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Elsternwick residential FINALpmd

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									                        Elsternwick
                     Draft Heritage Guidelines
                            June 2003




Introduction

T      hese guidelines are part of the Glen Eira Heritage Management Plan and
       support the implementation of Council’s heritage policy and heritage planning
controls contained in the Glen Eira Planning Scheme.

The guidelines are general in scope and form an initial step in the design approach.
Council recognises that further, more detailed design advice may be needed and
therefore provides a Heritage Advisory Service offering free architectural and
conservation advice.
                             Contents
Purpose of the guidelines __________________________________________ 5

Further design and technical advice __________________________________ 5

Properties within the Elsternwick Heritage Area ________________________ 5

Heritage Overlay Area – Elsternwick (residential) ______________________ 6

Cultural heritage significance of the Elsternwick Heritage Area ___________ 7

Architectural description of the Elsternwick Heritage Area _______________ 7

Architectural forms and features ____________________________________ 7

Typical house forms _______________________________________________ 8

Assessing the cultural heritage significance of buildings and places _______ 13

Council’s assessment of development proposals _______________________          13
  Council’s development objectives ___________________________________         13
  Planning Scheme requirements _____________________________________           13
  Significant and contributory buildings/places ___________________________    13
  Non-contributory buildings and places _______________________________        14
  Visibility of new buildings and works _________________________________      14
  Heritage conservation design ______________________________________          14

Predesign procedure _____________________________________________ 15
  Neighbourhood and site description and design response _________________ 15

Design approaches ______________________________________________               16
  Conservation __________________________________________________              16
  Following existing architectural traditions ______________________________   16
  Simplified interpretation __________________________________________         16
  Sympathetic contemporary design __________________________________           16

Demolition guidelines ____________________________________________ 17

Establishing building envelopes ____________________________________ 17

Key design checklist _____________________________________________ 18
  Further advice and information _____________________________________ 23
Purpose of the guidelines                                Elsternwick Heritage Area. The areas to which this
                                                         guideline specifically relates (ie, residential areas)
The purpose of these guidelines is to retain the
                                                         are highlighted on the plan.
overall qualities of the Elsternwick Heritage
Area which embody or contribute to its cultural
heritage significance and character. These               Properties within the
guidelines relate specifically to the residential        Elsternwick Heritage Area
areas of this heritage area. Separate guidelines
will deal with the commercial area of the                Acacia Street     1–19 (odd) and 2–18 (even)
Elsternwick Heritage Area.                               Allison Street    1–19A (odd) and
                                                                           6–20 (even)
The guidelines will assist property owners,              Beavis Street     1–19 (odd)
residents and designers who are intending to             Curral Place      14–16 (even)
conserve, restore, renovate, alter or extend
existing buildings, or construct new buildings, to       Curral Road       1–17 (odd) and 2–12 (even)
achieve their aims while retaining and                   Downshire Road 1
reinforcing the cultural heritage significance,          Elizabeth Street  1–51 (odd) and
including the architectural integrity and                                  10–58 (even)
character of the Elsternwick Heritage Area.              Elm Street        10–12 and 25
                                                         Elsternwick Place 3–5 (odd) and 4–6 (even)
The guidelines provide general design advice for
the range of typical architectural forms found in        Glen Eira Road 182–218 (even)
the Elsternwick Heritage Area. They set design           Glen Huntly Road 269–467 (odd) and
parameters, principles and techniques for                                  270–480 (even)
achieving appropriate heritage conservation                                Tram overhead wire poles
objectives.                                                                no. 64–79 and 81
                                                         Gordon Street     1–29 (odd) and railway
Council will use these guidelines, as well as the                          footbridge
advice of its heritage adviser, when assessing           Hotham Street     172–198 (even) and road
town planning applications for development                                 bridge over railway line
proposals within the heritage area.
                                                         King Street       1–3 (odd) and 2–6 (even)
                                                         Liscard Street    1–23 (odd) and
Further design and technical
                                                                           20–24 (even)
advice                                                   Long Street       1–23 (odd) and
Obviously, these guidelines cannot provide                                 2–24 (even)
solutions to every individual design issue which         May Street        1
might arise, but Council’s heritage adviser is
available for consultation on both general design        Maysbury Avenue 1–5 (odd) and 2–10 (even)
principles and individual detail matters. The            Orrong Road       37–129 (odd) and
adviser may recommend Council waive parts of                               48–88A (even)
the guidelines in specific circumstances, where          Riddell Parade    1A and 8–16 (even)
it is considered that a proposal, while not fully        Regent Street     1–77 (odd) and
complying, is likely to achieve a reasonable and                           2–84 (even)
acceptable design outcome.
                                                         Rowan Street      10 and 10A
                                                         Sandham Street 1–31 (odd) and
Properties within the                                                      2–20 (even)
Elsternwick Heritage Area                                Selwyn Street     1–21 (odd) and 2–16 (even)
The properties within the Heritage Area                  Sinclair Street   1–24 (all)
covered by the planning scheme controls are
                                                         Staniland Grove 1–24 (all)
indicated in the map on page 6. This plan shows
both the residential and commercial areas of the         St Georges Road 1–83 (odd) and 2–84 (even)
                                                         Villiers Street   1–23 (odd) and 2–24 (even)
                                                         Willow Street     24

