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					   Location_Name        Discipline      ND_NUMBER            ND_TITLE
Athens, Greece     AL                34111          Modern Greek



Athens, Greece     AL                34113          Modern Greek II




Athens, Greece     ANTH              34335          Byzantine Art & Architecture




                                                    Gender/Sexuality in Greek
Athens, Greece     ANTH              34336
                                                    Culture




Athens, Greece     ANTH              34337          The Ethnography of Greece
                                Modern Athens: History and
Athens, Greece   ANTH   34338
                                Culture of the Greek Capital




Athens, Greece   ANTH   34500   Greek Art & Archaeology




Athens, Greece   ANTH   34501   The Archaeology of Athens
Athens, Greece   ANTH   34731   Method




Athens, Greece   ANTH   44500   Archaeological Drawing




Athens, Greece   ARHI   24129   Ancient Greek Sculpture




                                Sites & Monuments of
Athens, Greece   ARHI   34121
                                Athens & Greece
Athens, Greece   ARHI   34123   The Archaeology of Athens




                                Ancient Greek Architecture
                                from the Archaic to the
Athens, Greece   ARHI   34123
                                Roman Times as Reflected in
                                the Monuments of Athens




Athens, Greece   ARHI   34126   Ancient Greek Painting
                                Aegean Prehistory: The Rise
Athens, Greece   ARHI   34127   and Fall of the Bronze Age
                                Cultures




Athens, Greece   ARHI   34212   Byzantine Art & Architecture




Athens, Greece   ARHI   34563   Monuments of Greece
Athens, Greece   ARHI   34564   Greek Art & Archaeology




Athens, Greece   CLAS   34105   History of Ancient Greece




                                Emergence & Development
Athens, Greece   CLAS   34110
                                of Athenian Democracy
                                From Contract to Conquest:
Athens, Greece   CLAS   34209
                                Rediscovering Roman Greece




Athens, Greece   CLAS   34323   Ancient Greek Athletics




                                The History and Society of
Athens, Greece   CLAS   34324
                                Ancient Sparta
Athens, Greece   CLAS   34404   Ancient Greek Sculpture




Athens, Greece   CLAS   34405   Greek Art & Archaeology




Athens, Greece   CLAS   34406   The Archaeology of Athens




Athens, Greece   CLAS   44351   Greek Myth & Religion




                                Honors Tutorial: The
Athens, Greece   CLAS   44801   Homeric View of Mortality &
                                Death


Athens, Greece   CLGR   14001   Beginning Ancient Greek I
Athens, Greece   CLGR   14002   Beginning Ancient Greek II




                                Intermediate Ancient Greek:
Athens, Greece   CLGR   24003
                                Plato



                                Intermediate Ancient
Athens, Greece   CLGR   24002
                                Greek: Homer



Athens, Greece   CLLA   34020   Advanced Latin I




Athens, Greece   CLLA   44020   Advanced Latin II




                                Citizen, State & Society:
Athens, Greece   CST    34111   A Service Learning
                                Approach
Athens, Greece   ENGL   44106   Attic Tragedy




                                Deconstructing Zorba:
Athens, Greece   ENGL   44134   The Search for Identity in
                                Modern Greek Literature




                                Gender/Sexuality in Greek
Athens, Greece   GSC    34205
                                Culture




                                Politics & Society in 20th C.
Athens, Greece   HIST   14520   Greece: New Challenges, Old
                                Problems
Athens, Greece   HIST   34220   History of Ancient Greece




Athens, Greece   HIST   34223   Ancient Greek Athletics




Athens, Greece   HIST   34225   Ancient Macedon
                                From Contact to Conquest:
Athens, Greece   HIST   34226
                                Rediscovering Roman Greece




                                Byzantium History (324-
Athens, Greece   HIST   34332
                                1453AD)




Athens, Greece   HIST   34435   Balkans: History & Politics




Athens, Greece   HIST   34520   History of Modern Greece
Athens, Greece   HIST   34521   History of Modern Athens




                                Struggling with the Past:
Athens           HIST   34522   Greece and the Balkans from
                                1453 to the Present
Athens, Greece   IIPS   34501   U.S./Middle East Policy




                                Global & Regional Security
Athens, Greece   IIPS   34506
                                after September 11th 2001
Athens, Greece   IIPS   44505   Middle East Politics




Athens, Greece   PHIL   24902   Thinking Through Myth




Athens, Greece   PHIL   34305   Greek Philosophy




                                Greek Philosophy: Good Life
Athens, Greece   PHIL   34306
                                & Common Good
Athens, Greece   POLS   34227   U.S./Middle East Policy




                                Global & Regional Security
Athens, Greece   POLS   34240
                                after September 11th 2001
                                European Union &
Athens, Greece   POLS   34425
                                Integration




Athens, Greece   POLS   34426   Middle East Politics




Athens, Greece   POLS   34427   Mediterranean Int’l Politics
Athens, Greece   POLS   34459   Balkans: History & Politics




                                Politics & Society in 20th C.
Athens, Greece   POLS   34460
                                Greece




                                A European Perspective on
Athens, Greece   POLS   34511   Environmental Politics: A
                                Service Learning Approach
                               The Natural Environment of
Athens, Greece   SCI   34312   Greece: From Landscape
                               Ecology to Conservation




                               Modern Athens: History and
Athens, Greece   SOC   24102
                               Culture of the Greek Capital




Athens, Greece   SOC   34110   The Ethnography of Greece
                                Gender/Sexuality in Greek
Athens, Greece   SOC    34856
                                Culture




                                A European Perspective on
Athens, Greece   STV    34350   Environmental Politics: A
                                Service Learning Approach




Athens, Greece   THEO   24811   The Orthodox Church
                                The Religions of the Middle
Athens, Greece   THEO   24814   East: A Comparative
                                Approach




