STAGE 5 SCHOOL CERTIFICATE SCIENCE by lindahy

VIEWS: 8 PAGES: 6

More Info
									     STAGE 5 SCHOOL CERTIFICATE
               SCIENCE

Year 9 STUDENT RESEARCH PROJECT
The  student  research  project  is  a  mandatory  part  of  both  the  Stage  4  and  the 
Stage 5  Science  Course.  At  Lithgow  High  School  the  Stage  4  Student  Research 
Project is done as a group task, with teacher support, mostly in class. The stage 
5  Student  Research  Project  is  done  in  Year  9  as  an  individual  task,  with  some 
teacher support, out of class time. This information is designed to give students 
a guide to carrying out a successful project that both meets the requirements of 
the Syllabus and builds their science skills. These skills will be assessed in various 
formal assessment tasks.

HOW YOU CAN WORK LIKE A SCIENTIST?
You need to: 

First: identify a problem or area of interest. 
Second:  search  relevant references (eg.  Books, Journals,  Internet etc) and  get 
the most recent and accurate information on your area of interest. 
Third:  compare  the  information  in  the  references  and  select  the  most  reliable 
information. Check that your sources are sound! This means that they are from 
well  known  authorities  such  as  a  universities  or  well  known  scientific/learning 
institutions  like  the  CSIRO.  If  you  are  unsure  about  the  quality  of  your 
information,  or  find  conflicting  information,  check  with  your  teacher  or  the 
librarian. 
Fourth: summarise the relevant information into a concise report. 
Fifth:  always  state  their  references  and  where  they  can  be  found.  This  is  the 
bibliography. 
Sixth:  then  and  only  then  would  you  set  about  formulating  your  hypothesis. 
An  hypothesis is  what you  think is  the answer to  a possible question, based on 
information you have gained from your research. This question might be to solve 
an identified problem, explain an observation or to test a new theory.
Seventh: construct an  aim  to your experiment. An aim is the reason for doing 
the  experiment,  it  should  relate  to  your  hypothesis.  It  might  be  to  observe 
something or to find out something, but it should be simple. Don’t ask too many 
questions at once, it will be too hard to design a valid method. 
Eighth:  design  your  method.  A  method  is  a  step,  by  step  set  of  instructions, 
that when followed by anybody, will  produce the same results.  This  means it  is 
reliable.  A  method  should also  be  valid.  This  means  that  it  is  based  on  good 
scientific principles and that it is carried out using good scientific practices. Your 
experiment will then be a fair test. 
Ninth: check your method with your teacher before you start. This is important 
and if you do not do this step you will lose marks. 
Tenth: once you have the OK from your teacher carry out your experiment and 
record your results.

GETTING STARTED
The hardest part of this task is often choosing a topic. The topic you choose can 
sometimes determine  the degree of difficulty you  will have  in carrying out  your 
project.  You  need  to  check  your  topic  with  your  teacher  plus  your  teacher  can 
help  you  work  one  out  if  you  are  having  trouble.  Your  teacher  will  give  you  a 
deadline  for  this  part  and  failure  to  meet  this  deadline  will  result  in  a  warning 
letter. CHECK POINT 1 

WHAT DOES A SUCCESSFUL RESEARCH PROJECT
INCLUDE?

There  are  2  main  components  to  a  successful  project:  a  background  research 
report and an experimental report.

THE BACKGROUND RESEARCH REPORT

It  is  important  for  you  to  work  like  a  scientist,  this  means  getting  information 
about your topic before you design your experiment. It is only with some specific 
subject  knowledge  that  you  can  design  an  experiment  that  validly  tests  a 
sensible hypothesis. 

Your  background  research  report  should  contain  relevant  information  about 
your topic that will help you come up with an hypothesis to test your experiment. 
It will also help you design a good method. 

You  must  show  how  your  researched  information  links  into  your 
experiment. You only need about 2 typed A4 pages of info. So you will need
to summarise your information to include only relevant material. If you can’t find 
enough information to write 2 A4 pages then you need to speak to your teacher 
and get some guidance. Check the relevance of your material with your teacher 
before you do your final draft. CHECK POINT 2 

You  must  include  a  bibliography,  the  teacher  can  and  will  check  your 
references if it’s thought that you have not used your own words, or your info is 
inaccurate, or if what you are doing sounds really interesting.

THE EXPERIMENTAL REPORT

This will have your hypothesis, aim, method, results, conclusion and discussion. 

