REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE - SHORT PAPER by lindahy

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 10

More Info
									 




    BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:



                  REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE




                            SHORT PAPER
 RACGP discussion Paper in response to the Final Report from the National
   Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, the Draft of Australia’s First
National Primary Health Care Strategy and its Primary Health Care Reform in
                             Australia Report.




                            November 2009
 




 
        BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                     REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE




CONTENTS                                                                                                  PAGE

    INTRODUCTION                                                                                            3

    KEY THEMES                                                                                              5

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                                                                       6

1. THE GENERAL PRACTICE EVIDENCE BASE                                                                       11

2. WHERE IS AUSTRALIAN GENERAL PRACTICE NOW?                                                                15
      General practice: undervalued and overstretched                                                       15
      The National Primary Health Care Strategy                                                             18

3. DEVELOPING A SHARED VISION FOR GENERAL PRACTICE                                                          20
      Characteristics of quality general practice                                                           21

4. RECOGNISING AND REWARDING QUALITY                                                                        26
      Embedding a strong focus on quality and outcomes                                                      27
      Option of enrolling with a single primary health care provider                                        28
      Community based primary health care -specialist shared care                                           29
      Establishment of comprehensive primary health care services                                           31

5. DRAFT STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK                                                                    32

6. CONCLUSION                                                                                               35

    REFERENCES                                                                                              36




          RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)          2

 
          BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                       REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE

INTRODUCTION

What will general practice look like in 2020? Major health system reform is agreed to be 
necessary, and will inevitably mean substantial change.  

New directions will crystallise in early 2010 when the Australian Government formally responds 
to final reports from the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission (the Commission), 
the National Primary Health Care Strategy, the Preventive Care Strategy and other major 
national review processes. These comprehensive review reports have led to an outpouring of 
views from many hundreds of individuals, groups and organisations, testifying to the 
widespread hunger for health system reform.  

The necessity to strengthen primary health care is one of the strongest emerging themes.  The 
Commission’s response to the depth of supporting evidence is to recommend the development 
of a person‐centred, strong, equitable, integrated primary health care system. The Draft 
National Primary Health Care (PHC) Strategy and its associated Report subsequently proposed a 
broad strategic framework for PHC, and the Minister for Health invited further discussion to 
refine “the nature of changes and specific approaches to implementation” required.  This is a 
welcome invitation that general practice and the PHC sector must take up. 

This does not mean that when the health reform dust settles, the outcomes will adequately 
reflect the evidence. Many different futures are possible. Major reform presents Australian 
governments with a difficult challenge given global economic circumstances, and vested 
interests will advocate alternative futures despite the evidence. The lack of implementation 
detail in all reports leaves open multiple implementation options and outcomes. 

Therefore, to preserve what is most central and valuable to our discipline and sector, general 
practice and primary health care organisations will need to present a sufficiently sound and 
united plan to move forward from a fragmented, under‐resourced past, to a strong integrated 
future.  
 
This  paper ‐ Building quality, equity and capacity in health systems: revitalising general 
practice, is primarily focused on general practice aspects of national health reform. It draws on 
international resources to describe the characteristics of future quality general practice, while 
identifying issues that weaken the discipline, compromise its sustainability, and impact on the 
quality and capacity of general practice and primary health care.  
 
A second paper may follow exploring  broader primary health care issues and how we might 
move from site to system solutions.  While this  paper emphasises the need to build on existing 
quality general practice, a second paper would focus on the need for change in the discipline, 
including infrastructure and relationships with other system elements. We are planning for our 



            RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)   3

 
           BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                        REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE

future communities’ needs, and for future generations of general practitioners and our 
colleagues in other primary health care disciplines. The challenges are formidable for both 
government and health professionals. The college seeks and welcomes your thoughts on these 
important issues. Readers are invited to contribute to the discussion by   emailing the RACGP at 
healthreform@racgp.org.au 

This paper has been prepared by the RACGP’s Presidential Task Force on Health System Reform.  
The RACGP Council thanks Task Force members for their work in developing this, and 
subsequent papers.    

Members of the Presidential Task Force on Health System Reform 

Assoc. Prof. Di O’Halloran (Chair)

Dr Janice Bell

Prof. Claire Jackson

Dr Kathryn Kirkpatrick

Dr Rob Pegram

 

 

 




             RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)   4

 
          BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                       REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE

KEY THEMES

•   Significant health system change is essential; it is not acceptable to do nothing.  
     