Athens, Greece   THEO   34701   Greek Myth & Religion
   HOST_UNIV_NUMBER      HOST_UNIV_TITLE
                      Modern Greek
M101
                      (Beginning)


M102                  Modern Greek II




                      Byzantine Art and
A364 (A464)
                      Architecture




                      Gender and Sexuality in
E356
                      Modern Greek Culture




                      The Culture of Modern
                      Greece: The
E333
                      Ethnography of a
                      Society in Transition
           Modern Athens: History
H/E330     and Culture of the
           Greek Capital




           Aegean and Ancient
A331       Greek Art and
           Archaeology




           The Archaeology of
A361/461
           Athens
              The Ethnography of
E333
              Greece




A416          Archaeological Drawing




A362          Ancient Greek Sculpture




              Sites and Monuments of
A351 (A451)
              Athens and Greece
           The Sites and
A361/461   Monuments of Ancient
           Athens




           Ancient Greek
           Architecture from the
           Archaic to the Roman
A366
           Times as Reflected in
           the Monuments of
           Athens




           Aegean and Ancient
A353/453
           Greek Painting
              Aegean Prehistory: The
A367 (A467)   Rise and Fall of the
              Bronze Age Cultures




              Byzantine Art and
A364 (A464)
              Architecture




              The Monuments of
              Greece in their Historic
A333          and Artistic Significance:
              Ancient, Medieval and
              Modern
       Aegean and Ancient
A331   Greek Art and
       Archaeology




       The History of Ancient
H333
       Greece




       Studying the Emergence
       and Development of
H411   Athenian Democracy
       from the Ancient
       Sources
       From Contract to
H358   Conquest: Rediscovering
       Roman Greece




H355   Ancient Greek Athletics




       The History and Society
H415
       of Ancient Sparta
A362 (A462)   Ancient Greek Sculpture




              Aegean & Ancient Greek
A331
              Art & Archaeology




              The Archaeology of
A361
              Athens




              Ancient Greek
H/R332
              Mythology & Religion




T1            Honors Tutorial



              Beginning Ancient Greek
C101
              I
         Beginning Ancient Greek
C102
         II




C201     Ancient Greek: Plato




         Ancient Greek:
C202
         Homer



C311     Advanced Latin I




C312     Advanced Latin II




         Citizen, State &
E/S357   Society: A Service
         Learning Approach
              Attic Tragedy (in
L351 (L451)
              translation)




              Deconstructing
              Zorba: The Search
L356
              for Identity in Modern
              Greek Literature




              Gender and Sexuality in
E356
              Modern Greek Culture




              Politics & Society in
              20th C. Greece: New
S/H339
              Challenges, Old
              Problems
           Origins of Classical
           Greek Civilization

H344       formerly
           (The History of Ancient
           Greece)




H355/455   Ancient Greek Athletics




           Ancient Macedon to the
H356       Death of Alexander the
           Great
           From Contact to
H358       Conquest: Rediscovering
           Roman Greece




           Power, State and
           Religion: A History of
H359/459
           Byzantium (324 - 1453
           AD)




           History & Politics of the
H/S351
           Balkans




           Between East and West:
           The History of Modern
H338
           Greece, 19th-20th
           century
         Modern Athens: History
H/E330   and Culture of the
         Greek Capital




         Struggling with the Past:
         Greece and the Balkans
H343
         from 1453 to the
         Present
S/H359   U.S. Policy Toward the
S/H459   Middle East




         Global & Regional
S/H354   Security after the 11th
         of September 2001
             Politics of the Middle
             East: Domestic
S/H337
             Challenges & External
             Threats




P/R340       Thinking Through Myth




             Greek Philosophy: The
P353/453     Nature of First Principles
             and of Ultimate Reality




             Greek Philosophy: The
P354 (454)   Good Life and the
             Common Good
S/H359   U.S. Policy Toward the
S/H459   Middle East




         Global & Regional
S/H354   Security after the 11th
         of September 2001
             The European Union &
H/S363/463
             European Integration




             Politics of the Middle
             East: Domestic
S/H337
             Challenges & External
             Threads




             Contemporary
             International Politics:
S/H361/461
             The Mediterranean
             Dimension
         History & Politics of the
H/S351
         Balkans




         Politics and Society in
         20th Century Greece:
S/H339
         New Challenges, Old
         Problems




         A European Perspective
         on Environmental
G/S352
         Politics: A Service
         Learning Approach
         The Natural
         Environment of Greece:
G350
         From Landscape Ecology
         to Conservation




         Modern Athens: History
H/E330   and Culture of the
         Greek Capital




         The Ethnography of
E333
         Greece
         Gender/Sexuality in
E356
         Greek Culture




         A European Perspective
         on Environmental
G/S352
         Politics: A Service
         Learning Approach




R365     The Orthodox Church
         The Religions of the
R350     Middle East: A
         Comparative Approach




         Ancient Greek
H/R332
         Mythology & Religion
                         Course_Description                       Credit     Term
Grammar, elementary composition, practice in conversation, and
                                                                3          FALL 2004
reading of modern prose.
For students who have successfully completed M101 or its
equivalent. The primary aim of this course is to enable the
                                                                           Spring
students: a) to communicate in the language and face daily life 3
                                                                           2006
situations; b) to read in the language and write short accounts
and letters.

The course surveys the development of Byzantine art from the
Late Antique Period through the Palaeologan periods.
Architecture provides the framework from which the other arts,
especially mosaic, fresco, panel painting, and manuscript
illumination are examined. These works are looked at in terms of
their formal characteristics, but the emphasis of the course is
placed on exploring the meaning of this art beyond its formal
                                                                           Spring
aspects, and on appreciating its function in Byzantine society,   3
                                                                           2005
particularly as a reflection of both the theological concerns and
the political realities that the Byzantine Empire confronted.
Readings introduce a range of approaches to this art in current
scholarship, and class trips to a number of monasteries and
museums, allow personal investigation of some of the most
important and beautiful examples of Byzantine Art that have
survived.

