionals, students and professors, and 3) provides a variety of pre-law related resources
including volunteer opportunities, job and internship listings, magazine articles, and Law School
Admission Test information. For more information, contact Matt_Howard@baylor.edu.

Law School Admission Council Online — Information on the LSAT and law school
admissions, including online registration and links to home pages of law schools
http://www.lsac.org/

Boston College Law School Locator — Lists the median LSAT scores and GPAs of the
entering first year class. Helps students identify chances of admission.
http://www.bc.edu/offices/careers/gradschool/law/lawlocator/

CLEO (Council on Legal Education Opportunity).
http://www.cleoscholars.com/all_about_cleo/

Overview of Pre-Law Student Services – Compiled by students at the University of Texas, it
includes links to undergraduate-friendly websites with information on the LSAT, application
process, school rankings, and more.
http://www.ilrg.com/pre-law.html



For general information on pre-law at Baylor or to make comments or suggestions, please
contact Sinda_Vanderpool@baylor.edu or Tiffany_Hogue@baylor.edu.




Revised May 2009.




                                                                           Updated by Charles North 5/2009
                                               118
                                  Baylor University
                                  Pre-Law Timeline

Summer before your Freshman Year
    •   Read Baylor University’s Pre-Law Guide
    •   Attend the Pre-Law session at Summer Orientation
    •   Register for rigorous, but appropriate courses
    •   If appropriate, consider participating in one of the Honors College programs.
    •   Talk to your advisor about declaring Pre-Law on your degree plan and about courses that
        will help you prepare for the LSAT and for law school. We strongly advise taking PHI
        1306: Introduction to Logic before the end of your junior year. Remember: Pre-Law is
        not a major, but rather a pre-professional track.

Freshman Year
    •   Focus on your grades. It is difficult to get into law school if you perform poorly during
        any academic year.
    •   Law schools do not require a particular major, so select a major in which you are deeply
        interested.
    •   Consider joining Phi Alpha Delta, Baylor’s pre-law fraternity (open to all majors).

Sophomore Year
    •   Continue to focus on your grades. Pay particular attention to all courses in your major.
    •   Explore the legal field – conduct informational interviews, volunteer or intern in different
        legal settings.
    •   Register for several challenging, seminar-style classes for your junior year. Also register
        for PHI 1306 if you haven’t yet taken it (you want to take it before you start studying for
        the LSAT).
    •   Talk with you advisor about additional course selections to round out your academic
        profile.

Fall of Junior Year
    •   Continue to focus on your grades. Since most students apply for law school in the fall of
        their senior year, your law school applications will, most likely, only include grades
        through the end of your junior year.
    •   Begin exploring the Law School Admissions Council website (www.lsac.org).

Spring of Junior Year
•   •   Begin thinking of possible recommenders and speak with them regarding your plans for
        law school.
•   •   Establish your criteria for what you want in a law school and begin researching schools
        (The Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools is a terrific resource available at
        http://officialguide.lsac.org/ ).


    •   Register early for the June LSAT to ensure a seat in your preferred location.
    •   We strongly advise taking an LSAT prep course.
6/5/2009 
                                                119
May
   •   Increase intensity of LSAT preparation as soon as you are finished with your final exams.
       During the month before the LSAT, you should be studying 3-4 hours per day.


June
   •   Take the LSAT.
   •   Continue researching schools.

July
   •   Receive and evaluate your LSAT score. If you’re not satisfied with it, explore whether
       you should retake the exam in October.
   •   Plug your undergraduate GPA and LSAT score into the LSAC search tool
       (http://officialguide.lsac.org/UGPASearch/Search3.aspx?SidString=) to help you
       determine where to apply.
   •   Begin working on your personal statement.

August
   •   If taking the October LSAT, begin (or continue) studying for the exam and register early
       to ensure a seat.
   •   Continue revising your personal statement and resume and submit for critique as needed.
       Try to have these completed by summer’s end.
   •   Refine your list of schools and try to finalize it by summer’s end.
   •   Register for the LSDAS. Be sure to order enough score reports for as many schools as
       you are applying to (minus the one report you receive free with registration).
   •   Order the LSACD or LSACD on the Web software to do applications or request paper
       applications from schools individually.
   •   Finalize your list of recommenders and compile information packets for them.

