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					ADVANCE CASE STUDIES - 2004

HUME

     ALEXANDRA SECONDARY COLLEGE .................................................................................. 1
     BEECHWORTH SECONDARY COLEGE ................................................................................ 1
     BENALLA COLLEGE – DUNLOP CAMPUS ............................................................................ 2
     BENALLA COLLEGE – FAITHFULL CAMPUS ........................................................................ 3
     BRIGHT P-12 COLLEGE ......................................................................................................... 3
     COBRAM SECONDARY COLLEGE ........................................................................................ 3
     CORRYONG SECONDARY COLLEGE................................................................................... 4
     EUROA SECONDARY COLLEGE ........................................................................................... 5
     MANSFIELD SECONDARY COLLEGE ................................................................................... 5
     MCGUIRE COLLEGE .............................................................................................................. 5
     MITCHELL SECONDARY COLLEGE ...................................................................................... 6
     MYRTLEFORD SECONDARY COLLEGE ............................................................................... 6
     NUMURKAH SECONDARY COLLEGE ................................................................................... 6
     OVENS COLLEGE .................................................................................................................. 7
     RUSHWORTH P-12 COLLEGE ............................................................................................... 7
     RUTHERGLEN HIGH SCHOOL .............................................................................................. 8
     SEYMOUR SPECIAL SCHOOL ............................................................................................... 9
     SEYMOUR TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL ................................................................................ 9
     SHEPPARTON HIGH SCHOOL ............................................................................................ 10
     TALLANGATTA SECONDARY COLLEGE ............................................................................ 11
     WANGARATTA DISTRICT SPECIALIST SCHOOL ............................................................... 12
     WODONGA HIGH SCHOOL.................................................................................................. 12
     YEA HIGH SCHOOL.............................................................................................................. 13



ALEXANDRA SECONDARY COLLEGE

Earlier this year I volunteered to particpate in the Emergency Response group associated with the
Advance program. Over 6 months my group went to the Ambulance, CFA and the SES. Though I
wasn't there for the ambulance, I was told it was great by other students. The group went through
the first aid course. When we went to the CFA, we learnt about how the CFA organises the trucks
and water supplies. We had a go at an emergency drill on the truck as well as how to control the
hoses. With the SES, we explored all the different tools in an SES truck including the "jaws of life'.
We had a great time at all the different places. I definitely would do that again.



BEECHWORTH SECONDARY COLEGE
The cadets decided early in the year that they wanted to work towards a sailing expedition on the
Gippsland Lakes at the end of the year. This came about as one or two of them had elder brothers
or sisters who had done a similar trip 2 years before and had returned with glowing reports of the
experience.

Two students Sammi and Richard, who were enrolled in VCAL at intermediate and senior levels,
undertook the organising of the expedition and the lead up to it. This was done in conjunction with
the cadet's coordinator. The following activities led up to the final trip.

The Australian Coastguard came and delivered a water safety course that led to students getting
their recreational boating licences.


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A two day course was held at Lake Hume where the Victorian Sailing School came and delivered a
course in dinghy sailing. Students stayed overnight in the Lake Hume Tourist Park.

Students did a Level 2 First Aid course with the National First Aid group.

Richard and Sammi arranged these visits with the respective organisations. They then contacted
Sail Safari based in Paynesville and arranged for the three days of sailing on the Gippsland Lakes
based at the Allawah Caravan Park.

Students were lucky enough to experience really good winds for the sailing and sailed across to
Ninety Mile Beach, to Metung and Lakes Entrance, and circumnavigated Raymond Island building
on their dinghy sailing skills now on 34 and 38 ft yachts.

Whilst they were in Paynesville they were able to use the school's double kayaks and rubber ducky
"safety boat" to explore the canals and straits of Paynesville.

On returning to Beechworth they all agreed that they had had a memorable experience. This was
only possible because of the financial support provided by the Advance Program.



BENALLA COLLEGE – DUNLOP CAMPUS
Performance-The initial challenge for me as facilitator was to select a medium through which this
group of girls could learn teamwork and planning skills. Two projects were selected, the first was
the generation and performance of an issues based piece and the second was a series of fun
afternoons for children living in a disadvantaged area of the town. The play focussed on students
concerns about bullying, depression and belonging. Having a performance opportunity available at
a Community day at the Drill Hall gave us a real goal and timeline.

