The Daly Mail_ 11th December

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					The Daly Mail, 11th December

Why there's something fishy about Jamie's TV advert for supermarket
smoked
salmon - Celebrity chef promotes farm at the centre of pollution
investigation

Dawn Thompson

IT'S virtues were extolled in celebrity chef Jamie Oliver's TV advert for
supermarket giant Sainsbury's.
Nestling in the tranquil magnificence of the Scottish mountains, much was
made of the cold, clear waters of the Highland loch. But the salmon farm
which featured so prominently in the chain's massive £4million Christmas
advertising campaign is at the centre of a pollution probe by the environment
watchdog.

Scientists fear excrement and waste food from the Marine Harvest site in
Loch Hourn, one of Scotland's most picturesque tidal lochs, could be
polluting the seabed. Now the fish giant has been told to clean up its act or
risk possible prosecution.

The latest concerns come five years after up to a quarter of a million fish
died when cages at the site were overstocked. The incident only came to
light when people living nearby were alerted by the foul stench of
decomposing carcasses. The revelation is another acutely embarrassing one
for Sainsbury's.

Oliver, 29, has already been criticised for promoting farmed salmon, which
he refuses to serve in his upmarket restaurant Fifteen, the setting for the
Channel 4 series Jamie's Kitchen. Campaigners against salmon farming have
complained to the Advertising Standards Authority over the advert which
describes farmed salmon as 'healthy'.

And the ad has angered Oliver fans, who have debated the issue in a forum
on the chef's official website. In it, the young chef visits the Marine Harvest
salmon farm where the fish are grown, and the smokehouse, owned by
Inverness-based Strathaird Salmon, where they are processed. During the
advert, one employee claims: 'Salmon are fit and healthy because they're in a
tidal loch, which means they have cold, clear water.'
But the Scottish Environment Protection Agency yesterday confirmed it was
investigating the level of waste discharged from the site.

A spokesman said: 'Seabed surveys are showing some evidence of
unsatisfactory impacts. SEPA is discussing a programme of remedial action
with the operator. Continuing evidence of such unsatisfactory impacts may
lead to SEPA taking further steps.' If Marine Harvest fails to clean up the
fish farm, it could be ordered to reduce the amount of fish or face
prosecution.

In June 2000, the company was found guilty of breaching its operating
conditions by having too great a tonnage of fish on site. It admitted flouting
the Control of Pollution Act 1974 and was fined £500 at Portree Sheriff
Court.
It is understood about 600 tons of fish suffocated and the mass deaths meant
fish oil, grease, fats and fish carcasses contaminated the surrounding
waters.

Earlier this year, a study by American scientists said that Scottish farmed
salmon was among the most toxic in the world and recommended that
people
should not eat it more than three times a year. The report, from the State
University of New York, claimed the salmon was contaminated with high
levels
of cancer- causing particles. But salmon producers in Scotland strongly
denied the American claims and threatened to sue the authors of the report.

Bruce Sandison, of the Salmon Farm Protest Group, said: 'In my view, Jamie
Oliver is completely ill-advised to use his position as a celebrity chef to
promote a product which is basically fat and unhealthy. 'And I am
astonished they should use a site which has had such a disaster for the
advert.'

But a spokesman for the chef said he was standing by the advert. He said: 'If
it was the sort of thing he shouldn't have put his name to, then he would not
have done so. We went up there to test the salmon and were fully satisfied
with the product.'

Dr Graeme Dear, of Marine Harvest Scotland, defended the farm's record
and
disputed SEPA's suggestion that further remedial action was necessary. He
said: 'The salmon farm at Loch Hourn is exceptionally well run and the fish
grown there are high quality, healthy fish. The only issue involves a minor
infringement of standards on the seabed which has no impact on the quality,
health or welfare of the fish.'

A Sainsbury's spokesman said last night: 'Food safety and integrity are our
top priorities and we have strict welfare and environmental requirements.
'All Sainsbury's fresh salmon is produced by approved suppliers who are
regularly audited by trained technologists to ensure compliance with
comprehensive welfare, environmental and safety requirements.'