                                                     5
Disclaimer
This map may contain information supplied under licence from the State of Victoria and in respect of which the State of Victoria retains ownership and copyright. The State of Victoria
does not warrant the accuracy or completeness of information in this publication and any person using or relying upon such information does so on the basis that the State of Victoria
shall bear no responsibility or liability whatsoever for any errors faults defects or omissions in the information.

This map has been produced by or for the City of Glen Eira and may contain information provided or assembled by other parties. While the City of Glen Eira has taken reasonable
steps to ensure the accuracy and currency of the information neither the City of Glen Eira nor any other party (the parties) represents that the information is current accurate or
complete. No person should act or rely on information contained in or omitted from the map and the parties will accept no liability for any loss occasioned by or related to any such
action or reliance. Independent advice should always be sought from a suitably qualified person. This map may not be reproduced in any form for any purpose without prior consent
from the City of Glen Eira.
                                                                                           6
Cultural heritage significance                          are the rows of formerly identical double fronted
                                                        “workingmen’s” cottages in Regent, Villiers and
of the Elsternwick Heritage                             Long Streets, now frequently defaced but recalling
Area                                                    the hectic years of the late land boom period and
The Elsternwick Heritage Area is locally                promises of quick fortunes to be made. These
significant for its 19th and early 20th century         houses have been unsympathetically maintained in
building stock and to the extent that it                many instances although there are now frequent
demonstrates a past way of life. The fabric of          indications of changing attitudes and new-found
the Area demonstrates the following historic            appreciation of their worth. French Street is
themes which contribute to its significance:            important as Caulfield’s only street to retain its 19th
• mid-19th century formation of country                 century character with pitched channels and
   residences for which Caulfield is noted;             unpaved carriageway recalling the condition of
                                                        many quiet residential streets before sealing. The
• late 19th century land boom development of
                                                        contrast between the privileged and working
   residential subdivisions and shops;
                                                        classes is a theme in this area recalled in its 19th
• the collapse of the land boom and of its land         century housing stock as well as in later years.
   development schemes and deals which                  Thus the early 20th century villas in St Georges
   became the subject of criminal charges;              Road to the north of Sandham Street have their
• the provision of public services including            upper class counterparts in Elizabeth Street, which
   pitched roads and electric trams;                    happens also to include the handsome inter-war
• the Edwardian residential and commercial              villa at no. 30.
   development associated with the economic
   revival of that period;                              The amenity of the area is enhanced by vistas that
• the pattern of residential development over           impart character and identity to it. In Bent Street,
   time leading to a diverse socio-economic             the Rippon Lea Gardens come into view and in
   profile expressed in the range of house sizes        Staniland Grove the view south is terminated by the
   and types;                                           distinguished façades of the former State Savings
                                                        Bank and the adjoining ANZ Bank.
• the continuing economic strengths of the
   shopping centre during the inter-war period;
   and
• the development of religious, recreational            Architectural forms and features
   and social institutions throughout the history       The following photographs show some of the
   of the area.                                         common architectural forms occurring in the
                                                        heritage area and identify their key architectural
                                                        features. This is not an exhaustive architectural
                                                        analysis, but should assist when discussing
Architectural description of
                                                        proposals with Council. The architectural forms of
the Elsternwick Heritage Area                           buildings may vary from these examples in the
This extensive historic area is made up of three        architectural details that they incorporate in their
parts, the Rippon Lea estate to the west and            design. Other building forms will require individual
the 19th and early 20th century residential areas       assessment to determine their aesthetic
to the east, separated from the former by the           significance.
Gordon Street subdivision following World War
II and from each other by the Glen Huntly Road          It is important to interpret the stylistic
strip shopping centre.                                  characteristics of buildings in the area when
                                                        designing alterations, additions and new buildings
The residential area to the north of Glen Huntly        in the same area.
Road is deceiving at first glance. Its important
early houses are easily missed, but include
Glenmoore which stands aloof within its
overgrown garden in St Georges Road, Stanmer
Park, Maysbury and of course Rippon Lea
which is also concealed from view by its
outstanding landscaped grounds. Of importance