Throughout the process the girls had to face the ebbs and flows of commitment, (attendance and
engagement) of most participants, as their lives continued to be chaotic, including a number of
episodes of chronic homelessness being experienced by three of the girls. Despite their poor
coping skills in the face of setbacks, they had developed enough commitment both to the project
and to the group and myself to enable them to get on track sufficiently to hold to the belief that they
could achieve their performance goal.

Being relied on was therapeutic to all students involved and in particular for the girl who took on the
lead role despite her history of being unable to deliver oral work in the classroom due to poor self
image. Three of the girls took it on themselves to teach the dance piece that they had
choreographed to a number of younger students. This was a positive leadership experience and
all students had to overcome a range of barriers to do this.

Performing both in front of an audience and for the video camera a fortnight later were challenging
and rewarding experiences for all members of the group. This performance has now been burnt
onto a DVD for posterity and all involved have a copy.

Fun Afternoons – A group of girls have shown a genuine interest in the children in the
neighbourhood (known by many as “the Bronx”) as they know from firsthand knowledge that many
children in this area lack adult guidance and that bullying and vandalism is common in their use of
the playground/park situated in the neighbourhood. Students came up with a range of activities,
planned, resourced and conducted three afternoons of FUN to which 30+ children came on each
occasion. They demonstrated their ability to conduct games and to assess the response of the
children. They do wish to continue with this activity and have been invited to assist at the
Neighbourhood House Christmas Party running activities for the children.



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BENALLA COLLEGE – FAITHFULL CAMPUS
Benalla College Middle School students selected youth homelessness as their major focus for the
Advance Program in 2004.

The community partnership has included NSAY(Northeast Support Agency for Youth) , Benalla
Rotary Club and the Local Council. It will also involve Murray Valley Family Care at a later stage.

We have set three goals:

1. A designated house for homeless youth in Benalla;

2. Encourage 'empty nesters' to provide accommodation and support for one homeless teenager in
Benalla, and

3. Develop flexibility in School to encourage homeless student to remain at school.
We are now far more aware of homeless in Benalla and progress is being made in achieving our
goals. It has been a challenging project but a rewarding one.



BRIGHT P-12 COLLEGE
This story is about one person - the most timid person I have ever met who loves to lurk in the
shadows and visibly shrinks if attention is shifted to her. Fears of the unknown are powerful and
limit her participation in lots of activities. She is lightly built, runs like the wind. She plays rep
soccer. She is fierce on the ground. But if she was to be put on the starting line of a cross country
run she'd vomit with nerves. She hates heights and probably suffers from vertigo. She is also still in
'SES'. She came away on a 5 day climbing and exploration trip to the Grampians. I promised I not
to ask her to attach to the rope or climb. She scambled over Mt. Stapylton and to my amazement,
did one small climb. It was an Everest for Bec.



COBRAM SECONDARY COLLEGE
Quotes from our students –
"There is a lot I have learned about myself, but the best is that I can be a leader."

"I can do a lot more than I thought. If I want to achieve something all I need do is set my mind to it
and complete it. I've learnt to express my own opinions."

"I have learnt to be more social, accepting and find it easier to trust people."

"I have learnt personal skills like initiative, assertiveness, working cooperatively in groups, stepping
out of my comfort zone and always having a go."

"By working together we can share ideas and come up with the best solution."

"I think Advance is a really great course as it really opens up your eyes to a whole new world of
adventure and leadership. It's challenging but at the same time




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CORRYONG SECONDARY COLLEGE
This is one of the many stories that illustrate the benefits of our program, the value to the
students and to the community in an extreme situation.
The Bogong Fires

By Anthony Wilson

On Wednesday the 22nd of January 2002 that night up at Dartmouth the fire came across from the
wall down to the bottom of the regulating pondage and beyond. We were on the other side of the
river patrolling to put out any spot fires that came onto the town side of the river. We patrolled to
5:00 am then went to bed until 8:00 am, when we had breakfast. Nothing much happened for the
next few days.

