EXPEDITION DOSSIER KILIMANJARO-MT MERU-SAFARI 16 DAYS CODE XPD016 by lindash

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									                EXPEDITION DOSSIER

           KILIMANJARO-MT MERU-SAFARI
                      16 DAYS
                   CODE XPD016
           GRADE – DIFFICULT/STRENUOUS

          ITINERARY – COSTS – INCLUSIONS




  FOR ANY MORE DETAILS OF EXPEDITIONS IN NEPAL, BHUTAN,
    INDONESIA, PAPUA NEW GUINEA AND AFRICA CALL US ON
(03) 9502 3789 OR SEE OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.NOROADS.COM.AU
   no borders – no limits – no roads



EXPEDITION OVERVIEW
    Our programme starts with an ascent of Mt Meru, one of Africa's highest and most
    beautiful volcanoes, 4600m. This is a good way to acclimatise before an ascent of
    Kilimanjaro. The track to the summit passes through parkland, mountain forest, a
    giant heather zone and moorland. Finally, the summit is reached by a narrow,
    barren ridge which provides stunning views of both the Ash Cone lying in the crater
    several thousand feet below and Kilimanjaro in the background. There is a large
    variety of bird and animal life in the park; it is possible to see bushbuck, colobus
    monkeys, buffalo and giraffe.

       We then move to climbing Kilimanjaro from the south. The south side of Kibo
       presents a much more rugged appearance. Deep gorges (barrancos) cut the
       forested slopes and spectacular ridges lead up to the screes below the 6000 foot
       southern precipices of glaciers, icefalls and cliffs.

       The most magnificent track to the southern side is the Umbwe. It follows a ridge up
       through natural forest, with dramatic views of the Great Barranco and Breach Wall,
       to the Barranco Hut.

       From Barranco we traverse around the southern circuit to the Barafu Hut and the
       final ascent up scree to the summit. It is a strenuous track but worth the effort to
       be free of the possible crowds on the Normal track and to enjoy the beauty of the
       forest, moorland, and glaciers of the mountain.

       This is a tough walking trip, with some steep terrain, but within the limits of a fit
       individual used to hill walking. A guide accompanies you on both ascents; porters
       carry your luggage and all communal food, camping and cooking equipment; you
       carry your day sack with the day's needs such as water bottle, waterproofs, spare
       jumper, camera. On Meru, a Park Ranger also accompanies you. Your guide will be
       responsible for the pace, food and well-being of the group: all important aspects in
       enjoying your treks and climbs.

       The trip finishes with a camping safari to Lake Manyara and the Ngorongoro Crater
       which probably provides the world's premier game viewing experience; an excellent
       way to relax before returning home

       Note: Our Mt Meru-Kilimanjaro-Safari expedition is scheduled so that you
       will summit Kilimanjaro on the night of a full moon. See our Moonlight
       Ascents sections for reasons why.


MAIN TRACKS ON KILIMANJARO
     The Marangu Track offers walking on gentle forest and moorland paths up to 4700m.
     Above, scree leads to Gillman's Point on the often snowy crater rim which is followed
     to Uhuru Peak. Accommodation is in huts. While this is a difficult climb it is the
     easiest and therefore the busiest track on the mountain. We do not offer this track.




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   The Machame and Umbwe Tracks are tougher. Steep forest paths, easy scrambling
   and airy ridges lead to the final screes and hence the crater. Nights are spent in
   tents. The Mweka Track is generally used to descend after either of the last two
   tracks.

   The Shira, Nanjara and Oloitokitok Tracks are more remote but can be organised by
   us. The remote Lemosho Glades Track is particularly beautiful and goes through one
   of the few areas on Kilimanjaro that is rich in game. We offer two options on
   Lemosho, one via the Barafu Hut and one via the Western Breach, which only open to
   experienced mountaineers.
   Finally, the Rongai Track snakes its way up Kili’s northern slope. Rongai is
   considered a gentler track, with fantastic views down to the plains below. We have
   had a great deal of success on this track over the years.

Mount Meru
  Mount Meru is one of Africa's highest and most beautiful volcanoes. Over 400
  species of birds, rhino, elephant, buffalo, baboon, warthog, black and white Colobus
  monkey and duiker are all found in this delightful "gem amongst parks". The visit to
  the Ngurdoto crater and Momella lakes, with their superb scenery, flamingoes and
  other wildlife, is an unforgettable experience.