The Independent on Sunday, 19th December

Fat Lady calls Naked Chef 'whore' over Sainsbury's salmon Clarissa
Dickson Wright accuses Jamie Oliver of 'selling his soul' over his
endorsement of controversial salmon farm

By Steve Bloomfield and Severin Carrell

Described as fake, a bit slimy and not very good for you, celebrity chef
Jamie Oliver was yesterday forced to defend the reputation of the smoked
salmon he is promoting this Christmas.

Oliver, already reeling from complaints about his London restaurant, is now
under assault from environmentalists, who claim Sainsbury's smoked salmon
comes from fish farms that damage the environment.

It is a celebrity-charged quarrel over the quality of the food we eat. It is a
row over whether intensive fish farming is ruining Britain's sensitive marine
environment and whether, as some campaigners claim, retailers are putting
profits before safety.

Today Oliver's opponents are to picket the restaurant, Fifteen, in a campaign
backed by another TV chef, Clarissa Dickson Wright, who says her
rival has "sold his soul" to the supermarket giant and become a culinary
"whore".
Oliver, the "face" of Sainsbury's, features prominently in its current
television campaign, which shows him visiting a salmon farm in Inverness-
shire.

But the environmentalists say the fish comes from a farm which has been
criticised by the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA). They
also claim the fish is not good enough to be put on the restaurant menu.

"Jamie Oliver is supporting what is probably a defective farm and he is
supporting a product which he doesn't eat," said Ms Dickson Wright. "I
think he's a whore. Isn't that what whore’s do, take money for something
they wouldn't do otherwise. Jamie has just sold his soul carte blanche to
Sainsbury's and turns up wherever they want him. It makes me very sad
because he sold his talents."

A spokesperson for the SEPA confirmed it is discussing a programme of
"remedial action" with Marine Harvest, the owners of the farm.

Bruce Sandison, chairman of the Salmon Farm Protest Group co-ordinating
the
campaign, said: "To try and hold this company up as a wonderful example of
excellence in environmental probity and producing high-quality salmon is
complete and utter rubbish - and that is what has outraged so many of our
supporters."

The row has even spread on to Oliver's website forum. Several contributors
have railed against his support for farmed salmon in recent days. Pete Begg,
Fifteen's executive chef, also weighed in, admitting that farmed fish was not
used in the restaurant but claimed Sainsbury's products were better than
most. "We thought this was a better product and a step in the right direction,
and that's why he went with it," he said.

US scientists warned in January that eating too much Scottish farmed
salmon could pose a cancer risk. Researchers at State University of New
York claimed that chemical levels found in the fish were so high that people
should eat no more than two ounces a month.

Following the publication of the research, in the American journal Science,
several Scottish fish farms closed down and the price of farmed salmon
slumped. Some farmers cried foul, claiming there was a link between the
researchers and an environmental campaigning agency.

The report was given short shrift by retailers and the Food Standards
Agency, who claimed it was based on poor science. But the farmed salmon
industry was also hit by news that the European Commission were
threatening to ban sales of Scottish salmon because of contamination.

The Scottish salmon industry is estimated to be worth £700m a year and
sales
have risen significantly from 600 tonnes a year in 1980 to 140,000 in 2001.
The Food Standards Agency's current advice stresses that the benefits of
eating salmon in moderation outweigh any risks.

FISH FACTS

Standard supermarket smoked salmon
£1.33 per 100g from Asda; £1.50 from Sainsbury's

What it is: It's the cheapest smoked salmon available in supermarkets. The
fish is actually reared on salmon farms.
What environmentalists claim: Overcrowding in fish farms may lead to
localised pollution from salmon droppings. They claim that the farms use
toxic chemicals to prevent seaweed from clinging to the net.

Quality supermarket smoked salmon
£1.99 per 100g from Asda; £3.20 from Tesco

What it is: This is a higher-quality salmon and much less fatty than the
cheaper versions.
What environmentalists claim: It's better than cheaper salmon but there are
concerns. They tend to be in sites free from parasites and are often grown in
cleaner, faster-flowing water. But there are fears that sea lice from farm fish
may infect wild fish.

