Safe Patient Handling Equipment

Document Sample
Safe Patient Handling Equipment Powered By Docstoc
					Safe Patient Handling
     Equipment
  Patient Handling Equipment & Aids


Perceived by staff nurses as the #1
 most effective solution for decreasing
• risk of injury
• musculoskeletal discomfort


                                          2
Bariatric Equipment




                      3
   Bed Improvements to Facilitate
    Transfers and Repositioning
• Shearless pivot reduces need to constantly
  reposition in bed by minimizing slippage
  towards the foot of the bed.
• Rotating air mattress rotates the patient as
  needed through use of air bladder in the
  mattress surface.
Specialized Beds




                   5
         Specialized Beds

Transfer conveyor system integrated
 into bed frame
Moves patient from bed into
 wheelchair and back




                                       6
        Specialized Beds




Retractable Footboard reduces sliding
  down in bed                           7
             Beds/Mattresses

   Retractable Footboard
   Percussion/Vibration
   Raised Knee Platform
   Capillary perfusion enhancement
   Built-in Scale
   Height adjustable
   CPR function
   Bariatric
                                      8
Patient Transport Devices




                            9
Air Assisted Lateral Sliding Aids
• Flexible mattress placed under patient.
• Portable air supply inflates the mattress.
• Air flows through perforations in the mattress
  allowing the patient to be moved on a film of
  air, decreasing nurse exertion.
• Good for patients with special medical
  conditions, such as pressure sores.
• Can be used in MRI, CT etc.
Lateral Transfer Devices




    Air Assisted Lateral
    Transfer Device
                           11
             Friction Reducing
            Lateral Sliding Aids
• Bed to Stretcher transfers
• Made of smooth, parachute-like material.
• Positioned beneath the patient to provide a
  reduced friction surface to slide the patient
  across.
• Small, foldable, easy to store.
• Properly designed handles can reduce
  horizontal reach of nurse.
Lateral Transfer Devices




Friction Reducing Device (FRD)

                                 13
            Transfer Chairs
• Some wheelchairs and dependency chairs can
  convert into stretchers.
• Back folds down and legs come up.
• Allow lateral transfer of patient.
• Eliminate need to transfer patient to and from
  wheelchair.
             Transfer Chairs

• Convert from chair to
  wheelchair to stretcher
• Facilitates lateral transfer
  from bed to chair
• Bariatric models available




                                 15
Car Extraction Sling Lift




                            16
Ergonomic Shower Chair




                     17
            Stand Assist Lift
• Easy to maneuver in restricted areas, such as
  bathrooms.
• Assists patient with standing from seated
  position.
• Appropriate for partially dependent patients
  with some weight bearing ability.
• Available with ability for patient to ambulate.
Sit to Stand Lifts




                      Non-powered
   With ambulation
         capability
                                    19
   Powered full body sling lift
• Mounted on portable base or ceiling tracks.
• Ceiling lifts can go over floors and around
  furniture however, transfers are limited to areas
  where track is installed.
• Easy to install sling beneath patient.
• Used for highly dependent patients.
• Available with many features such as scales
  and can be used for any transfer.
• Wide variety of slings available to meet needs
  of all patients and diagnoses. Such as
  ambulation slings.
Full Body Sling Lifts
     Floor-based




                        21
Full Body Sling Lifts
  Ceiling Mounted




                        22
               Full Body Sling Lifts

There are differences in use of portable floor lifts as
  opposed to ceiling lifts
• Biomechanical stress on caregiver is greater when
  pushing/pulling portable lift & patient.
  (Nelson, et al, 2003; Santaguida et al, 2005; Marras, 2007)

• Other Risks of Injury are greater.
  • Considerable arm strength & back torsion are required,
    especially when wheels are not working well.
  • Workers can trip over lifts or run into them.
  • Lifts on wheels are not always stable.
  (Garg, 1991; Garg, 1991; Daynard, 2001)

                                                                23
                 Full Body Sling Lifts

There are differences in use of portable floor lifts as
  opposed to ceiling lifts
• Ceiling lift accessibility results in greater use
   (OHSAH, 2006; Garg, 1991; Garg, 1991; Daynard, 2001; Nelson et al, 2006)
• Staff prefer ceiling lifts.
   (Nelson, et al, 2003; Santaguida et al, 2005; OHSAH, 2006; Garg, 1991; Garg,
   1991; Daynard, 2001; Nelson et al; 2006)




                                                                           24
           Full Body Sling Lifts


Ceiling Lift Recommendations
   – Include scales when buying lifts
   – Install ceiling lift H-track (traverse) rather than
     straight track




                                                      25
Ceiling Lift Track
 Configurations




                     26
                  Lift Slings

Lifts are not ‘presently’ the answer to ALL risks
  from patient handling…

• But... they may be soon for most…
• New advances in sling design enable lifts to be
  more versatile


                                                27
 Now you know what’s available,
 how do you choose what to buy?
• Identify what products can be used to perform
  the desired application in the most reasonable
  and safe manner using the following criteria:
    Lifting device criteria
• Appropriate for transfer.
• Safe and comfortable.
• Understandable and easy to use.
• Efficient in use of time and easy to
  maintain.
• Reasonable storage needs.
• Must have enough devices to be accessible.
• Must be of reasonable cost.
        Choosing Equipment
• Review literature. Manufacturer, outside
  research facility, peer review, newspaper,
  industry magazine. FDA and National
  Reporting Office have information regarding
  equipment-related incidents and recalls.
    Choosing Equipment

• Approach manufacturers and local vendors.
• Involve contracting staff.
• Consider performance measures such as:
  – Special features of particular brand
  – Compare probable life of the product
  – Warranty considerations
  – Maintenance requirements and availability
                 Questions?
• USACHPPM POC:
  LTC Myrna Callison Myrna.Callison@us.army.mil
  Ms. Kelsey McCoskey Kelsey.McCoskey@us.army.mil

				
DOCUMENT INFO