This course considers: gender roles and complementary
oppositions in Mediterranean families and societies; particular
                                                                           Spring
ethnographic situations; crosscultural comparisons and feminist 3
                                                                           2005
debates; theoretical elaborations; ethnographical writing and
recording.

The course acquaints students with central facets of Greek
society and culture as depicted by ethnographers and other
social scientists since the mid-sixties. The emphasis is on
institutions, modes of living, options, contests and negotiations
of everyday existence in the Greek society of today - the society
which the students actually come into contact with during their
stay in the country. The traditional" will come into the picture as        Spring
                                                                    3
one among other cultural frames of reference in terms of which             2007
people in Greece behave and "cope" in different circumstances
and situations. A central aim of the course is to cultivate in the
student an ethnographic sensibility which involves among other
things the ability and willingness to put oneself in the place of
the people one has come to study and become aware of one's
own cultural conditioning.
This course will study the historical development of
contemporary Athens through an analysis of the social and
cultural expressions of its residents. Focusing on migratory
movement into the city, the course will examine the conditions
in which the Athenian urban, social and cultural landscape has
evolved. Through the lens of popular culture we will consider the
establishment of the capital in the 19th century, the influx of
refugees from Asia Minor in the early 1920’s, the massive
internal migration form rural Greece into the city after the civil
                                                                         Spring
war ended in 1949, and finally the processes by which Athens is 3
                                                                         2008
becoming a multicultural post-modern metropolis. Along with an
in-depth examination of the history of modern Athens students
will engage with the ways in which “performances” (from the
artistic to the everyday) express and shape social life and
meaning. Analyses of various forms of artistic expression such as
music, literature, theatre and film will be combined with
fieldwork in the city offering students the opportunity to engage
with the myriad practices that convey the lives and concerns of
modern Athenians.


A survey of the art and archaeology of Greece from prehistoric
times to the end of the Classical period: its purpose is to
introduce the student, using whenever possible the primary
sources (monuments and artifacts), to the ancient civilizations of
the Aegean and Greece: Minoan, Mycenaean, and Classical
Greek. The schedule of class visits to sites, monuments and        3     FALL 2004
museums is coordinated as much as possible with school and
class trips. Classroom lectures and the readings provide the
historical context into which to set the monuments and artifacts.
Not intended for students who take A361, or for East
Mediterranean Area Studies Track students.

Detailed, on-site study of the archaeology of the ancient city as
described by ancient authors and determined by modern
research. Students explore the ancient city and its acropolis, its
sanctuaries, temples and theaters, its civic center (Agora), and         Spring
                                                                     3
stoas, the meeting places of Athenian democracy, and all major           2006
archaeological sites and monuments of historic interest
belonging to the famed city. Intended for students with a
background in Ancient Greek history and/or archaeology.
The course acquaints students with central facets of Greek
society and culture as depicted by ethnographers and other
social scientists since the mid-sixties. The emphasis is on
institutions, modes of living, options, contests and negotiations
of everyday existence in the Greek society of today - the society
which the students actually come into contact with during their
stay in the country. The "traditional" will come into the picture
                                                                  3    FALL 2004
as one among other cultural frames of reference in terms of
which people in Greece behave and "cope" in different
circumstances and situations. A central aim of the course is to
cultivate in the student an ethnographic sensibility which
involves among other things the ability and willingness to put
oneself in the place of the people one has come to study and
become aware of one's own cultural conditioning.


For students who will pursue a career in archaeology: this course
develops basic techniques in the drawing of pottery and other
archaeological finds, such as bone, metal, stone, and figurines,
                                                                       Spring
but also plans, trench sections, and the like. The skills acquired 3
                                                                       2006
have enabled students to work at excavations in Egypt, at Troy,
and in the Athenian Agora, among others. Enrolment limited to
eight students.

A course designed to give the student first-hand knowledge of
sculpture of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods;
                                                                       Spring
instruction in the National Archaeological, Acropolis, Kerameikos, 3
                                                                       2006
Agora, and Piraeus museums, and on class trips to Delphi,
Olympia, and elsewhere.

This course is designed to give the student first hand knowledge
of the history and topographical / architectural development of
the city of Athens, and of other major sites in the Peloponnese
and mainland Greece on the itineraries of the school's field trips
                                                                       Spring
from prehistoric times to the Roman era. The students will not     3
                                                                       2005
only learn to understand and interpret the major architectural
/topographical features involved, but most importantly, they will
be alerted to the human factor and its role in the life history of
cultural units.
Detailed, on-site archaeological study of the topography of the
ancient city as described by ancient authors and determined by
modern research. Students explore the ancient city and its
acropolis, its sanctuaries, temples and theaters, its civic center   3   FALL 2004
(Agora), and stoas, the meeting places of Athenian democracy,
and all major archaeological sites and monuments of historic
interest belonging to the famed city.


A study of the major architectural currents in the ancient Greek
world from the 6th century BC to the 2nd century AD as these
manifest themselves in the surviving architectural monuments of
                                                                         Spring
Athens. In order that students may profit as greatly as possible 3
                                                                         2008
from first-hand, visual contact with the monuments that are the
object of their study, almost all sessions of the course are held
on the Acropolis, the Agora and other major Athenian sites.



