St. Michael’s Lithuanian Roman Catholic Church

Document Sample
St. Michael’s Lithuanian Roman Catholic Church Powered By Docstoc
					       (Photo by Richard F. Hope)

St. Michael’s Lithuanian Roman Catholic Church (219 Spring Garden Street)
       Gothic church “built of ashlar and brick with a Trenton stone façade.”1 An
unusual, short steeple frame finishes off the older church tower. With adjacent garden
and parking lot.
        Originally built as the Brainerd Presbyterian Church2 in honor of colonial
missionary David Brainerd by “a group of 36 families” in 1853.3 The land was
assembled in that year by James McKeen,4 a lumber merchant from South Easton.5
James McKeen was the nephew of Col. Thomas McKeen,6 whose mansion stands today
on the other side of Sitgreaves Alley (now called Sitgreaves Street).7 James McKeen
sold the property to the Brainerd Church the next year (1854).8
       The church was then built, and dedicated on 7 October 1854. Its 175-foot spire
“dominated” Easton9 – then the tallest steeple in town.10 The “main audience room” (i.e.
nave) was located on the second floor, reached by twin staircases. The first floor had a
Sunday School / Lecture Room, and an additional four smaller rooms. The building cost
approximately $32,000.11
         The Presbyterian congregation left the building in 1893, when they joined the
Second Presbyterian congregation at the 333 Spring Garden Street church.12 In 1896, the
building was purchased by the Grant Conclave, No.123, of the Improved Order of
Heptasophs,13 which had recently been organized and chartered.14 The steeple was
removed, because the building would “no longer be used as a church.”15 The building
was remodeled into a club house, and renamed Heptasophs’ Hall.16 The first floor was
fitted out with billiard and pool tables, with a double bowling alley on the East side, “a
neat little reading room” in the NW corner, and kitchen and pantry facilities in the NE
corner.17 “One stairway to the nave was removed to make way for a smoking room and
                                             2


ladies lounge. The nave was used as an auditorium for concerts and public events.”18
“The auditorium occupies the entire second floor,” excepting cloak and toilet facilities
and a gentlemen’s smoking room also installed there.19
          The original Order of the Heptasophs (“Seven Wise Men” in Greek) was a
           fraternal society founded in 1852, modeled loosely upon the Masons. Its
           motto was “in God We Trust”, and it adopted a number of 7-pointed emblems
           and symbols, as well as an elaborate ritual. In 1878, the Improved Order of
           Heptasophs split off, wishing to sell fraternal benevolent life insurance to their
           members. In 1880, the two Heptasoph organizations joined in offering
           insurance to their members. The Improved Order of Heptasophs initiated
           many more members than the original group, reaching a membership of
           676,887 in 1915. It merged into the Fraternal Aid Union in 1917, which in
           turn became the Standard Life Association in 1933.20
At the time Easton’s Heptasophs’ Hall was opened in October 1896, Easton’s Conclave
was the ninth largest in the United States, with a membership of 340.21 The opening
ceremonies were attended by “Hundreds of people”. The welcoming speech was given
by Easton’s ex-Mayor Dr. B. Rush Field. The main address was given by Samuel H.
Tattersall of Baltimore, the Supreme Secretary of the Order, who emphasized the millions
of dollars paid to families of deceased members (evidently by the insurance available to
members).22 Three years later, in August 1899, Easton’s Heptasophs sponsored
“Heptasoph Day” at Island Park (an amusement park in the Lehigh River located West of
Easton), which drew over 2000 people. The event included races, a baseball game, and a
speech by “the silver-tongued orator of the Heptasophs”, Olin Bryan of Baltimore.23 This
repeated connection with Baltimore (MD) appears to be no accident. The city had its
own Heptasophs’ Hall at the beginning of the 20th Century.24 Even within the last few
years, the town has enjoyed a “Heptasoph Series” of theatrical events as part of the
Baltimore Theatre Project.25
        Heptasophs’ Hall appears to have been leased for various public functions. For
example, shortly after its opening, a public concert was given there by local musicians.26
The modern Y.M.C.A. in Easton was formed in 1898, at a “mass meeting” called by Rev.
