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Agri-Food Past_ Present _ Future Report United Kingdom January 2008

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Agri-Food Past_ Present _ Future Report United Kingdom January 2008 Powered By Docstoc
					                                Agri-Food
                      Past, Present & Future Report

                                  United Kingdom

                                    January 2008




The Government of Canada has prepared this report based on primary and secondary sources
of information. Readers should take note that the Government of Canada does not guarantee
the accuracy of any of the information contained in this report, nor does it necessarily endorse
the organizations listed herein. Readers should independently verify the accuracy and
reliability of the information. This report is intended as a concise overview of the market for
those interested in its potential and is not intended to provide in-depth analysis which may be
required by the individual exporter. Although every effort has been made to ensure that the
information is correct, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada assumes no responsibility for its
accuracy, reliability, or for any decisions arising from the information contained herein.

Please address any comments or suggestions you have on this report to:

Ben Berry - berryb@agr.gc.ca
United Kingdom
Past Present & Future Report
January 2008

Table of Contents

Overview ...................................................................................................... 2

Canada – United Kingdom Relations.................................................................. 2

Canada-UK Agricultural Trade .......................................................................... 3

Economy ...................................................................................................... 4
  Strengths .................................................................................................. 4
  Current Trends ........................................................................................... 5
  Forecast .................................................................................................... 5

Consumer Market........................................................................................... 6
  Lifestyle .................................................................................................... 6
  Meals ........................................................................................................ 6
  Ethnic Cuisine ............................................................................................ 6
  Food ......................................................................................................... 7
  Beverage................................................................................................... 7
  Eating Out ................................................................................................. 8
  Retail ........................................................................................................ 8
  Opportunities ............................................................................................. 9

Competitors .................................................................................................10

Access Issues ...............................................................................................10

Agriculture Sector & Policies of the United Kingdom ...........................................10
  Sector Overview ........................................................................................10
  Policies.....................................................................................................11

Contact Information ......................................................................................11

Key Resources ..............................................................................................13




                           United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                                           1
United Kingdom
Past Present & Future Report
January 2008


Overview

Once a predominantly industry- and manufacturing-based country, the United
Kingdom (UK) is now a thriving, industrialized, service-oriented market. The UK has
the fourth largest economy in the world and its capital, London, is considered one of
the world’s key financial centers. The UK is also regarded as the leading financial
centre in Europe and is a strategic gateway into continental Europe for Canadian
businesses.

The UK is politically and economically stable and has an attractive business climate –
low rates of direct taxation, intellectual property rights control, sound monetary
policy and an emphasis on free markets and deregulation, particularly within the
framework of the European Union (EU). Its considerable influence within the EU
makes it a natural entry point for Canadian exporters.

The UK or Great Britain (as it is also known) is a diverse country with four distinct
regions: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Its diversity is boosted by
the influx of immigrants from around the world. This multicultural facet of the UK
opens up a large variety of markets to Canadian businesses. The British government
is in the process of expanding the country’s critical infrastructure and improving
access to health care and education to meet the demands of a growing population
and to attract more foreign investment and business opportunities.


Canada – United Kingdom Relations

The UK is a country built on trade and it continues to have strong trade relations
with many countries due to its colonial past. Canada is no exception. The two
countries have exceptionally good bilateral relations thanks to their shared history,
language, culture and membership in the Commonwealth; similar legal systems and
business practices make it an attractive destination for Canadian companies,
especially those considering further expansion into Europe. Conversely, Canada is
seen as a good testing ground for British companies attempting to penetrate the
North American/US market. Canada and the UK have also formed close partnerships
in areas such as defence, security and international development. Both countries are
supportive of multilateral and bilateral agreements.