An intensive and comprehensive survey of Greek Painting from
the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period (ca. 3000 - 27 BC). Initial
class periods will study the techniques, materials, and functions
of Greek painting. A historical survey will follow, focusing upon
what the ancient Greeks chose to represent throughout their
history and what Greek painting tells 'us' about 'them'. In the
Bronze and Iron Ages (3000-ca. 650) Greek art is anonymous, but
from the Archaic period many signatures of artists are preserved. 3      FALL 2004
From them we are able to learn about their styles, aims and
workshops, and at times something of their personalities as well.
Special attention will be paid to such painters and their works. In
addition to slide lectures and discussions, advantage will be
taken of pottery holdings in Athens, with class visits to the Agora,
Kerameikos, and National Museum. Students will also be able to
see frescoes and painted pottery on all of our field trips.
This course is designed to explore the archaeology of the Aegean
Bronze Age, with special emphasis on the economic and socio-
political forces responsible for the rise and fall of the Minoan and
the Mycenaean world. Students will learn to interpret the role of
architecture, economy and foreign contacts in the formation of
urban societies. They will also explore the human factor and its 3     Fall 07
role in the life history of cultural units and, cultivate their own
judgment about the rise, development and collapse of complex
hierarchical societies. Extensive on-site sessions in museums
specializing in the prehistoric Aegean, and in a diverse range of
palatial and urban centers in Crete and on the mainland.


The course surveys the development of Byzantine art from the
Late Antique Period through the Palaeologan periods.
Architecture provides the framework from which the other arts,
especially mosaic, fresco, panel painting, and manuscript
illumination are examined. These works are looked at in terms of
their formal characteristics, but the emphasis of the course is
placed on exploring the meaning of this art beyond its formal
                                                                       Spring
aspects, and on appreciating its function in Byzantine society,   3
                                                                       2005
particularly as a reflection of both the theological concerns and
the political realities that the Byzantine Empire confronted.
Readings introduce a range of approaches to this art in current
scholarship, and class trips to a number of monasteries and
museums, allow personal investigation of some of the most
important and beautiful examples of Byzantine Art that have
survived.


The course covers Greek history from the Bronze Age to the
present day as this is reflected in the country's monuments. The
course is taught partly on site in Athens and Attica, and prepares
                                                                   3   FALL 2004
the student for the all important school trips. Not intended for
students who take A361, or for Ancient Greek Civilization Track
students.
A survey of the art and archaeology of Greece from prehistoric
times to the end of the Classical period: its purpose is to
introduce the student, using whenever possible the primary
sources (monuments, arts and artifacts), to the ancient
                                                                          Spring
civilizations of the Aegean and Greece: Minoan, Mycenaean, and 3
                                                                          2008
Classical Greek. The schedule of class visits to sites, monuments
and museums is coordinated as much as possible with school and
class trips. Classroom lectures and the readings provide the
historical context into which to set the monuments and artifacts.


A standard introduction to the history of Classical Greek
Civilization from the fall of Bronze Age civilizations to the death
of Philip of Macedon in 336 BC. The focus is on the rise and fall of
the Polis or citizen-state which became the crucible in which this
new civilization was formed. Particular attention is given to the         Spring
                                                                      3
concept of Public Domain, which was the unique defining                   2007
characteristic of Classical Greek Civilization as it evolved not only
in the Peloponnese and Central Greece, but also in Ionia. The
evolution of the citizen-states of Sparta and Athens are followed
in detail, particularly the constitutional history of Athens.


The seminar examines the emergence and unfolding of the
political institutions of Athenian democracy to the end of the 5th
century BC. Its focus is primarily on the Age of Pericles when
Athenian democracy reached the point of its highest
development, a period generally acknowledged as being one of
the greatest moments in world history. The political institutions 3       Fall 2005
of the period are examined against their historical background
and on the basis of the study of primary sources, i.e. the reading
and interpretation of literary sources, visits to archaeological
sites and museums, the study and interpretation of inscriptions
and other archaeological evidence.
With close reference to ancient perspectives and sources, this
course explores the long history of interaction between the two
great civilizations of Greece and Rome, from the times of their
early contacts to the period of the Roman conquest and
occupation of the entire Mediterranean world. Within this
chronological framework, particular attention will be paid to a
                                                                       Spring
parallel investigation of the prevailing social and political      3
                                                                       2007
conditions in both worlds with special emphasis on their
primary social, religious and cultural institutions. Through an
assessment of this interaction, this course seeks to establish how
the creation of the Greco-Roman civilization had a profound
impact and contribution to the shaping of western civilization in
general.


The course explores the origins and functions of competitive
athletics in ancient Greece with a major emphasis upon Olympia
and the Olympic Games. The traditional events of the ancient
Olympic Games are discussed in detail. The later development of
pan-Hellenic athletic festivals such as the pan-Athenaic games,
                                                                   3   Fall 07
are examined.The class visits the major festival sites of Isthmia,
Nemea, and Olympia. Also examined are the changes brought
about by Alexander the Great's conquests and by the later
domination of Greece by Rome. A brief look at the events
leading to the institution of modern international Olympic.



This seminar-based course will explore the history of ancient
Sparta from the earliest beginnings of the state in the Iron Age
(approx. 1000-700 BCE) to the city’s eclipse as a major power in
371 BCE. We will assess the validity of the traditional view of
Spartans as hardy warriors who lived under social norms
regarding ownership of land, the role of women, the treatment
of children, the use of coined money, and the display of personal 3    S'08
wealth, which were all diametrically opposed to Greek, and
indeed our own, norms. Through in-depth examination of
ancient sources we will examine, by means of seminars, lectures,
and a field trip, the evidence for this allegedly unique social
system and investigate how and why Sparta evolved into the
dominant military and political power in Classical Greece.
A course designed to give the student first-hand knowledge of
sculpture of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods;
instruction in the National Archaeological, Acropolis, Kerameikos, 3     S'08
Agora, and Piraeus museums, and on class trips to Delphi,
Olympia, and elsewhere.