Alfred Claire in Heptasophs’ Hall.27 In 1911, the Sophomore Class of Lafayette College
held their second “Cotillion” ball there.28 At the end of 1915, the hall was leased to the
Young Men’s Hebrew Association as the headquarters of their campaign to raise funds
for a new building.29
         In the 20th Century, the Improved Order of Heptasophs, “like so many other post-
Civil War fraternal societies, became simply an insurance company, their social and civic
functions ended.”30 In 1916, shortly prior to the merger of the national Heptasoph Order
into the Fraternal Aid Union (see above), Heptasophs’ Hall was purchased for $18,000 by
St. Michael’s Lithuanian Roman Catholic congregation,31 then only four years old.32 The
building was remodeled back into a church. “Ceiling murals in High Victorian style were
fitted into place and the church was graced with the antique[ ] pews from Trinity
Episcopal Church, Art Deco stained-glass windows, and an elaborate crystal
chandelier.”33 The used pews were purchased for $50, while an altar was ordered from
Pittsburgh for $425. Local carpenters did other work in the building.34 Services began in
May 1917; the church was dedicated on 5 August 1917 with sermons in Lithuanian and
                                                  3


Polish. At that time, the community had some 150 families with “more than 1000 souls”,
grown from only 5 families ten years before.35 The first resident pastor was Rev. J.
Rashtutis, for whose residence the house at 103 Spring Garden Street was rented.36
         In 1922, the parish also purchased the Reichard House at 114 Spring Garden
     37
Street as the residence for successive pastors of St. Michael’s Church.38 It is likely –
although unconfirmed in the City Directories – that the Reichard House had been
purchased from the Reichard Family by James B. O’Hay for use as a parsonage by St.
Michael’s Parish. O’Hay purchased the house only one year after St. Michael’s began
services; he sold it to the Parish immediately after he cleared title with one remaining
heir, in 1922.39
        In 1929, the first pipe organ was installed in the church. “Art deco” stained glass
was added later. In 1950, Rev. Joseph C. Gaudinskas was assigned as administrator of St.
Michael’s, and began a general refurbishing of the church. Among other things, he had a
new pipe organ installed. In 1954, the “former Episcopal manse next to the church
became available” and was purchased to be the rectory. A sacristy was built to connect
the two buildings.40 The two St. Michael’s priests then in residence at 114 Spring Garden
Street moved into the new Rectory – which was the Theodore Sitgreaves Mansion at 217
Spring Garden Street – by 1951,41 leaving the Reichard House vacant.42 Reichard House
was sold by the parish in December of that year.43 After the steeple at St. Michael’s was
destroyed by lightening, Hugh Moore, Jr. (son of the “Dixie® Cup” industrialist)
“designed a new bronze fleche to replace it in 1958.”44
       In 1964, Father Gaudinskas was named pastor of St. Bernard’s Church, as well as
Administrator of St. Michael’s. That left no resident pastor for St. Michael’s Parish.
Father Francis Connolly was assigned to St. Michael’s in 1966, and the Rectory was
converted into a Convent for the Sisters of St. Joseph.45
        In 1971, “in conformity with Vatican II decrees, the interior [of the church] was
stripped of many of its ornaments . . . .”46 In 1980, Father Thomas Benested made
renovations to the church to emphasize its historical character. The Sisters left the
Theodore Sitgreaves mansion, which then became a Holy Family residence for the
elderly.47 In 1992, an antique oak altar was brought from St. Joseph’s lower church, with
matching sanctuary furnishings.48 In 2008, as part of a “massive restructuring, which
closed 47 churches,” St. Michael’s Church was closed and its congregation was
consolidated into a new Our Lady of Mercy Parish headquartered in the former St.
Joseph’s Church in South Easton.49


1
       Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May
       2008).
2
       Leonard S. Buscemi, Sr., The 1992 Easton Calendar unnumbered pages 1, 42, 45 (Buscemi
       Enterprises and Pinter’s Printers, Inc. 1991)(spelled “Brainard”); William Peterson, Eagle Scout
       Project: Historic Guide of Easton Site #30 (2006), available through Easton website, www.easton-
       pa.com (via “History” link)(constructed 1872).
3
       Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May
       2008).
                                                4



4
     Deed, James (Mary) McKeen to Brainerd Church, A9 243 (3 July 1854)(and recitals).