   The group will be accompanied on Mount Meru by a Park Guide and porters. On the
   mountain we use dormitory style huts. A sleeping bag and mat are required for the
   huts. This is a tough walking trip with some steep terrain.

Kilimanjaro via Umbwe Track
    The south side of Kibo presents a much more rugged appearance. Deep gorges
    (barrancos) cut the forested slopes and spectacular ridges lead up to the screes
    below the 6000 foot southern precipices of glaciers, icefalls and cliffs.

   The most magnificent track to the southern side is the Umbwe. It follows a ridge
   up through natural forest, with dramatic views of the Great Barranco and Breach
   Wall, to the Barranco Hut. This is the track we will take on this expedition.

   From Barranco we traverse around the southern circuit to the Barafu Hut and
   the final ascent up scree to the summit. It is a strenuous track but worth the
   effort to be free of the possible crowds on the Marangu track and to enjoy the
   beauty of the forest, moorland, and glaciers of the mountain.

   This is a tough walking trip, with some steep terrain, but within the limits of a fit
   individual used to hill walking. A guide accompanies you on the ascent; porters
   carry your luggage and all communal food, camping and cooking equipment;
   you carry your day sack with the day's needs such as water bottle, waterproofs,
   spare jumper, camera. Your guide will be responsible for the pace, food and
   well-being of the group: all important aspects in enjoying your treks and climbs.

Safari
   Lake Manyara
   The Lake Manyara National Park stretches southwards alongside the north-western
   shores of the slightly saline waters of Lake Manyara. The rocky slopes of the Manyara
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   Escarpment form a dramatic backdrop to the west, numerous springs bubble up at the
   foot of the escarpment; their fresh waters support the lush forests and grassy game
   filled meadows in the northern half of the park. In the more remote, southern half, of
   the park the forests thin scenery becomes more open.

   The park is noted for its birdlife with almost 400 different species recorded. It also has
   a high elephant population and is famous for its "tree climbing lions". The forest
   contains a large variety of tree species creating a luxuriant, "jungle" atmosphere in the
   northern areas of the park. There are camping facilities inside and just out of the park.

Ngorongoro Crater
The steep walls of the Ngorongoro Crater hinder the easy movement of animals. This
coupled with the year round availability of good grazing and water in the crater result in a
constant, large, population of wild animals. This is a game viewers paradise and by far the
best destination for a short safari extension to any Northern Tanzanian mountain
expedition.

Strangely enough the Crater is sometimes visited by the Masaai with their cattle who are
capable of co-existing and sharing the rich grazing with the wild animals. Young Masaai
warriors - moran - escort their herds and protect them from lions and leopards which, in
the olden days, they had to kill in order to prove their manhood.

Ngorongoro History
On the 18th March 1892 Dr. O. Baumann, a German explorer was the first European to
record seeing the Ngorongoro Crater. He had approached the crater, like most visitors
presently do, via Mto wa Mbu and Lake Manyara. On the 13th of March he had climbed
the steep boulder slopes of the western wall of the Rift Valley to be rewarded by a
magnificent view of the lake. A view now enjoyed by visitors driving up the escarpment or
relaxing at the Lake Manyara Hotel or the Manyara Serena Lodge. It was from here also
that he saw the forested hills to the north that formed the southern rim of the crater.

On the 14th and 15th of March he and his entourage crossed the open plains leading
towards the crater. At this point two young Masai warriors met them and guided them
through the thick montane forests on their journey up to the crater rim. They followed
cattle paths lined with creepers, lichen, mosses and flowers with butterflies fluttering
amongst them. On the night of the 17th they camped high in the forests. Swirling thick
mists descended in the night making it chilly. The following day he looked into the crater
from a point near the present Sopa Lodge.

In the following days he traversed the crater and left it on the south west rim to then
descend to the inhospitable shores of Lake Eyasi. In his journey across the crater he killed
several rhino. The reason early explorers shot so many of these animals probably (though
they do not state it) is the fact that the rhino horn fetched a high price amongst coastal
traders and this helped them finance the expeditions. An ameliorating reason was to help
feed emaciated Masai who at the time of his visit where experiencing a famine brought
about by a combination of several diseases. In fact the healthiest Masai he came across
lived in the immediate vicinity of the crater. The crater and its surrounding highlands
plays an important part in Masai tradition since in times of famine they often move
towards it in search of better pasture.


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 In 1959 this important role that Ngorongoro played for the Masai was recognised by
 Professor Bernhard Grzimek when he proposed the Serengeti National Park to be
 separated from the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. The Masai were evicted from the
 Serengeti whereas the Crater area became an experiment in multi-purpose land use.