A survey of the art and archaeology of Greece from prehistoric
times to the end of the Classical period: its purpose is to
introduce the student, using whenever possible the primary
sources (monuments, arts and artifacts), to the ancient
civilizations of the Aegean and Greece: Minoan, Mycenaean, and 3         Fall 2005
Classical Greek. The schedule of class visits to sites, monuments
and museums is coordinated as much as possible with school and
class trips. Classroom lectures and the readings provide the
historical context into which to set the monuments and artifacts.


Detailed, on-site study of the archaeology of the ancient city as
described by ancient authors and determined by modern
research. Students explore the ancient city and its acropolis, its
sanctuaries, temples and theaters, its civic center (Agora), and
                                                                     3   Fall 07
stoas, the meeting places of Athenian democracy, and all major
archaeological sites and monuments of historic interest
belonging to the famed city. Intended for students with a
background in Ancient Greek history and/or archaeology.

The purpose of the course is to provide a knowledge and a
method of "reading" Greek myths of the Archaic and Classical
periods in their cultural and historical context. The course among
other things, will examine the nature of Greek myth and its
                                                                   3     Fall 2005
representation in Greek art. It will also explore how the artistic
representation of myth reflected social and religious institutions
and practices; and finally it will investigate how myth is related
to religion.

The courses are seminars on special topics. Requisites for
participation in them are an adequate previous knowledge of the
subject, a relevant major and/or consent of the instructor. Level 3      Fall 06
3 courses are writing and research oriented. Students may have
to work with primary sources (even if in translation).
The course consists in an intensive study of the forms, syntax,
                                                                     3   Fall 07
and vocabulary of ancient Greek.
The course is the continuation of first semester Beginning
Ancient Greek. Most of the students, however, will be new to
                                                                          Spring
CYA. Some time will be given over to adjustment and review.       3
                                                                          2007
Then, the goal will be to get through the basic accidence and
syntax of Ancient Greek as thoroughly and as quickly as possible.
Students will read Plato’s Apology. The focus will be on a review
of grammar and analysis of syntax and usage. At the same time
the students will be able to read a Greek work in its entirety. We
                                                                   3      Fall 2005
will of course discuss the content and argument of the Apology
and the historicity of the court case and what we know of
Socrates’ life.
The course consists in the reading of selected books from
                                                                          SPRING
The Iliad or The Odyssey; sight-reading and exercises in 3
                                                                          2009
writing Greek prose complete the course.

Reading of selected authors as indicated by the requirements
and previous level of attainment of the class; exercises in prose       3 Fall 2008
composition. Prerequisite: two years of Latin.

Reading of selected authors as indicated by the requirements
                                                                          Spring
and previous level of attainment of the class; exercises in prose   3
                                                                          2006
composition. Prerequisite: two years of Latin.
This course examines major social issues in contemporary
Greece and the changing relationships between state and
citizen in Greek society. In recent years, Greece has seen
the emergence of what has been called “civil society”-
voluntary and social organizations that are an integral
part of political life, but are not commercial in nature or
part of the state. Students will join such organizations as
volunteers, and their experiences will be integrated into
the course, providing an experiential dimension to their
understanding of the social issues under scrutiny as well
                                                                          SPRING
as the ways in which the various actors that constitute     3
                                                                          2009
civil society are finding their place in Greece. Why is
volunteering still a somewhat unusual social practice in
Greece? What roles do NGOs play? How do people in
Greece think of themselves as citizens, and how do they
perceive the responsibilities of the state? Students will
read generally about Greek culture and society from a
variety of disciplines in the social sciences, with a
particular theoretical focus on political anthropology, and
will volunteer with a specific agency working on social
issues in Greece. Students enrolling in E/S357 are
Ancient Athenian tragedy as represented by the extant plays of
Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, is studied in its social,
political, topographical, and religious/philosophical context; the
                                                                         Spring
course benefits from easy access to the precinct of Dionysos, on 3
                                                                         2005
the south slope of the Acropolis, and other ancient theaters. On
occasion, efforts are made to revive the reality of ancient drama
by having students perform.

The course will explore forms of identity as mirrored,
forged or disputed in Modern Greek literature. Specific
topics will include individual vs. collective identity,
civilization and madness, national identity and
stereotypes, gender and diaspora politics, war and                       SPRING
                                                                    3
political ideology. Literary works will be explored in the               2009
context of Modern Greek history as well as in relation to
other national literary traditions. Authors will include
C.P.Cavafy, George Seferis, Nikos Kazantzakis, Odysseas
Elytis, Giannis Ritsos, Alki Zei, Rea Galanake and others.
This course considers: gender roles and complementary
oppositions in Mediterranean families and societies; particular
                                                                         Spring
ethnographic situations; crosscultural comparisons and feminist 3
                                                                         2005
debates; theoretical elaborations; ethnographical writing and
recording.
This class will treat the main aspects of modern Greek politics
and society. These are divided into four broad segments and
include such topics as nation-building and the creation of
national consciousness, the acute political conflicts of the
interwar years, the civil war and the incomplete postwar
democracy, the rise and fall of military dictatorship, the re-
establishment of democracy and democratic consolidation, the
new political system and party antagonism, relations between
state and society, Greece’s europeanization, problems
associated with the recent appearance of ethnic minorities, and
                                                                     3   Fall 2005
the position and problems of the country at the beginning of the
21st century. The topics and readings that follow are designed
primarily to establish as quickly as possible a common basis for in-
class discussions. The topics are not, however, written in stone.
Discussions will be open-ended, which means that the group may
pursue particular topics in greater depth if that seems the
appropriate thing to do.The central purpose of this course is to
deepen one’s understanding of contemporary Greece. An
additional aim is to use information about Greece to make wider
comparisons with the political systems and societies that
A standard introduction to the history of Classical Greek
Civilization from the fall of Bronze Age civilizations to the death
of Philip of Macedon in 336 BC. The focus is on the rise and fall of
the Polis or citizen-state which became the crucible in which this
new civilization was formed. Particular attention is given to the
                                                                      3   FALL
concept of Public Domain, which was the unique defining
characteristic of Classical Greek Civilization as it evolved not only
in the Peloponnese and Central Greece, but also in Ionia. The
evolution of the citizen-states of Sparta and Athens are followed
in detail, particularly the constitutional history of Athens.