•   International evidence demonstrates that effective health care systems are person‐focussed 
    and based on strong integrated primary health care foundations with accessible, quality 
    general practice at the centre of the system.  
 
•   Past deficiencies in national health policy and strategy have led to a growing mismatch 
    between the level and complexity of community needs, and the capacity of general 
    practice‐primary health care to proactively plan for and meet those needs.   
 
•   Professional organisations can contribute to health system reform through development of 
    a shared vision of the future of general practice and its relationship with the wider primary 
    health care system, including identification of the practical strategies required to reach that 
    vision.  
 
•   Based on philosophy, evidence and experience, future quality general practice will continue 
    to be defined as whole person, continuing, comprehensive, coordinated care for individuals, 
    families and communities. 
 
•   General practitioners will provide clinical leadership in expanded multidisciplinary teams, 
    where all team members have moved up the complexity scale and developed their own 
    leadership roles designed to meet emerging community needs.  Diverse, high capacity 
    practice and service models, developed with local communities, will emerge. 
     
•   Proven quality general practice will be preserved while new responsibilities are accepted, 
    new relationships forged, and more comprehensive integrated service models built from 
    existing foundations. Inevitably, there will be a substantial change process. 
            
•   Strategies to achieve the vision of future general practice will involve realigning primary 
    health care policies, functions, structures and funding to match projected community health 
    needs, enhance quality of care, and increase equity.  
 
    Most critically this will involve: 
      - establishing all primary health care disciplines as sought after career destinations 
      - investing in teams, technology, advanced skills training and teaching 
      - defining, embedding, and rewarding a strong focus on quality and health outcomes 
      - progressing voluntary  enrolment with provider of choice for at risk people and 
           groups 
      - creating integrated local clinical networks with cross sector and community 
           engagement, and strong pathways between community and hospital based services 
      - redistributing system resources to increase scope and capacity in general practice 
           and primary health care, with priority given to areas of greatest community need.     
 


               RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)   5

 
          BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                       REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The RACGP congratulates the Australia Government on its commitment to reforming our 
struggling health system, and the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission on its 
extensive work in consulting, analysing and refining ways forward (1,2,3). The strategic directions 
outlined are welcomed, including the evolution of a health system based on person and family 
centred care, greater equity, sound primary health care foundations, prevention and the early 
years, and continuing, comprehensive, coordinated care.  

The college also welcomes the long awaited Draft of Australia’s First National Primary Health 
Care Strategy and its supporting Report (4,5). These valuable documents are clearly designed to 
complement the Commission’s Final Report in their articulation of the essential Primary Health 
Care Building Blocks, Key Priority Areas, and Key Future Directions summaries. The National 
Preventative Health Strategy (6) adds a whole‐of‐society perspective on prevention. 

These national review processes have necessarily taken broad, cross‐sector perspectives, 
charting only major changes in priorities, principles and directions. In consequence, necessary 
detail relating to implementation strategies remains to be identified.  

For general practice to move forward, we need a clearer view of the present, the future, and the 
distance to be traversed, which is essentially the purpose of this paper. 

Part One reviews the evidence and finds that an effective primary health care system will have 
quality general practice at its centre (6‐13). Evidence shows that accessible quality general 
practice incorporates comprehensive and coordinated care, and is essential to improving 
patient satisfaction, key health outcomes, and health related costs. 

Part Two reviews Australian general practice and finds that neglect of policy and real 
investment in general practice has compromised the quality and sustainability of the discipline 
over the past decade. In Part Two, assumptions that general practice and primary health care 
are “robust” are questioned. Though it is recognised that report recommendations will achieve 
reforms, they are unlikely to be sufficient to ensure quality and sustainability across all aspects 
of primary health care. A collaboratively developed general practice‐primary health care vision, 
linked to a comprehensive and practical revitalisation strategy, is proposed. 

Part Three considers a general practice‐primary health care vision, identifies resources that 
demonstrate a consistent view about the future of general practice, and explores the strategies 
needed to close the gap. It suggests improvements to both general practice and the broader 
primary health care system, while recognising that existing core general practice values can be 
transferred to diverse, multi‐disciplinary, clinical settings designed to match local needs. 



            RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)   6

 
          BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                       REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE

Part Four looks at how general practice might be revitalised and explores recommendations 
relating directly to general practice, including voluntary patient enrolment, increased emphasis 
on quality and outcomes, shared specialist‐PHC community care, and comprehensive primary 
health care centres and services. A number of draft implementation strategies have been 
outlined for wider discussion. They are intended to build quality, capacity, and sustainability in 
primary health care within the frameworks outlined by the Commission’s Final Report and the 
Draft of Australia’s First National Primary Health Care Strategy. The strategies are summarised 
below. 


Strategic Development Framework for General Practice

1. Develop a shared vision of future general practice.  

    Professional groups, working with other stakeholders, will build on the wealth of 
    international evidence and key resources to define a 2020 general practice vision, the 
    strategies required to achieve that vision, and agreed outcomes for the National Primary 
    Health Care Strategy (NPHCS).  

2. Establish general practice and PHC disciplines as sought after career destinations.  
 
    The shared vision will guide relevant government policy and strategy decisions relating to: 
    - recognising and supporting the critical importance of high quality general practice  
    - recognising the complex professional skills required for quality generalist practice 
    - continuing the emphasis on regionalisation and integration (vertical and horizontal) of 
       education and training, with development of teaching hubs and ”beacon” practices 
    - recognition of clinical colleges’ essential roles in standards, quality improvement, and 
       development of professional identity, ethics, behaviours, morale, and recruitment 
    - investment strategies across the general practice‐PHC system leading to: 
           ⋅ infrastructure development linked to quality parameters, with priority given to 
              areas of greatest community need in all geographic locations 
           ⋅ rationalised, integrated incentive packages (including HECs relief) for education, 
              training and practice in areas of greatest community need in all locations 
           ⋅ support for development of career structures including formal recognition of 
              seniority, expertise, advanced specific skills, dual training and career pathways, 
              and transition pathways between contexts and disciplines 
           ⋅ protected time, academic recognition, and reward for senior clinician teachers. 
 
3. Build on what is proven to be effective: quality general practice.  
 
   The NPHCS will incorporate strategies to enhance capability, service range and performance 
   in existing quality practices and services by investing in teams, technology, training and 
   teaching.   


            RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)   7

 
          BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                       REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE

     
    -   Expanded multidisciplinary teams within the practice/service and across service 
        boundaries, including expanded physical infrastructure and new coordination and 
        support roles, will increase capacity 

    -   Advances in technology and informatics will enhance diagnostic and management 
        capabilities, quality, safety, connectivity, and coordination 

    -   Availability and formal recognition of advanced skills training for general practitioners, 
        practice team members and community health professionals, will enable all to “move up 
        the complexity scale”, increasing service range, complexity and cost effectiveness in 
        accordance with local community needs 

    -   Investment in teaching skills will provide expertise, professional development, career 
        pathways, disciplinary evolution, and our future workforce. 

4. Embed a strong focus on quality and health outcomes across all primary health care 
   services (NH&HRC Recommendation 19). Looking specifically at general practice, the NPHCS 
   will progress this objective in close  collaboration with professional groups by:  
 
   - defining key outcome measures which truly reflect patients’ health and experience of 
       health care and capacity, rather than easily measurable but less valid parameters 
   - ensuring evolution of performance measures, and any linked changes to our blended 
       payment system, are evidence based and support accepted quality characteristics  
   - fast tracking development of PHC coding and classification systems, clinical software 
       standards, practice data management processes, connectivity, and secure messaging 
   - building on proven quality and safety tools with strategies which support practice/ 
       service quality improvement and service planning at practice and local levels 
   - incorporating a professionally developed and led Quality Framework which supports 
       and automatically documents improvement in overall practice/service performance in 
       meeting practice population needs, patient experiences of care, and health outcomes. 
 