September of Senior Year
   •   Meet with those you have chosen as recommenders to ask for letters of recommendation.
       Be sure to have all paperwork prepared to give to them.
   •   Request transcripts from all undergraduate colleges to be sent to LSDAS.

   •   Begin working on application forms.
   •   Read applications carefully to determine whether you will have to write additional
       essays. If so, begin work on these immediately and have them critiqued as needed.
   •   Consider attending the Texas Law School Forum that takes place either later this month
       or in October (see www.lsac.org for details).

October
   •   Take the LSAT, for those taking the October exam.
6/5/2009 
                                              120
    •   Continue work on applications, including additional essays.

    •   Send a handwritten “Thank You” note to your recommenders. This will serve as a
        reminder to those who have not already written your letter and an appropriate gesture to
        those who have. Follow up with recommenders as needed to ensure timely receipt of
        letters.

November
    •   For those who took the October LSAT, receive and evaluate LSAT scores. Adjust your
        list of schools if necessary.
    •   Finalize all application forms, resumes, and essays for admission.
    •   Follow up with recommenders to ensure that letters have been mailed.
    •   Submit applications either by mail or online. If submitting online, be sure to mail any
        supplementary forms to the law school that could not be transmitted online. If using the
        mail, make a copy of your entire application package and send the package certified mail,
        return receipt requested so that you have proof of delivery and signature confirmation.
        Or, you may use a private carrier such as FedEx or UPS.

December
    •   December 1- Preferred application deadline
    •   Begin investigating financial aid requirements at the schools to which you are applying.
        Find out about any paperwork that you will need to submit.
    •   Early action and Early decision applicants start receiving admission notifications.

January/February
    •   Check to ensure that your application was received and that your file is complete.
    •   Follow up with the appropriate persons regarding any parts of your application that have
        not been received.
    •   Have your parents do their taxes as soon as possible so that you can complete the FAFSA
        and all other financial aid paperwork.
March
    •   Begin receiving admission and financial aid award notifications from schools and
        weighing admission offers.
April/May
    •   Decide on which school to attend and submit your position deposit.




 




6/5/2009 
                                               121
                                     ROTC
Baylor University now has affiliation with both the US Air Force and the US Army for
the The Reserve Officer Training Corps. Students who enter the program go on to serve
in the military following college. Many students in the ROTC program receive financial
support for their involvement.


Advising Air Force ROTC Students

Air Force ROTC students must enroll in A S 1101, Foundations of Air Force I, AND A S
1111, Leadership Laboratory. Each course represents 1 hour of credit and each meets on
Wednesday. Leadership Laboratory is Wednesday from 4-5:50. Students who enroll in
ROTC get 1 hour of HP credit toward their degree.

For more information, contact Colonel Dan Leonard or Betty Mullins at x3513.


Advising Army ROTC Students

Army ROTC students must enroll in MILS 1101, Introduction to Leadership I, AND
MILS 1111, Leadership Lab I. Each course represents 1 hours of credit and each meets
once a week. MILS 1101 meets on Tuesday and MILS 1111 meets on Thursday from
3:30-5:20. Students who enroll in ROTC get 1 hour of HP credit toward their degree.

For more information, contact Command Sergeant Major Fidel Gomez at
Fidel_Gomez@baylor.edu. or Lieutenant Colonel John Agor at John_Agor@baylor.edu.



Students who want to pursue scholarships offered by the Baylor ROTC program should
contact the departments. The ROTC web pages are also a good source of reference.




                                                                 Updated by Judy McClain 5/2009
                                          122
                     Study Abroad Programs at Baylor University


There are two kinds of study abroad programs at Baylor:

       Baylor Abroad (also called group study abroad)—programs that take Baylor professors
       along to teach classes and provide guidance for students.

       Exchange/Affiliate programs—these programs send students to universities with whom
       we have standing agreements. No Baylor professors travel along. However, each of the
       programs does have a Baylor professor who is our on-campus contact person. These
       professors can help students answer critical questions prior to travel and are great
       resources even while the students are away.



Baylor Abroad is available for summer or a full semester. Classes are taught in English, unless
they are foreign language classes. They normally have a program cost that covers lodging, some
meals and tickets/passes, and some travel (air fare is often listed separately); tuition is the same
for classes taught here on campus. Baylor Abroad programs (especially those in the summer)
will provide students with a reading list well in advance of travel so that students may begin
preparing long reading assignments, which will allow more time to sight-see and learn about
other cultures while abroad.