Organic smoked salmon
£3.56 per 100g from Waitrose; £3.99 from Sainsbury's

What it is: The salmon are fed only organically approved food.
What environmentalists claim: Fish cages have more space than
conventional
salmon farms, in waters selected as freer from parasites and disease.

http://news.independent.co.uk/low_res/story.jsp?story=594571&host=3&dir
=65&d ir=65&host=3


London Evening Standard/Metro, 20th December

'Whore' Jamie in salmon farm row, by Jayne Atherton

They're a touchy lot, these celebrity chefs who seem to relieve all that
tension in the kitchen by insulting each other.

Jamie Oliver is the latest to feel the wrath of a rival, being branded a
'Sainsbury's whore' by Clarissa Dickson Wright, the surviving half of TV's
Two Fat Ladies.

The Fifteen boss was attacked for promoting salmon farming in his latest TV
advert for the supermarket.

Environmentalists say the practice damages the sea bed and produces
salmon that is not good enough to be served in restaurants.

Protesters handed out leaflets outside Fifteen yesterday.

Dickson Wright waded in, saying: 'I think he's a whore. Isn't that what
whore’s do, take money for something they wouldn't do otherwise? Jamie
has just sold his soul carte blanche to Sainsbury's and turns up wherever they
want him. It makes me sad because he sold his talents.'

But Oliver's spokesman sniped back: 'I think she's just trying to put her name
to something. She only seems to be in the papers these days if she's slagging
someone off or saying how marvellous fox-hunting is.'

The row is just the latest in a long line of flare-ups between TV chefs.
Antony Worrall Thompson, Gary Rhodes and Egon Ronay have all lined up
to insult Delia Smith, who, in turn, called Worrall Thompson 'just revolting'.
Gordon Ramsay has launched typically venomous attacks on Ainsley
Harriott, Raymond Blanc and Nigella Lawson.
http://www.thisislondon.com/news/articles/15454534?source=Metro


The Times, 20th December,

Naked Chef 'exposed as a hypocrite' over salmon, Sophie Kirkham

A CELEBRITY row over salmon farming spilt into the street outside Jamie
Oliver's London restaurant yesterday when campaigners picketed his Sunday
lunchtime customers.

The Naked Chef has been accused of "selling his soul" after a Christmas
advertising campaign for Sainsbury's had him promoting farmed salmon as
healthy, while campaigners say that the practice is damaging the
environment and killing off wild salmon stocks.

The Scottish salmon farm where the advert is filmed has been fined in the
past for its practices and still fails Scottish environmental standards.
Oliver has also been called a hypocrite for advertising something that he
refuses to serve in his restaurant, Fifteen, where only the freshest wild
salmon appears on the menu.

Critics of the salmon farming industry include several of the country's
celebrity chefs including Clarissa Dickson Wright, Antony Worrall
Thompson and Andrew Fairlie, of the Gleneagles Hotel in Perthshire.

"Jamie Oliver is supporting what is probably a defective farm and he is
supporting a product which he doesn't eat," Ms Dickson Wright said. "I
think he's a whore. Isn't that what whores’ do, take money for something
they wouldn't do otherwise? Jamie has sold his soul carte blanche to
Sainsbury's and turns up wherever they want him."

Campaigners argue that salmon farming practices produce unnatural fish that
are high in fat and contain pesticides, harmful dioxins and artificial food
dyes. They also claim that the farms pollute Scottish waters and that wild
salmon are being killed by diseases carried by their farmed brothers.

Rod O'Sullivan, of the Salmon Farm Protest Group that handed out leaflets
to diners outside Fifteen yesterday, accused Oliver of ignoring the issues in
favour of his pay cheque. "I suppose it is hard to say no to £1 million, but he
has just swallowed the Sainsbury's line after going to a salmon farm and
being shown lots of nice things before going on his way.

"We are concerned with protecting the wild fish, and wild Atlantic salmon is
now an endangered species. People should be aware of the damage it is
doing."
The advert in question was filmed at Loch Hourn salmon farm in Inverness-
shire, run by Marine Harvest, which supplies the supermarket. Oliver is
filmed plucking a fresh fish from the loch's "cold" water - which he tells
viewers ensures that the fish is healthy - before dashing off to a party to cook
it for friends.

