Install Guide Linux Samba as Primary DC and SSO Identity Management

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					Global Open Versity ICT Labs                    Install Guide Linux Samba as PDC and SSO ID Management v1.0




                          Global Open Versity
        Systems Integration Hands-on Linux Labs Training Manual

  Install Guide Linux Samba as Primary DC and SSO ID Management

                                    Kefa Rabah
                       Global Open Versity, Vancouver Canada
                                   krabah@globalopenversity.org
                                    www.globalopenversity.org

Table of Contents                                                                                Page No.

INSTALL GUIDE LINUX SAMBA AS PRIMARY DC AND SSO IDENTITY MANAGEMENT 2

Introduction                                                                                              2
  1.1 Our Implementing Plan                                                                               2

Part 1: Install and Check necessary packages                                                              3

Part 2: Install & Configure Samba 3                                                                       4
  Step 1: Configure Samba                                                                                 4
  Step 2: Configure Samba PDC Server                                                                      4
  Step 2: Add Users & Machines to Samba Account                                                           7
  Step 3: Add Users Profiles & Netlogon to Samba Account                                                  8
  Step 4: How to Delete Users from your Samba Domain                                                      9

Part 3: Accessing your Client & Server Machines                                                           9
  3.1 Connecting to a Samba Machine in Linux                                                             10
  3.2 Configuring Windows Machines                                                                       11
  Step 1: Access Shares on the Windows Desktop.                                                          11
  Step 2: Access Shares on the Mac OSX 10 Desktop.                                                       12
  Step 3: Mounting shared drives on Windows                                                              13
  Step 4: Binding to the Windows Domain Controller.                                                      14
  Step 5: Accessing Windows shares from the Linux node.                                                  14

Part 4: Accessing Network Machines from Mac OS X                                                         15
    1. Mac OS X has built-in capabilities through Samba to play nicely with Windows & Linux networks. An
    early step to working seamlessly with a Windows workgroup is joining that network.                   15

Part 5: Mounting Shared Windows Folders to the server on your Mac                                        16
  Step 1: Linux Shared Folders from RHE5                                                                 16
  Step 2: Windows Shared Folders from Winxp01                                                            17

Part 6: Easier Web Access to Shared Data                                                                 18

Part 7: SSH Support                                                                                      19

Part 8: Hands-on Labs Assignments                                                                        20

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April 2007, Kefa Rabah, Global Open Versity, Vancouver Canada

www.globalopenversity.org                  A GOV Open Knowledge Access License Technical Publication
Global Open Versity ICT Labs                   Install Guide Linux Samba as PDC and SSO ID Management v1.0




                            Global Open Versity
             Systems Integration Hands-on Labs Training Manual

        Install Guide Linux Samba as Primary DC and SSO Identity
                              Management

By Kefa Rabah, krabah@globalopenversity.org                Oct., 07, 2009                 GTS Institute


Introduction
Samba 3 server technology is godsend software for small business who have need for
centralized identity management but cannot afford Windows Active Directory Domain
controller Win2003 or later. Samba supports operating as a Primary Domain Controller,
serving up all that great centralized identity management single password (Single-Sign-On
or SSO), machine trust, shared printer, and roaming profile goodness on both Windows and
Mac OSX 10 operating systems. And the beauty of it all – it’s open source – or in other
words free – when rolled on Linux systems! And, therefore, no reliance on proprietary
systems; which can leave a huge crater on your money purse leading to poor ROI.

Hands-On Labs
In this Hands-on Labs session, you will learn how to install all the necessary software on a
Linux box (in our case on VMware running on WinXP) running the Linux Red Hat Enterprise 5
(RHE5) distro:

 •   Install a DHCP server, and assign IP addresses to all the machines on the network.
 •   Install the BIND9 name server, and have it serve up DNS locally for network, creating a
     "rhe5.groptech.com" DNS domain in the process.
 •   Install samba and set it up as a primary domain controller (PDC).
 •   Install Windows 2003 Active Directory DC "server02.medtech.com" and integrate it
     with Linux SAMBA network
 •   Install Mac OSX 10 server (macosx) and integrate it with Linux SAMBA network
 •   Deploy shared network resources including Web access to shared data

Assumptions:
1. It’s assumed that you have a good understanding of Linux operating system and its working
   environment. It’s also assumed that you know how to install and configure Linux RHEL5, if not go
   ahead and pop over to scribd.com and check out a good HowTo entitled “Install Guide Red Hat Linux
   Enterprise Server v1.0” to get you started.
2. It’s assumed that you have already installed Windows AD 2k3 or know how to install Win 2k3 AD. If
   not then head to Scribd.com and check out an excellent article by the same author entitled "Install
   Windows Server 2003 Active Directory HowTo", to get you started.