                                                    7
Typical house forms
  1. Single fronted timber worker’s cottage (Victorian)




  Typical features
  roof form                  Hipped, verandah roofs convex, not bullnosed.
  materials                  Ashlar boards to facades, square edged weatherboards
                             elsewhere, slate roofs, more recently corrugated iron,
                             cast iron lace verandahs usually with timber posts.
  ornamentation              Cast iron lace to verandahs, timber moulded capitals to
                             chamfered posts (not turned timber), ashlar boards,
                             eaves brackets, stained glass work to windows.
  façade composition         Single fronted with posted verandah across whole of
  and form                   façade, symmetry established by hipped roofed form
                             and central chimney.
  windows and doors          Principal windows often tripartite, side light and fan light
                             to front door. Typical windows double hung, all with
                             ornamental horns to sashes. Doors paneled with
                             bolection moulds.
  chimneys                   Stuccoed with cornice moulds.
  set backs                  Highly regimented and consistent along the street
                             frontage.
  fences                     Timber picket fences and gates.
  principles for design      The scale and rhythm of the street architecture together
  of alterations             with its repetitive nature should be respected. Building
                             materials and forms should be interpretive. Additions
                             should not challenge the single storeyed character of
                             the cottages. Alterations to façades should recover the
                             former appearance of the place.


                                  8
2. Single fronted villas (Victorian)




 Typical features
 roof form               Hipped, verandah roofs convex, not bullnosed.
 materials               Tuck pointed polychrome brick, or stuccoed walls, slate roofs, more
                         recently corrugated iron, cast iron lace verandahs with cast iron or
                         timber posts, bluestone sills and plinths. Rear additions often timber
                         framed clad with square edged weatherboards.
 ornamentation           Cast iron lace to verandahs, timber moulded capitals to chamfered posts
                         (not turned timber) or fluted cast iron with ornamental capitals,
                         polychrome brickwork, typically with white tuck pointed black body
                         bricks relieved by black tuck pointed whites and black tuck pointed reds,
                         eaves brackets, cast cement ornamentation to stuccoed walls, especially
                         in the form of architraves to openings and impost moulds, patterned
                         slates, stained glass work to windows.
 façade composition      Single fronted with posted verandah across whole of façade, symmetry
 and form                established by hipped roofed form with chimneys and central doorway
                         balanced by windows on either side. Alternatively, the verandah may
                         extend around one or both sides and protect the front door.
 windows and doors       Principal windows often tripartite, side light and fan light to front door.
                         Typical windows double hung, all with ornamental horns to sashes.
                         Doors paneled with bolection moulds.
 chimneys                Face brick or stuccoed with cornice moulds.
 set backs               Usually consistent along the street.
 fences                  Timber picket fences and gates.
 principles for design   Building materials and forms should be interpretive. Additions should
 of alterations          not challenge the single storeyed character of the villas. Alterations to
                         façades should recover the former appearance of the place.


                                             9
3. Double fronted villas (Victorian)




 Typical features
 roof form               Hipped, verandah roofs convex, not bullnosed.
 materials               Tuck pointed polychrome brick or stuccoed walls, slate roofs, more
                         recently corrugated iron, cast iron lace verandahs with cast iron or timber
                         posts, bluestone sills and plinths. Rear additions often timber framed clad
                         with square edged weatherboards.
 ornamentation           Cast iron lace to verandahs, timber moulded capitals to chamfered posts
                         (not turned timber) or fluted cast iron with ornamental capitals,
                         polychrome brickwork, typically with white tuck pointed black body bricks
                         relieved by black tuck pointed whites and black tuck pointed reds, eaves
                         brackets, cast cement ornamentation to stuccoed walls, especially in the
                         form of architraves to openings and impost moulds, patterned slates,
                         stained glass work to windows.
 façade composition      Double fronted having a projecting wing, sometimes with a faceted
 and form                window bay, with posted verandah across recessed section, chimneys
                         dominant elements.
 windows and doors       Principal windows often tripartite, side light and fan light to front door.
                         Typical windows double hung, all with ornamental horns to sashes. Doors
                         paneled with bolection moulds.
 chimneys                Face brick or stuccoed with cornice moulds.
 set backs               Highly regimented and consistent along the street frontage.
 fences                  Timber picket fences and gates.
 principles for design   The scale and rhythm of the street architecture together with its repetitive
 of alterations          nature should be respected. Building materials and forms should be
                         interpretive. Additions should not challenge the single storeyed character
                         of the villas. Alterations to façades should recover the former appearance
                         of the place.