                    United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                     2
The trade figures below demonstrate the significance of this bilateral relationship:

Canada-United Kingdom Bilateral              •   The UK is Canada’s third largest
Trade (2006)                                     international export market.
                                             •   Top     export    items    are  natural
United Kingdom Total Trade                       resources,         agriculture     and
Exports            $508.7 billion                manufactured products.
Imports            $690.1 billion
Trade balance      $(181.4) billion          •   Canada is the UK’s 15th largest import
                                                 market.
Canada-United Kingdom Trade                  •   In 2006, the UK invested $22.2 billion
Exports           $10.1 billion
                                                 in Canada, making it one of the two
Imports           $10.8 billion
Trade balance     $(0.7) billion                 top direct investors in Canada.
                                             •   Canadian companies have invested
Canada-United Kingdom Ag Trade                   over $46 billion in the UK since 2005,
Exports               $268.0 million             representing 40% of Canada’s total
Imports               $363.7 million             foreign    direct    investment  (FDI)
Trade balance         $(96.7) million
                                                 abroad.


Canada-UK Agricultural Trade

Although Canada’s main agri-food export market is the United States, Canada has
taken steps to diversify and we see an expansion of export markets into South
America, Asia and Europe. In Europe, the UK is a top export market for Canada.
Overall, the UK is Canada’s fourth largest trading partner – total agricultural trade in
2006 represented roughly $630 million of all trade between Canada and the UK.

In 2006, the agri-food industry exported $268.9 million worth of goods to the UK,
representing almost 9% growth from the year before. Bulk exports to the UK totalled
$86.8 million, while intermediate exports totalled $77.3 million. Consumer oriented
exports were worth $104.8 million. Exports on the whole have been steadily
increasing in the past four years. In addition, Canada has seen crop prices rise
substantially in recent years thanks to increased demand from emerging markets, a
growing biofuels industry and unstable weather across the globe. Price increases
have benefited Canadian farmers by widening their profit margin.

Conversely, agri-food imports from the UK totalled $366.5 million – a moderate
growth of 1.2% from the previous year. Canada is the UK’s 10th largest export
market but exports to Canada have been relatively static in the past few years due
to a lower demand for intermediate imports, such as cocoa, oilseeds and grains.


Canada’s Top 5 Agricultural Exports
                                             •   Canada’s top agri-food exports were
to United Kingdom (2006)
                                                 wheat (30.1%), kidney beans and
Wheat, non-durum      $80.750 million
                                                 white pea beans (16.7%), cheese
Kidney Beans          $44.942 million            (11.3%), fruits (5.1%), and bovine
                                                 semen (2.5%).
Specialty Cheese      $30.335 million
                                             •   Canada’s top 5 imports were whiskies
Blueberries, frozen   $12.509 million            (22.9%), black tea (17.5%), beer
                                                 (6.6%), chocolate (6.1%) and gin
Bovine semen          $6.782 million
                                                 (5.8%).

Complete statistical summary at: http://ats-sea.agr.gc.ca/stats/unitedkingdom.pdf.


                        United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                    3
                                   Canada's Exports of Bulk, Intermediate and Consumer Goods

                            120




               $ Millions
                            100

                            80

                            60

                            40

                            20

                             0
                                        2003             2004                   2005      2006
                                                                     Year

                                                       Bulk     Intermediate   Consumer



   •   In 2006, bulk exports made up 32.3% of total agricultural exports to the UK.
       Intermediate exports comprised of 28.7% and consumer exports made up 40
       percent.
   •   In 2006, 31% of Canada-UK agricultural trade comprised of grain exports.
       Grains made up 95% of trade in bulk items.
   •   Top bulk exports were wheat, tobacco, mustard seeds and coffee, which
       together make up 98% of all Canadian bulk exports.
   •   Top intermediate exports were kidney beans, bovine semen, animal feed,
       lentils, chickpeas and plants seeds, accounting for more than 80% of all
       intermediate exports.
   •   69% of trade in intermediate exports in 2006 comprised of edible vegetables
       and roots.
   •   Top consumer exports were cheese, fruit and nuts, communion wafers, sweet
       corn and apples, making up more than 60% of total consumer oriented
       exports.
   •   Dairy products, eggs and honey represented 29% of all trade in consumer
       oriented exports in 2006.