 In the early 1900's two Germans, the Siedentopf brothers, settled and built farms in the
 crater. However their cattle were frequently depleted by Masai raids. Ruins of their farms
 may still be seen on the crater floor.

 Although the Masai now claim the crater as their territory this has not always been the
 case. Over 300 years ago the Nilo-Hamitic nomadic Datoga tribe brought their cattle into
 the crater where they stayed till the early 19th century when they were forced out by the
 Masai. Small Datoga communities are still found in the Lake Eyasi area.

EXPEDITION GRADE

           The Kili-Meru-Safari expedition is considered a Difficult to Strenuous
           expedition. The climb up Mt Meru is considered Difficult as there is some
           altitude involved in a relatively remote part of Tanzania. The climb up
           Kilimanjaro is Strenuous with high altitudes reached. Some trails are
           considered more difficult than others so please read trail information
           carefully before deciding your track. The final part of this expedition is
           an Easy Safari with very little walking involved.

ITINERARY

           Day 1: Arrive at Kilimanjaro International Airport and transfer to Springlands
           Hotel
           Day 2: Drive to the park gate and walk through game-filled parkland up to
           Miriakamba Hut, at 2470m. Along the way there are many fine views; including
           Kilimanjaro from Miriakamba Hut.
           Day 3: The path passes through fine forests and heather to the Saddle Hut, at
           3500m, 3 hours walking. An ascent of Little Meru is possible in the afternoon.
           Day 4: A very early start takes us first to a superb viewpoint on the crater rim
           and then onto an airy ridge which leads up to the summit. Return to
           Miriakamba.
           Day 5: Descend to Momella Lodge in Arusha National Park
           Day 6: Drive to Umbwe village, a tough walk leads to our first campsite on the
           Umbwe Track.
           Day7-10: Ascend Kilimanjaro
           Day 11: Descend by the Mweka Track and drive back to our hotel.
           Day 12-14: Safari to Manyara and Ngorongoro
           Day 15: Drive back to our hotel near Moshi
           Day 16: Transfer to Kilimanjaro International Airport for departure




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INCLUSIONS
         Arrival and departure airport transfers.
         2 nights accommodations in Marangu Hotel, before and after the climb.
         Extra nights are available for only $40/person per night.
         Part board at the Marangu Hotel.
         Enrolment in the Flying Doctor Service for emergency evacuation
         insurance.
         Accommodation in mountain tents with mattresses. We use the highest quality
         expedition tents of Eureka and The North Face.
         All meals on expedition.
         All park fees, including mountain rescue fees, and government taxes.
         Services of our own trained English-speaking mountain guide, and a skilled
         cook (serving as porter), and enough porters for your luggage, food, and
         water, and a dinning tent.
         Transport from your hotel to the mountain, and back to your hotel.
         Use of radios/phones to increase your safety.
         Average group size, 5 climbers.
         4x4 vehicle use and driver.
EXCLUSIONS
               Items of a personal nature such as passport, visa, traveler’s insurance.
               Extra meals and beverages.
               Tips to guides and porters.

EXPEDITION DATES

                        Please refer to our web site for the most up to Expedition schedule.




 PRICE

          AUD $4990 ex Moshi

 PRIVATE EXPEDITIONS

         We are able to organize private expeditions for those that want familiar
         people to join them or our scheduled departures don’t suit. We are also
         able to organize personalized itineraries. We can organise trips up any
         track at any time of year for any size of group. Our team are based at our
         hotel near Moshi year round. We also offer several scheduled trips which


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       combine the ascent of Kilimanjaro with that of Mount Kenya or Mount
       Meru and a Safari in Tanzania.




PRE DEPARTURE INFORMATION

               Once your expedition is confirmed we will send you detailed Pre
               Departure Information which includes a list of recommended clothing
               and personal equipment, along with many other relevant information to
               help you prepare for your trip. Prior to the trip departure from Moshi,
               you will attend a detailed trip briefing and orientation meeting to make
               sure that you are well prepared for your river trip and trek.




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OUR TEAM AND GUIDES
            Dickson Kibaara Matunga, born in 1974, lives in Chogoria and Nairobi,
            he is our chief guide, experienced in glacier work and simple rock climbing.
            He has been guiding on Mt Kenya since 1995, all of this time he has been
            the main guide for No Roads. He knows all the trekking tracks on Mt Kenya
            and has been involved in exploration and development of new walking
            tracks in the forest. He has also been to Kilimanjaro and has organised
            game viewing safaris in Samburu, Masaai Mara, Amboseli, Lake Nakuru,
            Hell's Gate and Tsavo.