     The front part of the land, along Spring Garden Street, was part of original town Lot No.57 that
     had been purchased from the Penn Family in 1802 by Philip Odenwelder, Trustee for the German
     Reformed Congregation of Easton, and trustees for the other congregations in the German Union
     Church at that time. See Deed, John Penn and Richard Penn to Philip Odenwelder, Trustee for
     German Reformed Congregation of Easton, et al., G2 512 (31 May 1802)(sale price £ 11 18s. 6d.
     for original town Lot No.57). These congregations sold it to James McKeen in 1853. Deed,
     German Reformed Congregations of Easton, Drylands, and Plainfield, et al., to James McKeen,
     G8 395 (1 Apr. 1853)(sale price $7,000).
     The rear part of the Brainerd Church’s land was purchased by James McKeen in the same year
     from Joseph B. Gross, a clergyman in Fayette, New York. Deed, Joseph B. (Sophia C.) Gross to
     James McKeen, G8 394 (4 Mar. 1853)(sale price $1,500). Gross had held the property since
     1825. See Deed, William (Catharine) Ricker to Joseph B. Gross, B5 143 (6 May 1825).
5
     See Deed, German Reformed Congregations of Easton, Drylands, and Plainfield, et al., to James
     McKeen, G8 395 (1 Apr. 1853)(recital identifying James McKeen as a Lumber Merchant from
     South Easton). See also Talbot’s Lehigh Valley Gazetteer and Business Directory 1864-65 23
     (Press of Wynkoop & Hallenbeck 1864)(James McKeen, saw-mill proprietor from South Easton);
     Fitzgerald & Dillon, Easton Directory for 1870-71 61 (Ringwalt & Brown 1870)(James McKeen,
     lumber, home at 62 N. Ferry St.).
6
     See McKeen Genealogy Chart, contained in the “McKeen” file at the Northampton County
     Historical & Genealogical Society (no compiler noted). Nephew James McKeen’s father (a
     brother to Col. McKeen) was also named James, but in 1854 it would appear more likely that the
     nephew was the person involved. See generally footnote discussion of the relationships between
     Col. McKeen and his relatives contained in the separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the
     McKeen-Young Mansion at 241 Northampton Street.
7
     See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for the Col. Thomas McKeen Mansion at 231 Spring
     Garden Street.
8
     Deed, James (Mary) McKeen to Brainerd Church, A9 243 (3 July 1854)(sale price $3,000 for
     land at the NE corner of Spring Garden Street and Sitgreaves Alley measuring 60’ X 90’.
9
     See Virginia Williams Bentley, Sesquicentennial Story of the First Presbyterian Church of Easton,
     Pennsylvania 1811-1861 110 (1961)(picture with spire at p.111); see Buscemi, The 1992 Easton
     Calendar, supra at unnumbered page 42 (church built in 1854); William Peterson, Eagle Scout
     Project: Historic Guide of Easton, supra at Site #30 (church built in 1852); Northampton County
     Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May 2008).
     Counting the base, the steeple rose 200’ from the pavement. Article, “The Brainerd Steeple
     Gone”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Tues., 18 Aug. 1896, p.3, col.5.
10
     Article, “The Brainerd Steeple Gone”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Tues., 18 Aug. 1896, p.3,
     col.5; Buscemi, The 1992 Easton Calendar, supra at unnumbered page 42 (church built in 1854).
11
     Virginia Williams Bentley, Sesquicentennial Story of the First Presbyterian Church of Easton,
     Pennsylvania 1811-1861 110 (1961).
12
     Buscemi, The 1992 Easton Calendar, supra at unnumbered page 42; Bentley, Sesquicentennial
     Story of the First Presbyterian Church, supra at 123-24.
13
     Deed, Brainerd-Union Presbyterian Church to The Heptasoph Association, A27 265 (12 May
     1896)(sale price $8,000); see Article, “Easton Heptasophs. They Have an Option on the Old
     Brainerd Church Property and May Convert it Into a Hall”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Tues., 3
     Mar. 1896, p.3, col.2 (Grant Conclave, No. 123, Improved Order of Heptasophs); Article,
     “Heptasoph Hall Association”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Wed., 15 Apr. 1896, p.3, col.2 (Grant
     Conclave, Improved Order of Heptasophs, to take possession of old Brainerd Church on 1 May);
                                                  5



     Article, “The Heptasophs’ Housewarming – An Evening of Music and Speeches at Heptasoph
     Hall”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Wed., 28 Oct. 1896, p.3, col.3 (Grant Conclave of Easton);
     Article, “Heptasoph Hall Opened. The New Building Formally Opened to the Public”, EASTON
     EXPRESS, Wed., 28 Oct. 1896, p.3, col.2.