Economy

Strengths

The UK is ranked the fifth freest economy in the world based on indicators such as
taxation levels, property rights, government regulations and investment climate. The
UK government supports private sector development and vigorously promotes trade
and long term investment through low direct taxation, strict intellectual property
controls, deregulation and multilateral free trade agreements. The country’s
economy makes up 2.9% of the global economy and more than 80% of its
population is employed by the private sector.

The UK is primarily service-oriented, with the sector comprising almost 70% of the
country’s GDP. The UK is particularly well known for its financial services and London
is considered one of the largest, most well-developed financial and business centers



                                  United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                    4
in the world. The country is also a business leader in Europe where many companies
have established their European regional headquarters. The UK also has large coal,
natural gas and oil reserves. The agricultural sector is efficient - technological and
scientific advancements in this field have reduced the number of workers needed,
while simultaneously increasing crop output. A new emerging sector is IT and science
and technology.

Current Trends

Industry and agriculture, which make up approximately 25% and 1% of the
country’s GDP respectively, are on the decline. This number is likely to continue to
decline as the country becomes more service and technology oriented.

Annual GDP, due to higher interest rates and an overall global slowdown, is expected
to grow moderately at approximately 2.6% in 2007. The service sector, particularly
the transportation, storage and communications sector will continue to contribute the
most to the country’s GDP. Projected growth in 2007 is 2.6%, with a slight decrease
in 2008 to 2.4 percent.

Annual consumer price inflation went down to 2.4% in June 2007 before dropping to
1.8% in August 2007. The Bank of England is still having difficulty bringing the
inflation rate to its target of 2 percent. The Bank increased interest rates this year to
tighten the monetary cycle, which led to a decline in consumer confidence despite a
slight increase in retail sales. Household consumption also went down slightly in
response to rate hikes. However, another rate increase is unlikely during this
monetary cycle. Due to uncertainties in the global financial markets, the Bank
prefers not to make any drastic moves.

Gross Domestic Product (2006)                    •   Business and financial services,
                                                     logistics, and industry contribute to
GDP                         US$2,391.3 billion       around 90% of the country’s GDP.
                                                 •   The UK had a trade deficit of
Real GDP growth     2.8% (2006) 2.6% (2007e)
                                                     roughly US$150 billion in 2006.
GDP/ capita                        US$39,686     •   Major export categories in 2006
                                                     were manufactured goods, fuels,
GDP/ capita (PPP)                  US$34,901
                                                     food products and basic materials.


Forecast

The UK is one of Canada’s top markets in Western Europe. The country’s outlook is
stable and expected to grow in 2007 due to healthy levels of investment and
domestic consumption. The appreciation of the sterling has hindered trade
competitiveness and widened the trade deficit but the sterling is expected to
depreciate in 2008. Although overall consumption has declined slightly, the impact is
small. Business investment dipped compared to 2006 but the economy is still going
strong and should stabilize once the monetary tightening cycle ends. Housing boom
in the country is leveling off and mortgage rates are climbing for first time buyers.




                       United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                      5
Consumer Market

Lifestyle

The UK consumer market has seen remarkable change in recent years due to busier
lifestyles: longer working hours, more women in the workforce, and the breakdown
of the traditional family unit. Single-person households are on the rise and this trend
has led to demand for convenience products and a subsequent growth in the fast
food sector. Quality, not price, is a top requirement for consumers. People are also
becoming more health conscious, resulting in a growing demand for healthier food
choices, such as locally grown, organic, low-fat, low-calorie and cholesterol-free
products.

In general, consumer expenditure on food and beverage will continue to grow,
although purchases of non-food items will increase at a greater rate as consumers
become more affluent. Consumer expenditure on food totalled 67.1 billion pounds in
2005 and is expected to increase to 75.7 million pounds in 2015. From 2000 to
2015, expenditure on food will see an overall growth of roughly 30 percent.
Spending on alcoholic beverages will also see similar growth.

Meals

Breakfast, lunch and dinner are the three main meals in the UK but set meal times
are becoming less common as consumer lifestyles change. The traditional English
breakfast consists of cereal, fried egg, bacon, sausage, tomato and toast. Nowadays,
breakfast usually consists of only cereal and/or toast. Coffee or tea accompanies the
meal. Hot cereals, such as quick-cooking porridge have seen growth. However, busy
schedules have led some people to skip breakfast completely.