Saturday 25th we went home to transfer water from the holding dam to our house dam, because we
were out of water. We left home around 10:00 am Sunday morning and as we came over the gap
towards the Dart we saw the mushroom clouds of smoke. We went from 80 km/h to 130 km/h.
When we got to Springpole there were flames on either side of the road. We kept on going until
we got to the town, where we picked up our truck and my Quick-fill pump.

Dad took the truck and towed the pump and I took the car with the eskies of food and water in it for
the fire fighters down to the fire front. John Scales (Dartmouth Captain) told us to go back up to his
place and put my pump in the dam at the driveway. I had the job of manning the pump so I had
the car. I had parked on the dirt side of the dam (with the UFO on the roof) and had the pump
ticking over ready to go. I could see the smoke getting closer and then there was an
announcement over the radio that the fire had reached the sewage complex (1 km across the road
from me) and then things started to happen.

The fire started to spot and it dropped a spot in front of me, I got it out with the safety line I had on
the pump and as I got it out another spot landed just out of reach. I got it with the knapsack and
just as I got back I saw the front coming over the hill at me. I hammered up the pump and fought
the fire front as long as I could until it got too hot. I got behind the pump and put the fog of, then
the pump started to cough and surge (it was getting water in it) so I shifted from behind the pump
to in front of it to stop it from playing up, then the flames went over me. The masks we were given
got full of water and I could not breathe so I took it off and then the smoke burnt my lungs. The fire
was as hot as hell. It felt like 5 minutes as it went over but it was only 54.4 seconds before it had
gone past me (I timed it). Then we started blacking out.

That afternoon I had just sat down to have some tea when we got a phone call saying we were
needed at the end of Jitema St where our house was. When we got there all the standpipes were
gone so I was sent to get a standpipe and hose. When I got in the car the lights had burned out so
I was driving around town with only the hazard lights on at 10:00 pm at night. On the way back the
wires in the dash burned out and the car caught fire. So I‟m going 90 in a 60 zone at 10:00 at night
with only the hazard lights on and skidded the car onto the foot path at our house and tried to get
the battery off, but I could not find any spanners or cutters, then dad shoved the garden hose
under the dash to put out the flames. The car was left there until the next morning. We blacked
out all night until 4:30 in the morning.

From Tuesday until Friday we worked at Callaghan‟s Creek to help back burn and we also had my
quick-fill there too.




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EUROA SECONDARY COLLEGE
Organising myself to wander through the bush for two days and return to my parents with a sense
of achievement and increased knowledge is a great feeling. I had the opportunity to walk in the Mt
Disappointment State Forest with a map & compass and navigate my way around and find a series
of check points.

We were able to camp for the night, cook on fuel stoves and talk for half the night before packing
up and finding our way out to the bus where we were to meet. I had a great time and found out by
experience that I could find my way around. It gave me real confidence to be able to take on
challenges.



MANSFIELD SECONDARY COLLEGE
Monday the 2ndHow fuel influences fire intensity

We had our assessment on Wildfire behaviour and safety and survival. It took place at school with
a couple of volunteers around to help.
The week before we went for a walk through a forested area and we were shown by CFA members
what was counted as extreme to low fire danger fuel and what was counted as fine fuel, heavy fuel
or ladder fuel.

Here are some of the things that we had to study about wildfire behaviour:
    What are the three main factors that affect a wildfire?
    What aspects of the fuel affect the ferocity of the fire?
    How does the weather affect a wildfire?
    How does the topography affect the speed of a wildfire?

Also on safety and survival:
    What is SMEACS?
    What is on the WATCHOUT card?
    And many other things.

This exercise helped us study for our assessment on Monday the 2nd.




MCGUIRE COLLEGE
James (not real name) is aged 15 and is in Year 9. He was disaffected and not engaged in his
learning last year. He had low self esteem and had often been the victim of bullying. He had
considered leaving school but in consultation with the coordinator, had decided to give the program
a go.

At the start of the year James was less than enthusiastic but felt obligated to continue. James
found the communication and community modules somewhat tedious but persisted when he

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applied the skills to our real life project. James' leadership skills came to the fore when the actual
designing, developing and building of the garden began. He delegated tasks, ordered materials
and generally used his own initiative. James' previous experience in using tools was an advantage
and he was able to mentor other inexperienced participants.

