Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace

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Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace Powered By Docstoc
					Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace
Last Updated: September/2006

Applies to: IT, training, and communication professionals who are responsible for
making sure that employees are trained for and productive on Windows Vista.




Abstract: This white paper provides recommendations for helping employees at large
organizations learn how to use Microsoft Windows Vista™. It includes an overview of the
new learning resources that are available to those who are responsible for training
employees; a list of learning objectives; and recommendations, based on our research
and on the best practices that we have gathered, for delivering this training at large
organizations. This information applies to the Microsoft Windows Vista operating system.
Disclaimer
The information that is contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft
Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must
respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the
part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented
after the date of publication.

This document is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES,
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT.

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Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual
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any written license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you
any license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property.

Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e-mail
addresses, logos, people, places and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association
with any real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place
or event is intended or should be inferred.

© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, Win32, Windows, and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation in the United States or other countries or regions.

The names of actual companies and products that are mentioned herein may be the trademarks
of their respective owners.
Contents

About This White Paper ........................................................................................................... 4
  Background ......................................................................................................................... 4
  What’s In This White Paper ................................................................................................. 4
New learning resources for Windows Vista .............................................................................. 6
  A Completely Redesigned Help System.............................................................................. 6
  Guided Help ........................................................................................................................ 7
  Windows Online Help (WOH) .............................................................................................. 8
  The Enterprise Learning Framework (ELF) Tool ................................................................. 9
  Tips and Tricks for Windows Vista .................................................................................... 10
  "Best Practices" Reference Guides ................................................................................... 11
What to Teach: Windows Vista Learning Objectives .............................................................. 13
  Learning Objectives for Windows Vista ............................................................................. 15
     Collaborating and Communicating................................................................................ 15
     Connecting to Work From Home or Away .................................................................... 15
     Desktop and Start Menu ............................................................................................... 15
     Ease of Access (Accessibility) ...................................................................................... 15
     Finding and Organizing Files ........................................................................................ 16
     Getting Help ................................................................................................................. 16
     Internet Explorer ........................................................................................................... 17
     Managing Battery Power .............................................................................................. 17
     Mobile PC Tips ............................................................................................................. 17
     PC Maintenance and Performance............................................................................... 17
     Presentations ............................................................................................................... 18
     Security and Privacy ..................................................................................................... 18
     Synchronizing ............................................................................................................... 18
     Tablet PC ..................................................................................................................... 18
     Turning Off and Starting Up the Computer ................................................................... 19
     Windows SideShow ...................................................................................................... 19
     Wireless Networking ..................................................................................................... 19
     Working Offline ............................................................................................................. 19
  Top 7 Behavior Changes (If You Don’t Do Anything Else) ................................................ 20
     When Changing Skill-Based Behavior Is the Issue....................................................... 21
     When Learned Failure Is the Issue ............................................................................... 22
     When Inertia Is the Issue .............................................................................................. 23
  Top 11 Motivators.............................................................................................................. 23
  Top 8 Discoverability Targets ............................................................................................ 24
  Putting It All Together: Some Areas of Focus For Training ............................................... 24
Recommendations for Windows Vista Learning Delivery ....................................................... 27
  Manage the Learning Curve .............................................................................................. 27
  Manage Multiple Categories of Information Workers......................................................... 28
     What About Beginners?................................................................................................ 29
  Motivate Information Workers Effectively .......................................................................... 29
  Do Not Neglect Conceptual Topics ................................................................................... 31
  Support Informal Learning ................................................................................................. 32
     Provide Self-Help Resources in Small Chunks ............................................................. 34
     Provide a Variety of Learning Choices and Celivery Mechanisms................................ 34
  Encourage Viral Learning .................................................................................................. 37
     The Role of Learning Influentials .................................................................................. 37
     Make Dissemination Easy ............................................................................................ 38
  What About IT Support? .................................................................................................... 39
  Involve the Right Departments .......................................................................................... 40
  To "Classic" Or Not To "Classic"? ..................................................................................... 40
What About the 2007 Microsoft Office Release? ................................................................... 41
Summary................................................................................................................................ 42
Appendix A: Content Provided by Microsoft to Meet Learning Objectives ............................. 43
About This White Paper
This white paper gives you recommendations for helping information workers learn how
to use Windows Vista. At Microsoft, we use the term information workers to describe
users in organizations who need to access information while on the job. The emphasis
of this white paper is on maximizing the productivity of information workers at large
organizations. However, organizations of any size may find useful information here.

Who Should Read This White Paper
This white paper is pertinent for anyone in your organization who has a stake in making
sure that information workers are trained for and are productive on Windows Vista. We
expect the material here to be most useful for your training department, communications
department and/or the desktop deployment leads that are responsible for the success of
information workers who are learning to use Windows Vista.
If you're not a training professional, or are not heavily involved in training information
workers for Windows Vista, you may not want to read this entire document. If you just
want some quick pointers regarding Windows Vista, concentrate on the following
sections:
New Learning Resources for Windows Vista
Top 7 Behavior Changes (If You Don’t Do Anything Else)
Top 11 Motivators
Top 8 Discoverability Targets
Putting It All Together: Some Areas of Focus for Training

What’s In This White Paper
In this white paper, we’ve divided our practical advice for teaching information workers
about Windows Vista into three main sections:
1. New learning resources for Windows Vista
    In this section, we summarize the new learning resources that are available to you
    to help information workers learn how to use Windows Vista.
2. What to teach: Windows Vista learning objectives
    In this section, you’ll find a detailed list of learning objectives, including the areas
    where you should focus your training.
3. Recommendations for Windows Vista Learning Delivery
    In this section, we make suggestions, based on our research and on what our
    customers have told us, about how best to deliver Windows Vista learning content to
    your information workers.
Appendix A brings together the first two sections of this white paper by summarizing
where to find content for each learning objective. For example, if you’re particularly
concerned about people knowing how to use the new Start menu, look in Appendix A to
see which learning resources provide topics about it.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                 5



Deep Dive
The Deep Dive sections of this white paper give more detailed background about a
theme. For example, they may provide you with additional information about what is
happening in the learning industry in general, or about some background data from
Microsoft’s research. Feel free to skip these sections if you only want more general
advice.

Background
Starting with the earliest paper prototypes of Windows Vista, the Windows Client User
Experience research team has gathered data on user performance and on user
satisfaction with Windows Vista features. Windows Client User Experience researchers
have worked closely with the Windows Vista program management, design, and user
assistance (UA) teams to incorporate the results of their research into the product. In
many cases, this research has led to significant changes that have improved the
usability and the learnability of Windows Vista.
The Windows Client User Experience team's user research on Windows Vista has
included usability lab testing, in-home testing, testing at organizations, and feedback
from large customer panels. For this release, we’ve conducted interviews with training
stakeholders at large organizations, in order to understand their training practices and
how we can assist them with helping information workers learn Windows Vista. In
addition, our ongoing ethnography program provides data about how real employees at
dozens of organizations actually work with our software.
With data from our usability labs, we track information workers' success with common
and important operating system tasks, based on time, task-specific success rates, and
satisfaction metrics. We specifically include information workers from both large and
small organizations in this research. Our goal is always to help the majority of
information workers to be able to do these tasks the first time that they use Windows
Vista, even before they receive training. In fact, the goal of first-time success in
completing tasks has been a strong factor in the design of many of the features of
Windows Vista.
However, learning must still take place. Learning is critical because the organizational
goal is really productivity. Increasing productivity may require learning the benefits of
new features that may not be immediately obvious. However, productivity in information
workers is difficult to measure. Measurements like those recorded in our usability labs
give an incomplete picture of productivity. What if it takes a bit longer to use a new
feature, but the work product that is created is more effective in helping an employee be
successful?
You’ll see in this white paper that we are focusing our learning efforts on giving
information workers ideas about what they might be able to do with Windows Vista, and
helping them evaluate the features of Windows Vista that are most likely improve their
productivity. We do not assume that every information worker needs to learn every new
feature.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                               6




New Learning Resources for Windows Vista
Microsoft offers great breadth and depth of learning content for information workers. Our
Microsoft Learning division produces e-learning, books, and training courses that are
delivered by our partners. Our extensive Windows Help system consists of several
thousand topics. Feedback from our customers has taught us that for Windows Vista, we
needed to provide more short content, more content for raising awareness before
deployment, and pointers to the most critical topics.
The new learning tools for Windows Vista are listed below, and each is described in the
following sections.
A completely redesigned Help system
Guided Help
Windows Online Help (WOH)
The Enterprise Learning Framework (ELF) tool
Tips and tricks for Windows Vista
Best Practices reference guides
All of these resources are provided to customers at no additional cost.

A Completely Redesigned Help System
For Windows Vista, all Microsoft Windows XP® Help topics were thrown out, and the
new Help system was augmented with graphics and re-written in a non-technical,
approachable tone. The topics in the new Help system focus on areas where statistics
have shown that we get the most customer queries, as well as important learning areas
for new features. The search system for the new Help system has also been greatly
improved.
These improvements in the new Help system make the content suitable for use in
training. Figure 1 shows the Search topic in Windows XP compared to the Search topic
Windows Vista.
Availability: Now in Windows Vista, from Start menu > Help and Support.




Figure 1: Help topic in Windows XP vs. Windows Vista



© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                  7



Guided Help
Guided Help (formerly called Active Content Wizard, or ACW) is a new interactive Help
format that both describes how to accomplish a task and completes it for the user.
Guided Help can either perform the task automatically, or can show a person how to do
it step by step. Guided Help is most useful when it is accessed from the Help system
that is local to the employee’s computer. The same topics exist on Windows Online Help
(WOH), but they are not interactive, because the employee’s computer cannot be
controlled from the Web. Some of the topics in Guided Help assist in early learning, such
as the What’s new in the Documents folder tour and the Tour the Control Panel tour.
A list of Guided Help topics is available on WOH, but to run the topics interactively, you
must find them in the Help system that is local to the computer (and that is usually
accessed via the Start menu).
Availability: Now in Windows Vista, from Start menu > Help and Support > search for
―guided help.‖




Figure 2: Guided Help can walk the information worker through a task, or take the
information worker on a brief tour of a task or of a new feature




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                8



Windows Online Help (WOH)
New for Windows Vista, WOH includes all of the Help topics that arrive in the Windows
Vista package, as well as some additional articles, and also provides access to
community resources. WOH provides the most up-to-date Windows content available,
including new topics that the Windows writing team has produced in response to
customer needs. WOH is an important learning resource because unlike with the Help
topics that arrive in the Windows Vista package, you can link to any topic at WOH via its
URL, and you can share that or any other topic by using the Email this page button that
is on every WOH topic. Information workers can also mark an interesting topic for later
review by using the Favorites button. You may copy WOH topics and customize them
for internal use (for example, on your organization's intranet), as long as you follow the
guidelines on the Terms of Use specific to this site webpage at the WOH site.
Availability: A Beta 2 version of WOH is now available at
http://windowshelp.microsoft.com.