Lunch is traditionally a hot meal but the trend now is toward lighter food choices,
such as sandwiches and salads. The evening meal used to be an opportunity for
families to eat together, but they are now sitting down together less and less
because of incompatible schedules. Instead of traditional dinners, consumers are
now opting for take-away and ready-made meals that can be bought from the
supermarket or fast food outlets.

Ethnic Cuisine

British dishes mostly consist of meat or fish, potatoes and vegetables but Britain’s
increasingly diverse and multicultural immigrant population has helped introduce
cuisine from other parts of the world into the British diet. Foods like Indian and
Chinese have been common in the British diet for decades while dishes like pizza are
a growing popular trend. Britons have long been open to new foods and this has
helped the introduction of a variety of ethic foods.

As consumers become more affluent, their tastes become more refined and they
seek more upscale culinary experiences. Education has also made consumers more
aware of the variety of food options available around the world. The increasing
opportunity for Britons to travel abroad has broadened their palate, leading to a
desire for international flavours and ingredients back home. The demand for exotic
food is no longer limited to Indian and Chinese. Japanese, Southeast Asian and Latin
American cuisine are also gaining popularity. Fusion food is also a growing niche.



                    United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                      6
While the foodservice industry (restaurants, take-away and fast food outlets) has
caught on to this trend, supermarkets still lag behind in stocking exotic foods and
ingredients. Major retailers and supermarkets have added foodservice counters in
central areas of their outlets to capitalize on this trend.

Food

In addition to an infusion of ethnic foods in the British diet, consumers are now
demanding food that is not only diverse but can be easily prepared or is ready-made.
“Fish and chips” is a traditional British take-away along with Chinese and Indian.
Snacking is very popular as meal times become less structured in recent years.
Snack bars have seen growth of approximately 130%, noodles at approximately
40%, and frozen processed food and ready-made meals at around 20-25 percent.
Fast food restaurants, such as burger bars, are equally popular and regularly
frequented.

Despite snacking and a rise in take-away foods, consumers are also becoming more
health conscious, especially with recent food scares such as BSE (mad cow disease)
and foot-and-mouth disease. Obesity is also a huge issue in the UK. The government
has responded by launching public health campaigns to educate people on how to
maintain a healthy lifestyle. Consumers, young and old, are pursuing a healthier
lifestyle by buying organic food, eating more vegetables and fruit, and choosing
products that have ingredients with added health benefits, such as probiotics – a
type of bacteria that is added to drinks or yogurt to aid digestion. This category is
sometimes referred to as “food plus”. Consumption of red meat has decreased and
people are choosing healthier alternatives such as fish and white meat. Poultry is the
most widely consumed meat in the UK. A key illustration of this is the decline of the
roast as a traditional weekend and holiday meal. A roast at Christmas has been often
replaced by any number of alternatives.

Beverage

Hot drinks remain the most popular type of drink in the UK. The majority of Britons
are still avid tea drinkers but the consumption of coffee and soft drinks has increased
in recent years. The emergence of American-style coffee shops selling specialty
coffee has contributed to this sector’s growth. Coffee-drinking is marketed as a
lifestyle choice and coffee companies, such as Starbucks, have been successful in
developing a “coffee culture” in the UK.

The majority of consumers purchase soft drinks for home consumption. Carbonates
are the most popular type of soft drink but have been criticized for causing health
problems, such as diabetes and obesity. Nonetheless, the soft drink market is still
the fastest growing beverage segment. Companies have responded to consumer
concerns by shifting their focus to ready-to-drink (RTD) tea, fruit and vegetable
juices, and bottled water. These product categories are seeing immense growth.

Alcoholic drinks make up a small percentage of all drinks consumed in the UK. Beer
is still the most popular beverage in the UK but wine consumption is rising. Wine is
no longer reserved for special occasions but is consumed regularly during meals.
Young people drink more than older people and often exceed the recommended daily
units set by the government. On-trade sales, i.e. on licensed premises, have
decreased while off-trade alcohol consumption, e.g. at home, has increased.