Exchange/Affiliate programs are available for summer, semester, and even an entire year.
Classes are usually taught in English, but if not, the language of instruction is listed on the web
page for that program. The web pages for these programs normally list Baylor tuition and then
housing costs to be paid to the host university. Air fare and all other types of expenses will be
separate.

Students are required to buy Travel-Abroad Health Insurance for all of these trips, and they are
always encouraged to leave copies of important documents with their parents in case of an
emergency.

For more information, see the Study Abroad website.




                                                                      Information provided by Natalie Terry, 2009
                                                 123
BAYLOR UNIVERSITY
STUDY ABROAD OPPORTUNITIES


Argentina:    Univ. de Cordoba (Cordoba)      Semester (E)         Spanish (taught in Spanish)
              Univ. de Cuyo (Mendoza)         Summer I (G)         Spanish & HHP
                                              Sum & Semester (E)   (taught in Spanish)

Australia:    Brisbane                        Fall only (G)        5-wk education internship
              Swinburne Univ. (Swinburne)     Semester (E)         All majors
              Tasmania (U. of Tasmania)       Semester (A)         All majors

Austria:      Baylor in Austria               Summer II (G)        All majors

Belize:       Baylor in Belize                Summer I (G)         Environmental & Int’l Studies

Brazil:       Baylor in Brazil                Summer I (G)         All majors
              Minas Gerais (UFMG)             Summer II (E)        Portuguese
                                              Semester (E)         All majors (taught in Portuguese)

Canada:       Montreal (HEC)                  Semester (E)         Business

China:        Baylor in China                 Summer I (G)         Chinese
              Technology & Entre.             Summer II (G)        Entre, Comp Sci, Engin.
              in Shanghai
              Tsinghua Univ. (Beijing)        Semester (E)         Asian studies and Chinese
              Hong Kong (HK Baptist Univ.)    Summer I (E)         Advanced business courses
                                              Semester (E)         All majors

Costa Rica:   Baylor in Costa Rica (San Jose) Summer I (G)         All majors, Education

Dominican
 Republic:    Baylor in Dominican Republic Summer I (G)            Business courses/Spanish 3311

Egypt:        American Univ. in Cairo         Semester (A)         All majors

Guatemala:    Anthropology Field School       Summer II (G)        Anthropology
              in Guatemala

England:      Baylor in England               Summer II (G)        Communication Studies
              Baylor in Great Britain         Summer II (G)        All majors
              Baylor in Oxford                Summer II (G)        All majors
              Edge Hill Univ. (Omskirk)       Semester (G)         Education
              Kingston-upon-Thames            4 weeks only (G)     Student teaching
              London/FIE (London)             Fall Semester (G)    All majors
              Middlesex Univ. (London)        Semester (E)         All majors
              Queen Mary (London)             Semester (A)         All majors
              Great Britain                   Summer II (G)        Women’s Health

France:       Paris & Burgundy                Summer I (G)         French
              ISC (Paris)                     Sum & Semester (E)   French/Business
              Universite de Caen (Normandy)   Semester (E)         French/Business
              Paris (CUPA)                    Semester (E)         All majors (taught in French)
              Paris Graduate School of MGT    Summer (E)           Business
                                              Semester (E)         Business

                                                        124
Germany:        Baylor in Germany (Dresden) Summer II (G)                   German
                Albert Ludwigs Univ.(Freiburg) Semester (E)                 All majors (taught in German)
                Cologne Business School        Summer II (E)                German/Business
                                               Semester (E)                 German/Business

Italy:          Baylor in Italy                   Summer II (G)             All majors
                Florence Univ. of the Arts        Sum & Semester (A)        All majors
                John Cabot Univ. (Rome)           Sum & Semester (A)        All majors
                MCAS (Sicily)                     Sum & Semester (A)        All majors

Japan:          Hosei Univ. (Tokyo)               Semester (E)              All majors
                Seinan Gakuin (Fukuoka)           Semester (E)              All majors

Korea:          Yonsei Univ. (Seoul)              Semester (E)              All majors

Mexico:         Baylor in Mexico                  Summer I (G)              Spanish
                Monterrey TEC Univ.               Sum I & Semester (A)      All majors

Netherlands: Baylor in Maastricht                 Summer (G)                All majors
                                                  Semester (G)              All majors

Russia:         Voronezh State Univ.              Summer (E)                Slavic & East European studies
                                                  Semester (E)              Slavic & East European studies