Figure 3: Windows Online Help home page




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                           9



The Enterprise Learning Framework (ELF) Tool
The new Web-based Enterprise Learning Framework (ELF) tool helps corporate IT
departments and corporate training departments develop a training and communication
plan for employees, and provides the training content in short topics that are only a few
minutes in length. The Windows content comes primarily from WOH. The ELF tool sifts
through several thousand WOH topics, identifies about 150 topics that would be of
interest to enterprise information workers, and places them on a timeline. Along with
these topics, the ELF tool also points to content for the 2007 Microsoft Office release,
which resides at the Office Online website.
A future release of the ELF tool will include the ability to install it on your local intranet,
make modifications to it, and schedule automatic employee e-mails.
Availability: The ELF tool is part of the Microsoft Solution Accelerator for Business
Desktop Deployment (BDD), which is available on the TechNet Desktop Deployment
Center. The ELF tool can be accessed by anyone without a password. The ELF tool is
available at www.microsoft.com/technet/desktopdeployment/bdd/elf/welcome.aspx.




Figure 4: Excerpt from an ELF report. The purple text in the report links to WOH
topics




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                    10



Tips and Tricks for Windows Vista
Tips and Tricks for Windows Vista is a scripted demo session that lasts approximately
45-60 minutes. It demonstrates the most important new features of Windows Vista, and
is ideal for a lunch-and-learn format. The material, which is available to you, includes:
A demo script.
Introductory slides.
A video of the presentation1.
A tip sheet (Word document).
A Top 10 Tips and Tricks reference card (PDF).
    You can make the video available to employees. In addition, you or a Microsoft field
    representative can deliver the presentation live. The Top 10 reference card can be
    distributed to employees independently of the demo session.
Availability: To obtain the Tips and Tricks for Windows Vista materials, visit
www.windowsvistatnt.com.




Figure 5: Excerpt from Top 10 Tips and Tricks reference card




1
    Video is in production as of the publication date of this white paper.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                            11



"Best Practices" reference guides
Microsoft Information Technology (IT) created the Everyday Productivity Education
(EPE) program to help its information workers make the best use of Microsoft products
and IT services. The EPE program's job aids and instructional content are presented in
simple, easy to use formats. The EPE group is sharing several of its "Best Practices" for
Windows Vista guides with customers. These guides were created in Microsoft
PowerPoint®; feel free to modify them to meet the needs of your organization. The two
guides that the EPE group has shared are listed in the following table.
For more information about the EPE program, visit
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/itsolutions/msit/epe.mspx.
Table 1. "Best Practices" Reference Guides
  Title of "Best Practices" guide                    Description of guide
  Best Practices for Everyday Work                   Helps you to understand the enhanced
  with Windows Vista                                 search capabilities, file organization, and
                                                     user interface (UI) improvements in
                                                     Windows Vista, so that you can work
                                                     smarter.

  Best Practices for Power Management                In Windows Vista, a power plan helps you
  with Windows Vista                                 manage your computer's power
                                                     consumption. Use power plans to reduce
                                                     your computer’s power consumption. You
                                                     can also use the new Sleep functionality in
                                                     Windows Vista to reduce your computer's
                                                     power consumption.

Availability: To obtain these "Best Practices" guides, contact your Microsoft field
representative.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                        12




Figure 6: Sample page from the Best Practices for Everyday Work with Windows
Vista reference guide




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                    13




What to Teach: Windows Vista Learning Objectives
In building the learning objectives for Windows Vista, we assumed that most corporate
employees need to learn what’s new and different about Windows, and do not need to
learn the operating system from scratch. However, in addition to topics about changes to
Windows, the ELF tool also includes topics that cover other features of Windows Vista
that aren’t necessarily new. For example, there are some important security-related
concepts in the ELF tool, such as recognizing a secure wireless network, that aren’t
included in this white paper because they are not new to Windows Vista. If you are
interested in more general Windows Vista topics in addition to the learning objectives in
this white paper, or if you are transitioning employees from a version of Windows that's
older than Windows XP, you should review the topics in the ELF tool.

Deep Dive
The 5 Stages of Learning: Meeting Learners Where They Live
by Bob Mosher, Director of Learning Evangelism, MSLearning division, Microsoft
Corporation
Have you ever heard the expression ―The only constant is change‖? Nothing could be
truer when it comes to effectively training learners. With all the new learning modalities
that are available, it's all an organization can do just to keep up with the latest industry
trends. But with all of our attention focused on training modalities, have we been equally
as effective in keeping up with our learners' training needs?
If you look at how most organizations deliver training to the majority of their student
populations, many still take an entry-level approach, meaning they design learning
around the early stages of knowledge adoption. There's a reason they do it this way.
There was a time when the entry-level learner dominated the organizational landscape.
Training departments and learning organizations developed thousands of hours of
classroom training to educate this learner, and they did a wonderful job. But the number
of entry-level learners in the organizational context is growing smaller every day. Most
learners in this context have matured beyond the entry level, and they need to be
challenged at a higher level.
For the sake of this article, I will group learners into two buckets: entry-level learners and
experienced learners. Entry-level learners are at or near the beginning of their learning
journey. The content is either completely new to them, or they are just starting to work
with it; either way, this group is focused on the acquisition of skills. Experienced
learners, by contrast, have moved beyond skills acquisition, and are more worried about
the application and integration of the skills they have. Learners in this group are more
interested in what has changed based on what they have already learned, and they do
not need to be taught as though they had little to no background.
While maturing through these two levels, most learners can be seen at one of five
different stages. Entry-level learners are typically either at the initial stage or at a
continued stage of learning. At the initial stage, entry-level learners are completely new
to the content. They are heavily dependent learners who typically need a lot of guidance.
Continued learners in the entry-level stage, by contrast, are simply learning more
content. The content is still very new, but it tends to be more advanced. Both of these
stages have typically been addressed in the classroom with a subject matter expert at
the front of the room. Both stages are easy to assess, because the skills are measured
by whether they can be recalled or demonstrated, not always whether they can be
applied.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                       14



Experienced learners typically fall into one of three stages. The first stage is the
remediation stage. Experienced learners in this stage do not need more content. It’s not
that they didn’t ―get it‖ the first time; rather, they are struggling back at the workplace
trying to apply their new skills to their jobs. Simply putting them back in a classroom to
hear the same skills will not address this problem. Experienced learners in the
remediation stage need more reference-based and example-based approaches, which
will allow them to apply their new skills. The second stage of experienced learner is the
upgrade stage, which occurs when "the rules change"—much like what will happen with
the introduction of Windows Vista—on students who are already applying what they
have learned. Experienced learners in the upgrade stage simply need an environment
where they can see and try the "new rules". The final stage that experienced learners fall
into is the transfer stage. In this challenging stage, not only have the rules changed, but
so has the domain. Nothing is new conceptually, but the steps and the environment are
no longer familiar. Experienced learners in the transfer stage are often wrongfully sent
back to the entry level; however, doing this ignores the conceptual background that
these learners already possess. Experienced learners at this stage need a robust
experiential environment where the concepts that they've learned can be recognized
and then related to the new domain to which they are being introduced.
If we are to meet the learning needs of experienced learners, we must take a closer look
at the learning tools, strategies, and processes that we put before them. Entry-level
learners will always be with us, but they are being overtaken by the experienced
learners who, in many organizations, may already be the dominant learning population.
How will your organization approach, recognize, and address this shift?
If you scan the lists of learning objectives below, you’ll see that we are not
recommending that people learn to use and apply every new feature of Windows Vista.
Instead, we have categorized the learning objectives into three areas:
1. Knowledge and Comprehension: These topics include information that people
   should be able to recall for future application. Examples are terminology changes or
   improvements to a feature. The titles of these learning objectives start with
   Recognize, Identify, Summarize, or Describe.
2. Evaluation: These topics are about features that the information worker should
   learn enough about to be able to determine their value in the information worker’s
   own work. The titles of these objectives start with Assess or Evaluate.
3. Application: These topics are about features that the information worker should
   learn to apply directly to his or her work. The titles of these topics start with Use or
   Apply.
There are over 100 learning objectives here! But that doesn't mean that you need to
teach employees 100 different things about Windows Vista. This is a comprehensive list
from which you should select the most relevant topics for your organization and your
employees. As you try to determine which topics from this list you should use, keep the
following points in mind:
Not every learning objective will apply to your organization. Use the list as a starting
    point. We expect most organizations to use from 30% to 50% of these learning
    objectives.
Not every learning objective will apply to every information worker in your organization.
    The ELF tool filters topics according to employee profiles, such as road warriors or
    meeting warriors.
The primary learning objectives cover the areas that we believe have the most potential
   impact on productivity. The secondary learning objectives are not unimportant, but
   may have a less dramatic effect on productivity.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                             15



Appendix A shows how the learning objectives relate to Help topics, which can be
accessed online from WOH and are also referenced on the ELF tool.

Learning Objectives for Windows Vista
Collaborating and Communicating
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Evaluate the new Windows Meeting Space tool for collaboration capabilities.
2. Recognize that NetMeeting is no longer available and identify alternatives.
3. Recognize that Windows Messenger is no longer available and identify alternatives.
Secondary Learning Objectives
4. Evaluate new ad-hoc networks for sharing files and presentations.

Connecting to Work from Home or Away
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Use the new VPN Wizard to connect to the workplace.

Desktop and Start Menu
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Recognize the new button for launching the Start menu.
2. Assess the new Sidebar.
3. Use the new Start menu search box.
4. Use the new All Programs list format.
5. Recognize the different ways to launch the Run command.
6. Recognize changes to the Windows Flip feature (ALT+TAB).
7. Assess the new Windows Flip 3D feature (the Windows logo key+TAB).
8. Evaluate the improved ability to detect and to adjust for multiple displays.
Secondary Learning Objectives
9. Assess the new taskbar thumbnail previews.
10. Recognize updated recommendations for getting the best display quality.
11. Evaluate the new feature for comparing windows side by side.

Ease of Access (Accessibility)
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Recognize the change in terminology from Accessibility to Ease of Access.
2. Recognize that Utility Manager has been replaced by the Ease of Access Center.
3. Recognize that the Accessibility Wizard has been replaced by a questionnaire in the
   Ease of Access Center.
4. Assess the new webpage Zoom feature.
5. Assess the new screen Magnifier feature.
6. Use the new Ease of Access Center.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                16



Secondary Learning Objectives
7. Summarize improvements to the Narrator tool.
8. Evaluate new Speech Recognition capabilities.
9. Summarize new keyboard settings.
10. Assess the new Ease of Access button on the logon screen.
11. For people without disabilities, evaluate the new ease of access features.

Note Why the name change from Accessibility to Ease of Access? As the workforce
ages and becomes more diverse, it’s important that employees who do not have
disabilities recognize how accessibility features can help make their computers easier to
use. This name change highlights these accessibility features. Consider including some
of the Ease of Access features in your training for all employees.

Finding and Organizing Files
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Recognize that My Documents is now just Documents.
2. Evaluate turning menus back on.
3. Evaluate the new Search folder.
4. Use the new Search box.
5. Use the new Address bar.
6. Use and customize the new Navigation pane, including the Folders option.
7. Evaluate major improvements to the use of tags and properties for finding and
   organizing files.
8. Evaluate the new column heading filter.
9. Evaluate the new column heading stack and group options.
10. Evaluate new ways to save a search.
11. Use the new Views option to change icon size.
12. Evaluate the new ability to retrieve previous versions of files.
13. Evaluate the new reading pane.
Secondary Learning Objectives
14. Evaluate the new Search pane
15. Summarize how the new index improves searches.
16. Evaluate the new Backup Wizard and the new Restore Wizard.
17. Review new methods for customizing folders and selecting files.