                                              10
4. Complementary pairs (post-Federation)




 Typical features
 roof form        Hipped with dominant gables as design elements, verandahs vary and may
                  constitute separate elements or be formed by an extension of the main roof.
 materials        Square edged weatherboards, black tuck pointed red bricks, stucco to heads and
                  sills or as bands, bluestone sills and plinths, rough cast or pressed metal to
                  simulate rough cast, timber strapwork, slate and terra cotta roofs, sometimes in
                  combination, corrugated iron roofs. Rear additions often timber framed clad with
                  square edged weatherboards.
 ornamentation    Highly picturesque, weatherboards shingled in bands, turned timber posts with
                  capitals to verandahs having fretted and ladder framed friezes either straight or
                  curved (cast iron lace unusual), Art Nouveaux references, simulated half
                  timbering recalling English Medieval construction methods, terra cotta pots and
                  rough cast bands to chimney, lead light work to windows or tinted Flemish glass.
 façade           Picturesque but regimented to the extent that attached and complementary pairs
 composition      are identical though mirror reversed. Whilst individual dwellings are
 and form         asymmetrical, they form symmetrical units as pairs.
 windows and      Front windows usually casements with upper lights in tinted or lead light glass in
 doors            groups of three, often projecting as window bays. Alternatively, double hung
                  with ornamental horns to sashes. Doors paneled with bolection moulds,
                  sometimes with glazed upper lights.
 chimneys         Face brick or stuccoed often with rough cast work and terra cotta pots. Usually
                  dominant and asymmetrical to emphasise contrived picturesque form.
 set backs        Usually consistent along the street.
 fences           Timber picket fences and gates.
 principles for   Since individual dwellings often have an identical though mirror reversed
 design           relationship with their adjoining dwelling, alterations should not obscure the
 of alterations   clarity of this relationship. Building materials and forms should be interpretive.
                  Additions should not challenge the single storeyed character of the villas.
                  Alterations to façades should recover the former appearance of the place.


                                              11
5. Detached villas (post-Federation)




 Typical features
 roof form        Highly picturesque, hipped with dominant gables as design elements, emphasis
                  often being given to the diagonal axis by means of gablets, towers and
                  verandah treatments. Picturesque verandahs vary and may constitute separate
                  elements or be formed by an extension of the main roof.
 materials        Black tuck pointed red body bricks, cement banding, bluestone sills and plinths.
                  Square edged weatherboards, rough cast or pressed metal to simulate rough
                  cast, timber strapwork, slate and terra cotta roofs, sometimes in combination,
                  corrugated iron roofs. Rear additions often timber framed clad with square
                  edged weatherboards.
 ornamentation    Highly picturesque, weatherboards shingled in bands, turned timber posts with
                  capitals to verandahs having fretted and ladder framed friezes either straight or
                  curved, Art Nouveaux references, (cast iron lace unusual), simulated half
                  timbering recalling English Medieval construction methods, terra cotta pots and
                  rough cast bands to chimneys, lead light work to windows or tinted Flemish
                  glass.
 façade           Highly picturesque with emphasis given to the diagonal axis usually enhanced
 composition      by the detached nature of the place within garden surrounds. Picturesque roof
 and form         lines are characteristic. Design elements typically extend to window bays,
                  dormers, chimneys, gablets, corner bays and corner towers.
 windows          Front windows usually casements with upper lights in tinted or lead light glass,
 and doors        in groups of three, often projecting as window bays. Alternatively, double hung
                  with ornamental horns to sashes. Doors paneled with bolection moulds,
                  sometimes with glazed upper lights.
 chimneys         Face brick with rough cast work and terra cotta pots. Usually dominant and
                  asymmetrical to emphasize contrived picturesque form. Height is also often
                  exaggerated.
 set backs        Usually consistent along the street.
 fences           Timber picket fences and gates.
 principles for   The picturesque compositions permit flexibility in the design of additions which
 design           enter into the spirit of the original designs, provided that they do not obscure or
 of alterations   compromise original concepts or significant fabric. Roof spaces may lend
                  themselves to the introduction of attic floors. Building materials and forms
                  should be interpretive.
                                              12
Assessing the cultural heritage                               • ensure proposed changes to the buildings and
                                                                places within the area, which are visible from
significance of buildings and                                   the street, involve minimal alterations to
places                                                          contributory architecture and minimise the
The buildings within the Elsternwick Heritage Area              visibility and impact of new buildings and
not only vary in their architectural forms but also in          extensions by responding to the architectural
their cultural heritage significance and architectural          character and significance of the building and
integrity. The Heritage Management Plan assessed                street;
both the individual significance of many buildings as         • where proposed alterations and additions to
well as their contribution to the overall cultural              existing significant or contributory buildings and
values of the heritage area to determine whether                places will be visible from the street, ensure that
they are significant, contributory or non-                      the design is sympathetic and subordinate to the
contributory.                                                   design of the original structure, by using
                                                                materials, textures, colours, finishes, which exist
The majority of buildings within the area were                  within the original structure or place; and
assessed as being significant or contributory to the          • ensure the design of new in-fill development
cultural heritage significance of the Elsternwick               respects, complements and interprets the
Estate Area. These buildings may vary in their                  character of the street and area.
individual significance depending upon their age,
architectural form, integrity and condition.                  Planning Scheme requirements
Those buildings assessed as being non-contributory            The Heritage Overlay controls in the Glen Eira
                                                              Planning Scheme (Clause 43.01) specify when
are generally more recent buildings or buildings that
have been substantially altered and therefore do not          a planning permit is required. Generally, this
contribute meaningfully to the overall cultural               includes demolition, new buildings and works and
                                                              subdivision. The schedule to the Heritage Overlay
heritage significance of the area.
                                                              specifies any additional requirements of the
                                                              controls. The scheme also specifies matters
The assessments made in the Heritage
                                                              Council must consider when assessing planning
Management Plan will be used as the basis
                                                              applications. In particular, Clauses 54 and 55 of
for Council’s consideration of development
                                                              the Scheme, which form part of ResCode, must
proposals and will be supplemented, when
                                                              be considered.
necessary, by site inspections and the advice of
Council’s heritage adviser.
                                                              Significant and contributory
                                                              buildings/places
Council’s assessment of
                                                              The impact of the proposal on the cultural heritage
development proposals                                         significance of the building and place, and the
When assessing development proposals Council                  contribution it makes to the cultural heritage
will consider the following.                                  significance of the area, will be based on
                                                              assessments in the Glen Eira Heritage
Council’s development objectives                              Management Plan and by site inspection.
The development objectives set broad heritage
goals for new development within the heritage                 The assessment of whether a building or place
area. All proposals for new work should:                      is significant or contributory, is important when
                                                              Council considers development proposals,
• conserve and/or reconstruct the original
                                                              whether these proposals are for minor or major
   architectural elements of significant and
                                                              alterations or redevelopment. Council is concerned
   contributory buildings/places;
                                                              to ensure the cultural heritage significance of
• conserve features of the area that contribute to            significant and contributory buildings and places is
   its cultural heritage significance and integrity,          not compromised.
   while recognising the possible need for their
   adaptation to new circumstances;