The Scottish Environmental Protection Agency has given warning to the
company about conditions at the site, which was fined in June 2000 for
overstocking its cages, leading to a large fish kill that polluted the
surrounding waters. Although the situation has improved, an agency
spokeswoman said that there were still concerns and the site was failing to
meet environmental standards.

A spokeswoman for Marine Harvest insisted that the farm did not damage
the environment and that its fish were in excellent condition. "Jamie Oliver
spent quite a lot of time up there asking lots of probing questions about how
the fish farms were run. He was not just taking a line, he found out for
himself," the spokeswoman added.

Oliver said last night: "One of the reasons I work with Sainsbury's is to get
this better-quality food to everyone around the country, and salmon is a
perfect example of this."

A spokesman for the chef said that farmed salmon was not on the menu at
his restaurant because the chefs cooked only with seasonal produce.

The Food Standards Agency said that the benefits of eating oily fish
outweighed any risks posed by dioxins in salmon.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-1409989,00.html


The Daily Mail, 20th December
THE FAT LADY PUTS THE HEAT ON OLIVER OVER FARMED
SALMON, by Sean Poulter (Consumer editor)

JAMIE Oliver's support for farmed salmon yesterday earned him a roasting
from the formidable Clarissa Dickson-Wright.

The former star of the BBC's Two Fat Ladies condemned her fellow TV
cook for advertising the product for Sainsbury's while refusing to use it in
his restaurant, Fifteen.

'He's a whore, it's as simple as that,' she said. 'I would never endorse a
product that I would not use. If I were to endorse something, it would be
something I believe in.

'There was a time when the public were prepared to believe in celebrity
endorsement but I think it is beginning to wane.'

Miss Dickson-Wright is a fierce opponent of salmon farming, which is said
to have had a disastrous impact on the Scottish environment.

Campaigners who share her views gathered outside Fifteen yesterday for a
protest.

Oliver's TV commercial sees him visiting a Highland salmon farm and
smokehouse. The fish are said to be fine and healthy because they come
from the clean tidal waters of a loch.

However, it has emerged that the salmon farm concerned, at Loch Hourn,
which is run by Marine Harvest, has been at the centre of a pollution inquiry.

Scientists fear excrement and waste food from the farm could be polluting
the seabed. The Scottish Environment Protection Agency confirmed it is
investigating the level of waste discharged from the site and has demanded
that the company clean up its act.

A forum on the 29-year-old TV chef's website has been inundated with
complaints from critics of salmon farming.

On the website, Peter Begg, a research and development chef at Fifteen,
states: 'Jamie wouldn't normally go near farmed fish - we certainly don't sell
it in the restaurant - but we thought this was a better product and a step in the
right direction, and that's why he went with it.'

That did not satisfy the Salmon Farm Protest Group, which handed in a letter
at Fifteen detailing its objections. Chairman Bruce Sandison said: 'The fish
Jamie is promoting come from Loch Hourn, from a farm that is being
investigated for pollution.

'In 2000 the same farm was fined for polluting the loch when they allowed
240,000 salmon to die in their cages.

'The weight of the dead fish broke the cages, allowing tens of thousands of
decaying and dying farm salmon to spread throughout the loch.
'Jamie Oliver is prostituting himself by promoting a product he is not willing
to serve in his own restaurant.'

Dr Rod O'Sullivan, who led the protest, said: “Jamie Oliver appeared in a
glossy commercial giving the impression everything is wonderful, when
nothing could be further from the truth.

'The wild salmon is now an endangered species in Scotland. That is largely
the result of the spread of disease and parasites linked to salmon farming.'

Oliver is thought to have been paid around £4million by Sainsbury's over the
last four years.

A spokesman for him said: 'If it was the sort of thing he shouldn't have put
his name to, then he would not have done so. We went up there to test the
salmon and were fully satisfied with the product.'

Marine Harvest defended the farm's record and disputed suggestions that
action is needed to limit pollution from the farm.

Sainsbury's said: 'Food safety and integrity are our top priorities and we have
strict welfare and environmental requirements.'
s.poulter@dailymail.co.uk


The Daily Express, 20th December
Jamie slated for farmed salmon adverts

CELEBRITY chef Jamie Oliver was targeted by protesters yesterday who
are furious at his TV endorsement of farmed Scottish salmon.