The course explores the origins and functions of competitive
athletics in ancient Greece with a major emphasis upon Olympia
and the Olympic Games. The traditional events of the ancient
Olympic Games are discussed in detail. The later development of
pan-Hellenic athletic festivals such as the pan-Athenaic games,
are examined. The class visits the major festival sites of Isthmia, 3     FALL 2004
Nemea, and Olympia. Also examined are the changes brought
about by Alexander the Great's conquests and by the later
domination of Greece by Rome. A brief look at the events
leading to the institution of modern international Olympic
Games in 1896 concludes the course of study.


An examination of the actions and events of the 4th century BC
through the study of primary evidence-literary, epigraphic and
archaeological. Special attention is paid to the career of Philip II
and to that of his son Alexander the Great. The course is partly
taught on the field trip to Northern Greece which takes the
students to Thessaloniki and its Museums, the ancient capital
city of Pella, the royal Macedonian tombs, the palace at Vergina          Spring
                                                                     3
and other sites with a view to familiarize the students with the          2005
archaeological evidence on Macedonian history. A visit to the
Epigraphic Museum in Athens acquaints students with important
4th century documents that survive inscribed on stones and
which constitute valuable sources of ancient history. Special
emphasis is given to topics that are central to modern political
and intellectual debate.
With close reference to ancient perspectives and sources, this
course explores the long history of interaction between the two
great civilizations of Greece and Rome, from the times of their
early contacts to the period of the Roman conquest and
occupation of the entire Mediterranean world. Within this
chronological framework, particular attention will be paid to a           Spring
                                                                    3
parallel investigation of the prevailing social and political             2006
conditions in both worlds with special emphasis on their primary
social, religious and cultural institutions. Through an assessment
of this interaction, this course seeks to establish how the
creation of the Greco-Roman civilization had a profound impact
and contribution to the shaping of western civilization in general.


The range of the more important subjects and issues which the
course covers includes the following: the factors which led to the
transformation of the eastern part of the Roman Empire to a
Greek Orthodox medieval empire and to the creation of a
separate identity for the Byzantine state and society; the
organization of the Byzantine state and the development and        3      FALL 2004
defining features of Byzantine civilization; the relations between
Byzantium and the Latin West, the Slavic world, and Islam; the
factors which led to the decline of the empire and the eventual
fall of Constantinople in 1453 AD; finally, the pivotal and unique
place of Byzantium in world history and its lasting legacy.


The historical development of the peoples and nationalities of
the Balkan peninsula; the political, social and economic
physiognomy of the states which came to express them in the
period before and after World War II (Yugoslavia, Rumania,                Spring
                                                                     3
Bulgaria, Albania); the new state of affairs in the area after the        2005
collapse of the Soviet Union, the end of the Cold War and the
more recent dramatic developments on the western half of the
peninsula.

The course examines the history of Greece from the creation of
the new state after the War of Independence of 1821 to the
present. Attention is paid to such issues as irredentism and
Greek nationalism; the conditional nature of Greek sovereignty 3          FALL 2004
in the last century; civil-military relations; state-society relations;
the dynamics of party politics; authoritarianism and democracy;
and the nature of the modern Greek identity.
This course will study the historical development of
contemporary Athens through an analysis of the social and
cultural expressions of its residents. Focusing on migratory
movement into the city, the course will examine the conditions
in which the Athenian urban, social and cultural landscape has
evolved. Through the lens of popular culture we will consider the
establishment of the capital in the 19th century, the influx of
refugees from Asia Minor in the early 1920’s, the massive
internal migration form rural Greece into the city after the civil
                                                                        Spring
war ended in 1949, and finally the processes by which Athens is 3
                                                                        2008
becoming a multicultural post-modern metropolis. Along with an
in-depth examination of the history of modern Athens students
will engage with the ways in which “performances” (from the
artistic to the everyday) express and shape social life and
meaning. Analyses of various forms of artistic expression such as
music, literature, theatre and film will be combined with
fieldwork in the city offering students the opportunity to engage
with the myriad practices that convey the lives and concerns of
modern Athenians.




The course will examine the history of Greece from the end of
the Byzantine Empire to the present in a comparative
perspective with the other Balkan nations. It will cover the
Ottoman period, the emergence of modern Greece and the
other Balkan states, the transformations in society and politics
and the rise of competing nationalisms during the nineteenth
century, the experience of the Balkans during the Balkan Wars
                                                                    3   Fall 2008
(1912-1913), World War I (1914-1918), and World War II (1939-
1945). It will examine the post-war period and the diverging
paths of Greece from the other Balkan states that were ruled by
communist regimes, and the establishment of stable democracy
in Greece following seven years of dictatorship. The course will
end with the Wars of Yugoslavia and the as of yet incomplete
inclusion of the region in the European Union. Although the
focus will be on social and political developments, the course will
be examining cultural transformations and we will touch upon
questions dealing with gender, religion, and ethnicity.
This course proposes to offer an overview of US policy toward
the Middle East from the end of World War II until today. More
specifically it intends to familiarize students with the broad
parameters characterizing this policy and offers an analysis of the
domestic and external factors which have shaped US policy in
                                                                      Spring
this region. Topics to be examined: The Cold War and US-Soviet 3
                                                                      2005
rivalry in the Middle East; Oil and US policy; Middle Eastern
nationalism versus US interests; US policy and the question of
democratization in the Middle East; the Arab-Israeli dispute as
seen from Washington; the US position in the Middle East after
the Gulf War and the 2003 war against Iraq.