     But see James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Historic Buildings” (article copy in the folders of the
     Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library)(“Imperial Order of Heptasophs”).
     One authority viewed the Easton group as a Civil War veterans’ club. Northampton County
     Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May 2008). While this
     does not appear to have been explicitly the case, it is possible that the Easton “Grant Conclave”
     was named for General Grant of Civil War fame. It would also not be surprising if many of the
     members were from Easton’s large group of Civil War veterans.
14
     Article, “Heptasoph Hall Association”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Wed., 15 Apr. 1896, p.3,
     col.2.
15
     Article, “The Brainerd Steeple Gone”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Tues., 18 Aug. 1896, p.3,
     col.5.
16
     Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May
     2008); see Leonard S. Buscemi, Sr., The 1992 Easton Calendar unnumbered pages 42 (Buscemi
     Enterprises and Pinter’s Printers, Inc. 1991); see also Charles M. Barnard (compiler), West’s
     Directory for City of Easton 21 (The Union Publishing Co. 1914)(“Blocks, Buildings, Halls”,
     Heptasophs’ Hall at Spring Garden and North Sitgreaves Streets). Eagle Scout Peterson’s
     statement that non-religious uses began after the First Presbyterian Church congregation’s merger
     (in 1941) with the Brainerd Presbyterian Church is apparently an error. William Peterson, Eagle
     Scout Project: Historic Guide of Easton, supra at Site # 30 (2006).
17
     Article, “Heptasoph Hall Opened. The New Building Formally Opened to the Public”, EASTON
     EXPRESS, Wed., 28 Oct. 1896, p.3, col.2; see Article, “The Heptasophs’ Housewarming – An
     Evening of Music and Speeches at Heptasoph Hall”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Wed., 28 Oct.
     1896, p.3, col.3 (Grant Conclave of Easton); see also Northampton County Historical &
     Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May 2008)(billiard and pool tables and
     bowling alley). See also James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Historic Buildings” (article copy in the
     folders of the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library).
18
     Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May
     2008).
19
     Article, “Heptasoph Hall Opened. The New Building Formally Opened to the Public”, EASTON
     EXPRESS, Wed., 28 Oct. 1896, p.3, col.2.
20
     See Phoenixmasonry, Inc., “Improved Order of Heptasophs”,
     www.phoenixmasonry.org/masonicmuseum/fraternalism/heptasophs.htm (accessed 8 Oct. 2009);
     Articles, “Order of the Heptasophs”, www.stichtingargus.nl/vrijmetselarij/ooh_en.html and
     “Improved Order of Heptasophs”, www.stichtingargus.nl/vrijmetselarij/ioh_en.html (both
     accessed 6 Oct. 2009).
21
     Article, “The Heptasophs’ Housewarming – An Evening of Music and Speeches at Heptasoph
     Hall”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Wed., 28 Oct. 1896, p.3, col.3 (Grant Conclave of Easton).
22
     Article, “Heptasoph Hall Opened. The New Building Formally Opened to the Public”, EASTON
     EXPRESS, Wed., 28 Oct. 1896, p.3, col.2; see also Article, “The Heptasophs’ Housewarming – An
     Evening of Music and Speeches at Heptasoph Hall”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Wed., 28 Oct.
     1896, p.3, col.3.
23
     Article, “Heptasoph Day – Members of the Order from All Over the Lehigh Valley Assembled at
     Island Park”, EASTON FREE PRESS (semi-weekly), Fri., 1 Sept. 1899, pl.3, col.3 (held the prior
     Monday). See generally Article, “Heptasoph Convention – Held Thursday Evening in
                                                6



     Gradwohl’s Hall South Bethlehem”, EASTON FREE PRESS (semi-weekly), Tues., 12 Sept. 1899,
     p.3, col.5.