5. Progress “the option of enrolment with a single primary health care service” for at risk 
   people and groups (NH&HRC Recommendation 18). General practice will maintain close 
   collaboration throughout program design, implementation, evaluation and evolution, to 
   ensure that:  
  
   - enrolment remains a matter of choice for patient and practice (Interim Report p93)  
   - enrolment processes support continuity with a trusted practitioner, as the strongest 
       evidence on the benefits of continuity of care relates to individual provider over and 
       above service provider, with trust then extending to other team members 
   - care packages are flexible and configured around individual patient/family needs 



            RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)   8

 
            BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                         REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE

    -  management of enrolled patients may be shared between individual practice and the 
       community hub, division or PHC organisation, which directly supports local practices 
   - related changes to financing systems are evidence based, trialed in Australian 
       conditions, and offer choice to practitioners/practices wherever possible. 
        
6. Progressively redistribute health system resources to increase investment in general 
   practice and primary health care.  
 
   The NPHCS will increase general practice‐PHC capacity, efficiency, and performance over 
   time by progressing 4 (embed a strong focus on quality and health outcomes across all 
   general practice‐PHC services).  In addition, gradually redistribute and reinvest resources 
   via: 
     
    -   modifying the MBS to remove incentives for rapid throughput, and instead facilitate 
        community management of complex conditions through extended teams, advanced 
        skills, and wider delegations to practice teams with appropriate oversight, support and 
        coordination 
    -   ensuring that potentially isolated practitioners such as midwives and nurse practitioners 
        are connected into teams, continuing quality improvement, and networking processes 
         
    -   removal of all unnecessary general practice “red tape” burdens  
    -   resolving medical indemnity issues which predispose to reduced scope of practice and 
        increased referral rates (with consequent higher costs) 
    -   bringing cost effective diagnostic and management technology into general practice  
    -   committing to relative values adjustment between generalist and specialist disciplines, 
        starting with equivalent remuneration for equivalent work 
         
    -   facilitating professionally led integration of general practice and community health 
    -   bringing all secondary and selected tertiary services into community based settings  
        wherever these can be provided at equivalent or better quality and cost  
    -   shifting the locus of control for chronic disease, hospital avoidance, and hospital in the 
        home programs from hospital based organisations to community based organisations 
        and services 
    -    localising the majority of sub‐acute services in the community, and extending general 
        practitioner/nurse hospital‐inreach and specialist community outreach strategies 
    -   implementing Home and Community Care (HACC) and similar services through primary 
        health care organisations, community hubs, and general practices as appropriate 
 
    -   quarantining primary health care budgets and pre‐empting hospital claw back of funds 
    -   evaluating and rationalising all national rural medical incentives programs (financial, 
        workforce, academic and infrastructure incentives), then making the most effective 
        programs available in high need communities in all geographic settings 
    -   progressively reducing the major inefficiencies and administrative burdens associated 
        with duplicated and siloed Commonwealth‐state‐regional programs and services. 
 

             RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)   9

 
         BUILDING QUALITY, EQUITY AND CAPACITY IN HEALTH SYSTEMS:
                      REVITALISING GENERAL PRACTICE

Conclusion
 
The college recognises both the unsustainability of our current health system and the huge 
challenges facing governments in reforming that system – including the functional, structural, 
financial, and governance reforms required to ensure effective, equitable, and sustainable 
health care in the decades to come. We recognise that this means major change for every 
discipline, every service, and every sector.  
 
We accept and welcome changes that increase the discipline’s responsibilities in close 
collaboration with our primary health care colleagues and our communities, including 
responsibilities for local population health planning, demonstrable high quality performance, 
and improved equity of access to health services and health outcomes. 
 
In accepting these responsibilities, we also ask and expect that reforms to general practice and 
the primary health care system preserve, recognise, and appropriately reward the discipline’s 
proven quality characteristics (i.e. whole person, continuing, comprehensive, coordinated care). 
We also ask and expect that reform should build on what already exists, and aim to integrate, 
not fragment, responsibilities, care, and services.  
 
The proposed general practice strategic development framework, while controversial in some 
respects, is intended to support discussions amongst general practitioners, general practice 
groups, and other colleagues and communities of interest, about best ways forward, leading to 
the development of strategies to achieve the primary health care disciplines our communities 
need.  
 
The reconfiguration and evolution of the broader primary health care system to achieve greater 
efficiency, equity, and sustainability will be explored subsequently.  
 

 

 

 

 

  

 




            RACGP Discussion Paper on the NHHRC Final Report: Revitalising General Practice (Short Paper)   10

 

								
To top