The course will explore the characteristics of the global and
regional security environment (with an emphasis on the
Mediterranean and the wider Middle East) in the post-Cold War
and, especially in the post-September 11, 2001 era. The role of
great powers (and especially the U.S.) and international
organizations will be
examined in detail, together with the impact of various regional
conflicts (Arab-Israeli, Iraq, Afganistan, Greek-Turkish, Cyprus,
etc.) and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction on
regional stability. There will be extensive reference to the      3   S'07
"Global War on Terrorism" (GWOT) and its implications for
transatlantic
relations and for global and regional security. In addition to
"traditional security problems", the course will examine
transnational security threats, such as migration, economic
underdevelopment, Islamic fundamentalism, environmental
problems, water conflicts, transnational organized crime,
terrorism, democratization and human rights. The approach will
be both geographical and "functional".
Students are familiarized with the process that led to the
contemporary situation in the Middle East, the participants and
politics of the region, the major causes of friction and the
unresolved problems, as well as its strategic importance and
relevance in the global setting. It also explores a number of key
ideas and ideologies and their impact on the state systems of the
Middle East, i.e. the existence of multiple identities, questions of 3   Fall 2005
legitimacy of the states and regimes, the lack of democracy and
growth of nationalism and religious fundamentalism, the impact
of modernization and underdevelopment, security predicaments,
and the phenomenon of terrorism. This is done with reference to
representative case studies both of states and crucial non-state
entities, such as the Kurds and Palestinians.


A study of mythic religion as a form of thought and of the
understanding of the world that results from mythic thinking. We
will consider the roots of myth in metaphor, compare mythic
understanding with scientific and historical explanation and trace 3     Fall 06
the transformation of myth into more sophisticated Western and
Asian religions. Readings drawn from the works of Calasso, Plato,
Hegel, Cassirer, Eliade, Lakoff and Johnson and Langer.


An examination of selected works by Plato and Aristotle, as well
as surviving fragments of certain pre-Socratic philosophers
pertaining to meta-physics. The course emphasizes the
                                                                 3       FALL 2004
philosophical development of critical metaphysical issues but
focuses on the manner in which Aristotle responded to Plato,
especially with respect to problems on substance and being.

This course examines the ethical and political ideas of classical
Greek philosophy. It focuses first on Plato and Aristotle and
attempts a comparison with Stoic and Epicurean doctrines.
Plato's Symposium and Phaedo, and excerpts from the Republic             Spring
                                                                  3
are explored before a concentration on Aristotle's Nicomachean           2005
Ethics and Politics. The contrast between Hellenistic ethical and
political views with the corresponding structures of Platonic and
Aristotelian philosophers is emphasized.
This course proposes to offer an overview of US policy toward
the Middle East from the end of World War II until today. More
specifically it intends to familiarize students with the broad
parameters characterizing this policy and offers an analysis of the
domestic and external factors which have shaped US policy in
                                                                          Spring
this region. Topics to be examined: The Cold War and US-Soviet 3
                                                                          2005
rivalry in the Middle East; Oil and US policy; Middle Eastern
nationalism versus US interests; US policy and the question of
democratization in the Middle East; the Arab-Israeli dispute as
seen from Washington; the US position in the Middle East after
the Gulf War and the 2003 war against Iraq.


The course will explore the characteristics of the global and
regional security environment (with an emphasis on the
Mediterranean and the wider Middle East) in the post-Cold War
and, especially in the post-September 11, 2001 era. The role of
great powers (and especially the U.S.) and international
organizations will be examined in detail, together with the
impact of various regional conflicts (Arab-Israeli, Iraq, Afganistan,
Greek-Turkish, Cyprus, etc.) and the proliferation of weapons of
mass destruction on regional stability. There will be extensive           Spring
                                                                      3
reference to the "Global War on Terrorism" (GWOT) and its                 2006
implications for transatlantic relations and for global and regional
security. In addition to "traditional security problems", the
course will examine transnational security threats, such as
migration, economic underdevelopment, Islamic
fundamentalism, environmental problems, water conflicts,
transnational organized crime, terrorism, democratization and
human rights. The approach will be both geographical and
"functional".
The course is designed to provide an introductory, albeit detailed
and critical, understanding of what the European Union is, how it
works, and what its objectives are. The course begins with a
general overview concerning the historical evolution of the
European project and proceeds to present a theoretical
framework for European integration. The institutional framework
of the European Union is presented in detail as well as the policy- 3    FALL 2004
making process of key selected policy areas such as agricultural
policy, economic and monetary union and foreign policy. Key
issues dealing with the future evolution of the European Union
such as enlargement and its relations with the United States are
also assessed as well as a special case study comparing EU
integration to US federalism.


The aim of this course is to familiarize the students with the
process that led to the contemporary situation in the Middle
East, the participants and politics that characterize the region,
the major causes of friction and the unresolved problems
afflicting it, as well as its strategic importance and relevance in
the global setting. The course also explores a number of key
ideas and ideologies and their impact on the state systems of the
                                                                     3   FALL 2004
Middle East, i.e. the existence of multiple identities, questions of
legitimacy of the states and regimes, the lack of democracy and
growth of nationalism and religious fundamentalism, the impact
of modernization and underdevelopment, security predicaments,
and the phenomenon of terrorism. This is done with reference to
representative case studies both of states and crucial non-state
entities, such as the Kurds and Palestinians.


The focus of this course is the Balkans in their international
dimension. Attention is directed to the place of the region in the
international system and to its importance in international
affairs. The influence and role played by outside powers on
                                                                   3     FALL 2004
developments in the domestic field as well as on the external
behavior of Balkan countries is investigated. The time span
covered by the course is the period prior to World War II to the
post-Cold War era.
The historical development of the peoples and nationalities of
the Balkan peninsula; the political, social and economic
physiognomy of the states which came to express them in the
period before and after World War II (Yugoslavia, Rumania,                   Spring
                                                                       3
Bulgaria, Albania); the new state of affairs in the area after the           2005
collapse of the Soviet Union, the end of the Cold War and the
more recent dramatic developments on the western half of the
peninsula.