Scotland:       Univ. of Edinburgh                Semester (A)              All majors
                Univ. of Dundee                   Semester (A)              All majors
                Baylor in St. Andrews             Spring Semester (G)       Phil & Rel, All majors

South Africa: Rhodes Univ. (Grahamstown)          Semester (E)              All majors

Spain:          Baylor in Madrid                  Summer I (G)              Spanish
                Baylor in Spain (Denia)           Summer II (G)             Spanish
                Saint Louis Univ. (Madrid)        Sum & Semester (A)        All majors
                Univ. de Cantabria (Cantabria)    Semester (E)              Spanish (taught in Spanish)

Sweden:         JIBS (Jonkoping)                  Semester (E)              Business

Thailand:       Baylor in Thailand                Interim (January)         All majors

Turkey:         Bogazici Univ. (Istanbul)         Semester (E)              All majors

Various European
Countries:   MAUI-Utrecht Network                 Semester (E)              All majors
             European Business Seminar            Summer I (G)              Business/marketing
             European Entrepreneurship            Summer I (G)              Business/marketing
             Int’l Studies in FCS                 Summer I (G)              Family Consumer Science


G-Group study abroad program (travel with other Baylor students & Baylor professor(s))
E-Exchange program (travel individually/courses taught at exchange university/reciprocal balance exists)
A-Affiliate program (travel individually/courses taught at affiliate university)

**If you are interested in a Group Study Abroad Program, contact the Faculty Program Director.


For more information: Baylor Study Abroad, Poage Library 204, (254) 710-4824, www.baylor.edu/study_abroad
                              or e-mail us at studyabroadinterest@baylor.edu


                                                             125
                                                                                                 Updated Spr 09 Katie Erickson
 




    126
                 Table of Contents
Section 6: Campus Resources                           127
Paul L. Foster Success Center                         129
Academic Support Programs                             130
Tutor Scheduling – How It Works                       131
Departmental Tutoring                                 132
Academic Referral System                              134
Office of Access and Learning Accommodations (OALA)   135
Career Counseling Process                             136
Student Guide to Baylor Career Services               137
Spiritual Life                                        138
Health Services                                       139
Health Services Contact Information                   140




                                127
 




    128
129
                                                                                                               

•   Academic Mentoring – Confer once weekly for about 15-20 minutes with a trained graduate student who
    can alert you to effective ways of managing time, preparing for tests, developing proven learning
    strategies, and staying focused. Contact Trish Baum, Resources Coordinator, 254-710-8771.

•   Workshops and Seminars – Register for an EDP 1101 Workshop and earn one elective hour of credit by
    completing a focused “mini-course” on an academic topic such as preparing for tests, developing proven
    academic strategies, getting organized, managing heavy reading assignments, identifying a major and
    potential career, succeeding in a math course, and preparing for final exams.

•   Individual Academic Counseling – Develop an individualized plan for implementing effective academic
    strategies resulting in better grades! Contact Trish Baum, Resources Coordinator, 254-710-8771.

•   EDC 1200 – Take a two credit hour course that introduces highly effective strategies for college
    academics (reading, note taking, test preparation, time management, Baylor information, etc.) and have
    multiple opportunities to implement these strategies with your regular courses throughout the semester.

•   Supplemental Instruction – If you are in a class where SI is offered, take advantage of it! A trained
    student who has already been successful in the course leads regularly scheduled, weekly study sessions
    that integrate what to learn with how to learn it. Available to all in the class.   (5/2008) 




                                                       130
                                    Tutor Scheduling: How It Works

All appointments are filled on a first come, first served basis.

Schedule tutoring appointments online using BearWeb:

The online scheduling tool will allow you to schedule and view a maximum of three
weeks of appointments. At the beginning of each new week, you can schedule a
tutoring session for an additional week.

You will be able to view your appointment times, receive e-mail reminders about your
next scheduled appointment, and schedule additional appointments with tutors as
needed on BearWeb.

Online Tutoring Scheduler instructions:
• Log in to BearWeb
• Click on Student & Financial Aid
• Click on Student Records
• Finally, click on the link for Paul Foster Success Center Tutoring

Suspended Use of the Online Tutoring Scheduler

Unfortunately, some students will fail to keep or neglect to cancel scheduled
appointments. After the second missed appointment, a student may lose access to the
online scheduling service. A student whose access to the online tutoring scheduler has
been suspended will be required to explain the missed appointments to the Tutoring
Coordinator and request consideration for having online services restored.