Angry demonstrators blockaded his 15 Restaurant in London to express their
outrage at his involvement in a TV advert for Sainsbury's.

Fellow chef Clarissa Dickson Wright said: "In my opinion he's a whore; it's
as simple as that. I would never endorse something that I would not use."
Oliver defended his decision to do the ads, saying: "I'd much rather the
public ate this quality of salmon than none at all."

The personality chef had to shut down a discussion forum on his website
after it was flooded with complaints from people who claimed the ads were
an attempt to fool people into eating fish which was "a third-rate, fat and
flabby substitute" to wild salmon.

Bruce Sandison, chairman of The Salmon Farm Protest Group, said: "I agree
with Clarissa Dickson Wright's view that Jamie Oliver has prostituted
himself by promoting a product he is refusing to serve in his restaurant." He
said the fish Oliver was promoting came from a farm run by foreign-owned
Marine Harvest Scotland in Loch Hourn, Inverness-shire.

The farm is currently under investigation by the Scottish Environmental
Protection Agency for alleged pollution.

Peter Begg, Oliver's executive chef, said: "Jamie normally would not go near
farmed salmon. We certainly don't sell it in the restaurant but we thought
this [Sainsbury's] was a better product." A spokesman for 15 Restaurant said
he had tasted the farmed salmon promoted by his boss.

He said: "The Sainsbury's stuff is really very good. The texture is firm and
dry, with none of the flabbiness or greasiness you get in cheap smoked
salmon. I absolutely accept that there are problems with the fish farming
industry, but it isn't going to just go away, people aren't going to stop buying
it." Scotland's fish farming industry has been at the centre of health scares
due to the spread of parasites such as sea lice, which can harm wild salmon
and sea trout.
Seafood Intelligence, 20th December

Sainsbury's Scottish farmed salmon TV ads could prove embarrassing for
Marine Harvest -Media reports

The Sainsbury TV ads' campaign in the UK featuring farmed Scottish
salmon being endorsed by Celebrity 'Naked Chef' Jamie Oliver is causing
some stir
as the Salmon Farm Protest Group (SFPG) and the media have this weekend
been widely reporting the inconsistency in the chef's position. He got a
substantial fee to feature on the ads while refusing to serve farmed salmon
in his own restaurant.

Furthermore, an article in The Times this morning is casting further light on
the campaign, by stating that the (Marine Harvest-owned Loch Hourn
salmon farm in Inverness-shire) salmon farm where the ad was filmed was
fined by the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) in June
2000 for
overstocking its cages, leading to a large fish kill that polluted the
surrounding waters.

Although the situation has improved, a SEPA spokeswoman said that there
were
still concerns and the site was failing to meet environmental standards.

A spokeswoman for Marine Harvest insistently told the newspaper that the
farm "did not damage the environment and that its fish were in excellent
condition". "Jamie Oliver spent quite a lot of time up there asking lots of
probing questions about how the fish farms were run. He was not just taking
a line, he found out for himself," the spokeswoman added.

Oliver said last night: "One of the reasons I work with Sainsbury's is to
get this better-quality food to everyone around the country, and salmon is a
perfect example of this."

A spokesman for the chef said that farmed salmon was not on the menu at
his
restaurant because the chefs cooked only with seasonal produce.
Read also: Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver branded as 'hypocrite' for his role
in £4m Sainsbury Xmasy ad campaign

http://www.seafoodintelligence.com


Seafood Intelligence, 20th December

UK celebrity chef - Jamie Oliver's - restaurant target of protest by
anti-farmed salmon activists

Ads in the UK (and Ireland) featuring Jamie Oliver promoting Sainsbury's
Scottish farmed salmon in a £2 million TV campaign have caused
widespread
"outrage". The celebrity chef's website forum discussion was closed after
being flooded by complaints from people claiming the ads were 'misleading',
'untrue' and 'a blatant attempt to try to fool people into eating a third-rate, fat
and flabby substitute for the real thing,' comments the Salmon Farm Protest
Group (SFPG).

Peter Begg, Oliver's executive chef commented: "Jamie normally wouldn't
go near farmed salmon - we certainly don't sell it in the restaurant - but we
thought this [Sainsbury's] was a better product."