Getting Help
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Use the new Help system.
2. Evaluate the new WOH site.
3. Recognize the new ability to share online Help topics with others.
Secondary Learning Objectives
4. Recognize the new Guided Help topics.
5. Recognize that the Help system can access the new WOH website.



© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                         17



Internet Explorer
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Evaluate the method for turning Internet Explorer menus back on.
2. Use the new Toolbar Search box in Internet Explorer.
3. Recognize the new Favorites icons.
4. Summarize the new Favorites Center features.
5. Evaluate the new tabbed browsing.
6. Evaluate the new Quick Tabs.
7. Evaluate the new capabilities for saving and restoring groups of tabs.
8. Assess the new webpage Zoom feature.
9. Evaluate the new method for changing the home page.
10. Recognize that now multiple home pages may be used.
11. Use different methods to navigate to visited webpages.
Secondary Learning Objectives
12. Recognize new capability for multiple providers in Search.
13. Describe the new RSS feeds.
14. Summarize the new Pop-up Blocker feature.
15. Describe new scaled webpage printing.

Managing Battery Power
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Recognize the new battery meter.
2. Recognize that power schemes are now called power plans.
3. Assess the new default power plans.
Secondary Learning Objectives
4. Recognize that the new power plans can be customized.

Mobile PC Tips
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Evaluate the new Windows Mobility Center.

PC Maintenance and Performance
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Recognize that disk fragmentation now runs automatically.
2. Evaluate new ways to get information about computer speed and performance.
3. Use the new control panel Search box and the improved category navigation.
Secondary Learning Objectives
4. Recognize the new way to stop a program from running when you start the
   computer.
5. Evaluate the new Backup and Restore Center




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                 18



Presentations
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Evaluate the new presentation settings.
2. Recognize the improvements in automatically adjusting for a projector display.
Secondary Learning Objectives
3. Describe the new network projector feature.

Printing
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Describe the new XML Paper Specification (XPS) document format.

Security and Privacy
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Recognize that some system settings are locked as indicated by the shield icon.
2. Understand why Windows Vista prompts for you for verification of administrative
   tasks.
3. Evaluate the new certificate information that is associated with the lock icon in
   Internet Explorer.
4. Summarize the capabilities of the new phishing filter and how to use it to protect
   yourself.
Secondary Learning Objectives
5. Identify new security features and new privacy features in Internet Explorer.
6. Evaluate the new BitLocker encryption.
7. Recognize the new Windows Defender tool for protecting the computer against
   spyware.

Synchronizing
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Use the new Sync Center.
2. Use the new system tray icons on the Sync Center.
3. Assess new strategies for syncing success that use Sync Center.

Tablet PC
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Identify new features for the Tablet PC.
2. Use the input panel efficiently by utilizing new features.
Secondary Learning Objectives
3. Evaluate new handwriting recognition strategies.
4. Evaluate new ways to use the pen.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                         19



Turning Off and Starting Up the Computer
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Identify the new location of the Shut Down option.
2. Recognize that the Shut Down option is now used only when the computer must be
   turned off.
3. Recognize that the Standby mode and the Hibernate mode have been replaced by
   the Sleep mode.
4. Use the new power button, instead of the Shut Down command, to put the computer
   in Sleep mode.
Secondary Learning Objectives
5. Recognize why the new power button occasionally changes to the Shut Down
   command.
6. Evaluate the new ability to switch users without logging off.

Windows SideShow
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Summarize the capabilities of the new Windows SideShow-compatible devices.
2. Use security features of the new Windows SideShow-compatible devices.
Secondary Learning Objectives
3. Recognize the common features of the Windows SideShow-compatible device.

Wireless Networking
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Use the modified Connect To feature.

Working Offline
Primary Learning Objectives
1. Use improved offline files.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                 20




Top 7 Behavior Changes (If You Don’t Do Anything Else)
In an organizational environment, one of the specific goals of learning something new is
to create a change in behavior that will result in increased productivity. We’ve identified
seven areas that are likely to be the most challenging for changing behavior, but also the
most rewarding. If you don’t teach information workers anything else about Windows
Vista, focus on these seven areas, with maximum emphasis on the topics in bold.
     1. Security messages: Change the automatic-click-through response.
     2. Sleep: Change from shutting down the computer to putting it in Sleep mode.
     3. Navigation: Use new techniques such as the Address bar.
     4. Search: Use the vastly improved Search functionality.
     5. Help: Be self-reliant by taking advantage of the new Help system.
     6. Start menu: Use the Start menu in a much richer way.
     7. Tabbed browsing: Improve efficiency when working with multiple webpages.

Deep Dive
The frontline Manager: a Key Driver in Behavioral Change
by Bob Mosher, Director of Learning Evangelism, MSLearning division, Microsoft
Corporation
For a technology deployment in an organization to be successful, the training program
that supports it needs to be aligned with the organization’s best resources. New
learning options, such as e-learning, have decentralized learning, just like local area
networks (LANs) decentralized data processing. The training department, once kept
separate from the rest of the organization, no longer exclusively controls learning; now,
training can live at the desktop and can be controlled by the learner. This changes the
way we approach learning. With decentralized learning systems so widespread, the
organization must understand how best to influence and monitor the training program
that it once controlled very closely. This has caused the need for new strategies and
alliances in order to make the training program work effectively. in this context, the
biggest asset of the training program maybe the frontline manager.
Most organizations do not realize the power and influence of the frontline manager.
However, a frontline manager’s involvement and engagement is key to the success of
any training program. Two colleagues of mine conducted a study which showed that a
high level of involvement by the learner’s frontline manager is critical for maximum
performance improvement in, and behavior change by, the learner. Unfortunately, with
the advent of self-paced learning modalities, many frontline managers are seeing a
reduction in their involvement in directing learning. Organizations need to reverse this
trend. Along with more learning at the desktop and the emergence of more effective
blended learning strategies, frontline managers are becoming more important then ever
in the success of any training program. The problem in most organizations is that
frontline managers are not effective stewards of learning. They need to be taught how to
do this. The following list describes a few points that the frontline managers need to be
aware of:

    Raise awareness. Many frontline managers aren’t aware of the positive effect of
     their involvement in the learning process. Organizations need to teach frontline
     managers how to get more involved by creating tools such as the learning path and
     the learning objectives mentioned in this white paper. These tools help learners map


© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                     21



     their learning options to specific performance outcomes based on job descriptions
     and responsibilities.

    Teach frontline managers to be learning mentors. Many frontline managers do a
     great job of mentoring their reports when it comes to doing their daily jobs, but are
     not quite as effective when it comes to mentoring learning. Daily job interactions can
     be very directive, while learning interactions need to be more supportive. Teaching
     employees to be good learners is a different skill set for most frontline managers.

    Frontline managers need to exemplify effective learning. – This is the classic
     problem of ―the cobbler’s children having no shoes.‖ Although the frontline manager
     may promote the virtues of new learning strategies like e-learning, many frontline
     managers haven’t used it themselves. Modeling is one of the highest forms of
     instruction. We need to encourage frontline managers to practice what they preach.
Organizations have more learning strategies at their disposal then ever before. Training
need not be limited to the confines of a classroom. However, because they are more
self-directed, the new learning strategies carry a greater risk of failure. Soliciting the help
of a learner’s frontline manager can help to guarantee the success of these new learning
strategies.

When Changing Skill-Based Behavior Is the Issue
Skill-based behaviors are things we have learned to do automatically, without thinking
about what we are doing. Such behaviors are difficult to change. They are often so
ingrained that they are driven more by motor and muscle response than by cognitive
processing. For example, most information workers have adopted skill-based behaviors
when dealing with security messages; as a result, changing how people deal with
security messages will probably be one of your most difficult challenges. Unfortunately, it
is also one of your most important tasks.
The following areas of Windows Vista are areas where information workers will be
required to change a skill-based behavior:
1. Security messages: Rapidly clicking through messages is a natural activity for
   most of us. The UAC (User Account Control) feature of Windows Vista provides
   much tighter security than previous versions of Windows: it requires users to confirm
   some actions that are potential security risks, and does not allow some actions at all
   for standard users. Much research has gone into the phrasing of security messages
   so that they are easy to understand, and the shield icon helps information workers
   anticipate when authorization is needed. However, getting information workers to
   read each security message before they click is an ongoing challenge. This applies
   to many areas of the UI such as the Security Center, Windows Defender, UAC, and
   Internet Explorer-protected mode. The goal of the training program is to teach
   employees the following things:
          Security messages are important.
          The employee will regularly see security messages.
          The employee is required to read and respond to security messages.
2. Sleep: In Windows Vista, the recommended method for turning off the computer is
   the new Sleep mode. Use of the power button to put the computer into the Sleep
   mode allows the information worker to quickly either turn off or start up the
   computer, thus eliminating a common complaint of information workers.
     The barriers to the employee's adoption of this new method are as follows:
          Shutting down the computer by using the Shut Down command has become an
           automatic behavior for many information workers.



© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                        22



          Information workers may relate the new Sleep mode to the old Standby and
           Hibernate modes, which sometimes caused problems with the computer.
           Much of the encouragement for using the new Sleep mode will need to come
           from the organization, which will need to let information workers know that its
           use is an accepted practice (see the previous Deep Dive section). Be sure that
           your learning influentials understand the benefits of this feature.
           For more information about learning influentials, see the The Role of Learning
           Influentials section.
3. Navigation: Most information workers have ingrained behaviors for navigating, such
   as using the Back button, the Parent button, or the folder hierarchies in Windows
   Explorer and in Internet Explorer. The navigation controls in Windows Vista are
   more flexible than their predecessors (for example, people use the Address bar
   instead of the parent folder icon) and are appreciated by information workers, but
   they do require a behavior change. Navigation behavior changes to train for are:
          Use filters and stacking instead of just folder navigation
          Use the Address bar instead of repeatedly pressing the Back button or relying
           on the folder hierarchy
          Customize favorite links in the navigation pane
          Understand that the User folder, not the Documents folder, is the top level. For
           example, the My Photos folder is no longer in the My Documents folder
           hierarchy; rather, it is in the User hierarchy.

When Learned Failure Is the Issue
When things don’t work right, people often simply give up on a task. This is called
learned failure. Getting people to try something again that didn’t work well for them in the
past is a challenge. In this category, searching is the biggest area of focus.
4. Search: Search functionality has been entirely updated in Windows Vista, and
   information workers give it positive feedback. Behavior changes to train for
   regarding using the Search functionality consist of the following:
          Try actively searching as opposed to just looking through the folder structure.
          Use tags (that is, metadata) for files to dramatically improve the search
           experience.
          Do not search only by title. Use tags, file content, dates, and other information
           about what you are looking for.
          Rather than organizing primarily by folders, attach tags and use piles (such as
           stacks).
          Use the Search box, which appears in many places, including in the Control
           Panel.
          Save searches for later use.
Help: Using the Help system is a great way for information workers to be self-sufficient.
    The Help system for Windows Vista has been totally rewritten and is an excellent
    learning resource. For more information about the Help system and learning, see
    the Support Informal Learning section. Behavior changes to train for regarding the
    use of the Help system consist of the following:
          Try the Help system again. The Help topics in Windows Vista are much easier to
           read and understand than those in earlier versions of Windows Help.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                          23



          The online Help files on WOH are updated on a regular basis. If you don't find
           what you were looking for in the online Help files the first time, try again later.
          Try the new Guided Help, an interactive tool that helps the people accomplish a
           task. For more information about the new Guided Help tool, see the
     
          New Learning Resources for Windows Vista section.