Write your hypothesis first, remember this is what you expect will happen. Write 
your aim to test your hypothesis and show it to your teacher before you design 
your method. CHECK POINT 3 

If  your hypothesis and  aim are OK  then discuss  your method  with  your teacher 
before doing a draft. Decide how you will record your results and include this in 
your method. Include any safety measures that should be followed.   Show your 
teacher  your  draft  method  before  you  start  experimenting.  This  is  really 
important  because  we  don’t  want  you  doing  anything  that  could  hurt  you,  or 
have you waste a lot of time doing something wrong. CHECK POINT 4 

Once  you  have  had  the  first  4  checkpoints  signed  off  by  your  teacher  you  can 
start experimenting. Don’t forget to record your results as you go, and to label 
things clearly so you don’t get things mixed up. 

Decide  how  you  will  present  the  results  in  your  report  eg  a  table, a  graph etc. 
talk to your teacher about this if you are unsure. 

Write  a  conclusion  to  your  experiment  and  remember  it  should  relate  back  to 
your aim. 

Discuss  your  conclusion  in  terms  of  whether  you  got  the  results  you  expected, 
was your hypothesis right? You should also analyse  the quality  of your  method, 
was it easy to do? Would you do it differently next time? Why? Did you have to 
change anything? Were there any problems? If so, what were they? 

Lastly  did  your  experiment  pose  any  new  questions  that  could  be  looked  into 
further?
HANDING IN YOUR PROJECT
Your report needs to be handed in on time. If you are having problems you need 
to speak to your teacher before the due date. Tick off the check points below to 
ensure  you  have  done  everything  needed.  Then  hand  in  your  project  to  your 
science teacher. 

CHECK POINTS:

    ·   Check  the  marking scheme before  you hand in anything. Have  you  done 
        everything in the marking scheme?

    ·   Have  you  included  both  your  research  report  and  your  experimental 
        report?

    ·   Get your teacher to look at it before you hand it in.

    ·   Make sure you get a receipt and sign off that you have handed it in.

    ·   You must also hand in the section below with all your checkpoints signed 
        by your teacher with your report. 


­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 


NAME:__________________________  TEACHER:_______________________ 

TOPIC:__________________________       YEAR:________________________ 


                    CHECK POINT                TEACHER’S SIGNATURE 
                 1 TOPIC CHOICE 
                 2 RESEARCH DRAFT 
                 3 AIM 
                 4 METHOD
                                   MARKING SCHEME 

         RESEARCH REPORT                  MARKS                EXPERIMENTAL                       MARKS 
                                                                     REPORT 
 It  is  well  presented  and  relates  12 ­15     It  has:  a  well  thought  out                15 ­20 
 well  to  the  topic  area  chosen.  It           hypothesis; an aim that links to the 
 includes       detailed,      accurate            hypothesis;  a  method  that  is  safe, 
 research        that     has      been            logical, valid, reliable and relates to 
 summarised  and  rewritten  in                    the  aim;  the  method  clearly 
 language  at  a  yr  9  level  while              demonstrates  an  understanding  of 
 maintaining  a  scientific  approach.             controls  and  variables;  replicated 
 It  includes  a detailed  bibliography            results,       presented         in      an 
 and  demonstrates  some  effort  to               appropriate scientific way including 
 authenticate sources.                             tables or graphs; a conclusion that 
                                                   answers  the  aim;  a  detailed 
                                                   discussion  that  assesses  the 
                                                   method/results  and  links  the 
                                                   content of the research report. 
 It  is  reasonably  well      presented  8 ­11    It  has:  an  hypothesis;  an  aim  that       10 ­14 
 and  relates  clearly  to  the  topic             links  to  the  hypothesis;  a  method 
 area  chosen.  It  includes  accurate             that  is  safe,  logical,  easy  to  follow 
 research       that      has       been           and a fair test of the aim; controls 
 summarised  and  rewritten  in                    and  variables  are  mentioned; 
 language  at  a  yr  9  level.  It                results  that  are  presented  in  a 
 includes a detailed bibliography.                 scientific  way  including  tables  or 
                                                   graphs,  with  some  effort  to 
                                                   replicate  them;  a  conclusion  that 
                                                   answers  the  aim;  a  discussion 
                                                   about the quality of the results and 
                                                   the fairness of the test. 
 It  relates  generally  to  the  topic  4 ­7      It  has:  an  aim;  a  method  that  is 
                                                                                       5 ­9 
 area  chosen.  It  includes  some                 logical  and  a  fair  test;  results  that 
 accurate  research  that  has  been               are  presented  in  a  clear  way;  and 
 summarised  to  some  degree  in                  a conclusion that answers the aim. 
 the  student’s  own  words.  It 
 includes a bibliography. 
 It relates in some way to the topic  1­3      It  has  an  aim,  a  method,  results  1­4 
 area  chosen.  It  includes  limited          and a conclusion. 
 accurate  research  that  has  been 
 summarised  to  some  degree.  It 
 includes a bibliography. 
Overall grades equivalents. A: 29 – 35; B: 22 – 29; C: 12 – 22; D: 7 – 12; E: 2 – 6

								
To top