Walk-in Appointments:

To schedule a same-day, walk-in appointment, come to the Tutoring Center beginning
at 1:00 PM. Different courses are tutored each day; if a tutor is available, we will
schedule your session with a tutor for later that same day. If a tutor is unavailable, we
will suggest a day to return with your request or you can click here for a list of subjects
that are available each day for tutoring.

For current information:

http://www.baylor.edu/support_programs/index.php?id=33852




 


Baylor > Office of Academic Support Programs > Tutoring > Success Center Tutoring > How It Works
 
                                                                 131
                                  Departmental Tutoring
Accounting & Business Law
A list of tutors is available in the department office.
710-3536

Biology
Tutoring information is posted in the Biology department office. Tutoring is also available
through the Beta Beta Beta Honors Society.
710-2911

Chemistry and Biochemistry
A list of graduate student tutors is available in the department office. These tutors charge a fee.
710-3311

Classics
A student worker tutor is available.
710-1399 or your professor

Computer Science
Tutoring is available Mondays in Room 112 from 7-9 p.m.
710-3876 or your professor

English
The Writing Center
710-4849

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate
A list of tutors is available in the department office for students in introductory classes. Tutoring
for other classes is usually arranged through professors.
710-2263

Geology
Graduate teaching assistants are available for informal tutoring.
710-2361 or your professor

Grammar Lab
Hankamer Rm. 401, Normal hours of operation are Monday through Friday from 8:00 AM to
5:00 PM. Please contact Dr. Randy Waller if you have questions about the availability of the lab
or the student worker schedule.

History
Graduate teaching assistants are available for informal tutoring; a few classes are assigned
graduate students as tutors.
710-2667 or your professor



                                           Baylor > Office of Academic Support Programs > Tutoring > Departmental Tutoring
                                                    132                                                                   
Mathematics
A Math Lab staffed by graduate students is available from 3:00 - 5:00 pm every afternoon and
6:00 - 8:00 pm Monday through Thursday. The department maintains a list of free tutors.
710-3561 or your professor

http://www.baylor.edu/math/index.php?id=54034

Modern Foreign Languages
Student workers are employed as tutors.
710-3711 or your professor

Music
Students should go first to their professor for tutoring options. Graduate students in the META
Lab on the 3rd floor of Moody Library provide basic help. A list of tutors for Music Theory and
Musicianship may be found in Waco Hall East. These tutors charge a fee.

Philosophy
Graduate student tutors are available. Some classes have assigned tutors.

Physics
Graduate students offer tutoring, primarily for Physics 1 and 2. Schedules are posted in the
Physics department.
710-2511

Religion
Graduate student tutors are available. Most classes have assigned TAs.
710-3735 or your class TA

Other departments offering tutoring options may contact the Success Center at 710-8212 to be
added to this list.

For additional information:

http://www.baylor.edu/support_programs/index.php?id=40918




                                          Baylor > Office of Academic Support Programs > Tutoring > Departmental Tutoring
                                                   133                                                                   
                                               Academic Referral System

Use of this online tool is restricted to Baylor faculty and staff. If you are not a faculty/staff
member at Baylor University and you have an academic concern about a student, please call
Ronald English (254) 710-8986.

Welcome to the online Academic Referral System. Thank you for your investment in the
students' success here at Baylor University in this rigorous academic environment.

     MAKE A REFERRAL                                       DEFICIENCIES

When to Refer (EARLY)
Academic intervention early in the semester allows time and opportunity for students to reverse
patterns of inadequate academic performance. The program enhances student success by
providing academic services/resources to students about whom faculty have academic concerns.
Academic success will compliment the classroom environment and increase retention of
students.

Who to Refer & Submit Deficiencies
Faculty members are encouraged to refer students early in the semester who exhibit academic,
social, or emotional difficulties. Students should be referred for any of the following reasons:

     •    Excessive absences within the first four weeks of the semester (two or three absences)
     •    Stop attending class
     •    Fail (or miss) an exam
     •    Fail to turn in assignments
     •    No response to professor's expressed concerns
     •    Display signs of needing counseling or advice
     •    Ask where to receive academic assistance

In order to maximize the usefulness of services offered, referrals should be made as early as
possible in the semester to give the students the longest amount of time to take corrective action.