When Inertia Is the Issue
Most people are reluctant to change how they perform a task once they've found a
method that is successful for them. However, if a new way of doing something yields
better results than the old way, people can be persuaded to at least give the new way a
try. In this category, the top focus is learning new ways to use the Start menu. Behavior
changes to train for regarding new ways of using the Start menu consist of the following:
5. Start Menu: Information workers can benefit by using the new Start menu in a rich
   way. The Search box directly at the bottom of the Start menu enables people to find
   favorites, applications, e-mail, and files very quickly. The Start menu in Windows
   Classic View does not provide these benefits.
         For more information about the Start menu in Windows Classic View versus the
         new Start menu, see the To "Classic" Or Not To "Classic"? section.
6. Tabbed browsing. Tabbed browsing is one of the most appreciated features for
   people who work with multiple websites. In the organizational environment, this is
   often intranet sites. Behavior changes to train for regarding tabbed browsing consist
   of the following:
          Use tabs instead of launching multiple browser windows.
          Use tab groups in favorites instead of just saving one webpage at a time.

Top 11 Motivators
These are features that information workers tend to get the most excited about. You may
want to include learning content about these features in the early phases of your training
program (in other words, before employees receive Windows Vista), to help generate
excitement.
1. Tabs in Internet Explorer.
2. Quick Tabs in Internet Explorer.
3. Favorites Center in Internet Explorer.
4. Search tools and indexed search.
5. Folders in the Navigation Pane.
6. Windows Flip/Flip 3D.
7. The All Programs list on the Start menu.
8. The Address bar in the Documents folder.
9. Filtering on headers in the Documents folder.
10. Views in the Documents folder.
11. Photo Gallery: Management of photos.
     While this does not apply to most information workers, if you have employees whose
     jobs require managing large numbers of photos, you may want to make sure they
     have this information.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                      24



Top 8 Discoverability Targets
Some features are easier to discover than others. Many information workers feel that
they know only a very small percent of computer functionality available to them. This can
be a barrier in their willingness to upgrade; after all, why would people want more if they
don’t even use what they already have?
For the last few years, we have focused on this problem by conducting discoverability
research in our usability labs. We have improved the discoverability of many features,
but there are many more features which would increase productivity but are unlikely to
be discovered by employees unaided. The following numbered list identifies eight of
these features, which you should consider discoverability targets in your training
program.
1. The Search box in the Control Panel.
2. Windows Flip/Flip 3D.
3. Filtering on headers in the Documents folder.
4. Tags and metadata editing on files.
5. Previous versions of files.
6. Reading pane in the Documents folder.
7. Saving a search and the Search folder.
8. The Zoom function in Internet Explorer.

Putting It All Together: Some Areas of Focus for Training
To help you select and prioritize the content that you will use in your training program,
we have summarized the previous three sections of this white paper into the following
table. A  in the column indicates the need to emphasize that aspect, or those aspects,
of that feature of Windows Vista. The last column is the related learning objective as
defined in the section Learning Objectives for Windows Vista.
To find out where you can get content for teaching the related learning objectives, see
Appendix A.
Table 2. Areas of Focus for Training
 Windows Vista      Behavior    Motivator            Discover-   Learning Objective
 Feature            change +                           ability
                   productivity

  Security                                                      Recognize that some
  messages                                                       system settings are locked
                                                                 as indicated by the shield
                                                                 icon.
                                                                 Understand why Windows
                                                                 Vista prompts for you for
                                                                 verification of administrative
                                                                 tasks.
  Sleep                                                         Recognize that the Shut
                                                                 Down option is now used
                                                                 only when the computer
                                                                 must be turned off.
                                                                 Recognize that the Standby
                                                                 mode and the Hibernate



© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                  25



                                                             mode have been replaced
                                                             by the Sleep mode.
                                                             Use the new power button,
                                                             instead of the Shut Down
                                                             command, to put the
                                                             computer in Sleep mode.

  Navigation                                               Use the new Address bar.
                                                             Use the new Navigation
                                                             pane, including the Folders
                                                             option.
                                                             Evaluate the new column
                                                             heading filter.
                                                             Evaluate the new column
                                                             heading stack and group
                                                             options.
                                                             Recognize that My
                                                             Documents is now just
                                                             Documents.

  Search                                                  Evaluate major
                                                             improvements to the use of
                                                             tags and properties for
                                                             finding and organizing files.
                                                             Evaluate the new Search
                                                             folder.
                                                             Use the new Search box.
                                                             Evaluate the new Search
                                                             pane.
                                                             Evaluate the new column
                                                             heading stack and group
                                                             options.
                                                             Summarize how the new
                                                             index improves searches.
                                                             Evaluate new ways to save
                                                             a search.

  Help                                                      Evaluate the new WOH site.
                                                             Use the new Help system.
                                                             Recognize the new Guided
                                                             Help topics.

  Start menu                                               Use the new Start menu
                                                             search box.
                                                             Use the new All Programs
                                                             list format.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                    26



  Tabbed                                                   Evaluate the new tabbed
  browsing                                                   browsing.
                                                             Evaluate new Quick Tabs.
                                                             Evaluate the new
                                                             capabilities for saving and
                                                             restoring groups of tabs.
  Favorites                                                 Summarize the new
  Center in                                                  Favorites Center features.
  Internet
  Explorer

  Windows                                                  Recognize changes to the
  Flip/Flip 3D                                               Windows Flip feature
                                                             (ALT+TAB).
                                                             Assess the new Windows
                                                             Flip 3D feature (the
                                                             Windows logo key+TAB).

  Views in the                                              Use the new Views option to
  Documents                                                  change icon size.
  folder

  Previous                                                  Evaluate the new ability to
  versions of                                                retrieve previous versions of
  files                                                      files.

  Reading pane                                              Evaluate the new reading
  in the                                                     pane.
  Documents
  folder

  Zoom in                                                   Assess the new webpage
  Internet                                                   Zoom feature.
  Explorer

The table suggests some possible areas of focus for your training program. However, for
a more complete training program, review the full list of learning objectives in the
Learning Objectives for Windows Vista section.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                27




Recommendations for Windows Vista Learning
Delivery
The recommendations in this section are based on our research as well as best-
practices identified from interviews with our large corporate customers. Over the years
that Windows Vista was in development, we have directly observed hundreds of
information workers at dozens of organizations, brought hundreds more into our usability
labs, and conducted surveys with thousands of information workers. In addition, we have
interviewed customer training managers and deployment leads who are responsible for
training employees on Windows and other desktop software.

Manage the Learning Curve
You should consider timing the delivery of the Windows Vista training materials to allow
for a gradual learning curve. The tri-colored chart below represents the learning
progression model that we developed by working with our customers. The ELF tool is
modeled to support this learning progression model. The "Minimize Disruption" arrow
coincides with the day that the employee upgrades from an earlier version of Windows
to Windows Vista.




Figure 7. The ELF "Minimize Disruption" Arrow.
The following list is an explanation of the components of our learning progression model.
1. Raise Awareness: Most customers that we have talked to are very concerned
   about providing employees with good information before the employees receive
   Windows Vista. They have asked us for awareness content with an informative tone.
   The goal is to move the employee’s attitude regarding the upgrade away from "a
   necessary (or, at worst case, unnecessary) evil" to enthusiasm about what the
   upgrade to Windows Vista will enable the employee to accomplish. This awareness
   content is also the first stage of learning. If you already have a communication group
   in your organization that develops pre-deployment ―marketing‖ material for
   employees, you may want to carefully synchronize that group's content with the
   learning content that will follow, and consider the entire flow to be the learning
   process.
2. Minimize Disruption: Most of our customers want information workers up-to-speed
   with a new version of Windows in an hour or two. This doesn’t mean absorbing all of
   the new features; however, it does mean being able to use the new operating
   system to do all the basic tasks that were possible before, such as finding files and
   applications. Content in this phase falls under the ―what’s different‖ category or the
   ‖what happened to..?‖ category.
3. Gain Productivity: This phase is the opportunity to help information workers dive
   into the new features that will help them the most. Content in this phase consists of
   more detailed how-to topics, tips and tricks.
A gradual learning progression model enables you to deliver content when it is most
relevant and most likely to be used. For example, information about how to work with
power plans would be given to information workers in the Gain Productivity phase. This
method also allows you to repeat important content at various levels of detail. For
example, using the new Search functionality is one of the key behavior changes that is
necessary for information workers to take full advantage of Windows Vista. The ELF tool



© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                28



includes pre-deployment search topics that mention or demonstrate the new search
capabilities (Raise Awareness), a day-of-deployment topic that gives the information
worker the basic information that he or she needs to find files (Minimize Disruption), and
a topic that contains more detailed searching tips topic for the weeks after deployment
(Gain Productivity); you might deliver these topics to the information worker in the Raise
Awareness phase, the Minimize Disruption phase, and the Gain Productivity phase,
respectively. As another example, the ELF tool topics about tabbed browsing start with a
mention of tabbed browsing in topics about new features in Internet Explorer; ignore
tabbed browsing on the day that Windows Vista is deployed, because it’s not necessary
for getting up-to-speed; then later, post-deployment, have a detailed topic about tabbed
browsing that includes FAQs and usage tips.