                                                         13
     The contribution made by an individual building to a
     heritage area will influence decisions made by
     Council in relation to proposals for minor or major
     alterations or redevelopment. It is Council’s aim to
     ensure the cultural heritage significance and the
     architectural integrity of significant and
     contributory buildings and places are not
     compromised.

     Non-contributory buildings and places
     Because non-contributory buildings have little
     individual importance within a conservation area,
     any application for their demolition, major alteration
     or redevelopment will be viewed in the context of
     the impact the new proposal has on adjoining
     properties, the surrounding streetscape and the
     cultural heritage of the area. Proposed
     developments therefore should not detract from or
     intrude upon the aesthetic values of their environs.

     Visibility of new buildings and works
     Assessing the visibility of proposed new buildings
     and works from the street is one technique used to
     determine the likely impact a proposal will have on
     the cultural heritage significance and architectural
     integrity of a building and heritage area. Where
     works are scarcely visible from the street, they are
     considered to have little impact on the significance
     of the integrity of the streetscape (refer Figure 1
     on page 16).

     This approach, subject to an appropriate design,
     enables alterations and additions to the rear of
     significant or contributory buildings to be made
     without the same level of concern about their
     visual impacts from a heritage management
     viewpoint. The design, however, must also be in
     accordance with ResCode requirements.

     Heritage conservation design
     Suitability of the design is based on appropriate
     heritage conservation design principles outlined in
     these guidelines and as assessed by Council’s
     heritage adviser.




14
Predesign procedure
Before commencing a design for new works in the
Elsternwick area, it is important to understand the
generally accepted principles for appropriate design
in heritage areas.

Neighbourhood and site description
and design response
An important step in the design and planning
process is preparing a neighbourhood and site
description and design response prior to the
preparation of development proposals (including
demolition). This analysis must comply with the
requirements of Clause 54 or 55 of the Glen Eira
Planning Scheme (ResCode) and should include the
following matters:
• identify which parts of the building and site
    contribute to the cultural heritage significance of
    the buildings, places, street or area;
• consider which elements of the front garden
    contribute to the significance of the place, street
    or area including pathways, fences, gates and
    the like; and
• consider view lines which need to be protected
    to ensure the contributory elements of the place
    and adjoining properties are not obscured.

This analysis may require technical advice from an
architect with experience in the conservation of
heritage places and is essential to the adoption of an
appropriate heritage conservation design approach
for any places of local importance.

Council’s Heritage Advisory Service can also help
applicants by providing free architectural and
conservation advice.