James has achieved highly recognised success for the first in his secondary schooling and has
now selected subjects to continue his education into Year 10. He now feels he has many options
available as well as good relationships formed with several members of Advance .



MITCHELL SECONDARY COLLEGE
The Mitchell Secondary College Advance Group began their Community involvement with a
Volunteer Expo, where a range of local community organisations came to the College and
presented to the Students as a panel. The Albury Wodonga Volunteer Resource Bureau organised
the panel, and coordinated an interview/selection process to follow where students expressed
interest and were placed in organsations of their choice. Our students were placed at a number of
organisations which gave them great choice and flexibility.



MYRTLEFORD SECONDARY COLLEGE
How Advance - CFA has made a difference in my life -
Written by a Year 10 student who is finishing the 2 year program this year.

At the start of Year 9 I was lucky enough to be selected to join the CFA Youth Crew because one
of the persons who had been selected moved to another town, and left a space for me!

Finishing the first aid part of the course has meant a lot to me. I can now help a person who is hurt;
I can do slings, and otherwise treat the person. With the training, I feel so much better really
knowing what to do in an emergency.

I enjoyed wearing the uniform that we selected because it makes me look different, compared to
the other students in the school. The uniform also keeps me warmer in winter!



NUMURKAH SECONDARY COLLEGE
Under The VYDP structure, in partnership with the SES Regioal service provider, the students
participated in an SES training day with students from Rutherglen and Seymour.

The training was held at Lake Makoan ( near Benalla ). the day involved training in aspects of
search procedure, cliff face rescue, navigation and initiative activities.

The day was organised by the North East region SES based at Benalla. The day provided an ideal
outlet to apply skills and develop group leadership skills as well as interaction between the groups.

Highlight of the day. the trip in the SES rescue craft to the island and back.




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OVENS COLLEGE
Students were involved in the development of a group behaviour agreement as well completing
assignment work on a range of community providers. The students were free to choose which
providers were researched and actively encouraged to seek information and make contact with
providers and community groups.

Classwork focussing on the principles of the Advance program, volunteering, and concept
mapping of community services and organizations was the main focus. Students investigated their
connections with community organizations and built links to the community through their
investigations.

A community sevices grid was constructed using solely student input and the connections between
the students and the community mapped. An investigation of the sevices available within the
community and accessable by young people was undertaken. An investigation of volunteering
within the community was also undertaken utilizing the “volunteeringaustralia” website and other
resources.

The rights and responsibilities of volunteering were examined and discussed at length



RUSHWORTH P-12 COLLEGE
To put it plainly, the Rushworth P-12 community is far from prosperous. In general, Advance
allowed for a wider participation in activities throughout the year.

          CFA - allowed free of charge of participation in three trips: Seymour and Wangaratta
           training, Puckapunyal station visit.

          Purchase of gloves and goggles (CFA provided overall and helmets).

Students Quotes presented at CIP dinner:

"It doesn‟t matter how strong or fast you are, you do your best."

"I am capable of things I didn‟t think I would be capable of."

"If I like something hard I will not stop until I‟m finished."

"I pay more attention and try harder than I do in class."

"When I was crew leader I got to take control of a group of people and be more confident in myself
and other people."

"I learnt to control my urge to take control."

CFA Instructor quote, "I'd have these kids on my strike teams any day!"



RUTHERGLEN HIGH SCHOOL
SES CADETS
The SES Cadets have had another eventful year, packed with activities trips and heaps of fun.
We‟ve been skiing, abseiling, surfing, orienteering, and participating in Road Rescue and Land
Search exercises.
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At the beginning of the year we spent a lot of
time preparing for our surfing trip in Torquay.
We had a day at Shaw‟s flat participating in
various water safety and rescue exercises
before the camp. At Torquay we enjoyed (and
endured depending on point of view) two surfing
lessons and by the end of the lessons we had
some very keen surfers and some very
exhausted people. We went mountain bike
riding and had heaps of fun, though keeping up
with the pack was extremely difficult. The trip
was topped off with a trip to the movies in
Geelong. Oh, the life of the SES Cadets!

We had some casualty handling exercises preparing for our day at The Albury Quarry where we
were to go abseiling. We had a great day at the Quarry descending down cliffs from 20m to 50m
high on our own.