24
     A college of homeopathic medicine in Baltimore held its ninth commencement exercises there on
     10 Apr. 1900. See George T. Shower (Dean), “The Southern Homeopathic Medical College and
     Hospital of Baltimore”, in William Harvey King, History of Homeopathy and Its Institutions in
     America, Chapter III, www.homeoint.org/history/king/2-03.htm (accessed 17 Oct. 2009).
25
     See Baltimore Theatre Project Inc., the heptasoph series,
     www.theatreproject.org/heptasophseries.html (accessed 17 Oct. 2009); see also Agents + Assets,
     www.theatreproject.org/moreinfo_agents.htm (accessed 17 Oct. 2009)(unusual theatrical
     production that was part of the 2006-07 Heptasoph Series in Baltimore Theatre Project).
26
     Item, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Wed., 28 Oct. 1896, p.3, col.1 (concert to be given on Friday
     evening at Heptasoph Hall by Herman Beans, assisted by Maurice Clemens “and his Thursday
     morning class.”).
27
     James Flagg, “The YMCA’s Always Had a Lot of Friends”, EASTON EXPRESS, Fri., 15 Aug. 1975,
     p.6; see also Article, “Wars Twice Halted Rise of Y.M.C.A.”, EASTON EXPRESS, Saturday, 12
     June 1937, Jubilee Section B p.14 (Alfred Claire called first meeting on 11 Oct. 1898, and
     organized at a second meeting on 7 Nov. 1898).
28
     Article, “College Dance – Heptasoph Hall in Gay Colors for The Sophomore Cotillion”, EASTON
     EXPRESS, Sat., 18 Nov. 1911, p.5, col.3.
29
     Article, “Heptasoph Hall Is Y.M.H.A. Headquarters”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Fri., 3 Dec.
     1915, p.13, col.5; accord, Article, “Young Men’s Hebrew Club Launch New Home Project”,
     EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Mon., 6 Dec. 1915, p.1, cols. 4-5 (opening meeting in Star Theatre,
     but headquarters and noon luncheons at Heptasoph Hall).
30
     James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Historic Buildings” (article copy in the folders of the Marx
     Room, Easton Area Public Library).
31
     Deed, The Heptasoph Association to Most Rev. Edmund F. Prendergast, Archbishop of
     Philadelphia, Trustee for Saint Michael Llithuanian Roman Catholic Congregation, D43 322 (31
     May 1916)(sale price $18,000 for property 60’ X 90’); James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Church –
     the early years” (article copy in the folders of the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library);
     accord, James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Historic Buildings” (article copy in the folders of the
     Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library); see Article, “Heptasoph Hall Now St. Michael’s
     Church – New Catholic Congregation of Lithuanians Dedicate Former Brainerd Presbyterian
     Edifice”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Mon., 6 Aug. 1917, p.7, col.5; Article, “St. Michael’s Is
     Dedicated – Lithuanian Church Located in Building Formerly Known as Heptasoph Hall”,
     EASTON EXPRESS, Mon., 6 Aug. 1917, p.5, col.4; Leonard S. Buscemi, Sr., The 1992 Easton
     Calendar unnumbered pages 42 (Buscemi Enterprises and Pinter’s Printers, Inc. 1991);
     Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May
     2008).
     See generally Leonard S. Buscemi, Sr., The 1992 Easton Calendar unnumbered page 39 (Buscemi
     Enterprises and Pinter’s Printers, Inc. 1991) (pictures of Brainard Presbyterian Church,
     Heptasophs [sic] Hall and St. Michael’s Lithuanian Roman Catholic Church).
32
     Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May
     2008); accord, James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Historic Buildings” (article copy in the folders of
     the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library); see James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Church – the
     early years” (article copy in the folders of the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library)(the
     visiting Lithuanian priest begun in Aug. 1907, but meetings to organize a Lithuanian parish were
     begun on 7 August 1912).
                                                7



33
     Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May
     2008); see Information Sheet, Saint Michael’s Church, Easton, Pennsylvania (located in folder of
     the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library)(used pews from Trinity Episcopal Church).
34
     James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Church – the early years” (article copy in the folders of the Marx
     Room, Easton Area Public Library)(pews cost $50, altar ordered from Pittsburgh for $450, local
     work done to build other features).