How to Refer
If you have identified a student that needs to be referred due to academic concerns, making a
referral is easy. The following two links are very helpful tools for anyone who desires to make a
referral (screenshots included):

     •    Using the Academic Referral System
     •    Screenshots for Deficiency Reporting
     •    Accessing Academic Referral System

Please keep in mind that referrals are processed within 48 hours of being submitted including
notification to the person submitting the referral. If you have any problems or concerns, please
contact Ronald English.

http://www.baylor.edu/support_programs/index.php?id=58168



Baylor > Office of Academic Support Programs > Academic Referral System
                                                                  134
    Office of Access and Learning Accommodations
                  (OALA) 710-3605

WHO DOES OALA SERVE?                                   ACADEMICS
   OALA provides support and                               The University offers educational
assistance to students with documented                 opportunities to all students, and the
disabilities:                                          primary concern of OALA is student
    • Physical disabilities (including                 success.
        hearing and visual impairments)                Academic support includes:
    • Psychological disabilities                           • Transition consultation
    • Attention deficit disorders                          • Study skills and time
    • Learning disabilities                                   management mentoring
                                                           • Scheduling assistance
POLICY STATEMENT                                           • Faculty workshops
    Baylor University complies with all                    • Reasonable classroom
applicable federal and state                                  accommodations
nondiscrimination law and does not                         • Computer lab
engage in unlawful discrimination on the                   • Adaptive technology
basis of race, color, national or ethnic
origin, sex, age, or disability in                     COUNSELING
employment or the provision of services.                   Counseling services are available to
                                                       all Students through the Counseling
ADMISSIONS                                             Services Department, located in the
    Specific standards may be obtained                 McLane Student Life Center. Call (254)
through Admissions Services, which is                  710-2467. Counseling for specific
located in Suite 580 of Robinson Tower,                academic needs due to disabilities is
and can be reached by calling (254) 710-               provided in OALA.
3435. Students with disabilities are
admitted under the same standards as all
other students.                                        WEB SITE INFORMATION
                                                           The OALA Web site, located at
ORIENTATION                                            www.baylor.edu/oala contains important
   Appointments can be made with an                    information such as:
OALA representation during new                             • Policies and procedures
student orientations. Call OALA at (254)                   • Documentation requirements
710-3605 to schedule an appointment.                       • Answers to frequently asked
                                                               questions
UNIVERSITY HOUSING                                         • Links to other campus services
   Requests for accessible residence hall                  • E-mail contacts for OALA staff
rooms are handled by OALA, and
recommendations are sent to Campus
Living and Learning.


            OALA is located in the east wing of the first floor, Sid Richardson Building

                                                                                       Dae Vasek 5/14/2009
                                                 135
                          Career PROCESS
                  Counseling
  Session 1
 •Meet with a career counselor to discuss your personality, interests,
 strengths, values, and calling.
 •For next session: Complete career counseling assessments prior to next
 appointment.




                                                                  Session 2
                                    •Discuss results of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and
                                                               Strong Interest Inventory.
                                               •Discuss careers and/or majors of interest.
                                  •Make a list of possible occupations/majors to explore.
                             •For next session: Explore careers and/or majors of interest
                                                               while narrowing each list.




 Session 3
•Discuss narrowed list and how each option fits with
 your personality, interests, strengths, values, and calling.
•Form a Plan of Action regarding next steps in your
 career decision-making process.
•Make a follow-up appointment with your career
 counselor, if necessary.

                                                         Sid Richardson Building, Room 132
                                                            To request an appointment, call
                                              136                    (254) 710-8434 or visit
                                                          www.baylor.edu/careercounseling
                           Student Guide to
                        BAYLOR CAREER SERVICES
 Mission:               Inspire Confidence through Competence!
 Core Purpose:
                    •   Empower students by providing access to a variety of professional development
                        opportunities (career fairs, interviews, workshops, etc.) that will enable them to
                        develop the skills necessary to confidently pursue their careers of choice.
                    •   Introduce a systematic and structured approach to the job search process thereby
                        reducing and in many cases eliminating the confusion and frustration often
                        associated with the process.
                    •   Partner with employers, alumni, faculty, staff, parents and other entities to
                        maximize opportunities for students.
                    •   Commit to address student career-related needs with the utmost respect in a timely,
                        courteous, and service-oriented manner.
                    •   Offer our professional expertise and guidance in helping connect students with their
                        vocational calling through the tools God has given us.