                    United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                      7
At the same time, energy drinks such as Red Bull and Full Throttle have become
increasingly popular, especially among young consumers. While alcoholic drinks still
dominate on-trade sales, bars and pubs are starting to shift their attention to the
sale of energy drinks.

Eating Out

Busy lifestyles have contributed to the trend of eating out. This trend has also been
bolstered by a strong economy, low unemployment and higher disposable incomes,
leading to a greater incentive to dine outside of the home. Around 70% of the
population eats out at least once per month. However, consumer expenditure on
eating out is low compared to other European countries because consumers tend to
choose fast food outlets rather than full service restaurants.

Overall, cafés and bars make up the largest percentage of eating establishments.
Fast food outlets have reached a saturation point and growth is slowing down
because people are becoming more health conscious. Nonetheless, it is still a strong
sector. Instead of selling burgers and fries, some establishments have opted to sell
healthy sandwiches and wraps. Traditional pubs that were typically dark, smoky and
male-dominated are declining and being replaced by more upscale “gastro pubs”.
Gastro pubs are a favourite among young professionals and the modern restaurant-
style pub scene embraces both male and female clientele. Menus have adapted to
incorporate more modern and international dishes. Full service restaurants have a
steady market but face continuous competition from fast food outlets and gastro
pubs.

Retail

Busy lifestyles have led to a greater demand for convenience. As a result,
supermarkets have extended their opening hours into the night, with some offering
24-hour shopping. Traffic congestion, lack of parking space and long queues at the
check-out in city centers have prompted consumers to shop at suburban
supermarkets. Large supermarkets and superstores located out of town that offer
one-stop shopping have seen their popularity increase. People prefer to stock up in
bulk for the week or the month instead of having to do their grocery shopping every
day.

To cater to the busy urban dweller, supermarkets have responded by converting
their city-centre stores into shops that focus on selling ready-made meals, cooking
sauces and snacks, and basic food items, such as milk and bread. A small selection
of fresh produce and packaged meat is made available.

Overall, consumers are more concerned about quality and convenience than about
price, with many willing to pay a premium price for a supermarket or retailer’s
private label products and for items such as organic, locally grown produce.
Supermarkets and grocery retailers have successfully capitalized on the consumer’s
desire for gourmet food by developing a premium sub brand of their private label,
such as Tesco’s Finest, which differentiates against their discount sub-brand Tesco
Value. This explains why North American discount supermarkets have had trouble
gaining a large market share in the UK supermarket sector. Consumers in the UK
tend to equate low prices with low quality and low income status.



                    United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                    8
Opportunities

The UK has seen a growth in “ethical consumers” who are more aware of what they
buy. They are concerned about the environment and are against excessive, wasteful
packaging. The UK consumer market is also becoming more receptive to natural
foods. The organic food market in particular is flourishing and the sector is set to
expand in years to come as people become more health conscious. The UK Soil
Association reported a growth of more than 10% in organic food sales in 2004 with
more than 80% of UK households buying organic products. This represents a huge
market for organic food growers in Canada if they can meet the stiff EU
requirements. However, the high price of organic food is a barrier for those with low
incomes. Canadian exporters should be aware of price levels and attempt to make
organic food more affordable to increase their market share.

Consumers concerned about the environmental costs of shipping goods from afar to
the UK have turned to locally grown products. Locally grown products reduce the
environmental impact because goods travel a shorter distance to reach stores
meaning less consumption of oil, erosion of infrastructure and use of transportation.
The distance from farm to plate is known as “food miles”: consumers are increasingly
paying attention to the “food miles” of the food they buy. The “little red tractor” logo,
indicating products grown in the UK that have passed food safety and hygiene
standards is a well known and trusted symbol.