Cast in a comparative, interpretative framework designed to
render the Greek political system more readily intelligible to the
average American undergraduate, the purpose of the course is to
                                                                             Spring
explore the structure and dynamics of Greek politics in the 20th 3
                                                                             2005
century. A salient feature of the course is an examination of the
central role that the "foreign factor" played in Greek politics
from the 19th century to the most recent past.


The course explores the nature and characteristics of the rapidly
evolving field of environmental policy, a distinct and peculiar
field of international relations. By familiarizing themselves with
some of the greatest current environmental pressures, students
will examine the measures that have been developed to counter
these challenges. Although developments at the global level
create the setting for this course, the course offers a European
perspective to environmental protection by examining the
policies and tools established within the European Union. The
                                                                           3 Fall 2008
study of particular case studies, from Greece and the broader
Southeast European region, will provide the opportunity for a
detailed examination of protection schemes. The course is based
on the motto “think globally, act locally.” While students can
expect to develop analytical and critical thinking skills, they will
also gain hands-on experience by collaborating with institutions
that partake in the protection of the environment and are based
in Athens. Service learning constitutes a core component of the
course.
A unique review of the natural world and wildlife of Greece
through an exploration of its lands and seas with reference to
humankind’s effects on the environment through the ages. The
course uses a multidisciplinary approach to study physical and
human geography, biodiversity, and historical ecology. Through a
                                                                     Spring
succession of guided excursions in and around Athens, students 3
                                                                     2008
will be able to interpret landscape features and processes and
develop skill in identifying the region’s rich flora and fauna.
Interpreting natural history will promote a better awareness of
the environment and current conservation problems in Modern
Greece.


This course will study the historical development of
contemporary Athens through an analysis of the social and
cultural expressions of its residents. Focusing on migratory
movement into the city, the course will examine the conditions
in which the Athenian urban, social and cultural landscape has
evolved. Through the lens of popular culture we will consider the
establishment of the capital in the 19th century, the influx of
refugees from Asia Minor in the early 1920’s, the massive
internal migration form rural Greece into the city after the civil
                                                                     Spring
war ended in 1949, and finally the processes by which Athens is 3
                                                                     2008
becoming a multicultural post-modern metropolis. Along with an
in-depth examination of the history of modern Athens students
will engage with the ways in which “performances” (from the
artistic to the everyday) express and shape social life and
meaning. Analyses of various forms of artistic expression such as
music, literature, theatre and film will be combined with
fieldwork in the city offering students the opportunity to engage
with the myriad practices that convey the lives and concerns of
modern Athenians.


Central facets of Greek society and culture as depicted by
ethnographers and other social scientists since the mid-sixties.
The emphasis is on institutions, modes of living, options,
contests and negotiations of everyday existence in the Greek
society of today. The "traditional" will come into the picture as
one among other cultural frames of reference in terms of which 3     Fall 2005
people in Greece behave and "cope" in different circumstances
and situations. The course cultivates in the student an
ethnographic sensibility, i.e. the ability and willingness to put
oneself in the place of the people one has come to study and
become aware of one's own cultural conditioning.
This course considers: gender roles and complementary
oppositions in Mediterranean families and societies; particular
                                                                         Spring
ethnographic situations; crosscultural comparisons and feminist 3
                                                                         2006
debates; theoretical elaborations;ethnographical writing and
recording.

The course explores the nature and characteristics of the rapidly
evolving field of environmental policy, a distinct and peculiar
field of international relations. By familiarizing themselves with
some of the greatest current environmental pressures, students
will examine the measures that have been developed to counter
these challenges. Although developments at the global level
create the setting for this course, the course offers a European
perspective to environmental protection by examining the
policies and tools established within the European Union. The
                                                                     3   Fall 2008
study of particular case studies, from Greece and the broader
Southeast European region, will provide the opportunity for a
detailed examination of protection schemes. The course is based
on the motto “think globally, act locally.” While students can
expect to develop analytical and critical thinking skills, they will
also gain hands-on experience by collaborating with institutions
that partake in the protection of the environment and are based
in Athens. Service learning constitutes a core component of the
course.


A survey course on the Orthodox Christian Tradition, from the
beginnings to the modern world. The course will embrace the
history, theology, and culture of this distinctive Christian
tradition. It will explore the early Church, Byzantine, and post-
Byzantine periods with particular focus on the `Greek` dimension         Spring
                                                                  3
of Orthodoxy. The Orthodox Church has an extraordinary history           2006
and remains a salutary challenge to contemporary modes of
thinking and acting. This course offers an opportunity to delve
deeply into this ancient yet eternally relevant expression of
Christianity.
This course serves as an introduction to Judaism, Christianity,
and Islam, the three “Abrahamic” faiths. Though historical
context will be important to our study, the course will be
organized thematically as a means of trying to capture the key
differences as well as similarities among the three religions. The
main themes to be addressed include: Scripture & Tradition,        3   FALL 2007
Monotheism, Authority, Worship & Ritual, Ethics, Art, and
Religion and the Political Orders. In view of significant
contemporary events, an ongoing effort will be made to examine
the role of each religion in the 21st century. No previous
knowledge of the subject is necessary.


The purpose of the course is to provide a knowledge and a
method of "reading" Greek myths of the Archaic and Classical
periods in their cultural and historical context. The course among
other things, will examine the nature of Greek myth and its
                                                                   3   FALL 2004
representation in Greek art. It will also explore how the artistic
representation of myth reflected social and religious institutions
and practices; and finally it will investigate how myth is related
to religion.

				
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