At the beginning of the second semester we participated in a land search exercise at Mt. Pilot
which also involved some orienteering. Trudging around in the bush on a freezing cold day was
challenging but the Canadian tourists lost in the bush were soon found whilst under the guidance
of our trusty leaders James and Dan.

We also had a day at Falls Creek downhill skiing which was thoroughly enjoyed by all who
participated despite the less than perfect conditions. People were lost, found, and lost again as
many first time skiers and boarders hit the slopes and it was only with the guidance of our group
leaders that we all returned safely to Rutherglen.

As the year progressed radio exercises and road rescue activities also widened our knowledge and
proved to be very interesting as well as extremely challenging for many. The “Jaws of Life” used in
the Road Rescue were extremely heavy and awkward to use but no one was willing to miss the
opportunity to cut up a car and there was no shortage of helpers.

                                                   In Term 4 we participated in a day of exercises at
                                                   Lake Mokoan where we had to work together with
                                                   Cadets from Seymour and Numurkah. The day was
                                                   spent participating in land search activities,
                                                   orienteering, and team work exercises as well as
                                                   modelling in photo shots for Dave as he apparently
                                                   looks a lot like Jeremy Sumpter. This was followed
                                                   up with a joint exercise with the CFA cadets at the
                                                   Wangaratta Fire ground. Throughout the year we
                                                   also spent time planning in our Duke of Edinburgh
                                                   diaries and congratulations to all the cadets who
                                                   were dedicated enough to achieve their bronze,
                                                   silver and gold awards this year. A special mention
                                                   to Dan Walsh (silver) and our first ever gold award
                                                   achieved by Brian McLeod.

During the year members from the Rutherglen SES were helping us whether we were doing first
aid, radio exercises, land search exercises or simply driving us from one place to another. Thanks
go to all the Rutherglen SES members who helped us with all these exercises but especially to Mr
John Waugh, Chris Pertzel, Pat O‟Connor and our leaders Mr Rob Porter and Laura Oberin for
organising our activities and making everything possible.



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SEYMOUR SPECIAL SCHOOL
The Seymour cluster of schools has been given a bush block of land in a rural area outside
Seymour, which had been an old school site many years ago. The cluster has a long term plan of
developing the site into a camp for cluster schools, and a potential site for an alternative setting for
students at risk.

Seymour Special School students had been out to the site and decided that the old fence needed
to be pulled down and replaced. This became their project.

Some of the students attend a Special School class, which is based at Seymour Technical High
School, so because of this connection, were able to tap into STHS resources, in terms of
equipment, teacher expertise and the opportunity to work alongside STHS students.
Because of the location of the site, and to fit in with Duke of Edinburgh and VCAL curriculum
objectives, students decided that health and safety issues needed to be taken into account before
completion of the project. This was achieved in partnership with Ambulance Victoria.
Many Seymour Special School students have self esteem and behaviour issues to overcome in
their quest to become as independent as possible.

 Advance has made a great difference to their self esteem and confidence, in that they are proud of
their visible achievements at the old school site and overcoming obstacles during adventure
activities. They have learnt valuable hands on skills, have enjoyed working collaboratively as a
team, and have developed skills to modify their own behaviour.

The following are some comments from one student, whose name has been changed to protect his
identity:

David
“Everyone worked really well. They all did the best they could.” When asked if he would do the
project again, he said, “I would do it again. I enjoyed that. It‟s good to get out of the classroom
and I learnt to use all kinds of new equipment.”



SEYMOUR TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL
During a school excursion two students collided at the bottom of a waterslide. Under the guidance
of one of our cadets, one of the injured students (with suspected back injury) was supported and
maintained in the water for approximately 40 minutes awaiting the ambulance.
The second student who had left the scene was located lying on his bunk with pain to his back.
One of our cadets assisted in dismantling the bunk to allow ambulance stretcher access.




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SHEPPARTON HIGH SCHOOL
„Students Help Out‟
Shepparton News, General News
By Kristin Favaloro

A group of Shepparton High school students is volunteering time to help Shepparton charities.
The students are participating in the Advance program, which is a youth development program
providing opportunities for young people to work with community organisations.

The 12 students are volunteering at four organisations throughout the community, with four at The
Bridge Youth Services, Shepparton.