Manage Multiple Categories of Information Workers
Common employee work patterns can be an effective way to categorize information
workers for your training program. The strongest categorization trend that we’ve seen
over the last several years is grouping employees according to those who are "mobile"
(that is, those who work outside the office at least part of the day), and those who are
not. Many organizations that we work with categorize their information workers (at least
from an IT perspective) as "mobile vs. office-oriented". The features of Windows Vista,
and the learning objectives regarding those features, also consider user categories.
The organizations that we have worked with that have mobile workers have further
categorized those workers, and thus tailored the organization's learning content, as
follows:
1. Road warrior: an information worker who frequently travels.
2. Meeting warrior: an information worker who is frequently in meetings, or who
   frequently travels around either the building or the organization's campus.
3. Home workers: an information worker who works a significant amount of time
   (possibly including evenings and weekends) from home.
An employee may fall into more than one of these categories. For example, a significant
number of information workers that we study are meeting warriors as well as home
workers.
Some topics, such as those about managing battery power, are appropriate for all
mobile workers, whereas other topics, such as those about how to establish a virtual
private network (VPN) connection, may make sense only for road warriors and home
workers. The ELF tool supports the selection of topics based on these categories.
Other employee categories that our research has discovered, and that can affect the
manner and type of learning content that you use, are as follows:
1. Collaborator: an information worker who frequently works with on projects in
   conjunction with other information workers.
2. Helper: an information worker who tends to assist others, whether formally or
   informally.
3. Content Creator: an information worker who creates documents that are used by
   others. Other information workers in an organization may have a greater need to
   search for documents that are developed by a Content Creator.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                29



What About Beginners?
As previously mentioned, we expect that most of the employees in your training program
will probably be experienced users of Windows. Our expectation is based on the
premise that by now, most information workers already know how to use a version of
Windows, and are therefore probably learning about an upgrade to Windows, rather than
learning about an entirely new product. However, you may have categories of
information workers that you consider beginners, either because they don't have much
computer experience or because their use of a computer has for whatever reason been
very limited. (This group might include a job role that is sometimes referred to as
"structured task work").
For these beginning users, you might consider a set of topics called the Basics, which
the Windows writing team has designed specifically for information workers who are
relatively new to Windows. This set of topics exists in the local Help system and on
WOH. You might consider using some of these topics in your general training program;
the ELF tool uses several of them. Some of the overview topics, such as Working with
digital pictures, make great introductory material for specific needs, such as insurance
employees who manage pictures. The Windows Basics: All topics topic, which is
available at the WOH website, has a linked list of all the topics, which include:
Learn About Your Computer
Introduction to computers
Parts of a computer
Using your mouse
Using your keyboard
Turning off your computer properly (this topic is also referenced in the ELF tool)
Desktop Fundamentals
The desktop (overview)
The Start menu (overview)
The taskbar (overview)
Windows Sidebar and gadgets (overview)
Working with windows
Using menus, buttons, bars, and boxes
Programs, Files, and Folders
Using programs
Working with files and folders
Getting started with printing
Using Paint
Internet and E-mail
Exploring the Internet
Getting started with e-mail
Understanding security and safe computing
The Help System
Getting help (this topic is also referenced in the ELF tool)
What accessibility features does Windows offer? (this topic is also referenced in the ELF
tool)

Motivate Information Workers Effectively
None of the organizations we’ve talked to plan to require employees to participate in a
training program for Windows Vista, nor are they holding employees accountable for
completing a training program for any specific operating system. While some software is



© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                    30



critical for specific roles (such as, HR employees must know how to use PeopleSoft, and
accountants need to know how to use Microsoft Excel), the operating system is a
―background‖ tool that is not viewed by most information workers as being critical to job
success. However, many of the new features in Windows Vista are designed to increase
productivity and job effectiveness. Therefore, motivating employees to learn Windows
Vista becomes very important. In fact, we believe that paying close attention to
motivational factors is a more effective approach than prescribing a learning path
across-the-board.
Our research has repeatedly shown that information workers rarely learn for fun. In
organizations of every size, information workers are consistently time-constrained, if not
regularly in an all-out panic over lack of time. While exceptions do exist, many
information workers tend to constrain their exploratory learning because they don’t feel
they have the amount of time it requires.
Our research has shown that in order for a training program to be effective among
information workers, the training messaging must directly relate to their perceived pain
points and job effectiveness. A training message that relates training to saving time or
being more productive is more likely to be successful than one that says ―here’s the
training, take it.‖
We suggest that you create a sense of value for the information worker based on the
information worker's job concerns and priorities. The ELF tool can aid you in
accomplishing this task by providing you with text that you can use to pique information
workers’ interest from their point of view. However, most of your training messaging will
be driven by your organization's goals for the training. We do not recommend that you
send an e-mail with a "click here for training"-style link but no value proposition; such a
message would be perceived by information workers as just one more thing to do.

Deep Dive
Who are Your Most Enthusiastic Learners?
by Julie Nowicki, Product Manager, Microsoft Corporation
During the development of Windows Vista, we researched information workers'
motivations for and attitudes during learning. Not surprisingly, we found that the
information workers with the highest level of perceived success with Windows were
those who rated themselves as being at the highest expertise level and having the most
enthusiasm about technology. Highly educated information workers also rated
themselves as having higher expertise. However, education level did not correlate with
success; highly educated information workers did not feel that they could easily learn a
new operating system, work effectively with it, and figure out where to look for new
features. Furthermore, highly educated information workers had the least enthusiasm
about computer technology. By contrast, information workers with less formal education
were more enthusiastic. At all education levels, information workers with the most
enthusiasm about technology were also more likely to be self-sufficient and less likely to
ask others for help.
One of our researchers noted that the number and type of steps that an information
worker takes to get assistance with a question or problem are related to his or her skill
level, enthusiasm for technology and enjoyment of problem solving, and that these
factors also relate to both the amount of time an information worker is likely to spend on
learning, and the success rate of that learning. This observation reinforces our belief that
whether and how an information worker learns about a new technology is a complex
matter, and one in which motivation and enthusiasm play an important role.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                   31



Do Not Neglect Conceptual Topics
While it’s true that many information workers often just want to know which buttons to
push, you should not underestimate the number of information workers who also want to
understand why they are doing what they are doing. People who understand the
concepts behind a procedure are often the most successful learners. In fact,
understanding concepts is considered a foundation of good instructional design.
In WOH, many conceptual topics start with Understanding…. These topics often include
graphics and diagrams to aid the information worker in understanding the concept.
Some conceptual topics that are included in the ELF tool are as follows:
Understanding offline files: Keep working even when you're not connected
Understanding multiple monitors: How Windows automatically detects and sets up
   additional displays
How to keep your information in sync: Keeping track of all your information even when
   it’s in different locations
The following graphic is an excerpt from the Understanding offline files topic that is
included in the ELF tool. It illustrates the use of graphics and definitions to introduce a
concept. Notice that there are no ―how to‖ or procedural steps, although there are links
to this information at the end of the topic.




Figure 8: Excerpt from a conceptual topic in WOH




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                  32



Deep Dive
How Do Information Workers Prefer to Learn?
by Julie Nowicki, Product Manager, Microsoft Corporation
A large scale survey that we conducted with several thousand information workers
classified their learning orientations according to the emotional and motivational aspects
of learning. These aspects of learning are especially important in an informal learning
environment. (For more information about informal learning environments, see the
Support Informal Learning section). The information workers in large organizations were
mostly either middle managers or skilled knowledge workers such as analysts. A very
small percent of these workers – less than 10% - were people who prefer to learn by
conforming to a prescribed curriculum that is laid out by others. The remainder were
almost equally split between two groups: 1) practical learners who constrain learning
according to the value it will provide them, and prefer hands-on, energetic learning that
does not require significant effort (think people who will attend a tips-and-tricks lunch
session)' and, 2) highly motivated learners who love to discover, manage their own
learning, and work best with short, hyperlinked topics that they can explore on their own.
Persons in the first group are those most likely to attend a tips-and-tricks lunch session;
by contrast, persons in the second group prefer learning conceptual information, rather
than how-to information.

Support Informal Learning
The common patterns that we have seen in our research on information workers is best
expressed in the following ideas:
Formal learning may have to wait.
Informal learning happens continuously.
By formal learning we mean not only structured coursework (online or in the classroom),
but also anything that takes more than a few minutes and is not immediately relevant to
the problem at hand.
Informal learning includes asking someone for help, poking around the software trying to
learn something on your own, or using self-help resources such as reference material. In
the next section, we will discuss the importance of asking someone for help. Around
25% of information workers tell us they don’t use any resources to learn Windows, they
just try to figure things out themselves. For people in this pattern, perhaps the best we
can do is to provide value propositions for our training, as discussed above, that are so
compelling that information workers in this group simply can’t help themselves!

Deep Dive
Informal Learning: the 80 In the 80/20 Rule
by Bob Mosher, Director of Learning Evangelism, MSLearning division, Microsoft
Corporation
Despite the effort that is put into creating and delivering formal training programs, many
studies show that informal learning encompasses as much as 70-80% of the learning
which occurs in organizations today. But even when faced with such compelling data,
few training organizations have defined approaches that understand and support
informal training. This does not mean that we think that informal learning ought to
become formal; rather, we think that those of us who impact learners during formal
training can do a better job of impacting and supporting learners when they leave our
instruction.


© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                    33



As independent learning modalities such as e-communities and electronic performance
support systems (EPSSs) continue to grow and improve, the role of formal training will
need to change and grow right along with them. Formal training will become less about
designing, owning, and disseminating content, and more about enabling, guiding, and
supporting learners through the many informal options they have for acquiring and
applying content in the context of their work day.
There are three areas of enablement that I’d like to discuss in this article: the learner, the
instructor, and the learning content. Each of these areas of enablement deals with a
different audience and stakeholder in the learning process. In a well-designed training
program, each of these areas of enablement will complement the others.
The learner. The learner’s ability to understand how to attack a learning problem is
called metacognition. Each of us has learned, whether formally or informally, how to
work towards a solution when presented with a problem. We employ certain methods
and strategies: some approach problems methodically, relying on proven methods and
tools, while others randomly approach each situation as if it’s the first time they’ve
encountered it. Unfortunately, those who choose the latter method for solving problems
often use inefficient strategies, waste time, and wander off on tangents. Furthermore,
with informal rather than formal learning dominating the learning landscape of most
organizations, those with poor metacognitive skills can often flounder and become
frustrated. Formal training programs can do a better job of teaching metacognitive
strategies. Learners in a formal training program need to be made aware of their own
metacognitive strengths and weaknesses, and then empowered to cultivate skills and
strategies that compliment those strengths and weaknesses.
The instructor. Traditionally, a ―good‖ instructor answered every question and guided
his or her students through lessons with the same amount of structure and support from
the first minute of class to the last. This approach supported the completion of the
promised content, but it didn’t always teach the strategies or metacognitive skills needed
to apply that content outside of the classroom. To enable learning and knowledge
transfer beyond the formal learning environment, instructors can use a strategy that is
called cognitive apprenticeship. Cognitive apprenticeship is a method whereby the
instructor basically teaches him- or herself out of the ―support business‖ by modeling,
and teaching, effective metacognitive tools and strategies to their students, then slowly
transferring metacognitive responsibilities to learners, and finally phasing out" their
support, enabling learners to try these tools and strategies for themselves with the
instructor present for support and guidance.
The learning content. In order for cognitive apprenticeship to happen. you need to use
the right learning content. Learning content that is highly structured and supportive
throughout the learning experience, actually makes it difficult for the instructor to
cultivate good learning strategies within the learner. You must design your learning
content so that its structure works with the flow of a class to effectively support students
as they learn. Designing and using content in this manner is often called scaffolding. If
the appropriate content is correctly utilized, the scaffolding that is comprised of the
instructor, the learning content and the training program is gradually removed as the
student learns effective methods and start to support themselves. If students are not
allowed to try these problem-solving strategies, many will not trust their own capacity to
either use problem-solving strategies or to develop effective strategies on their own once
the focus of training shifts from formal to informal. Cognitive apprenticeship is a way of
using scaffolding effectively with the learning content that is being taught.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                   34



Many learners struggle with the informal learning tools and learning environments that
are present in organizations today. The fault usually lies not with the tool or the strategy,
but rather, with the learning methods that the learner has been taught or, more typically,
not taught that causes them to fail. Training departments today need to focus on
enabling the learning strategies that their students use if they hope to see the application
of their training programs be successful.