                                                          15
Design approaches                                           Simplified interpretation
These guidelines recommend one of the following             In certain circumstances, simplified versions of
four design approaches be adopted for works on              existing design idioms that are “in the spirit” of the
properties within heritage areas.                           style, but not necessarily literal in their design
                                                            interpretation, may be appropriate for proposed
Conservation                                                additions and alterations to existing structures. They
                                                            should draw on appropriate design sensibilities, and
This technique involves the maintenance                     employ similar street setbacks, building scale, form
(protective care) of a place, and may, according to         and proportions, roof shapes, window and door
circumstances include preservation (retarding               opening types and building materials and colours.
deterioration), restoration (returning the existing
building fabric to a known earlier state by the
                                                            The heritage adviser’s guidance is helpful when this
removal of accretions or by re-assembling existing
                                                            approach is to be undertaken.
components), reconstruction (to a known earlier
state), or appropriate approved adaptation.
                                                            Sympathetic contemporary design
This technique is most appropriate for places               Contemporary designs which show sympathy and
individually listed in the Planning Scheme Heritage         resonance with the original form and design of a
Overlay schedule as having cultural heritage                building and/or the character of an area, without
significance, or which are considered to be                 replicating past historical styles, forms or detailing.
significant to a heritage area, and where major             The design would need to demonstrate deference
alterations to the building form are not required.          and “good manners in architecture” to existing
                                                            significant structures and to any neighbouring
Following existing architectural                            significant and/or contributory buildings, through the
                                                            appropriate use of such things as materials,
traditions
                                                            textures, colours, finishes, rhythms, proportions,
This approach is appropriate where a designer               scale, angles, roof forms, solid/void relationships,
values the existing architecture of the area and            massing, set backs and planting.
designs new works in the same stylistic traditions
as those that impart value to the street. Whilst
recognising that it is particularly challenging to
enter into the spirit of a past era and to produce a
creative design using the architectural vocabulary
of the past, such a course is acceptable.




                      Figure 1: establishing the development envelope (vertical)

                                                       16
Demolition guidelines
Generally, whole or partial demolition of any
building or structure that contributes to the
significance and integrity of the area will not
be supported.

However, there are circumstances where
demolition will be considered including:
• where demolition is of a non-contributory
  building within an area;
• where the works are limited to the removal of a
  later addition, which contributes little to the
  significance of the building or are part of an
  attempt to restore the building to an identified
  early or original state;
• where the demolition is of low contributory
  material not visible from the street (refer Figure
  1 on page 16); or
• where, on the advice of a suitably qualified
  building practitioner, the relevant parts of any
  building are deemed to be structurally unsound
  or beyond repair. Council may seek alternative
  advice in this circumstance prior to reaching
  a decision.

Where whole or partial demolition is considered
acceptable, it will not be formally permitted until
building plans have been approved for a
replacement development which makes a positive
contribution to the streetscape.

Establishing building envelopes
The key objective of establishing a development
envelope is to prevent or minimise the visual
intrusion of new development on a heritage building
or place and the heritage area, particularly from
vantage points in nearby public areas, streets, lanes
and parks.

The form or shape of the building envelope should
be derived from the shapes of the building
envelopes of significant and contributory buildings
in the heritage area.

Where the predominant contributory buildings are
single-storey the upper levels of double-storey
additions should be well setback from the front
façade line to ensure they do not intrude
unreasonably on the existing streetscape.

New development should be within the line of
vision (refere Figure 1 on page 16) so that it is
out of site and minimises the likely impact on the
original buildings and the street appearance.
                                                        17
Key design checklist
The checklist identifies a number of key design elements that should, where appropriate, be considered
and used as a guide when preparing a development proposal within the heritage area.

   Key design                       Design principles                         Design techniques
   considerations
 Analysis of the cultural           •   Identify and understand the           •   Identify whether or not the
 heritage significance of a             cultural heritage significance of         subject building/place is
 site and building                      the building/place, street or area.       contributory and if so in what
                                                                                  way. This analysis should form
                                                                                  a written report for submission
                                                                                  as part of any application for
                                                                                  town planning approval.
                                                                              •   Conserve those elements that
                                                                                  impart significance to a building.
                                                                              •   Identify those buildings in the
                                                                                  vicinity of the site that
                                                                                  contribute to the character of
                                                                                  the street or area.
                                                                              •   Use Council’s free Heritage
                                                                                  Advisory Service to obtain
                                                                                  guidance.