Year 10 student Matt Atkinson said he chose the Bridge because he supported the work it did with
young people in region.

“They are always there for people who need a place to stay, a shower or food,” matt said.
“I like what they do.”

Matt and two other students are helping paint the interior of the Bridge, while another student is
working on a computer programme.

Fellow year 10 student Jamie Mazzochi has volunteered her time at Shepparton‟s ReVamp
Opportunity Shop, and is painting a mural in the change room.

“I love op-shops and I love painting so I thought I‟d paint a mural,” Said Jamie.

“The change room is an old shower so I‟m painting tiles and eventually it‟s going to have vines
coming up the walls.”

Jamie and Matt agreed the volunteer work had been excellent experience and they would both
benefit from having the work on their resumes.

Advance program co-ordinator Faye Jasper said volunteer work was an important way for the
students to gain contacts in the community.

“We are looking at how the individual can contribute to out community,” Ms Jasper said.

The remaining students are working at SPC Ardmona Kids Town moving train tracks and building
tables, and with Shepparton Theatre Arts Group organising costumes and props.
The Advance program is also being implemented at McGuire College where the students are
creating a community garden at Wilmot Rd Primary School.

The first stage of the community garden was officially opened yesterday




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TALLANGATTA SECONDARY COLLEGE
This is one of the many stories that illustrate the benefits of our program, the value to the
student and to the community in an extreme situation.

The Bogong Fires
By Anthony Wilson

On Wednesday the 22nd of January 2002 that night up at Dartmouth the fire came across from the
wall down to the bottom of the regulating pondage and beyond. We were on the other side of the
river patrolling to put out any spot fires that came onto the town side of the river. We patrolled to
5:00am then went to bed until 8:00 am, when we had breakfast. Nothing much happened for the
next few days.

Saturday 25th we went home to transfer water from the holding dam to our house dam, because we
were out of water. We left home around 10:00 am Sunday morning and as we came over the gap
towards the Dart we saw the mushroom clouds of smoke. We went from 80 km/h to 130 km/h.
When we got to Springpole there were flames on either side of the road. We kept on going until
we got to the town, where we picked up our truck and my Quick-fill pump.

Dad took the truck and towed the pump and I took the car with the eskies of food and water in it for
the fire fighters down to the fire front. John Scales (Dartmouth Captain) told us to go back up to his
place and put my pump in the dam at the driveway. I had the job of manning the pump so I had
the car. I had parked on the dirt side of the dam (with the UFO on the roof) and had the pump
ticking over ready to go. I could see the smoke getting closer and then there was an
announcement over the radio that the fire had reached the sewage complex (1 km across the road
from me) and then things started to happen.

The fire started to spot and it dropped a spot in front of me, I got it out with the safety line I had on
the pump and as I got it out another spot landed just out of reach. I got it with the knapsack and
just as I got back I saw the front coming over the hill at me. I hammered up the pump and fought
the fire front as long as I could until it got too hot. I got behind the pump and put the fog of, then
the pump started to cough and surge (it was getting water in it) so I shifted from behind the pump
to in front of it to stop it from playing up, then the flames went over me. The masks we were given
got full of water and I could not breathe so I took it off and then the smoke burnt my lungs. The fire
was as hot as hell. It felt like 5 minutes as it went over but it was only 54.4 seconds before it had
gone past me (I timed it). Then we started blacking out.

That afternoon I had just sat down to have some tea when we got a phone call saying we were
needed at the end of Jitema St where our house was. When we got there all the standpipes were
gone so I was sent to get a standpipe and hose. When I got in the car the lights had burned out so
I was driving around town with only the hazard lights on at 10:00 pm at night. On the way back the
wires in the dash burned out and the car caught fire. So I‟m going 90 in a 60 zone at 10:00 at night
with only the hazard lights on and skidded the car onto the foot path at our house and tried to get
the battery off, but I could not find any spanners or cutters, then dad shoved the garden hose
under the dash to put out the flames. The car was left there until the next morning. We blacked
out all night until 4:30 in the morning.

From Tuesday until Friday we worked at Callaghan‟s Creek to help back burn and we also had my
quick-fill there too.