35
     Article, “Heptasoph Hall Now St. Michael’s Church – New Catholic Congregation of Lithuanians
     Dedicate Former Brainerd Presbyterian Edifice”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Mon., 6 Aug. 1917,
     p.7, col.5 (community from “Russian Poland”, which the article located as being “in the
     Balkans”); Article, “St. Michael’s Is Dedicated – Lithuanian Church Located in Building
     Formerly Known as Heptasoph Hall”, EASTON EXPRESS, Mon., 6 Aug. 1917, p.5, col.4.
36
     Article, “Heptasoph Hall Now St. Michael’s Church – New Catholic Congregation of Lithuanians
     Dedicate Former Brainerd Presbyterian Edifice”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Mon., 6 Aug. 1917,
     p.7, col.5; Information Sheet, Saint Michael’s Church, Easton, Pennsylvania (located in folder of
     the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library)(Rev. Rastutis (note spelling), the first resident
     pastor, rented the house at 103 Spring Garden Street). The Information Sheet relates that Rev.
     Rastutis/Rashtutis had been the assistant to Rev. Gudaitis of Tamaqua, who had been assigned to
     help the Easton Lithuanians in setting up their parish.
37
     Deed, James B. O’Hay to His Eminence, Dennis J. Dougherty, Cardinal Archbishop of
     Philadelphia, G49 494 (30 June 1922)(sale price $6,000).
38
     West’s Easton, Pa and Phillipsburg, NJ Directory 207, 698 (R.L. Polk & Co. 1930)(Pastor J.
     Simon Draugelis); Polk’s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1935 153, 619 (R.L. Polk &
     Co., Inc. 1935)(Pastor J. Simon Draugelis); Polk’s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1937-
     38 197, 727 (R.L. Polk & Co., Inc. 1937)(Rev. Francis Garnius at 727 is evidently a misspelling
     not followed at 197); Polk’s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1942 538 (R.L. Polk & Co.
     1942)(Rev. Francis Garmus); Polk’s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1944-45 676 (R.L.
     Polk & Co. 1944)(Rev . Francis Garmus); Polk’s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1949
     186, 785 (R.L. Polk & Co. 1949)(same); Polk’s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1951 185,
     187, 569 (R.L. Polk & Co. 1951)(Rev. Francis Garmus and Rev. Joseph C. Gaudinskas). See
     generally separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for 114 Spring Garden Street.
39
     See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for 114 Spring Garden Street, and sources cited
     therein.
40
     Information Sheet, Saint Michael’s Church, Easton, Pennsylvania (located in folder of the Marx
     Room, Easton Area Public Library); accord, James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Historic Buildings”
     (article copy in the folders of the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library).
41
     See Polk’s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1955 293-94 (R.L. Polk & Co. 1955).
42
     Polk’s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1955 999 (R.L. Polk & Co. 1955).
43
     Deed, His Excellency, Most Rev. John F. O’Hara, Archbishop of Philadelphia, to Joseph (Mary)
     Segreto, A95 138 (2 Dec. 1955). This deed recites that Cardinal Archbishop Dougherty died on
     31 May 1951, and Archbishop O’Hara was his successor.
44
     Information Sheet, Saint Michael’s Church, Easton, Pennsylvania (located in folder of the Marx
     Room, Easton Area Public Library).
45
     Information Sheet, Saint Michael’s Church, Easton, Pennsylvania (located in folder of the Marx
     Room, Easton Area Public Library).
46
     Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The 28th Annual House Tour 19 (3 May
     2008); accord, James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Historic Buildings” (article copy in the folders of
                                                8



     the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library); see also Information Sheet, Saint Michael’s
     Church, Easton, Pennsylvania (located in folder of the Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library).
47
     Information Sheet, Saint Michael’s Church, Easton, Pennsylvania (located in folder of the Marx
     Room, Easton Area Public Library).
48
     James Somogy, “Saint Michael’s Historic Buildings” (article copy in the folders of the Marx
     Room, Easton Area Public Library).
49
     John A. Zukowski, “Merged Easton churches feel bond of faith, Combining three Catholic
     churches into one has been a spiritual success, pastor, parishioners say”, EXPRESS-TIMES, 14 Aug.
     2008, p.C-7, cols.2-5.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:109
posted:4/3/2010
language:English
pages:8