Increasingly consumers have also turned to farmers markets to buy their produce.
These markets are temporarily set up in town centres or on blocked-off streets.
Some farms offer box schemes to deliver fruit and vegetables to consumers on a
regular basis. Overall, packaging, freshness and sustainability all affect a consumer’s
purchasing decision.

The British government is actively promoting healthy lifestyles and recently rolled
out campaigns that promote fish and seafood as a healthier alternative to meat.
Canada’s high quality fish and seafood products have a growing market to tap into in
the UK as consumers seek to incorporate fish more frequently into their diet.

Online shopping is prevalent for those who wish to avoid overcrowded stores and
long line-ups, especially during the holiday season. Growth is relatively slow but
consumers are starting to prefer this method of shopping. Consumers shop online for
non-perishable items or hard-to-find specialty foods and go to the store to buy
perishable items.

UK consumers are also seeking to widen their palate. Manufacturers of specialty
foods, drinks and sauces in Canada can tap into this market through online sales as
consumers become more comfortable making purchases over the internet. Specialist
products have a potential market in the UK in general. Products with added health
ingredients (known as functional foods) are also popular and Canadian agri-
businesses have an opportunity to expand into this market both online and through
in-store sales.




                    United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                        9
Competitors

In 2006, the UK’s principal import sources included the United States and members
of the EU, particularly Germany, France and the Netherlands. As an EU member, the
UK relies heavily on EU members for imports, making the market more difficult for
Canadian exporters to penetrate. The free movement of goods within the EU and
lower transportation costs makes trade between EU countries more attractive.
Canada currently ranks 15th behind several EU countries and the Asian economic
giants China and Japan.


Access Issues

The UK is a member of the WTO, OECD, NATO and the EU. Canadian exporters
should be aware of the regulations and tariffs governing imports from outside of the
EU. Import regulations are also governed by local UK laws and Canadian exports to
the UK may be subject to additional duty. Examples of tariffs include the European
Community Common Customs Tariff (CCT) and Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs
Integrated Tariff of the United Kingdom. Some categories, such as dairy need an
import licence. Special regulations also apply to live animals and seafood, GM foods,
novel foods, and organic foods. Exporters of meat should note that the UK has not
resumed trade with Canada of cattle, beef or related imports.

Detailed information on imports and exports can be found at:
   • http://www.infoexport.gc.ca/ie-en/DisplayDocument.jsp?did=40706
   • http://customs.hmrc.gov.uk

Great Britain has several key policies with regard to food packaging and labeling: the
Food Safety Act 1990, the General Food Law Regulation and the General Food
Regulations. Northern Ireland has its own separate but similar legislation. More
details at http://www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/imports/.


Agriculture Sector & Policies of the United Kingdom

Sector Overview

Agriculture is an important sector of the UK economy but has limited growth
opportunities. The service and technology sector will continue to make up the
majority of the country’s GDP. Agriculture and farming activities use up more than
75% of the UK’s land, which amounts to around 18 million hectares. Roughly three
quarters of this land is used for grazing, while the remaining is used for growing
crops. Agriculture employs less than 2% of the workforce but produces around 60%
of the food demanded by the population. Modern agricultural technology has made
the sector highly developed and efficient.

   •   Major agricultural products: cereals, oilseeds, potatoes, vegetables, cattle,
       sheep, poultry and fish.
   •   Leading export partners: US, Germany, France, Ireland, Netherlands
   •   Leading import partners: US, Germany, France, Netherlands, China




                    United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                    10
Policies

The UK agricultural sector is largely governed by EU policies. The EU ensures free
flow of goods within the EU and sets common tariffs for imports originating outside
of the EU. The European Commission oversees the agriculture branch of the EU. The
Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and its reforms make up the framework of the
agriculture sector. Some of the outcomes of the CAP include distributing payments
and subsidies to farmers, setting standards to ensure quality, and promoting rural
development. More about EU agricultural policies can be found at:
http://ec.europa.eu/agriculture/index_en.htm.

In the UK,     the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) is
responsible    for domestic agricultural policies and regulations. The International
Agriculture   & Technology Centre helps the farming industry find international
markets for   its exports.