We had to put out a heap of fires that had spotted from the back burn. I was mostly filling the
DNRE fire truck and other units with water, because our truck was only 2WD. Then on the
Thursday & Friday I was taken on the DNRE fire truck. I also got to drive it to the quick-fill to fill it
up because Terry was busy doing other things and helping other people. ON the way back on

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Friday the fire got over the river at Giltraps and was burning like anything. The flames were as
high as the trees and over the trees and we were on the flat putting the spots out. From under it
John Cardwell rolled his ute down the hill while we were busy putting out the flank of the fire and
putting out the trees on the road. We did two loads of 3000 litres on the fire and then we refilled
and went to McDonalds place to protect it. There was an announcement over the UHF that the
expected winds were 70-90 km/h in the next 15 to 20 minutes, the Mitta and Dartmouth Tankers
went past in 5 minutes. They had the front at McDonalds knocked down and out so we filled the
truck and kept it full while they were mopping up. Tony Plowman turned up to see what was going
on and got a little dirty.

On the Saturday we went down to the Mitta and cleared around a house that had Tea Tree all
around it. It took all day to do this and then we left our truck there in case the fire went over there
house because they had no water pressure to run anything.



WANGARATTA DISTRICT SPECIALIST SCHOOL
Even after our group had selected the local Anti Cancer unit to be our main community partner not
all students shared the enthusiasm of the majority, the school staff and the community partner.
Several of our students adopted the 'what's in it for me?" approach. Once we engaged in
discussions about the prevelance of cancer and how most of us know someone with cancer it was
heartening to see the shifting of attitudes. Added to this was the informative session conducted
with all senior students by the members of the local Anti Cancer unit. They explained how money
raised was used.
The profile of our school and our students was really raised through the Advance Program. When
we initially offered to assist at the Anti Cancer units 'Great Australian Morning Tea', conduct our
own and become involved in selling Daffodil Day merchandise in the CBD and at a school level,
our offers were gratefully received but one could not help but detect the underlying notion that,
whilst this was a nice gesture, our contributions would be limited by necessity.

This prevailing attitude soon changed when our enthusiastic band of helpers worked tirelessly
throughout the entire morning, receiving accolades, not only from the Anti Cancer group, but also
from members of the public. our school raised in excess of $80.00 from it's own 'Great Australian
Morning Tea' and around $300.00 from sales of Daffodil Day merchandise. Members of the Anti
Cancer group were touched by the generosity and efforts of our students and reflected this to
them. This, in turn, did much for our students and served and as a great advertisment for
community involvement.

Another real positive for our school and our students was the opportunity for us to give back to a
community that has always been so generous to our school and our students. It was great for the
self esteem of our students to be donors rather than receipients. Numerous articles in the local
newspaper were also of benefit to all concerned.



WODONGA HIGH SCHOOL
Charles is a young man for whom the opportunities provided via Advance through VCAL has been
extremely successful. Charles participated in a number of the Advance sponsored programs.
Whilst he was absent from school for several months having major back surgery, the flexibility of
the projects he worked with enabled him to complete his tasks and achieve an incredible number
of community service hours.

Charles was a very active member of the Chaplain in schools committee and a driving force in
fundraising activities. He took responsibility for the promotion of VCAL and its achievements,
producing pamphlets and organising information booths for course advice. His confidence and
organisational skills have increased enormously.

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YEA HIGH SCHOOL
The most striking activity in 2004 would have been the Adventure Playground project. The two
boys consulted with their primary scholl and a project was selected that served both the school and
the community. The Agreement was worked out at a meeting with the boys, the principal and the
parent who had offered his building skills and experience to assist. Many obstacles were
encountered and overcome. These included the weather which necessitated great flexibility on all
sides. Teachers in particular accepted that the value of this project was enormous to all concerned
and accepted some more absences from class than we had originally rostered.

At last the grand opening day arrived. The school had organised a great festival, preceded by a
great mulch carrying morning. All the students and many parents and teachers took part to enable
the event to work. The boys cut the ribbon and all the student s demonstrated that they would
make use of their new facility. As a community project, this had it all! The boys grew in self esteem,
the parent involved was really proud of the boys, the school and the community were pleased with
their new equipment. I gained a great insight into the school community of one of our more remote
feeder schools. Win Win!




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