Weapon Systems Acquisition Reform Act of 2009 and Cost by fnp94334

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									                      Weapon Systems Acquisition Reform Act of 2009
                                            and
             Cost Engineering System for Aerospace and Military Programs (CES)

                                        Joseph Lavender / 26 May 2009

On Friday May 23, 2009 President Barrack Obama signed the Weapon Systems Acquisition Reform Act of
2009 into law. The following is a brief summary on how the Cost Engineering System for Aerospace and
Military Programs (CES) relates to the final text of this newly enacted legislation.

The intent of the Act is to improve the organization and procedures of the Department of Defense for the
acquisition of major weapon systems, and for other purposes.

The process of cost estimation and schedule determination is greatly enhanced by the use of CES that is a
revolutionary advancement to be used from the start of Material Solution Analysis thru Milestones A, B and C
of a program. CES functions at the total program level that includes engineering performance and design
parameters and capabilities that are represented in an overall performance capability.

CES permits a development cost estimate, production cost estimate and schedule to be established at any point
in time during Technology Development, Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) or Production
and Deployment. The accuracy of the cost and schedule at any timeframe are directly related the completeness,
maturity, and alternatives of the technical “Point Design”.

CES is not a process but actual software simulations that once developed can be modified to include new
technologies and designs. Unique simulations are required and to date an Air-Superiority Fighter, Air Transport,
and a Naval Surface Combatant & Submarine simulations have been developed.

The Department of Defense’s Deputy Director for Cost Assessment, Cost Analysis Improvement Group
(CAIG), military services, and prime contractors can utilize CES simulations.

The Act requires a consideration of trade-offs among cost, schedule, and performance objectives in Department
of Defense acquisition programs.

The CES architecture has been developed to simultaneously include development cost, production cost,
schedule and a performance capability to support trade-offs at the program level. Intrinsic Elements are
individual performance and design capabilities are that can only be altered by inputs from engineering analysis
or engineering simulations. Extrinsic Elements are individual performance and design capabilities that can be
altered by the individual performing the CES simulation. Intrinsic and Extrinsic Elements are identified when
each CES simulation is developed.

No other software simulation at this time has a trade-off capability between cost schedule, and performance at
the program level. Operations & Maintenance Cost (O&M) can be included within the CES architecture.

The Act requires that actions be taken to identify and address systemic problems in major defense acquisition
programs prior to Milestone B approval.

Excessive cost of the program, risky performance capabilities and extremely long program schedule can be
identified and minimized by CES simulations at any time between the Material Solution Analysis the
completion of Milestone C
The Act recognizes that critical cost growth in major defense acquisition programs is nearly a universal
problem.

CES simulations either eliminate or minimize significant cost growth because the trade-offs that are made
between cost, performance and schedule are accurate, consistent, realistic, non-biased, complete, timely and
flexible.

The Act stipulates that assessments of special access and compartmented intelligence programs, in coordination
with the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics and the Under Secretary of
Defense for Intelligence and in accordance with applicable policies are permissible.

CES simulation can be of a non-classified or classified nature.

The Act requires guidance relating to the proper selection of confidence levels in cost estimates generally, and
specifically, for the proper selection of confidence levels in cost estimates for major defense acquisition
programs and major automated information system programs.

Performance Capability for CES simulations are formulated to be within  5 percent of actual values that are
based upon rules, boundaries and algorithms.

Cost for CES simulations (development and production) are formulated to be within  10 percent of actual
values that are based upon rules, boundaries and algorithms.

Schedule for CES simulations (Milestone B to Initial Operational Capability (IOC)) are formulated to be within
 10 percent of actual values that are based upon rules, boundaries and algorithms.

The Act mandates that the Director of Cost Assessment shall ensure that a report submitted under this
subsection does not include any information, such as proprietary or source selection sensitive information that
could undermine the integrity of the acquisition process.

The Cost Engineering System for Aerospace and Military Programs (CES) and its associated software the Air-
Superiority Fighter Simulation (ASFS) Version 1.0 and 2.0, Cost Engineering System (CES) As Applied to the
Joint Future Theater Lift (JFTL) Concept Version 1.0 and NavSim – Naval Simulation for Surface Combatants
and Submarines Version 1.0 are proprietary and are the exclusive property of Mr. Joseph A. Lavender who has
independently developed these three items in their entirety without any government or corporate funding.

The Act directs the Secretary of Defense to ensure that the Director of Cost Assessment has access to all records
and data of the Department of Defense (including the records and data of each military department and
including classified and propriety information, as appropriate) that the Director considers necessary in order to
carry out the Director’s duties under this subsection.

To develop and maintain new CES simulations of the highest caliber possible access to all records and data of
the Department of Defense (including the records and data of each military department and including classified
and propriety information, as appropriate) is critical for success.

The Act necessitates that a process for developing requirements is structured to enable incremental,
evolutionary, or spiral acquisition approaches, including the deferral of technologies that are not yet mature and
capabilities that are likely to significantly increase costs or delay production until later increments or spirals.

CES use of Intrinsic and Extrinsic elements provides a spiral analysis capability within a CES simulation.

								
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