Provide Self-Help Resources in Small Chunks
What kind of self-help resources can we provide for informal learning? A bit less than
half of Windows users tell us that they use printed documentation such as books,
magazines or manuals. Significantly more than half use the Internet to search for
information. In any form, informal learning implies very small granularity – in other
words, very short learning modules. Even if a large book or manual is used, a Windows
learner typically won’t read the whole thing; rather, he or she will search for the one
nugget if information that they need in order to resolve the issue at hand. Training
departments in organizations are aware of this, and they tell us over and over again that
shorter topics are needed.
A great example of the popularity of informal learning is the huge success of Microsoft
Office tips and tricks sessions at many of our customer organizations. Although these
are usually delivered in a seminar format where employees need to interrupt their work
for an hour or 90 minutes (often over lunch!), the fun, demo-oriented format, delivered in
small, digestible nuggets, as well as the feeling of instant success when you walk away
with a few tips you can use, has been very appealing.
Another significant informal learning resource is the Help system. This surprises many
people, as Help is generally assumed to be not very helpful. In fact, we often use the
term learned helplessness (that is, people don’t think Help will help so they give up) to
describe how people relate to the Help system. But we have lots of evidence that
suggests that about 70% of information workers do use the Help system to learn. This
seems like a large number only until you consider that the Help system is used in only
about 2-3% of Windows sessions. So, the frequency of use is small (which makes
sense, as learning and problem solving don’t occur every day), but the importance when
it is needed is high across many information worker categories. As discussed earlier in
the A Completely Redesigned Help System section, our Windows writing team
addressed the potential and the challenges of the Windows Help system by entirely re-
writing it.

Provide a Variety of Learning Choices and Delivery Mechanisms
Our research indicates that people use a wider variety of resources for learning than
they do for problem solving. While many organizations are interested in providing short
videos for training, and these can be very effective, we recommend always also
providing the same content in a more text-oriented format, such as a webpage with text
and graphics. Doing this enables the organization to support people who prefer different
modes of learning. It is also more practical for organizations that have a highly mobile
workforce in which many employees may not have access to equipment or networks that
can support video.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                   35



Deep Dive
Microsoft Learning Preferences Research
by George Moutsiakis, former Usability Lead, Microsoft Learning Division, Microsoft
Corporation
Research conducted by the Microsoft Learning usability team has found that learning
preferences are important predictors of both the type of learning product a person will
purchase when given a choice, and the effectiveness of that learning product for that
person. The three contrasting relationships to learning that were most important in
predicting both preference and effectiveness were social learner/autonomous learner,
text learner/multimedia learner, and linear learner/nonlinear learner.
In general, social learners account for 30% of developers, 45% of IT professionals, and
36% of information workers, whereas autonomous learners account for 70% of
developers, 55% of IT professionals, and 64% of information workers. Social learners
prefer to learn in a classroom setting. If they are required to learn in a more
autonomous, online environment, they need online social interaction (chat rooms, IM,
and so on) to supplement their learning experience.
Text learners account for 58% of developers, 45% of IT professionals, and 40% of
information workers, whereas multimedia learners account for 42% of developers, 55%
of IT professionals, and 60% of information workers. Text learners prefer to learn by
reading a book or another type of document. Multimedia learners prefer to learn through
video, audio, interactive exercises, lab exercises, or similar types of media.
Our findings indicate that the linear and nonlinear learners are split evenly (50%) across
all three audiences. Linear learners have a strong preference for a linear structure or
progression in their learning materials, while nonlinear learners prefer to create their own
structure.
In designing our new E-Learning viewer we developed a navigation scheme that would
appeal to text learners, multimedia learners, linear learners, and nonlinear learners by
allowing people to switch between a circular, icon-based navigation system (Figure 8a)
and a linear, text-based navigation system (Figure 8b). We found that this seemingly
minor design element made this product accessible and pleasant to a much larger
portion of the learning audience than seen previously.




Figure 9a – Icon-based navigation




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                   36




Figure 9b – Text-based navigation
In summary, informal learning is the reality for Windows for most information workers.
You can support, and indeed leverage this opportunity, by taking the following steps:
Provide self-help resources in small modules.
Provide a variety of learning choices and delivery mechanisms.

Deep Dive
Blended Learning: What Does It Really Take to Make It Work?
by Bob Mosher, Director of Learning Evangelism, MSLearning division, Microsoft
Corporation
The latest buzzword in IT training seems to be "blended." A blended learning solution is
a training program that is experienced via multiple learning modalities. The advent of e-
learning has highlighted the issues involved in offering a ―blended" learning solution
within many organizations. Now, every organization wants to provide some degree of a
blended offering, but what does this option really mean and what does it take to do it
appropriately?
Most organizations have actually had the tools to offer a blended learning solution since
well before the Internet. . Most learners have been utilizing this approach ever since they
first started attending classrooms for part of their learning, and absorbed the rest by
reading a textbook. While prep school may be a simple example, it is nevertheless a
blended learning solution, one you should keep in perspective if your blended learning
solution is to be effective. Many blended learning solutions fail because, quite simply,
the learning solutions were never blended in the first place. The presence of many
options constitutes a buffet of learning options, not a blend. Rather, how the learner
moves in and out of the learning options while simultaneously learning is what makes a
learning experience a truly blended one. Before you begin to craft your blended learning
solution, consider the following factors.
First, the organization must break from the traditional views of ―siloed learning‖ and
embrace the full availability of learning options. It’s one thing to purchase an e-learning
offering, but it’s quite another to have integrate that e-learning offering into the existing
learning culture of an organization. Millions of dollars are wasted each year by
organizations that think that merely having an e-learning offering guarantees that it is
being utilized and integrated. That’s the same as thinking that by simply building a
schoolhouse and filling it with whiteboards and desks, you’ll have an outstanding school.
Just having the tools does not guarantee their effective and efficient use. In order for
your blended learning solution to work, your organization must have a learning strategy
that drives the purchase of new learning tools. How does the new tool compliment your
existing strategy? How will it be introduced? How will managers view it relative to the
older tool? And most importantly, will the learners see this new tool as aligning with their




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                     37



goals and business outcomes? These and other important questions need to be
addressed before a new learning modality will be accepted and ―blended.‖
Once your organization has developed a learning strategy, you must have an
implementation plan. Learning is a process, not an event. One of the biggest surprises
for most organizations when they introduce a new technology is how attached learners
become to one way of learning. Change takes time, and many training programs fail
because they try to go too far too quickly. Learners need to ―warm up‖ to the new
options. Some of the worst training programs that we have seen are those that merely
assign e-learning IDs and sit back waiting for the utilization numbers to soar. Experience
has taught us that learners are not quick to switch learning modalities. Learning has
never been about the tool or the modality; it has always been about the outcome. When
a learner sees relevance and a productive outcome, he or she will adopt any learning
approach. In many cases, e-learning and blended solutions simply have not been given
the appropriate amount of time or consideration. Organizations need to use pilot
programs, develop learning champions, introduce the blending in phases, and conduct
appropriate assessments so that the learning is mapped to the appropriate outcomes.
Offering a truly blended learning solution is more then just purchasing, and making
available, a potpourri of learning options. It takes planning and time to do it right. When it
is done right, though, it can enhance a learner’s experience and outcome to a level
we’ve never seen before.

Encourage Viral Learning
Viral learning requires the following components:
1. People who spread the word about how to do new things ("learning influentials").
2. Easy mechanisms to support dissemination of information among peers or from
   influentials.

The Role of Learning Influentials
A key component of informal learning, and a common observation from all of our
research, is asking a peer for help. Information workers regularly rely on peers or local
experts to help them; these persons are often perceived as being familiar with
appropriate work practices and the organizational environment.
We call the people who are asked the questions learning influentials. Most organizations
tell us that executive administrators or department administrators fill this role. And
executive administrators are particularly important because they influence not only the
general employee population, but also their managers! Other learning influentials might
be commonly-known experts (such as "Bob, down the hall, who really knows Excel"). In
some departments, there may be people more formally targeted to train others.
Several of our customers have job titles and job roles that report to the business unit but
that support IT. These customers generally have a work history in, and report to, the
business unit. They may help manage technology resources, and may be responsible
for support functions or training functions. Either way, they are learning influentials,
because people come to them for help.
Asking a peer for help is a double-edged sword for organizations. On the one hand, it's a
very quick and effective way to learn, incorporating relevance, hands-on demonstration,
and targeted ―just-in-time‖ learning. Many times we have observed an employee
hunkered over the desk with a learning influential solving a pesky technology problem;
such learning is difficult or impossible for a centralized Help desk to emulate. On the
other hand, asking a peer for help robs productivity from the learning influential who is



© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                       38



being asked, and whose job is probably not to teach others. Most learning influentials
will continue helping others regardless of whether or not management sanctions their
activities. Rather than ignoring or trying to stop this pattern, consider leveraging it and
making it as efficient as possible.
We highly recommend that you identify and pay close attention to your learning
influentials when developing your Windows Vista training program. Learning influentials
can be particularly useful in helping to facilitate learning that requires a change in
behavior, making it ―ok in our group.‖ On the other hand, if a learning influential decides
that a feature or product is ―bad‖ for their group, that may spell the end of the
productivity usefulness of that feature.
Here are some suggestions for managing learning influentials.
1. Train them early. First, learning influentials must be one step ahead understanding
   the new features and their value, or they may negatively influence other employees.
   Deliver training for learning influentials well before the typical employee training.
   This is especially critical during the Raise Awareness phase of your communication
   plan, as learning influentials can create the perception of a product in their group.
   The ELF tool handles this by moving recommended training modules ahead by one
   timeframe when you select the learning influentials employee category.
2. Make sure that they understand the value of new features. Also, make sure that
   your learning influentials understand how the organization would like the new
   features to be used. Make sure that learning influentials understand the ―why‖
   behind some of the changes, and the benefits that you see for the organization’s
   strategic direction.
3. Include some special topics for them. To minimize the productivity hit on learning
   influentials, make sure that they are aware of learning resources that they can use
   to help other information workers and to make them more self-sufficient. This makes
   the learning influential’s job (or job-within-a-job) easier and less time-consuming.
   Make sure they are aware of the following resources:
          Your organization's intranet learning resources.
          WOH, including the option to e-mail a topic to someone.
Several different studies at Microsoft have highlighted that ideally, many people would
prefer to learn with the ―personal touch.‖ Interaction with a person is highly desirable, but
it is simply not possible to implement classroom training consistently at large, global
organizations. By recognizing and effectively managing your existing learning
influentials, you can help provide a highly effective personal learning mechanism.

Make Dissemination Easy
Informal, viral learning will be more effective if, instead of being purely word-of-mouth, it
is backed up by re-usable learning resources that people can send to each other. This
model also encourages self-help rather than total reliance on the learning influential.
This is most effective with short, targeted topics. Here are some suggestions for
providing self-help-friendly learning materials:
If you host learning topics on your intranet, provide a send in e-mail link on the topics (do
     not assume that people know how to do this from the browser).
Keep the granularity of topics small, so that topics can be easily referenced and
   forwarded.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                      39



Train people to use WOH, which has an Email this page link. (Figure 10 shows an
    example of this link in a WOH topic.) Include WOH information in your training
    materials for everyone, but especially for learning influentials.