Organic, locally grown and fair trade products are becoming increasingly popular in
the UK. In 2002, DEFRA launched an initiative called Action Plan to encourage
organic farming and food. Initially, only a third of all organic products originated
from the UK but by 2005, this figure had increased to 66 percent. To meet demand,
the government is hoping to increase the number of home producers to supply the
organic market. The Organic Entry Level Stewardship program provides funding for
farmers to convert to organic farming while maintaining their profitability. A body
has been set up to inspect farms to ensure that all organic products meet EU
standards. Consumer interest in organics has been boosted by government
marketing and consumers can just as easily find organics in retail stores as in
farmers markets.


Business Travel Tips

The UK and Canada share similar business practices. Punctuality is important and it
is best to dress more formally for meetings and in the workplace.

The UK is a diverse country made up of four parts: England, Wales, Scotland and
Northern Ireland. It also has a growing population of Britons of Asian descent.
Therefore, one should not assume anything about a person’s culture, heritage, or
background based on appearances.


Contact Information

For more information on the United Kingdom please contact:

Canadian High Commission in London

Address:
Macdonald House
1 Grosvenor Square
London, UK W1K 4AB

Tel: (011-44-20) 7258-6600
Fax: (011-44-20) 7258-6384


                     United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                 11
E-Mail:ldn-td@international.gc.ca
URL: http://www.infoexport.gc.ca/uk or
http://www.international.gc.ca/canada-europa/united_kingdom/menu-en.asp

Office Hours: Mon-Fri: 0900-1700
Time Difference E.S.T.: +5

Contact:
Mr. Douglas Bieber
Counsellor (Agriculture)
Trade Commissioner
Agriculture, Food and Beverages, Fish and Seafood Products
Email: ldn-td@international.gc.ca




                   United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008            12
Key Resources

Agriculture, horticulture and fisheries – Business Link
http://www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/action/layer?r.l1=1073858802&topicId=1078
105203&r.l2=1077717225&r.s=tl

Agriculture Overview – International Agri-Technology Centre
http://www.theiatc.org/page.asp?section=0001000100030001&id=19&opencode=00
0100010003

Britain Country Profile – The Economist
http://www.economist.com/countries/Britain/

Canada’s International Market Access Report – DFAIT – 2007
http://www.international.gc.ca/tna-nac/cimap-en.asp

Canadian Agricultural Trade Statistics (CATS) – StatsCan/AAFC – 2007
http://www.ats.agr.gc.ca/stats/data-e.htm

Canadian Exports and Imports – Industry Canada – 2007
http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/sc_mrkti/tdst/engdoc/tr_homep.html

Consumer Lifestyles in the United Kingdom – Euromonitor International – 2006
https://www.euromonitor.com/WALogin/WALogin.aspx?Web=GMIDv3

Import Regulations United Kingdom – InfoExport – 2006
http://www.infoexport.gc.ca/ie-en/DisplayDocument.jsp?did=40706

Local food 'greener than organic' – BBC News – 2005
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4312591.stm

My Red Tractor – UK Assured Food Standards
http://www.redtractor.org.uk/site/rt_home.php

Regulation and Legislation - UK Food Standards Agency
http://www.food.gov.uk/foodindustry/regulation/foodlaw/

The UK and Canada – British High Commission Ottawa
http://www.britishhighcommission.gov.uk/servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xce
lerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1106750653576

Trade Policy – UK Department for Business Enterprise & Regulatory Reform
http://www.berr.gov.uk/europeandtrade/trade-policy/page10188.html

UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
http://www.defra.gov.uk/

UK inflation rate eases to 1.8% - BBC News – 2007
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7000298.stm

United Kingdom – CIA World Fact Book – 2007
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/uk.html


                   United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008                 13
United Kingdom Economic Profile – EDC – 2007
http://www.edc.ca/english/docs/gunitedkingdom_e.pdf

United Kingdom Economic Profile – InfoExport – 2006
http://www.infoexport.gc.ca/ie-en/DisplayDocument.jsp?did=61538




                  United Kingdom Country Report: January 2008     14

				
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