            Ambrose Kilimi Riungu, born in 1967, lives in Chogoria, married with one
            young child. He started working on the mountain in 1984 as a porter, and
            in 1990 as a guide, he knows all the normal walking tracks on the mountain
            and has been involved in exploration on the mountain. He has been an
            assistant guide on Kilimanjaro which he has climbed five times by different
            tracks. He has had BMC first aid training.

            Festus Munene Nteere, lives in Chogoria, born in 1972, he has worked on
            Mt Kenya since 1994, and since 1996 as a guide. He knows the main tracks
            on the mountain and has been involved in exploration of new tracks. He
            has also been involved in the organisation of game viewing safaris in
            Kenya.

            Ashford Kithinji Bundi, born in 1970, worked on Mt Kenya since 1989,
            since 1995 as a cook. He has been on the mountain more than a hundred
            times. He is married with one child born in 1999. He lives in Chogoria
            where he also works as a carpenter and carver.

            Eliphas Micheni Ndiga, born in 1958, lives in Chogoria married with two
            children. He has worked on Mt Kenya since 1979 and is our most
            exprienced man on the mountain (he even has experience as a poacher
            when he was a boy!). He was initially involved with the development of the
            road from Chogoria to the Park Gate and with the exploration of tracks on
            the east side of the mountain. From 1989 he started the development of
            the new track to Spa Camp and so to Ithanguni. He is an expert guide and
            porter on Chogoria side.

            Wilson Njeru Edward, Born 1969, lives in Chogoria. He had rock climbing
            trained with NOLS in 1995, since then he has worked on mountain. In 1997
            he received further mountain rescue training with British Army which was
            followed up with further training with the Austrian Mountain Rescue team.
            He has climbed many tracks on the mountain and guided the Normal Track
            5 times, the North Face face 4 times, the West Ridge 2 times (as of April
            2000). He has also completed a First Aid course with NOLS.




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 CLIMBING OTHER MOUNTAINS AND SAFARIS

        There are many game parks to be visited and mountains to be climbed in East
        Africa. In Tanzania Mount Meru is a high beautiful volcanic mountain perfect
        as training before the ascent of Kilimanjaro. We have a combined Mt Meru –
        Kilimanjaro – Safari package for those with a bit more time. The active volcano
        Lengai is a sacred mountain to the Masaii. For these you may consider
        organising the trip as a private group. Our guides are based permanently in
        Moshi throughout the year. In Kenya, Mount Kenya offers top quality rock and
        ice climbing in a superb setting. In Uganda, Elgon’s caldera provides remote
        high altitude walking while the Rwenzori are a great, glaciated and mystical
        mountain range to be explored. Email us if you are interested in any of these
        options.



MOONLIGHT ASCENTS
        Almost all nights in the East African Mountains (excluding the Rwenzori) are
        clear and for many mountains such as Kilimanjaro, Mount Kenya, Lengai and
        Mount Meru a pre-dawn start is crucial. To make the night ascents more
        pleasant and in some cases beautiful, getting up and walking up by moonlight
        is the optimal situation.

        As a rough guide a full moon rises at sunset and sets at sunrise which is just
        about sunrise. This combined with the strength of the moonlight this provides
        excellent conditions for walking at night. However as the moon sets about 1
        hour later every day. the best conditions are probably about 2 to 3 days after
        the full moon as then at about 5am the moon is still big and quite high in the
        sky throughout the critical hours of the ascent. If you plan your ascent before
        the full moon you might get up by moonlight but it will set before twilight. An
        ascent a week after a full moon means you will have a half moon rising about
        midnight and this will be overhead in the sky around sunrise. If you have some
        flexibility in your plans make use of the moon!

        Why get up in the middle of the night anyway? An early edition of the MCK
        guidebook summed up the situation quite well (referring to the final ascent day
        on Kilimanjaro) - you feel sick and you cannot sleep so you may as well get up
        anyway. Then when you start it is cooler. The scree is frozen so it is more
        stable and you cannot see where you are and how far you have to go so you
        do not get so depressed. This maybe a bit exaggerated but it is not far off the
        truth. Good acclimatization will help reduce discomfort but another very
        important factor is the sun during the day, which can have a very debilitating
        effect on the body. On Kilimanjaro the air temperature may not be very high
        but the high levels of radiation can completely drain you of energy. On
        mountains such as Lengai it is almost dangerous to start the ascent too late as
        the day time temperature soar and heat exhaustion could at least force you to
        retreat and in extreme circumstances heat stroke can be fatal.