1.1 Our Implementing Plan
Because of the enhanced integration with Windows and Mac OS X 10, I choose to use Red Hat Enterprise
Linux 5 (RHEL5) for my Linux-to- Windows and Mac OSX integration project, which is schematically
represented by Fig. 1.
                                                                                                   2
April 2007, Kefa Rabah, Global Open Versity, Vancouver Canada

www.globalopenversity.org                 A GOV Open Knowledge Access License Technical Publication
Global Open Versity ICT Labs                     Install Guide Linux Samba as PDC and SSO ID Management v1.0




         Fig. 1: A Samba PDC, Windows and Mac OS X systems integration network.


Figure 1 shows a simple network that includes: one AD server, One Linux RHEL5 Samba server and a
few client workstations, connected through a router or switch (you can also use this setup for Home-
office/SMB, since most home/smb network routers have at least four ports of switch included in the
device). This network is easily scalable as most network tend to grow over time, usually by adding more
switches, routers, clients and additional storage on the server.

The following setup is used on GROPTECH group:

192.168.83.33     rhe5.groptech.com               Samba 3 PDC Server

192.168.83.34     Winxp01                         WinXP client

192.168.83.35     macosx                          Mac OS X server


The Samba system is based upon a stock standard RHE5 system with the Samba 3 software.

The following steps are needed to get the system functioning:

    1.   install and check necessary packages
    2.   configure name resolution using either DNS or a hosts file
    3.   setup and configure samba
    4.   testing Samba network SSO infrastructure
    5.   good luck & enjoy

Part 1: Install and Check necessary packages
The following packages are required to successfully run all the commands detailed in this guide:

Samba:

    1. system-config-samba
                                                                                                           3
April 2007, Kefa Rabah, Global Open Versity, Vancouver Canada

www.globalopenversity.org                 A GOV Open Knowledge Access License Technical Publication
Global Open Versity ICT Labs                   Install Guide Linux Samba as PDC and SSO ID Management v1.0



    2. samba-common
    3. samba-client
    4. samba

You can query if these packages are installed by running:
rpm -q package-name


Part 2: Install & Configure Samba 3
Step 1: Configure Samba

First and foremost check if Samba is installed, as follows:

]# rpm –qa | grep samba*                          \\ the start * allows you to parse all
                                                      installed Samba files

[root@rhe5 ~]# rpm -qa | grep samba*
system-config-samba-1.2.39-1.el5
samba-common-3.0.28-1.el5_2.1
samba-swat-
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Introduction Samba 3 server technology is godsend software for small business who have need for centralized identity management but cannot afford Windows Active Directory Domain controller Win2003 or later. Samba supports operating as a Primary Domain Controller, serving up all that great centralized identity management single password (Single-Sign-On or SSO), machine trust, shared printer, and roaming profile goodness on both Windows and Mac OSX 10 operating systems. And the beauty of it all – it’s open source – or in other words free – when rolled on Linux systems! And, therefore, no reliance on proprietary systems; which can leave a huge crater on your money purse leading to poor ROI. Hands-On Labs In this Hands-on Labs session, you will learn how to install all the necessary software on a Linux box (in our case on VMware running on WinXP) running the Linux Red Hat Enterprise 5 (RHE5) distro: • Install a DHCP server, and assign IP addresses to all the machines on the network. • Install the BIND9 name server, and have it serve up DNS locally for network, creating a "rhe5.groptech.com" DNS domain in the process. • Install samba and set it up as a primary domain controller (PDC). • Install Windows 2003 Active Directory DC "server02.medtech.com" and integrate it with Linux SAMBA network • Install Mac OSX 10 server (macosx) and integrate it with Linux SAMBA network • Deploy shared network resources including Web access to shared data Assumptions: 1. It’s assumed that you have a good understanding of Linux operating system and its working environment. It’s also assumed that you know how to install and configure Linux RHEL5, if not go ahead and pop over to scribd.com and check out a good HowTo entitled “Install Guide Red Hat Linux Enterprise Server v1.0” to get you started. 2. It’s assumed that you have already installed Windows AD 2k3 or know how to install Win 2k3 AD. If not then head to Scribd.com and check out an excellent article by the same author entitled "
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PARTNER Kefa  Rabah
Kefa Rabah is the Founder of Global Technology Solutions Institute. Kefa is knowledgeable in several fields of Science & Technology (www.gtechsi.ca), Information Security Compliance and Project Management, and Renewable Energy Systems. He is also the founder of Global Open Versity (www.globaopenversity.org), a place to enhance your educating and career goals using the latest innovations and technologies.