 Building envelope, height          •   Identify the principal elements of    •   For single storey buildings,
 and setbacks                           the building envelope which are           ensure any new works at first
                                        characteristic of the contributory        floor level are set well back from
                                        buildings in the site’s vicinity.         the street facade to retain
                                    •   Confine visible new work to an            original transverse roof line and
                                        envelope derived from the                 minimise visual intrusion into
                                        significant or contributory               the streetscape (refer Figure 1
                                        building/streetscape character.           on page 16).
                                    •   Ensure new works are discreet         •   Bulk and massing of any second
                                        and do not overwhelm the                  storey addition must be
                                        significant fabric of a building/         regressive in size compared with
                                        place or street.                          the existing dwelling.
                                    •   Minimise the impacts of new           •   Adoption of height reduction
                                        work on significant and                   techniques is recommended.
                                        contributory buildings and                Some examples include: coved
                                        elements.                                 or cathedral ceilings with a
                                                                                  maximum wall height of about
                                                                                  2000mm or use of existing roof
                                                                                  spaces with dormer windows or
                                                                                  other suitable roof windows.
                                                                              •   In general new works other than
                                                                                  landscaping will not be
                                                                                  permitted within the garden
                                                                                  frontage of a significant or
                                                                                  contributory building.
                                                                              •   Setback for new buildings
                                                                                  should be no less than the
                                                                                  larger of the setbacks of the
                                                                                  adjacent contributory/
  Figure 2: Techniques for adding a second storey to an inter-war house           significant buildings.

                                                       18
 Key design          Design principles                         Design techniques
 considerations
                                                               •   Side boundary setbacks should
                                                                   be typical for the area and no
                                                                   less than those of the nearest
                                                                   significant or contributory
                                                                   buildings.
                                                               •   The maximum height for new
                                                                   works should be no greater than
                                                                   the maximum height of the
                                                                   nearest significant and
                                                                   contributory building on either
                                                                   side, with a maximum height of
                                                                   two storeys.

Architectural form   •   Identify the critical architectural   •   Building forms for new works
                         forms that give character to the          should reflect the size, scale
                         area and ensure visible additions         and massing of the building
                         or new buildings are                      envelopes of significant and
                         complementary to those forms.             contributory buildings in the
                                                                   area. Refer to the common
                                                                   architectural forms and features
                                                                   contained in these guidelines
                                                                   with a view to developing
                                                                   a design that is responsive
                                                                    to them.
                                                               •   Ensure new roof forms
                                                                   complement the roofs that impart
                                                                   significance to the street.
                                                               •   Ensure the relationships
                                                                   between windows and walls
                                                                   complement those that impart
                                                                   significance to the street.
                                                               •   Ensure garages intrude as little
                                                                   as possible by making sure they
                                                                   do not dominate proposals for
                                                                   new buildings (refer section on
                                                                   garages/carports on page 22).
                                                               •   The building form should be
                                                                   derived from or relate with the
                                                                   shapes of the building
                                                                   envelopes of significant and
                                                                   contributory buildings of the
                                                                   area.
                                                               •   New building fabric should be
                                                                   complementary yet subtly
                                                                   distinguishable from original
                                                                   fabric.




                                        19
 Key design                        Design principles                         Design techniques
 considerations

Demolition                         • Avoid removal or demolition             •   Demolition will be considered
                                     of contributory buildings and               where circumstances such as
                                     significant buildings.                      those discussed elsewhere in
                                   • The demolition or removal of                these guidelines apply.
                                     non-contributory buildings/             •   Where demolition is acceptable,
                                     places or elements is acceptable.           designs for new work visible
                                                                                 from the street should serve to
                                                                                 strengthen the valued
                                                                                 architectural character of the
                                                                                 street and area in the manner
                                                                                 anticipated in these guidelines.

Building materials                 •   Use materials consistent              •   Use technical references and
                                       with the era, cultural significance       design advice to select
                                       of the building                           appropriate materials.
                                       and its architectural style.          •   Refer to nearby significant and
                                   •   Use materials that complement             contributory buildings to
                                       existing building materials.              establish a suitable range of
                                                                                 materials.
                                                                             •   If conserving, research evidence
                                                                                 of original building materials.
                                                                             •   Additions and alterations should
                                                                                 not diminish or destroy
                                                                                 significant materials or elements.
                                                                             •   The use of colorbond on the
                                                                                 roofs of existing significant
                                                                                 buildings is not encouraged
                                                                                 because of the subtle difference
                                                                                 between this material and
                                                                                 corrugated galvanised iron.
                                                                                 Similarly corrugated galvanised
                                                                                 iron is preferred to zincalume.

Paint colours                      •   Use colour consistent with the        •   (Generally) do not paint
(Note: Unless specifically             era, the design of the building           previously unpainted surfaces.
stated in the schedule to Clause       and the architectural character       •   Where possible, reinstate early
43.01 a planning permit is only        of the heritage area.                     paint schemes, or select colours
required for the painting of                                                     appropriate to the era, and the
previously unpainted surfaces)                                                   design of the building.
                                                                             •   Use technical references and
                                                                                 expert advice for guidance in the
                                                                                 selection of a colour scheme.
                                                                             •   Where removal of paint is
                                                                                 necessary use a technique that
                                                                                 will not damage the building
                                                                                 materials. Sandblasting is not an
                                                                                 appropriate means of paint
                                                                                 removal.
                                                                             •   Do not use inappropriately
                                                                                 bright or iridescent colours.
                                                                             •   Do not use unsympathetic
                                                                                 combinations of colours.

