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Collaboration-and-Partnership

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					12TH ANNUAL CALIFORNIA HUNGER & NUTRITION POLICY
                  CONFERENCE

                 JANUARY 25-26, 2010



California Nutrition & Healthy Eating Initiative
 Collaboration & Partnership Subcommittee
               COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIP
                   SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS


   Carl Hansen, Food Bank Coalition of San Luis Obispo County,
    Subcommittee Chair

   Sue Sigler, California Association of Food Banks

   Sandy Beals, FoodLink for Tulare County

   Joel Campos, Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Cruz County

   Marla Feldman, MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger
            WORKSHOP OVERVIEW

   Presentation
     Exploring  ways that food providers can more
      effectively collaborate for increased access to
      nutritious food, nutrition education and ultimately,
      culture change
         WORKSHOP GOAL

To discuss strategies for collaboration and
partnership leading to culture change in your
                 community
        SUBCOMMITTEE’S PROCESS

   We conducted informative interviews with a
    small but varied selection of MAZON grantees

    We learned about county-wide obesity
    prevention partnerships and collaborative
    efforts grantees are engaged in, their role, and
    the effectiveness of these collaborations
              GRANTEES’ RESPONSES

   About half of the responders either had no local collaborative or felt their local
    collaborative was not effective

   Most were collaborating with Feeding America, California Food Policy Advocates,
    or California Association of Food Banks

   The highly effective local collaboratives usually included public health
    departments

   Other common partners are WIC, schools, health providers (hospitals, clinics

   Most partnerships were either developed by, or enhanced by, Network for a
    Healthy California

   Most agreed that the highest value of the collaborative is sharing knowledge
    and resources
         COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIP?
         SOUNDS LIKE MORE MEETINGS TO ME!


   Collaborating with others isn’t easy

   Changing a culture is a daunting and necessary task

   Culture change requires a whole community of
    stakeholders; we can’t do it by ourselves
      COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIP?
               (CONTINUED…)

   In our effort to end hunger, we must also take the
    necessary steps towards preventing malnutrition


   Presenting a model of collaboration based on the unique
    assets of emergency food providers


   Model based on survey of emergency food providers and
    their “success” stories
      “THE MODEL”

 Collaboration and Partnership
Model for Cultural Transformation




    A                      B
                   Nutrition Education
 Resource
                     and Inspiration
And Delivery
  of Food




               C
           Creation of
          Culture Change
         A. RESOURCE AND DELIVERY OF FOOD
                   RESOURCING

Resource
   Partnerships with local grocery stores (fresh rescue programs)

   Partnerships with large farmers (Farm-to-Family Program)

   Partnership with local Sustainable Farming Community (gleaning,
    salvaging surplus, purchasing produce)

   Partnerships with Farmers’ Markets (salvaging unsold produce)

   Establishing community gardens (e.g. Vineyards to Veggies)
     A. RESOURCE AND DELIVERY OF FOOD
        RESOURCING (CONTINUED…)

Delivery
   Increase food banks’ and community food programs’ capacity for
    handling fresh produce


   Refusing to handle unhealthy food (high sugar, high salt, high corn
    syrup)

   Collaborate with food processors to produce shelf-stable, family-
    sized portions products from excess healthy products (Redwood
    Empire’ “3-Squares”)
B. NUTRITION EDUCATION AND INSPIRATION

   Nutrition education materials supplied at food distributions

   Utilizing local nutrition experts as teachers and consultants at
    distributions

   Holding classes at food providers given by local experts

   Healthy cooking demonstrations

   Helping to bring successful nutrition education assets to your
    community
C. WORKING TO CHANGE THE EATING AND LIVING
        PATTERNS OF YOUR CULTURE

   Participate fully in county-wide collaboration of organizations
    concerned with community health (Public Health Department,
    school district, government planning, emergency food providers,
    physical activity advocates, nutrition and wellness community,
    mental health community, and others)


   Leverage existing resources (WIC, Kaiser Permanente, The
    California Endowment, California Convergence, Network for a
    Healthy California, USDA, etc.)


   Public policy and advocacy that leads to a healthier community
             DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

1. Is there a countywide collaborative working on issues of
  culture change and how effective is it?

2. What is your role and level of participation in the
   collaborative? How might your role be expanded?

3. What are the barriers preventing a more effective
   collaborative effort working toward a healthier culture in
   your community?
                    California Hunger & Nutrition Policy Conference
                Collaboration and Partnership Discussion Forum
                                  January 25-26, 2010



kp.org/communitybenefit
MISSION


  Kaiser Permanente
    exists to provide
affordable, high-quality
health care services to
 improve the health of
 our members and the
communities we serve
HEALTHY EATING ACTIVE LIVING

   To transform communities,
   including neighborhoods,
   schools, workplaces, and
   health care settings so that
   healthy food is convenient
   and affordable, and engaging
   in physical activity is part of
   one’s daily life.
Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults
BRFSS, 1990, 1998, 2007
(*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person)


                   1990
                                                                                    1998




                                                  2007




       No Data    <10%     10%–14%      15%–19%      20%–24%   25%–29%           ≥30%



                                                               Source: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
KAISER PERMANENTE EFFORTS

 Community Health Initiatives in Northern California

                       5-year, $1.5 million investment
                       Multiple sectors: Community, Schools,
                        Work Site, Health Care
                       Community collaboratives create action
                        plans for creating healthy food and
                        physical activity environments
                       Three sites currently: Richmond, Santa
                        Rosa, Modesto
CALIFORNIA CONVERGENCE


Policy Focus

   Land Use and Transportation Planning
   Retail Food Environments
   Public Safety Measures
   Improving Nutrition Standards for Children




www.californiaconvergence.org/
HEALTHY EATING IN HARD TIMES



 Goals
        Respond to the recession
        Address food security challenges


 Parameters
        Impact on people’s lives within a year
        Policy efforts
        Access to healthy food
HEALTHY EATING IN HARD TIMES


 Grant Examples


       California Association of Food Banks

       California Food Policy Advocates

       Food Research and Action Center
KP’S ORGANIZATIONAL PRACTICES-
A PHILOSOPHY OF PREVENTION




                                 29   farmers’ markets in California
                                 Menu  labeling
                                 Local sourcing

                                 Healthy Picks vending

                                 Worksite Wellness programs
COLLABORATION




   County obesity coalitions
   Food stamp outreach
   Local WIC offices
   Healthy food retail efforts
   Farm to school/farm to institution programs
   Schools
CONTACT

 Southern California:

          Andrea Azuma       andrea.m.azuma@kp.org

          Roberta Tinajero   roberta.d.tinajero@kp.org

 Northern California:

          Kathryn Boyle      kathryn.f.boyle@kp.org
Thank you for your
  participation!

				
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