Career Resources                                             Employment
 • Career action plan                                         • Online resume
 • Strategic job search process                               • Resume referral service
 • Employer recruiting literature                             • Resume/cover letter critiquing service
 • Job bulletins                                              • On-campus interview program
 • Business journals                                          • Employer information sessions
 • Salary survey statistics                                   • Domestic and international internships
Online                                                       Workshops
 • Hire A Bear career management system                       • Resume Writing
 • Job search agents                                          • Prepare for the Job Fair
 • Internship and full-time job listings                      • Job Search Strategies
 • Vault career library                                       • Interviewing Skills
 • WetFeet career resource                                    • How to Find an International Internship
 • GoingGlobal international employment
 • InterviewStream practice interview tool                   Job Fairs
 • Internships USA                                            • Fall HireABear Career Fair
                                                              • Non-Profit Job Fair
Job Search Assistance                                         • Spring Internship/Job Fair
 • Walk-in hours                                              • Teacher Job Fair
 • Career coaching appointments                               • Science/Tech/Engineering/Math (STEM)
 • Mock interview days                                           Job Fair
 • Alumni network contacts                                    • Work in Waco Job Expo
                                                              • POSTGame Student Athlete Job Fair


                                  Baylor University Career Services
                                    Paul L. Foster Success Center
                                 Sid Richardson Building, Room 116
                               254.710.3771       137
                                                   www.hireabear.com
                              Spiritual Life
Through the Office of University Chaplain at Baylor, you can get in touch with people
and programs to help you find your true identity; figure out what you are being
influenced by and explore what you should let yourself be influenced by; and then
discover the ways in which God wants to use you to have an impact on this world.
There are many people on campus every day who want to come alongside you on your
journey to discover your identity, the influences on your life, and the impact you can
have on the world: psychologists and resident chaplains, Chapel speakers and area
ministers, career counselors and student leaders. Please feel free to contact us and let us
get to know you.


                             Contact Information

Burt Burleson                                  Kristen Richardson
University Chaplain                            Associate Chaplain and Director for
                                               Formation and Baptist Student Ministries
254.710.3517
Burt_Burleson@baylor.edu                       254.710.3222
                                               Kristen_Richardson@baylor.edu

Rebecca Kennedy                                Ryan Richardson
Associate Chaplain and Director for            Associate Chaplain and Director for
Missions                                       Worship

254.710.3517                                   254.710.3827
Rebecca_A_Kennedy@baylor.edu                   Ryan_Richardson@baylor.edu




                                             138
                               Baylor University
                                Health Services

Overview

Baylor University Health Services provides comprehensive health services to Baylor
University undergraduate and graduate students. Baylor faculty and staff are welcome to
come to the Health Center to receive necessary immunizations for travel.

The Baylor Health Center is a primary care ambulatory clinic.

A multidisciplinary staff comprised of physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses,
psychologists, a consulting psychiatrist, a physical therapist and administrative and
technical personnel are available to provide a comprehensive array of services.

Medical Services include:
• Outpatient primary medical care services by appointment
• Urgent care walk-in services
• After hours telephone triage services
• Women's and Men's health services
• Preventative health screenings
• Immunization and allergy services
• Travel vaccination services
• Physical Therapy services
• Referral Services
• Ancillary services including radiology and laboratory
• The Baylor Pharmacy is available for student, faculty and staff prescription needs

Counseling and Psychological Services include:
• Crisis intervention
• Individual psychotherapy
• Group psychotherapy
• Couples counseling
• Psychiatric consultation
• Dietician services
• Referral services
• Educational outreach and awareness




                                            139
                             Health Services
                           Contact Information

Counseling Center

Hours of Operation: 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday by appointment
only. The BUCC is closed during academic breaks.

Location: 2nd floor of the McLane Student Life Center (Baylor ID is needed for entry
into the SLC).

Phone: Call (254)710-2467 for appointments or to speak to a staff member.


Health Center

Location:
McLane Student Life Center, 2nd floor
209 Speight Avenue
Waco, Texas 76706

Telephone: 254-710-1010
Fax: 254-710-2499


Pharmacy

Location:
McLane Student Life Center, 2nd floor
209 Speight Avenue
Waco, Texas 76706




                                          140

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:209
posted:4/3/2010
language:English
pages:143