                                                      20
 Key design                          Design principles                        Design techniques
 considerations

Garden design                        •   Retain, restore or create frontage   • Keep garden frontages free of
                                         landscape design consistent with       permanent structures other than
                                         the era and architectural style        fences and gates.
                                         associated with the building.        • Employ garden designs, elements
                                     •   Minimise the impact of garden          and plant species consistent with
                                         structures on significant and          the architectural period of the
                                         contributory buildings and the         area.
                                         streetscape.                         • Refer to early surviving garden
                                                                                designs for details of garden
                                                                                layout and elements such as
                                                                                lawns, plantings, pathways and
                                                                                driveways. Where possible, the
                                                                                original garden design and
                                                                                elements should be conserved.
                                                                              • Do not screen dwellings from
                                                                                the street.

Car parking                          •   Minimise the visual impacts of       •   In general, car parking should be
                                         vehicle accommodation.                   restricted to the rear or side of a
                                                                                  dwelling. Parking within the
                                                                                  property frontage is discouraged.
                                                                              •   Where the provision of a car
                                                                                  space in the frontage setback is
                                                                                  unavoidable, it should not be
                                                                                  contained within a roofed
                                                                                  structure and it should be
                                                                                  integrated into the landscape
                                                                                  design to minimise visual
                                                                                  intrusion.
                                                                              •   Provide continuity to the front
                                                                                  fence by providing gates at the
                                                                                  front property alignment.

Carports/garages                     •   Existing garages should be           •   Where possible extant original
                                         retained and conserved as                garages should be conserved.
                                         a priority.                              In general, new car parking
                                                                                  structures should be based
                                                                                  on early examples within the
                                                                                  heritage area.
                                                                              •   Car parking structures should
                                                                                  be located either at the rear of
                                                                                  the property, adjacent to the side
                                                                                  boundary, or setback not less
                                                                                  than 1 metre from the front
                                                                                  facade. In all instances, access
                                                                                  should be via a driveway.
                                                                              •   New double garages will
                                                                                  generally not be supported
                                                                                  unless they are out of view
                                                                                  from the street.


              Preferred siting of garages and carports

                                                         21
 Key design             Design principles                        Design techniques
 considerations
                        •   Minimise impact of car parking       •   Driveways and crossovers
                            structures on contributory               should be of single car width.
                            buildings and the streetscape.           New crossovers are not
                                                                     encouraged.

Front fences            •   Existing early fences and gates      •   Where possible retain existing
                            should be retained as a priority.        original fence materials and
                        •   Where new fences are                     conserve.
                            constructed, a fence design,         •   Use technical references such as
                            which retains and enhances               Fences and Gates c.1840-1925,
                            the streetscape character                National Trust 8.1 or obtain
                                                                     expert advice to guide in the
                            should be adopted.
                                                                     selection of a suitable fence
                        •   New fence designs should be
                                                                     design.
                            appropriate to the period and        •   For many architectural styles in
                            style of the associated building.        the area, traditional fencing
                                                                     styles are low, less than 1.4m in
                                                                     height and use open materials
                                                                     such as timber pickets, iron work
                                                                     and woven wire.
                                                                 •   Avoid using fence designs
                                                                     that are too ornate to suit the
                                                                     building style.
                                                                 •   The use of hedges, shrubs
                                                                     and small trees can provide
                                                                     additional privacy.
                                                                 •   Provide continuity to the front
                                                                     fence by providing gates at the
                                                                     front property alignment.

Public infrastructure   •   Public streetscape elements such     •    Grassed nature strips and
                            as landscaping features and              footpaths, street signs and
                            roadside furniture and the broad         power or electricity poles dating
                            range of infrastructural materials       from the significant development
                            which contribute to the character        period should be retained.
                            of the heritage place shall, where   •    Original or early landscaping
                            appropriate, be conserved and            elements should be retained or
                            enhanced.                                early landscape character
                                                                     secured through the replanting
                                                                     of original species of trees,
                                                                     shrubs and grasses.
                                                                 •    The road surface and associated
                                                                     kerbs and channels should be
                                                                     retained as a priority or restored
                                                                     in materials and profiles to match
                                                                     early examples found on the site.
                                                                 •    New traffic management devices
                                                                     such as speed humps, line
                                                                     marking, signage and other street
                                                                     furniture should be unobstrusive.




                                            22
Further advice and information
Technical advice and appointments are available by contacting Council’s Heritage Advisory Service on
9524 3423.

Further information may also be gained from references such as the following, which are generally
available in public libraries:
       Peterson, Richard Fences and Gates c.1840–1925, National Trust Technical Bulletin 8.1 (1988)




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