The SFPG - a group of 'wild fish' supporters - said on Friday it intended to
take their message directly to Jamie Oliver by demonstrating outside his 15
Restaurant on Sunday (19th December) lunchtime.

SFPG chairman Bruce Sandison said: "The fish Jamie is promoting come
from
Loch Hourn in Inverness-shire, from a farm that is being investigated for
pollution. In 2000 the same farm was fined for polluting the loch when they
allowed 240,000 salmon to die in their cages. The weight of the dead fish
broke the cages allowing tens of thousands of decaying and dying farm
salmon
to spread throughout the loch."

Jamie Oliver defended his decision to do the Sainsbury ads, saying: "I'd
much rather the public ate this quality of salmon than none at all," he said.
The SFPG was quoted in the mainstream British press - such as The Times,
The
Independent, The London Evening Standard, and The Independent on
Sunday; and Fellow chef, Clarissa Dickson Wright of 'Fat Lady' fame was
quoted in The
Independent as saying: "Jamie Oliver is supporting what is probably a
defective farm and he is supporting a product which he doesn't eat," said Ms
Dickson Wright. "I think he's a whore. Isn't that what whores’ do, take
money for something they wouldn't do otherwise. Jamie has just sold his
soul carte blanche to Sainsbury's and turns up wherever they want him. It
makes me very sad
because he sold his talents," she said.

http://www.seafoodintelligence.com


Scotland on Sunday (Letters), 19th December

Letters: Crack down on salmon farming

I AM astonished at the general lack of media interest regarding salmon
farming in Scotland. The Dutch and Norwegian multinationals who control
this
dirty industry make some outrageous claims of the benefits they bring to
Scotland, but scratch beneath the surface of the hype and presentation and
you will find things are rather less rosy.

A recent World Wildlife Fund report highlighted that these Scottish salmon
farms dump the same volume of raw, untreated sewage into the once pristine
sea lochs as would be produced by nine million people. Why is this allowed?
No other industry would be permitted to do this, irrespective of how many
jobs it claimed to provide. The nutrient enrichment from this filth has been
implicated in unprecedented toxic algae blooms off the West Coast of
Scotland that have seriously damaged the valuable shellfish industry.

Daily we hear of problems of fish shortages in the oceans. Is this really a
surprise when we learn that it takes 3kg of wild, industrial-scale caught
fish to make the feed required to produce 1kg of farmed salmon?

The biological pollution from these farms has produced infestations of
parasitic sea lice that have brought populations of wild fish, especially
migratory sea trout, to near-extinction in almost every river and loch
system north of the Clyde. In eastern Scotland and in the extreme
south-west, where there are no salmon farms, salmon and sea trout have
been
increasing in recent years. The loss of angling-related jobs in the
North-west is a national disgrace.

Then we have the recent report in the respected journal Science that claimed
Scottish and Irish farmed salmon carry the highest levels of PCBs found
anywhere in the world. Bear in mind, too, that the rosy pink colour of this
product is produced by feeding the fish chemical dye. It would seem that
these neatly packed pink fillets are the most contaminated foodstuff on the
supermarket shelves.

F Carrie, Alford


The Sunday Times, Sunday 19th December

Farmed salmon fears

ALONG with many others, I am concerned with the continued sale of
Scottish farmed salmon. Jamie Oliver’s recent advertisement on behalf of
Sainsbury’s, is misleading the public into thinking farmed salmon is healthy
(Oliver under fire’ for farm salmon ads, News, December 5).

Recent findings still suggest Scottish farmed salmon is highly contaminated.
The colouring is artificial. In fact, very little about it is natural, including the
way in which it is raised and kept. The effect of these farms on the
environment is
destructive. The only thing that can be said for it is that it’s cheap, but at
what cost to the environment and future health?

Julia Downham
Washington, Tyne & Wear

GULLIBLE: This advert is an attempt to fool the public into believing that
this and other salmon farms operate in as sustainable and environmentally
friendly way that is good for the fish and, by implication, good for the
consumer. This is not the case.

Fred Carrie
Alford, Aberdeenshire

				
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