Figure 10: the Email this page link in WOH

What About IT Support?
In many ways, your organization's IT Support people (for example, the Help desk) are a
special type of learning influential. Certainly, training is typically not the primary job of IT
Support, which focuses more on troubleshooting. However, our research with support
employees and our experiences with our own support call center both show that many
help desk interactions are really educational interactions. Help desk employees often
report that much of their job is training, not troubleshooting. When an employee calls
with a ―problem,‖ the issue is often not that something is broken, but that they don’t know
how to approach the work. The Help Desk then becomes an informal training resource
as they walk the employee through the solution.
The ELF tool recommends that IT Support receive the same learning content as
information workers, but much earlier. (Of course, you will also need to provide
additional technical training for IT Support.) Most importantly, treat your Help Desk as
learning influentials, and implement the suggestions for training learning influentials.



© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                 40



Some of our customers report that they encourage IT Support to use Office Online to
help clients. They consider this a mechanism for teaching information workers to be
more self-sufficient. The new WOH will fill a similar role for Windows Vista. For example,
if an employee has a problem with keeping his or her laptop battery from running out,
the ELF tool topic on managing battery power can be emailed to that person and then
discussed together.

Involve the Right Departments
When we ask to talk to training stakeholders for Windows, we often get desktop
deployment leads from IT Support who are also charged with providing some type of
information worker training. The ELF tool was designed to help these people, but it can
also be a very effective tool for your training department and your communication
department. Most large organizations have a training department, but in the past they
may not have been involved with training for the deployment of Windows. Over the last
few years, we have talked to several customers who plan to change this for Windows
Vista. They are including their training departments early, and relying on them for
Windows Vista training for information workers. In addition, more and more frequently
we talk to large customers that are involving their Change Management departments in
the deployment of Windows Vista. In an earlier section of this white paper, we discussed
some of the behavior changes needed to get the most from Windows Vista; when you
consider how to implement these changes, you should consider utilizing your Change
Management department to help you deploy Windows Vista in your organization.

To "Classic" Or Not To "Classic"?
Of course, we would like you to use our new look and feel, rather than the Windows
Classic View. However, we realize that many organizations have relied on the look and
feel of Windows Classic View to minimize training. With Windows Vista, long-standing
features, such as the Start menu, have significant new productivity enhancements. For
example, the Start menu has an easier-to-use All Programs menu, and a quick Search
box that can find both files and programs. These are also some of the new features that
are the most easily discovered, and the most appreciated, by Windows Vista users.
Given these enhancements, now may be the time to take advantage of the productivity
features built into Windows Vista and move information workers from the Windows
Classic View to the new Windows Vista view.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                   41




What About the 2007 Microsoft Office Release?
This white paper focuses on the Windows Vista operating system. However, many
organizations deploy Windows and Microsoft Office together as a desktop environment.
Most of the suggestions above – for example, the learning curve, how to motivate, viral
learning – apply directly to helping information workers learn the 2007 Microsoft Office
system. Here are some additional points:
The ELF tool includes the following content for the 2007 Office release:
At the Office Online website, the training section for the 2007 Office system is an
     excellent resource. (This link works only if you have the 2007 Office release
     installed.)
Also at the Office Online website, a set of Getting Started topics is another excellent
    resource. (This link works only if you have the 2007 Office release installed.)
The ELF tool includes links to the two Office Online sections that are mentioned above,
as well as some 2007 Office system tours that can be accessed by those who have not
yet installed the 2007 Office release.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                 42




Summary
Our ethnography research verifies patterns that are painfully obvious to many of us --
the reality of how people work today is less time, more pressure, and higher
requirements. Windows Vista contains many new productivity-focused features for the
information worker, but the challenge for the information worker will be to make time to
learn and take advantage of these improvements. Many of the suggestions we have
made in this white paper pertain to informal learning. We strongly suggest that you
include several learning delivery options, and that informal learning options comprise a
large part of your training program. Informal learning options focus on self-help and
allow for quick, just-in-time learning, such as the short topics on WOH. Informal learning
can also be facilitated by carefully leveraging your learning influentials and making sure
that employees can easily share information.
Most organizations picture learning about a new operating system as learning about
what’s changed on something that they already know, rather than learning about an
entirely new operating system. Informal learning fits the former idea. Many of our new
learning resources – WOH, the ELF tool, tips and tricks for Windows Vista – support the
―upgrade model‖ and informal learning.
We are interested in your feedback on this white paper, and in your successes and
challenges with learning as you deploy Windows Vista, so that we can continuously
make improvements to the resources that we offer. The new WOH model allows us to
periodically upgrade and add topics as we receive customer feedback. Please contact
Julie Nowicki with feedback or questions about this white paper or about any of our
learning resources.
Julie Nowicki
Product Manager
MSX User Research, Windows Client Division
julien@microsoft.com




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Appendix A: Content Provided by Microsoft to Meet Learning Objectives
Learning objectives in bold are primary objectives as described in the Learning Objectives for Windows Vista section.
For descriptions of the resources and where to get them, see the New Learning Resources for Windows Vista section.

Notes The column for the ELF tool shows you topics from WOH that are included in the ELF tool. However, you can search for additional topics
in WOH, for example, by putting ―meeting place‖ into the Search box of WOH.
This column is current as of the writing of this white paper. However, the ELF tool topics change periodically as topics are added or modified, so
consider using the ELF tool online to get the latest list of topics.

Collaborating and Communicating
Learning Objective                             ELF tool topic from WOH                  Tips and        Top 10 Tips and     "Best Practices"
                                                                                        Tricks for      Tricks reference    Reference Guides
                                                                                        Windows         card
                                                                                        Vista demo
                                                                                        session
1. Evaluate the new Windows Meeting            What's new for using your mobile PC            
   Space tool for collaboration                in meetings?
   capabilities.
                                               What is Windows Meeting Space?
                                               Windows Meeting Space: frequently
                                               asked questions
                                               Set up a session using Windows
                                               Meeting Space

2. Recognize that NetMeeting is no             What happened to NetMeeting?
   longer available and identify
   alternatives.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                  44




3. Recognize that Windows Messenger                  What happened to Windows
   is no longer available and identify               Messenger?
   alternatives.
4. Evaluate new ad-hoc networks for                  Set up a computer-to-computer (ad
   sharing files and presentations.                  hoc) network




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                   45




Connecting to Work From Home or Away
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH              Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                          Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                          Windows      card
                                                                                          Vista demo
                                                                                          session
1. Use the new VPN Wizard to connect                 Set up a remote connection to your
   to the workplace.                                 workplace using VPN




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                  46




Desktop and Start Menu
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH             Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                         Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                         Windows      card
                                                                                         Vista demo
                                                                                         session
1. Recognize the new button for                      What's new with the Start Menu?          
   launching the Start menu.
Assess the new Sidebar.                              What's new with Windows desktop?                                   Best Practices for
                                                                                                                         Everyday Work with
                                                     Windows Sidebar: frequently asked                                   Windows Vista
                                                     questions
                                                     Customize Windows Sidebar

2. Use the new Start menu search box.                What's new with the Start Menu?                                   Best Practices for
                                                                                                                         Everyday Work with
                                                     Find a file or folder                                               Windows Vista

3. Use the new All Programs list                     What's new with the Start Menu?          
   format.
4. Recognize the different ways to                   What happened to the Run                 
   launch the Run command.                           command?

5. Recognize changes to the Windows                  What's new with Windows desktop?                                    Best Practices for
   Flip feature (ALT+TAB).                                                                                               Everyday Work with
                                                     Managing multiple windows                                           Windows Vista

6. Assess the new Windows Flip 3D                    What's new with Windows desktop?                                   Best Practices for
   feature (the Windows logo                                                                                             Everyday Work with
   key+TAB).                                         Manage multiple windows                                             Windows Vista




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                 47




7. Evaluate the improved ability to                  Understanding multiple monitors
   detect and to adjust for multiple
   displays.
8. Assess the new taskbar thumbnail
   previews.
9. Recognize updated                                 Getting the best display on your
   recommendations for getting the                   monitor
   best display quality.
10. Evaluate the new feature for                     Manage multiple windows
    comparing windows side by side.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                   48




Ease of Access (Accessibility)
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH              Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                          Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                          Windows      card
                                                                                          Vista demo
                                                                                          session
1. Recognize the change in                           What's new in Ease of Access
   terminology from Accessibility to                 (Accessibility)?
   Ease of Access.
2. Recognize that Utility Manager has                What's new in Ease of Access
   been replaced by the Ease of Access               (Accessibility)?
   Center.
3. Recognize that the Accessibility                  What's new in Ease of Access
   Wizard has been replaced by a                     (Accessibility)?
   questionnaire in the Ease of Access
   Center.                                           Make your computer easier to use

4. Assess the new webpage Zoom                       Zoom in on a webpage
   feature.
5. Assess the new screen Magnifier                   Make items on the screen appear
   feature.                                          bigger (Magnifier)

6. Use the new Ease of Access Center.                What's new in Ease of Access
                                                     (Accessibility)?
                                                     What accessibility features does
                                                     Windows offer?
                                                     Turn Ease of Access features on or
                                                     off




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                 49




7. Summarize improvements to the                     What's new in Ease of Access
   Narrator tool.                                    (Accessibility)?

8. Evaluate new Speech Recognition                   What's new in Ease of Access
   capabilities.                                     (Accessibility)?
                                                     What can I do with Speech
                                                     Recognition?

9. Summarize new keyboard settings.                  What's new in Ease of Access
                                                     (Accessibility)?
                                                     Keyboard shortcuts

10. Assess the new Ease of Access                    What's new in Ease of Access
    button on the logon screen.                      (Accessibility)?

11. For people without disabilities,                 Make your computer easier to use
    evaluate ease of access features.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                      50




Finding and Organizing Files
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                 Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                             Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                             Windows      card
                                                                                             Vista demo
                                                                                             session
1. Recognize that My Documents is                    What happened to My Documents?               
   now just Documents.
Evaluate turning menus back on.                      Show the menu in folders                                  
Evaluate the new Search folder.                      Find a file or folder                        
Use the new Search box.                              Find a file or folder                                     
                                                     Tips for finding files
                                                     Folders: frequently asked questions

Use the new Address bar.                             Folders: frequently asked questions                                   Best Practices for
                                                                                                                             Everyday Work with
                                                     Navigate using the Address Bar                                          Windows Vista

Use and customize the new Navigation                 Folders: frequently asked questions                                   Best Practices for
   Pane, including the Folders option.                                                                                       Everyday Work with
                                                     Working with the Navigation pane                                        Windows Vista

Evaluate major improvements to the use               What are tags?                                                         Best Practices for
   of tags and properties for finding                                                                                        Everyday Work with
   and organizing files.                             View the properties for a file                                          Windows Vista
                                                     Add tags or other properties to files




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                       51




Evaluate the new column heading filter.              Tips for finding files

Evaluate the new column heading stack                Tips for finding files                            Best Practices for
   and group options.                                                                                  Everyday Work with
                                                                                                       Windows Vista

Evaluate new ways to save a search.                  Save your search results                         Best Practices for
                                                                                                       Everyday Work with
                                                                                                       Windows Vista

Use the new Views option to change                   Change thumbnail size and file details        
   icon size.
Evaluate the new ability to retrieve                 Previous versions of files: frequently
   previous versions of files.                       asked questions

Evaluate the new reading pane.                                                                     
Evaluate the new Search pane                                                                          Best Practices for
                                                                                                       Everyday Work with
                                                                                                       Windows Vista

Summarize how the new index improves                 Improve Windows searches using the
   searches.                                         Index: frequently asked questions

Evaluate the new Backup Wizard and the               Back up your files
   new Restore Wizard.
                                                     Backup and restore: frequently asked
                                                     questions

Review new methods for customizing                   Change folder views and behavior
   folders and selecting files.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                52




Getting Help
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH           Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                       Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                       Windows      card
                                                                                       Vista demo
                                                                                       session
1. Use the new Help system.                          Getting help

2. Evaluate the new WOH site.                        What is Windows Online Help and
                                                     Support?