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         A final advantage of a night start is that you have a longer day available to you
         - being caught out by nightfall at the end of a hard day, particularly if the
         weather has deteriorated during the day can be very unpleasant. Early starts
         add to your safety margins.

                      JAN     FEB      MAR   APR   MAY   JUN   JUL    AUG   SEP   OCT       NOV   DEC
              2004    7       6        6     5     4     3     2,31   30    28    26        24    24
              2005    25      24       25    24    23    22    21     19    18    17        16    15
              2006    14      13       14    13    13    11    11     9     7     7         5     5
              2007    3       2        3     2     2     30    30     28    26    26        24    24
              2008    22      21       21    20    20    18    18     16    15    14        13    12
              2009    11      9        11    9     9     7     7      6     4     4         2     31
              2010    30      28       30    28    27    26    26     24    23    23        21    21

WHEN TO CLIMB
        Even though one can climb throughout the year, January, February and
        September are the best months, with June, July, August, October and
        December also being good.


WEATHER CONDITIONS
              Equatorial to arctic conditions are present on Kilimanjaro and Meru. The range
              begins with the warm, dry plains with average temperatures of 30 c, ascending
              through a wide belt of wet tropical forest, through zones with generally
              decreasing temperatures and rainfall, to the summit where there is permanent
              ice and below freezing temperatures. The temperature at the top of the
              mountain gets as low as minus 25 degrees Celsius.

FOOD
              Our typical food on the mountain includes:
              Breakfast: coffee, tea, porridge, fruits, fruit juice, scrambled eggs/omelet,
              sausage, toast, margarine, honey and jam.
              Lunch: hot tea, coffee, chips, sandwiches, biscuits, pancakes with honey or
              jam, and fruits
              Dinner: soup, cooked meat or vegetarian meal (these include chicken/beef
              with rice, sliced fresh carrots and green beans, mashed potatoes, and salads),
              fruits, and fruit juice, and variety of hot drinks.
              If you have special dietary requirements just let us know as we are more than
              willing to accommodate.




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TIPPING
             Tipping our porters, guides and cooks is an important way for us to
             supplement their wages. The following is a guide on what to expect to pay
             while in East Africa.
             Guide:US$10        Porter:US$5    Assistant Guide:US$7      Cook:US$4

             This tipping structure is per group/per day.

CONTINGENCIES

             In case one person gets sick and has to stay behind or even return, he
             or she will be accompanied by one of the assistant guides while other
             climbers go on with the leading guide and other assistant guide(s).

             Unlike most other companies who charge about US$100, we provide a
             free transfer from the mountain to the hotel should a climber return
             earlier than planned. However, if the climb is extended for any reason,
             NRE will charge $170 per day per person.


INFORMATION AND SUPPORT

             If you have any comments, questions or want more information,
             please let us know. We are here to support you with all information
             to help you prepare for your travels to Africa.




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EXPEDITION GRADE (EXPEDITION DIFFICULTY)

GRADE 1 - EASY
              Easy trekking,       generally between 900m/3,000ft. and
              2,000m/6,500ft. Clients need to be regular walkers to get full
              enjoyment from their experience. It is possible however to
              design 'easier' three to four day treks with perhaps only three
              to four hours walking per day on request.
GRADE 2 - MODERATE
              Moderate trekking 900m/3,000ft. and 3,000m/10,000ft. but
              possibly involving side trips to higher elevations.


GRADE 3 - DIFFICULT
              Reasonably demanding trekking at altitudes up to
              4,000m/13,000ft. with side trips to higher elevations. Some
              treks included here will, in part, be well away from villages on
              ill- defined mountain trails.

GRADE 4 - STRENUOUS
              Treks of a demanding nature, requiring all participants to be fit
              and in excellent health, often in remote alpine areas and
              sometimes reaching altitudes in excess of 5000m/18,000ft.

ALPINE

              Extremely demanding treks sometimes in very remote areas
              on rough terrain. Participants should have at least a basic
              knowledge of use of crampons and ice axes, though first time
              climbers may be accepted on some of the so called 'easy'
              tracks on these peaks. Medical certificates are required prior to
              acceptance on any climbing treks.

BOOKINGS
              If you would like to discuss this or any other matter with us
              please feel free to call us on (03) 9502 3789 or email us at
              info@noroads.com.au




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