3. Recognize the new ability to share                What is Windows Online Help and
   online Help topics with others.                   Support?

4. Recognize the new Guided Help                     Getting help
   topics.
5. Recognize that the Help system can                Get the latest Help content
   access the new WOH website.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                          53




Internet Explorer
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                     Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices
                                                                                                 Tricks for   Tricks reference   "Reference Guides
                                                                                                 Windows      card
                                                                                                 Vista demo
                                                                                                 session
1. Evaluate the method for turning                   Show the menus in Internet Explorer              
   Internet Explorer menus back on.
2. Use the new Toolbar Search box in                 Internet Explorer 7 Quick Tour                   
   Internet Explorer.
                                                     Internet Explorer at a glance

                                                     Tips for searching the Internet

3. Recognize the new Favorites icons.                Internet Explorer 7 Quick Tour

                                                     Internet Explorer at a glance

4. Summarize the new Favorites Center                Find recently visited webpages
   features.
                                                     Managing your Internet Explorer favorites

5. Evaluate the new tabbed browsing.                 Internet Explorer 7 Quick Tour                                
                                                     Internet Explorer at a glance

                                                     Tabbed browsing: frequently asked
                                                     questions

6. Evaluate the new Quick Tabs.                      Internet Explorer 7 Quick Tour                                
                                                     Internet Explorer at a glance

                                                     Tabbed browsing: frequently asked
                                                     questions




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                        54




                                                     Using Quick Tabs in Internet Explorer

7. Evaluate the new capabilities for                 Tabbed browsing: frequently asked
                                                     questions
                                                                                                    
   saving and for restoring groups of
   tabs.
8. Assess the new webpage Zoom                       Internet Explorer at a glance                     
   feature.
                                                     Zoom in on a webpage

9. Evaluate the new method for                       Change your Internet Explorer home page
   changing the home page.
10. Recognize that now multiple home                 Change your Internet Explorer home page        
    pages may be used.
11. Use different methods to navigate to             Find recently visited webpages
    visited webpages.
12. Recognize new capability for                     Internet Explorer 7 Quick Tour                 
    multiple providers in Search.
                                                     Internet Explorer at a glance

                                                     Tips for searching the Internet

13. Describe new RSS feeds.                          Internet Explorer 7 Quick Tour                        Best Practices for
                                                                                                            Everyday Work with
                                                     Internet Explorer at a glance
                                                                                                            Windows Vista
                                                     Using feeds (RSS)

14. Summarize the new Pop-up Blocker                 Internet Explorer Pop-up Blocker:
    feature.                                         frequently asked questions

15. Describe new scaled webpage                      Internet Explorer at a glance                  
    printing.
                                                     Preview the appearance of a printed
                                                     webpage




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                        55




Managing Battery Power
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                   Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                               Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                               Windows      card
                                                                                               Vista demo
                                                                                               session
1. Recognize the new battery meter.                  What's new for using your mobile PC in                                    Best Practices for
                                                     meetings?                                                                 Power Management
                                                     What's new for using your mobile PC
                                                                                                                               with Windows Vista
                                                     when traveling?

                                                     What's new in managing power settings?

2. Recognize that power schemes are                  Power plans: frequently asked questions
   now called power plans.
3. Assess the new default power plans.               What's new for using your mobile PC in                                    Best Practices for
                                                     meetings?                                                                 Power Management
                                                                                                                               with Windows Vista
                                                     What's new for using your mobile PC
                                                     when traveling?

                                                     What's new in managing power settings?

                                                     Power plans: frequently asked questions

4. Recognize that the new power plans                What's new in managing power settings?                                    Best Practices for
   can be customized.                                                                                                          Power Management
                                                     Power plans: frequently asked questions
                                                                                                                               with Windows Vista
                                                     Create, change, or delete a power plan
                                                     (scheme)




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                       56




Mobile PC Tips
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                  Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                              Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                              Windows      card
                                                                                              Vista demo
                                                                                              session
1. Evaluate the new Windows Mobility                 What's new for using your mobile PC in
                                                     meetings?
                                                                                                   
   Center.
                                                     What's new for using your mobile PC
                                                     when traveling?

                                                     What is Windows Mobility Center?

                                                     Using Windows Mobility Center




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                     57




PC Maintenance and Performance
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                            Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                            Windows      card
                                                                                            Vista demo
                                                                                            session
1. Recognize that disk fragmentation                 Schedule Disk Defragmenter to run
   now runs automatically.                           regularly

2. Evaluate new ways to get                          Get computer speed and performance
                                                     information
                                                                                                 
   information about computer speed
   and performance.                                  See details about your computer's
                                                     performance using Task Manager

3. Use the new control panel Search                  Tour the Control Panel                      
   box and the improved category
   navigation.
4. Recognize the new way to stop a                   Using Software Explorer in Windows
   program from running when you                     Defender
   start the computer.                               Stop a program from running
                                                     automatically when Windows starts

5. Evaluate the new Backup and                       Back up your files
   Restore Center
                                                     Backup and restore: frequently asked
                                                     questions




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                       58




Presentations
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                  Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                              Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                              Windows      card
                                                                                              Vista demo
                                                                                              session
1. Evaluate the new presentation                     What's new for using your mobile PC in
                                                     meetings?
                                                                                                   
   settings.
                                                     Adjust settings before giving a
                                                     presentation

2. Recognize the improvements in                     Understanding multiple monitors
   automatically adjusting for a
   projector display.
3. Describe the new network projector                What's new for using your mobile PC in
   feature.                                          meetings?

                                                     Giving a presentation over a network

                                                     Network projectors: frequently asked
                                                     questions




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                    59




Printing
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH               Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                           Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                           Windows      card
                                                                                           Vista demo
                                                                                           session
1. Describe the new XML Paper                        Print to the Microsoft XPS Document
   Specification (XPS) document                      Writer
   format.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                           60




Security and Privacy
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                      Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                                  Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                                  Windows      card
                                                                                                  Vista demo
                                                                                                  session
1. Recognize that some system
   settings are locked as indicated by
   the shield icon.
2. Understand why Windows Vista
   prompts for you for verification of
   administrative tasks.
3. Evaluate the new certificate                      How to know if an online transaction is
   information that is associated with               secure
   the lock icon in Internet Explorer.
4. Summarize the capabilities of the                 Phishing filter: freqently asked questions        
   new phishing filter and how to use it
   to protect yourself.
5. Identify new security features and                Security and privacy features in Internet
   new privacy features in Internet                  Explorer
   Explorer.
6. Evaluate the new BitLocker                        BitLocker Drive Encryption Overview
   encryption.
                                                     Protect your files using BitLocker Drive
                                                     Encryption

7. Recognize the new Windows                         Spyware: frequently asked questions               
   Defender tool for protecting the
                                                     Turn Windows Defender real-time
   computer against spyware.                         protection on or off




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace              61




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                           62




Synchronizing
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                      Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                                  Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                                  Windows      card
                                                                                                  Vista demo
                                                                                                  session
1. Use the new Sync Center.                          How to keep your information in sync              
                                                     Sync with a device

2. Use the new system tray icons on
   the Sync Center.
3. Assess new strategies for syncing                 How can I tell if sync succeeded?
   success that use Sync Center.
                                                     Resolving sync conflicts: frequently asked
                                                     questions

                                                     How can I avoid deleting files when I
                                                     sync?




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                     63




Tablet PC
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                            Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                            Windows      card
                                                                                            Vista demo
                                                                                            session
1. Identify new features for the Tablet              What's new for Tablet PC?
   PC.
2. Use the input panel efficiently by                Getting more out of your Tablet PC
   utilizing new features.
                                                     About Tablet PC Input Panel

3. Evaluate new handwriting                          What's new for Tablet PC?
   recognition strategies.
                                                     Getting more out of your Tablet PC

                                                     Strategies for improving handwriting
                                                     recognition

4. Evaluate new ways to use the pen.                 What's new for Tablet PC?

                                                     Getting more out of your Tablet PC

                                                     What are pen flicks?




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                       64




Turning Off and Starting Up the Computer
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                  Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                              Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                              Windows      card
                                                                                              Vista demo
                                                                                              session
1. Identify the new location of the Shut             What happened to the Shut Down option?
   Down option.
                                                     Turning off your computer properly

                                                     Turn off a computer: frequently asked
                                                     questions

2. Recognize that the Shut Down                      What happened to the Shut Down option?                                   Best Practices for
   option is now used only when the                                                                                           Power Management
                                                     Turning off your computer properly
   computer must be turned off.                                                                                               with Windows Vista
                                                     Turn off a computer: frequently asked
                                                     questions

3. Recognize that the Standby mode                   What happened to Stand By and                                            Best Practices for
   and the Hibernate mode have been                  Hibernate?                                                               Power Management
   replaced by the Sleep mode.                                                                                                with Windows Vista

4. Use the new power button, instead                 What happened to the Shut Down option?                                  Best Practices for
   of the Shut Down command, to put                                                                                           Power Management
                                                     Turning off your computer properly
   the computer in Sleep mode.                                                                                                with Windows Vista
                                                     Turn off a computer: frequently asked
                                                     questions

5. Recognize why the new power                       Turning off your computer properly
   button occasionally changes to the
   Shut Down command.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                 65




6. Evaluate the new ability to switch                Switch users without logging off
   users without logging off.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                        66




Windows SideShow
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                   Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                               Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                               Windows      card
                                                                                               Vista demo
                                                                                               session
1. Summarize the capabilities of the                 Using a Windows SideShow-compatible
   new Windows SideShow-compatible                   device
   devices.
2. Use security features of the new                  Make a Windows SideShow-compatible
   Windows SideShow-compatible                       device more secure
   devices.
3. Recognize the common features of                  Windows SideShow-compatible devices
   the Windows SideShow-compatible                   and gadgets: frequently asked questions
   devices.




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                       67




Wireless Networking
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                  Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                              Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                              Windows      card
                                                                                              Vista demo
                                                                                              session
1. Use the modified Connect To                       View and connect to available wireless
   feature.                                          networks




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace                                                        68




Working Offline
Learning Objective                                   ELF tool topic from WOH                   Tips and     Top 10 Tips and    "Best Practices"
                                                                                               Tricks for   Tricks reference   Reference Guides
                                                                                               Windows      card
                                                                                               Vista demo
                                                                                               session
1. Use improved offline files.                       Understanding offline files                    
                                                     Working with network files when you are
                                                     offline




© 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

				
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